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Westlake Legal Group > Kim Komando

CDs and LPs go digital, snooping spouses, social media alerts and more: Tech Q&A

Each week, I receive tons of questions from my listeners about tech concerns, new products, and all things digital.

Sometimes, choosing the most interesting questions to highlight is the best part of my job.

This week, I received questions about password protection for apps, covert social media searches, smartphone tracking, converting music collections and more.

Do you have a question you’d like to ask me?

Tap or click here to email me directly.

Stop phone tracking

Q: I know my phone tracks wherever I go. How can I make it stop? It’s such an invasion of my privacy and I know Big Tech is keeping it all in some database.

A: Yes, it’s eerie that Big Data companies know your physical whereabouts, and the breadth of their knowledge is hard to even grasp. The justification is that many apps may not work correctly, including maps and Find My Friends, unless they know where you are located.

As a result, you can technically turn off the tracking mode, but you may reduce much of your smartphone’s usefulness. Conversely, many users resent the targeted advertising that results from geographic analysis, but this is something you can control without losing navigation as well.

Some folks may prefer to browse the internet from their phones in peace, and there are several ways to do so without giving away your coordinates. In short: you have several options, aside from covering your tracks altogether. Tap or click here for 8 ways to stop your phone from tracking you.

App passwords

Q: My wife knows the passcode on my phone. I have one adult-themed app that I don’t want her to access. Can I password protect just certain apps on my phone?

A: I sure hope it’s not the cheating app Ashley Madison. Lest anyone judge you for this question, there are plenty of reasons why you would want to protect an individual app. Birthday surprises come to mind, but certain professions also put a premium on privacy: Physicians and therapists may wish to lock their work apps to prevent a HIPAA violation.

You can, in fact, protect particular apps with a special passcode. There are also apps that let you hide other apps. You may want to do this anyway. If you were to lose your phone, a passcode for apps gives you an additional line of defense against cybercriminals. Tap or click here to learn more about protecting smartphone apps with a passcode.

Ask me your questions live

Q: How can I call your show and speak with you? I’d rather do that than write you an email and not know if you might answer it.

A: You can Google a lot of things, but you cannot Google trusted advice. In the long and sordid history of talk radio, listeners have called in, received a quick screening and waited to suddenly hear their own voice coming through their speakers.

During especially popular shows like mine, these waits can be hours, and there was no guarantee we’d be able to connect. I hated that. That’s why you can now simply fill out a form on my website and one of my producers will schedule a time for us to talk.

Note that we would not be arranging a private conversation; every call must be aired for the benefit of all my listeners. So what are you waiting for? Tap or click here to schedule an appointment with me today.

Digitize music

Q: I have a bunch of CDs and records that I would like to listen to now. But I don’t have a CD or record player anymore! What is a lost-in-the-’80s guy supposed to do now?

A: You’ll be happy to hear a whole industry has grown up around digitizing different audio formats. As long as you’re patient, you can expect to transfer every last song in your library onto a hard drive or cloud. One of my favorite examples is a particular Audio Technica turntable, which not only plays vinyl records but also uses Bluetooth to convert songs into mp3 files.

You can use a similar specialty device for audio cassettes, which are particularly vulnerable to deterioration over time. In the case of compact discs, the absence of CD players on computers is definitely a roadblock, but you can probably find a way to rip songs without too much hassle or expense. Tap or click here for more details about digitizing your music.

Social search alerts

Q: I looked up someone who I had a major crush on years ago. Will she get an alert that I saw her profile? That would be so awkward!

A: Rest assured, services like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram do not notify people when you look at their profiles. If she has her profile set to “public,” she is tacitly agreeing to let her information be visible to anyone, the same way she might allow lawn ornaments to be visible to passing drivers.

What she will spot is a notification; you may “like” something on her profile, then decide to take it back, but she’ll still be notified of the original like. LinkedIn does inform users of profile views, but only the last three people to look at her page — unless it is a paid account, which lets her see every visitor.

I get so many questions about social media. Keep yourself in the know. Tap or click here for more answers to social media questions you were afraid to ask.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group computer-iStock CDs and LPs go digital, snooping spouses, social media alerts and more: Tech Q&A The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article a0f72158-2776-5187-a57c-1a7e315dae35   Westlake Legal Group computer-iStock CDs and LPs go digital, snooping spouses, social media alerts and more: Tech Q&A The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article a0f72158-2776-5187-a57c-1a7e315dae35

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

How hackers, scammers and companies know when you open an email and use it against you

It’s hard to believe that a single pixel could ruin your life. After all, a pixel measures about 0.0104-inches. If you took a mechanical pencil and drew the smallest mark you could, this dot would be much larger than a typical pixel.

With the advent of pixel-tracking, cybercriminals have a whole new weapon at their disposal. That’s why it’s important you take control of your email. Tap or click for the tricks I use to organize my inbox, including a free download that will give your old email a good cleaning.

Why has pixel-tracking become the new trend in cybercrime? Because we’ve become too smart for regular con artists and phishing spam. Plus, we have tools now to stop spam. Tap or click for tactics to reduce your junk email and third-party apps that help.

Since pixel-tracking is still unfamiliar to many users, let’s start with how it works before getting into what to do about it.

How pixel-tracking works

To review, these are common telltale signs of an email scam:

  • Writer requests that you enter personal information.
  • Unknown sender (“From” address).
  • Instructions require immediate attention.
  • Poor spelling or grammar.
  • Requests you click on a link.

Even if you’re super careful, details can go unnoticed. Technically, this microscopic pixel is computer code, embedded within the body of an email. The purpose of this code is to track a large amount of personal information, such as:

  • The number of times you open an email.
  • The operating system you use.
  • The time you opened the email.
  • Your IP address.
  • What type of device you used to open the email.

The shocking fact is this detailed data is sent back to the sender without you having to click on any links or even respond — it’s done automatically. Pixel-tracking allows marketers, advertisers and other companies collect data about you.

RELATED: Sick of the constant tracking? It’s time to change your settings. Tap or click for 8 ways to stop your phone from tracking everything you do.

This kind of tracking is legal, despite the fact that most consumers have never heard of it. As if collecting your info for marketing purposes without your consent isn’t bad enough, pixel-tracking can also serve as a valuable kind of surveillance for cybercriminals, too.

A little-known but widespread threat

Though it’s been used for years, this technique drew very little attention from the media or public; however, pixel-tracking was thrust into the limelight after a 2006 lawsuit revealed that HP employed a commercial email tracking service to trace an email sent to a reporter in an attempt to uncover her source.

As the use of pixel-tracking grows in popularity, consumers, data protection advocates and industry leaders have raised user privacy questions and supported regulations that call for placing limits on technologies like pixel-tracking. Here are a few steps you can take to help you avoid this marketing trap.

How to Block it

The simplest way to prevent pixel-tracking is to block images from displaying in your emails. If the pixel isn’t displayed, the code probably won’t work.

To block images in Gmail, click on the gear icon and select Settings. Scroll down and click on Ask before displaying external images under the Images option. Click Save changes (at the bottom of the page).

If you’re using Outlook or another third-party email client on a desktop or mobile device, you can enable this setting as well, typically located within the app’s settings.

Track the trackers

Why not turn the tables and track those tracking you? Using a browser extension, like PixelBlock, you can block tracking pixels and receive an alert indicating which emails contain the tracking code. A comparable extension, Ugly Mail, is available for Chrome and Firefox.

These browser extensions are easy to use and will reveal just how prevalent pixel-tracking is.

Other steps you can take

This advice is universal: Do not click any links within an email from a sender you don’t know, because the link may be hiding embedded pixel-tracking code. Unfamiliar links may also lead to malware, phishing schemes and any number of other malevolent things.

Never enter your email address in promotional emails, including those from well-known sites like Facebook or Amazon. Chances are, the email is tracking your response.

Did you know Twitter used your phone number and email to sell targeted ads? Tap or click to see how the social media site exposed users’ private details.

Although there is no guarantee you’ll eliminate these threats entirely, your best chance for reducing your inbox of these tracking emails is through awareness and taking the above precautions.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group 547008-hacker-hacking-security How hackers, scammers and companies know when you open an email and use it against you The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 91bf34c3-a1b7-5551-8639-40aeb75bb8da   Westlake Legal Group 547008-hacker-hacking-security How hackers, scammers and companies know when you open an email and use it against you The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 91bf34c3-a1b7-5551-8639-40aeb75bb8da

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

6 security settings iPhone and iPad users need to change right now

Our devices are packed with account credentials, contacts, emails, photos, videos and more that we definitely don’t want in the wrong hands. The problem is we get our devices and just start using them, giving little thought to the risks.

Your iPhone or iPad might have a virus and malware right now, sending your confidential data to who knows who. Tap or click here to check your phone or tablet for a virus or malware and clean it up if you do.

Far too many people think that if they have an Apple product they are immune to viruses and malware. What phones do you think are most vulnerable to getting hacked? What about apps? Tap or click for the answers that will definitely surprise you.

Here are security settings you need to activate, whether you’ve got a brand new iPhone or an iPad you’ve had for years. Not only will your device be safer to use, your social media accounts and privacy will benefit too.

  1. Create a secure passcode and turn on biometrics

iOS devices are acclaimed for their security. In fact, competitors actively try to copy some of Apple’s most secure systems like Apple Pay, Touch ID and Face ID.

When you first set up your device, you’ll be prompted to create a passcode. Many people try to skim through this section any create something “easy,” but your passcode shouldn’t be taken lightly. It’s the main way you lock your phone from the outside world, and leaving it unsecured leaves it open to bad actors.

UPGRADE YOUR APPS: Apps are a great way to get even more out of your phone. Tap or click here for 10 apps I have on my phone that you’ll want too.

Upon booting up your device, follow the passcode prompts and select a combination of digits that is easy enough to remember, yet tough enough to be secure. You may want to write it down, just in case you forget it.

By default, the system will have you set up a 6-digit code, which is quite secure. Don’t reduce the digits, even if it may seem easier. Your security is worth it in the long run.

If you missed or glossed over this part of the setup, open the Settings app and visit the Touch ID/Face ID & Passcode setting.

If it isn’t already enabled, tap Turn Passcode on and enter your 6-digit code. Once you’ve set this code, you can set up any biometric settings like Touch ID or Face ID. Which one you use will depend on whether your phone has a home button. Tap Add a Fingerprint or Set up Face ID and follow the on-screen prompts.

  1. Lock out accessory hackers and hijackers

As secure as iPhones and iPads are, a dangerous new way hackers are cracking these devices is via compromised USB connections. A modified device plugged into an iOS system can easily access personal data if it isn’t properly secured.

Thankfully, Apple thought ahead and included an option to restrict USB access in iOS. To find it, visit the Touch ID/Face ID & Passcode menu in the Settings app and scroll down. You’ll see an option labeled “USB Accessories.” Make sure it’s toggled off, as in the image above.

By doing this, your phone will restrict data access to your device if it’s left locked and dormant for an hour or more. This means any USB accessories will only be good for charging and will not be able to access any data.

TECH ACCESSORIES: Need a new case, a keyboard or an easier way to charge on the go? Tap or click for some of the best Apple accessories to outfit your tech.

  1. Prevent others from using your home screen to bypass your lock

Apple tends to walk a fine line between security and convenience, and the home screen on iOS is a perfect example. As secure as your lock and biometrics may be, an iPhone or iPad will allow certain features like replying to texts and returning calls right from alerts that appear when your device is locked.

Though this can be useful when you’re on the go and unable to fully log into your phone, it can have dangerous side effects for your security. A nosy friend could easily pick up your phone and start replying for you if they see an alert.

To limit lock screen access on iOS, we’re going to revisit the Touch ID/Face ID & Passcode menu. Scroll down until you find a section labeled Allow Access When Locked. Here, you can toggle specific settings like Siri and message replies, and restrict access without a passcode.

DIGITAL TIPS STRAIGHT TO YOUR INBOX: Get breaking tech news as it happens with free email alerts from Kim’s desk to your inbox. Tap or click here to sign up.

  1. Automate updates to stay ahead of the curve

Hackers and cybercriminals are constantly refining their tactics, which means the security on your device can become obsolete in a matter of weeks. Exploits and security flaws pop up all the time, which is why companies like Apple release patches and updates to refine their products and security.

If you’d rather not be pressured to constantly download new updates, you can instruct your phone to download and install them automatically. This will keep your device on the cutting edge of Apple’s security releases.

UPDATE WINDOWS: Microsoft is warning users to update now, following a stark warning from the NSA. Tap or click here to find out what’s putting millions of systems at risk.

To activate auto updates, open Settings, followed by General. Then, select Software Update. In this menu, you may see an update available to download. Do so when you have the chance, but for now, tap Automatic Updates and toggle the setting on.

This will download and install updates overnight when your phone is connected to power and Wi-Fi. Don’t forget that if you aren’t charging your phone overnight (which you should do anyway) the updates won’t install.

Keep in mind not every Apple update is perfect. Some have had significant issues that broke major features on devices. Tap or click here to see what a recent update from Apple broke. But Apple is pretty good about releasing new updates to fix previous ones, if need be, and updates are still worth it for the security patches.

  1. Adjust location tracking

Apple is a bit better than other companies about privacy, but it will still track your location if you visit the same places frequently.

Thankfully, you can disable this as well. To turn off Apple’s frequently visited location tracking, visit Settings, followed by Privacy. Then, select Location followed by System Services and choose Significant Locations. Turn this feature off to stop your device from keeping track of locations it thinks are important.

  1. Stop Apple from recording your Siri requests

Companies like Amazon have come under fire for recording and transcribing interactions with users. Apple did the same exact thing. Tap or click here to see how Apple transcribes Siri voice data.

The company has since claimed to have stopped the practice unconditionally, but it still records if given permission. This helps Apple improve its voice recognition software, but if you aren’t comfortable playing guinea pig, you can turn this option off.

To access audio review settings, open the Settings app and select Privacy. Then, scroll down and open Analytics & Improvements. Here, look for the section labeled Improve Siri & Dictation and toggle it off. This will stop Apple from storing and transcribing your Siri and Dictation interactions to improve its systems.

With these settings adjustments, you should have a much more private and secure experience on your device. Beyond this, be cautious with what you share on social media and beyond to keep your device as personal as possible. Otherwise, these settings won’t go far enough to protect you.

BONUS TIP FOR EXTRA KNOW-HOW: 3 settings you must change on your video doorbell

Unlike traditional doorbells that require you to squint through a dime-sized peephole, glance out a window or open the door without knowing who is on the other side, Ring provides you a clear view of who’s visiting.

In addition to being a convenient method of answering your door, the Ring video doorbell provides a layer of security for you and your home with its live view and recordings. Setup is simple and straightforward, too. But don’t miss these essential steps.

Tap or click for 3 settings you should adjust right away.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group 574067-iphone-11-vs-11-pro-vs-11-pro-max 6 security settings iPhone and iPad users need to change right now The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/technologies/iphone fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 608e9833-d1cc-5f8a-95f6-4d8a674f7885   Westlake Legal Group 574067-iphone-11-vs-11-pro-vs-11-pro-max 6 security settings iPhone and iPad users need to change right now The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/technologies/iphone fox-news/tech/companies/apple fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 608e9833-d1cc-5f8a-95f6-4d8a674f7885

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

One big mistake you’re making that puts your online security at risk

Westlake Legal Group PasswordCybersecurity1 One big mistake you’re making that puts your online security at risk The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 4c71141b-f64c-5327-9ff8-f5e2810ce50c

In an ideal world, our accounts protect us online. Our usernames and passwords secure private info and lock out hackers and snoops. In practice, most accounts aren’t so safe. Tap or click for 7 security basics you need to stop ignoring in 2020.

Beyond hackers and cybercriminals, our worst enemies are ourselves. You’re probably using a few terrible passwords that you should have banished long ago. Tap or click for a simple way to generate strong passwords without all the hassle.

Now, think back to the last time you signed up for an app or service. Did you click the “sign up with Facebook or Google” option? Sure, that’s a time-saver but there’s a huge downside. Apple says they have secure ways for you to use your Apple ID. More about that later.

The dangers of data sharing

Services such as Airbnb, Spotify and Tinder give the option of logging in with your Facebook or Google credentials. This auto-fills your information, adds your profile picture and sets you up with a single tap.

But logging in via Facebook or email exposes the data contained within your accounts. You already know Facebook’s business model is predicated on selling your data to the highest bidder. Why would that logic suddenly end when it comes to account sharing?

Tap or click to see how Facebook continues to sell your data.

Sure enough, platforms like Facebook provide your profile information and more to the services you sign up for when you choose their login option. For example, Spotify users are served targeted advertisements that relate to browsing and “like” history. It’s all part of the deals these companies made with one another.

Some platforms even include tracking scripts that keep tabs on your activity on the websites you sign in to. Would you feel comfortable with Facebook knowing your dating tastes on Tinder? That’s gonna be a “no” for me.

STAY IN THE KNOW: Get breaking tech news as it happens. Tap or click to sign up for free email alerts from Kim’s desk to your inbox.

Is your cybersecurity at risk?

Aside from shady data-sharing practices, signing in with an existing account has security problems of its own. If a hacker somehow gets ahold of your Google account, he or she will then own the keys to the kingdom for all your related accounts.

Your Google account contains so much more than your search history. Want to be shocked? Tap or click to find out everything Google knows about you.

This is doubly dangerous when the platforms you sign in to are small or insufficiently protected against hackers. A small e-commerce platform that lets you log in with Google can get hit with a cyberattack, exposing your much more secure Google account to the highest bidders on the Dark Web.

What are the right options for safe sign ins?

There isn’t any one right way to sign up for a service, but what you can do is create stronger accounts that will stand up against hackers and protect your privacy. By creating a new account without any private information in it, you can start on a new service as a clean slate of data that can’t be bought or easily sold.

That means taking steps such as creating a separate email address that will handle all or some of your service accounts. This email profile shouldn’t include too much personal information. Use your initial instead of your last name, and don’t include your street address in your profile.

Your account should also be protected with as strong of a password as possible. Tap or click here to learn how to make stronger passwords for all your accounts.

GO OFF THE GRID: There’s more about you on the web than you probably realize. Tap or click for 7 ways to delete yourself from the internet.

But which email service is best for secure accounts? Gmail is actually perfectly safe and secure — provided you don’t “log in with Google” when prompted. Your email address should be just that: an email address. It should be used only as a username to sign in with.

Of course, if you want to avoid Google when creating a secure account, there are several excellent options that will give you more anonymity. Tap or click to see our favorite Gmail alternatives.

How do I keep my new accounts safe?

Once you’ve set up secure accounts, you’ll want to take the next step to keep them safe from hackers. As we’ve discussed, passwords are quickly becoming obsolete, and even the most complicated password (though necessary) can be cracked by a determined enough hacker.

That’s where two-factor authentication comes in. Setting this up will add an additional layer of security to your account by requiring you to use your phone to verify your identity. Since a hacker won’t have access to your phone, the feature adds a major obstacle toward those hoping to compromise your account.

Every email service will have different methods to set up 2FA, but since Gmail is the most commonly used, we’ll show you how to turn it on there.

To begin, Google has a specific page here where you can activate two-factor authentication. Open the link, sign in with your new Gmail account and tap Get Started. You might be asked to sign in again after this step. Add your country from the drop-down menu and enter your phone number in the field that appears.

From here, you’ll be able to choose whether you want a verification text message or phone call. Tap Next, and you’ll have your authentication sent to your phone. Enter the code you receive and tap Next. Once Google has verified your code, tap Turn On to enable the service on your account.

2FA is useful because it effectively makes all of your logins far more secure than they’d be without it. It’s useful to set up with every service and platform that gives you the option.

Accounts like Facebook, which contain personal information, or your Dropbox containing important files would be well served by adding 2FA. And of course, set it up for bank accounts and any financial services too. Tap or click here to learn how to set up 2FA for even more websites.

What about ‘Sign in with Apple?’ The company claims it’s much more secure. Is it really?

Apple made headlines when it announced a new service for its users called “Sign in with Apple.” Much like signing in with a Facebook or Google account, Sign in with Apple uses your Apple ID in place of a login for various platforms and services.

Sign in with Apple features end-to-end encryption to protect your logins and doesn’t associate your account with any logins you set up. Instead, it uses one-time keys generated when you sign in to a website.

Plus, it’s based on biometric data via FaceID or Touch ID, so hackers may have a hard time getting in without your face or finger.

This is smart for several reasons — most notably the fact that even if a hacker somehow cracked your login, they wouldn’t learn anything about you. Sign in with Apple even creates alternate email addresses for the services you sign up for, so you don’t have to worry about hiding your email either.

This service effectively makes Apple a middleman between you and the service you sign up for. The only parties exchanging information are you and Apple. Whether that’s something you’re comfortable with is a personal decision.

How can I set up Sign in with Apple?

To get started, make sure you’re signed in with your Apple ID on your device. Sign in with Apple only works on Apple branded devices like iPhone and Mac. You’ll also need to be updated to iOS 13, iPadOS or MacOS Catalina.

  • Tap the Sign in with Apple button on the participating app or website.
  • If the app or site has not requested any information to set up your account, check that your Apple ID is correct and go to Step 4.
  • If you’re asked to provide your name and email address, Sign in with Apple automatically fills in the information from your Apple ID. You can edit your name if you like and choose Share My Email or Hide My Email.
  • Tap Continue and confirm with a quick Face ID, Touch ID or device passcode to sign in. If you don’t have Face ID, Touch ID or a passcode set up, enter your Apple ID password.

For more detailed step-by-step instructions, tap or click here to visit Apple’s support website.

BONUS TIP FOR EXTRA KNOW-HOW: Stream everything you want without breaking the bank

Are you a cord-cutter who relies on streaming services? Perhaps you’re a cord-never (those who have never signed up for cable) who utilizes apps like Roku, Apple+ or Pluto TV for watching television. Maybe you prefer a combo of cable and streaming services.

Streaming subscribers will total almost 68 million in the U.S. by 2024. So, regardless of the route you take with your television content, chances are you or someone you know subscribes to at least one streaming service.

What makes streaming so appealing? Content, convenience and cost. One trick will join all three and take your viewing experience to a whole new level.

Tap or click to save money and get all the content you want.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group PasswordCybersecurity1 One big mistake you’re making that puts your online security at risk The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 4c71141b-f64c-5327-9ff8-f5e2810ce50c   Westlake Legal Group PasswordCybersecurity1 One big mistake you’re making that puts your online security at risk The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 4c71141b-f64c-5327-9ff8-f5e2810ce50c

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Dating sites, political ads, Fire TV and more: Tech Q&A

Each week, I receive tons of questions from my listeners about tech concerns, new products and all things digital.

Sometimes, choosing the most interesting questions to highlight is the best part of my job.

This week, I received questions about whether any old tech is worth money to collectors, dating online, the Fire Stick, political ads and whether I shut down my app.

Do you have a question you’d like to ask me?

Tap or click here to email me directly.

Best Dating Sites

Q: My divorce is final and I’m ready to date again. Now that everyone is meeting online, are some apps better than others? I’m looking for a relationship, not a hookup.

A: There is nothing fun or glamorous about a legal separation, but now that you’ve reached the end of the tunnel, you may find exciting times ahead. Online dating has evolved dramatically in recent years, and although Tinder gets the most attention, it may not be the ideal venue for long-term relationships.

Unlike the early days of digital courtship, when the dating pool was small and any old profile would do, you are now competing with legions of other singles. Communicating with potential dates is a separate skill, and staying safe is yet another. Tap or click here for five online dating tips.

Political Ad Doubts

Q: Do online sites like Facebook monitor political ads? I saw an ad about Trump that was 1,000% wrong.

A: Given the epidemic of fake news, you would think political campaigns would face more oversight. Aside from confusion and slander, a vicious campaign ad with erroneous information can cause serious problems, including threats and manipulated polls. To answer your question, it depends on what social media platform you use.

Some services, like Twitter and Spotify, have stopped allowing political ads altogether. Facebook says they want to let their users decide what’s real. Keep in mind that an absence of political ads doesn’t impact the videos, posts and memes that may continue to spread lies and exaggerations about a given candidate.

Bans are effective, but in the end, it’s up to you to fact-check your sources and stay informed. Tap or click here to learn more about political ads on social media.

Find My App

Q: I looked in the App Store and couldn’t find your app. Did you take it down?

A: So many people struggle to find my app because they’ve misspelled my name. I get it: “Komando” isn’t a familiar English word, but “commando” is – so you may want to add a “c” or extra “m,” which may hamper your results.

I can assure you the Komando app is available wherever you get your apps, and the reviews have been splendid. There are so many reasons to download this app, from up-to-the-minute breaking tech news and security alerts to streaming episodes of my show.

If you still can’t find the app on Google Play or the App Store, feel free to use the handy link on my website. Tap or click here to download the Komando app.

Old Tech Worth Money

Q: I have boxes of old tech lying around the house from a Commodore, Walkman and more. Would collectors want any of it?

A: Most of us haven’t seen a PDA or LaserDisc in years, and we couldn’t even conceive of using one. Our garages are full of the “junk” you describe — technology that lost its relevance decades ago. But just because it’s old doesn’t mean a gadget is worthless, and collectors often chase after rare and original devices: Atari games, iPods and yes, Commodores.

Obviously, these items are more valuable when they’re in good condition, and the real prizes are still packaged in their original boxes. But before you dump your dusty stash in the Goodwill bin, check out what someone might pay for it. Tap or click here to identify old tech that is worth big bucks.

The Amazon Fire Stick Shtick

Q: My sweetie got me an Amazon Fire Stick for Christmas. Does it feed me ads based on my internet searches and stuff?

A: Amazon is pretty aggressive about advertising, and whether you’re using the Amazon website to shop or a Kindle Fire to read an ebook, you will probably stumble into a good number of targeted ads. The bad news is Fire TV won’t permit you to eliminate these ads altogether.

The good news is you can change your settings to stop using your browsing data. But that’s only the tip of the Fire TV iceberg. That little stick is packed with features, including Alexa compatibility and free streaming movies from IMDb.

Fire TV doesn’t grab as many headlines as Apple TV, but this service is excellent in its own right, and there are many ways to make it even better. Tap or click here for 10 secret Fire TV tips only the pros know.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group TinderThomasTrutschel-PhotothekviaGettyIMages Dating sites, political ads, Fire TV and more: Tech Q&A Kim Komando fox-news/tech fox news fnc/tech fnc article 3e5b5f35-ccc9-5d7c-a787-2010681491b5   Westlake Legal Group TinderThomasTrutschel-PhotothekviaGettyIMages Dating sites, political ads, Fire TV and more: Tech Q&A Kim Komando fox-news/tech fox news fnc/tech fnc article 3e5b5f35-ccc9-5d7c-a787-2010681491b5

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

11 questions you always wanted to ask about social media

Social media has taken over the planet. Facebook, YouTube and Instagram are the most popular platforms with billions of users, while Twitter, Reddit and Pinterest claim hundreds of millions.

With these kinds of numbers, you can bet the hackers and scammers are setting up shop, too. Take steps now so you’re not their next victim. Tap or click to learn how to enable an essential security setting for all your accounts: two-factor authentication.

On my national radio show and global Bloomberg TV program, I take calls from people like you who have questions about anything from buying the right smart home tech or getting a copy of everything their kids do on their phones to how to make money in this gig economy.

Tap or click here if you’d like to listen to a few of the show’s podcasts or you can watch the show here.

Social media comes up a lot. Here are some questions I have fielded that you probably have on your mind, too.

  1. I accidentally liked an ex’s photo. Can I take it back? 

No, you made a dumb mistake. Most social networks notify users of any likes on their profiles. Unliking a post won’t erase the original notification, so you’ll only be safe if notifications are turned off.

Try to be more careful in the future. Better yet, unfollow your ex. You don’t click anymore.

2. I’m looking for a job/date/whatever. What do other people see when they look at my Facebook profile? I live a respectable life … well, for the most part.

You’re right in assuming anyone you meet will look you up online. Facebook and LinkedIn have “View as” options that let you look at your profile through the eyes of another user. This trick is useful for checking if your specific privacy settings are working or not.

On the desktop version of Facebook, open your News Feed and click your name in the top left. Then click on the three-dot button at the bottom of your cover photo next to Activity Log and select View As.

On the desktop version of LinkedIn, open your profile page and look for a button in the upper right corner that says Edit public profile & URL.

Sure, you can make particular posts and photos viewable to only certain people. But if you’re questioning whether a certain part of your life should be public, best leave it off social media altogether.

3. My grandson told me that I’m an “oversharer” with the family on social media. What am I doing wrong? I just want to be a part of their lives and tell them what’s on my mind.

This reminds me of a joke. Did you hear about the woman whose husband called her out for being an oversharer on Facebook? Clearly, his hemorrhoids were making him cranky!

Your bratty grandson is telling you that you’re annoying. You’re posting too much personal information that friends and followers don’t care about or feel uncomfortable reading. Always think before you post, and consider the interests and tastes of your audience. Tap or click for 5 details you shouldn’t share on social media.

One more thing: Know that there’s a distinct difference between “Here’s what I think about this” and what should really be a conversation between you and your therapist.

4. I have a very annoying ex/friend/coworker. If I block them, will they know? I don’t want to make a difficult situation worse.

This answer depends on the platform. Facebook and Instagram don’t explicitly alert users when they’ve been blocked. Instead, they hide you from the person you want to ignore and the user won’t be able to find you, no matter how hard they look.

Twitter shows an explicit message when you visit a profile that’s blocked you. You won’t be able to contact this user or access their content in any direct way.

In real life, you would just avoid this person. Online, this task is actually easier. Just mute their posts. See #9 below for more about this social media feature.

5. I know sites like Facebook collect data on me. What do they do with it all?

Whenever you use a free site like Facebook, you are the product. Facebook collects the data you voluntarily give on your profile and it is used by advertisers. When an advertiser can better target their messages, they are willing to pay more money because their ads will be more effective.

RELATED: Sick of targeted ads on Facebook? You need to shut out advertisers. Tap or click here to change your settings and stay off the radar.

For example, let’s say you’re a 50-year-old woman, who loves golf, travels and works in the financial field. The ads you see will be much different than a 28-year-old newly married male who has a passion for NASCAR and music festivals. The more money the advertisers pay, the more money Facebook makes.

You might be sharing more information than you realize. Tap or click here to see what Facebook knows about you and 5 ways to lock down your account.

6. I need evidence for a legal situation that deals with a custody battle. I need to prove my ex is an unfit parent. Can someone tell if I saved their post?

Social media brings out the best in people. Instagram has no issue with you saving or taking a screenshot of a person’s post, nor does Instagram send alerts when you screenshot a user’s Story. However, there’s a big caveat. With direct messages that expire, any screenshots you take will send an alert to the user.

That logic extends to Snapchat, where the entire point of the app is to exchange messages that expire. Users will be alerted if you screenshot any videos, images or text conversations.

Facebook and Twitter do not alert users if you take a screenshot.

So capture away and be sure to save these images on your phone and as a backup in the cloud, too. You don’t want to lose some great posts if they can work to your advantage.

7. My kids want to use TikTok. How does it work? Is it safe?

I was in Barcelona last week and my tour guide asked me the same thing! TikTok is a video sharing app that has exploded in popularity, particularly with young people. TikTok is fun, but not always safe for kids.

A recent study from cybersecurity company Check Point found TikTok had serious flaws that were addressed in a December update. Hackers could manipulate user info and expose personal data. Be sure you get the latest version.

If you are going to let the kids use it, switch to a Private account so complete strangers cannot contact them and change all safety settings to Friends. And check “followers and following” regularly to make sure they are abiding by your rules.

I have a fabulous tech rules contract for you to use with the kids in your family. This way, the kids know what’s right and what’s wrong when it comes to devices, screen time, privacy and security. And best of all, I’m the bad guy and you’re not. You’re welcome.

Tap or click here for my free technology contract for kids.

8. I looked up a few old flames because I was curious about what they look like now. Can someone see when I search for them?

Don’t bother. They look old and you don’t.

Facebook, Twitter and Instagram don’t inform users when others visit their profile, and your search history is private to your account.

LinkedIn, however, is designed to help employers and workers connect with one another. Even with a free account, you can see the last five people who visited your page. If you upgrade to a premium account, you can see all the visitors from the last 90 days.

In case you need help with your stalking, tap or click here for 6 tricks to find anyone on social media.

9. My crazy relative posts political posts all day long. It’s annoying. Can I stop seeing this person’s posts without unfriending them? That would cause major drama.

“Muting” users on social media will remove all their content from your feed without removing them from your friends list. Best of all, the user will have no idea you did it.

On Facebook, use your desktop to visit the profile or page you want to mute and click Following. Select Unfollow.

On Twitter, visit their profile and click the three-dot icon next to their name. This reveals a few options including Mute.

On Instagram, tap or click on the three-dot icon next to any post. You’ll now see various options including Report, Unfollow and Mute.

If only this worked in real life.

10. I cleaned up my social media account. Can people still find embarrassing old posts I’ve deleted?

I’m so glad there was no social media when I was in college. Thankfully, nearly all social media platforms let you delete posts and content you no longer want to show. Keep in mind screenshots and archived pages can live on long after you’ve removed them.

Can you imagine the political campaigns of people, say twenty years from now?

11. I was upset last night at my boyfriend, had a few drinks and fired off a nasty message. Now it’s morning and I know better. Can I take the message back?

It’s clear your relationship is on the rocks. If your recipient has already read the message, the damage has already been done. If not, here’s what to do:

On the Facebook app, tap and hold on the message you wish to remove. You’ll see a message box pop up. Tap Remove for Everyone.

On the Instagram app, open your messages and tap and hold on the message you wish to remove. When the dialogue box pops up, select Unsend.

Unfortunately, Twitter does not offer this service.

You probably said what you wanted to say if you only had the nerve, but there are a few life lessons here.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group facebook-eye 11 questions you always wanted to ask about social media The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 5c5ffb8e-5fcc-5087-bf21-8cd2583aaa24   Westlake Legal Group facebook-eye 11 questions you always wanted to ask about social media The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 5c5ffb8e-5fcc-5087-bf21-8cd2583aaa24

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

11 questions you always wanted to ask about social media

Social media has taken over the planet. Facebook, YouTube and Instagram are the most popular platforms with billions of users, while Twitter, Reddit and Pinterest claim hundreds of millions.

With these kinds of numbers, you can bet the hackers and scammers are setting up shop, too. Take steps now so you’re not their next victim. Tap or click to learn how to enable an essential security setting for all your accounts: two-factor authentication.

On my national radio show and global Bloomberg TV program, I take calls from people like you who have questions about anything from buying the right smart home tech or getting a copy of everything their kids do on their phones to how to make money in this gig economy.

Tap or click here if you’d like to listen to a few of the show’s podcasts or you can watch the show here.

Social media comes up a lot. Here are some questions I have fielded that you probably have on your mind, too.

  1. I accidentally liked an ex’s photo. Can I take it back? 

No, you made a dumb mistake. Most social networks notify users of any likes on their profiles. Unliking a post won’t erase the original notification, so you’ll only be safe if notifications are turned off.

Try to be more careful in the future. Better yet, unfollow your ex. You don’t click anymore.

2. I’m looking for a job/date/whatever. What do other people see when they look at my Facebook profile? I live a respectable life … well, for the most part.

You’re right in assuming anyone you meet will look you up online. Facebook and LinkedIn have “View as” options that let you look at your profile through the eyes of another user. This trick is useful for checking if your specific privacy settings are working or not.

On the desktop version of Facebook, open your News Feed and click your name in the top left. Then click on the three-dot button at the bottom of your cover photo next to Activity Log and select View As.

On the desktop version of LinkedIn, open your profile page and look for a button in the upper right corner that says Edit public profile & URL.

Sure, you can make particular posts and photos viewable to only certain people. But if you’re questioning whether a certain part of your life should be public, best leave it off social media altogether.

3. My grandson told me that I’m an “oversharer” with the family on social media. What am I doing wrong? I just want to be a part of their lives and tell them what’s on my mind.

This reminds me of a joke. Did you hear about the woman whose husband called her out for being an oversharer on Facebook? Clearly, his hemorrhoids were making him cranky!

Your bratty grandson is telling you that you’re annoying. You’re posting too much personal information that friends and followers don’t care about or feel uncomfortable reading. Always think before you post, and consider the interests and tastes of your audience. Tap or click for 5 details you shouldn’t share on social media.

One more thing: Know that there’s a distinct difference between “Here’s what I think about this” and what should really be a conversation between you and your therapist.

4. I have a very annoying ex/friend/coworker. If I block them, will they know? I don’t want to make a difficult situation worse.

This answer depends on the platform. Facebook and Instagram don’t explicitly alert users when they’ve been blocked. Instead, they hide you from the person you want to ignore and the user won’t be able to find you, no matter how hard they look.

Twitter shows an explicit message when you visit a profile that’s blocked you. You won’t be able to contact this user or access their content in any direct way.

In real life, you would just avoid this person. Online, this task is actually easier. Just mute their posts. See #9 below for more about this social media feature.

5. I know sites like Facebook collect data on me. What do they do with it all?

Whenever you use a free site like Facebook, you are the product. Facebook collects the data you voluntarily give on your profile and it is used by advertisers. When an advertiser can better target their messages, they are willing to pay more money because their ads will be more effective.

RELATED: Sick of targeted ads on Facebook? You need to shut out advertisers. Tap or click here to change your settings and stay off the radar.

For example, let’s say you’re a 50-year-old woman, who loves golf, travels and works in the financial field. The ads you see will be much different than a 28-year-old newly married male who has a passion for NASCAR and music festivals. The more money the advertisers pay, the more money Facebook makes.

You might be sharing more information than you realize. Tap or click here to see what Facebook knows about you and 5 ways to lock down your account.

6. I need evidence for a legal situation that deals with a custody battle. I need to prove my ex is an unfit parent. Can someone tell if I saved their post?

Social media brings out the best in people. Instagram has no issue with you saving or taking a screenshot of a person’s post, nor does Instagram send alerts when you screenshot a user’s Story. However, there’s a big caveat. With direct messages that expire, any screenshots you take will send an alert to the user.

That logic extends to Snapchat, where the entire point of the app is to exchange messages that expire. Users will be alerted if you screenshot any videos, images or text conversations.

Facebook and Twitter do not alert users if you take a screenshot.

So capture away and be sure to save these images on your phone and as a backup in the cloud, too. You don’t want to lose some great posts if they can work to your advantage.

7. My kids want to use TikTok. How does it work? Is it safe?

I was in Barcelona last week and my tour guide asked me the same thing! TikTok is a video sharing app that has exploded in popularity, particularly with young people. TikTok is fun, but not always safe for kids.

A recent study from cybersecurity company Check Point found TikTok had serious flaws that were addressed in a December update. Hackers could manipulate user info and expose personal data. Be sure you get the latest version.

If you are going to let the kids use it, switch to a Private account so complete strangers cannot contact them and change all safety settings to Friends. And check “followers and following” regularly to make sure they are abiding by your rules.

I have a fabulous tech rules contract for you to use with the kids in your family. This way, the kids know what’s right and what’s wrong when it comes to devices, screen time, privacy and security. And best of all, I’m the bad guy and you’re not. You’re welcome.

Tap or click here for my free technology contract for kids.

8. I looked up a few old flames because I was curious about what they look like now. Can someone see when I search for them?

Don’t bother. They look old and you don’t.

Facebook, Twitter and Instagram don’t inform users when others visit their profile, and your search history is private to your account.

LinkedIn, however, is designed to help employers and workers connect with one another. Even with a free account, you can see the last five people who visited your page. If you upgrade to a premium account, you can see all the visitors from the last 90 days.

In case you need help with your stalking, tap or click here for 6 tricks to find anyone on social media.

9. My crazy relative posts political posts all day long. It’s annoying. Can I stop seeing this person’s posts without unfriending them? That would cause major drama.

“Muting” users on social media will remove all their content from your feed without removing them from your friends list. Best of all, the user will have no idea you did it.

On Facebook, use your desktop to visit the profile or page you want to mute and click Following. Select Unfollow.

On Twitter, visit their profile and click the three-dot icon next to their name. This reveals a few options including Mute.

On Instagram, tap or click on the three-dot icon next to any post. You’ll now see various options including Report, Unfollow and Mute.

If only this worked in real life.

10. I cleaned up my social media account. Can people still find embarrassing old posts I’ve deleted?

I’m so glad there was no social media when I was in college. Thankfully, nearly all social media platforms let you delete posts and content you no longer want to show. Keep in mind screenshots and archived pages can live on long after you’ve removed them.

Can you imagine the political campaigns of people, say twenty years from now?

11. I was upset last night at my boyfriend, had a few drinks and fired off a nasty message. Now it’s morning and I know better. Can I take the message back?

It’s clear your relationship is on the rocks. If your recipient has already read the message, the damage has already been done. If not, here’s what to do:

On the Facebook app, tap and hold on the message you wish to remove. You’ll see a message box pop up. Tap Remove for Everyone.

On the Instagram app, open your messages and tap and hold on the message you wish to remove. When the dialogue box pops up, select Unsend.

Unfortunately, Twitter does not offer this service.

You probably said what you wanted to say if you only had the nerve, but there are a few life lessons here.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group facebook-eye 11 questions you always wanted to ask about social media The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 5c5ffb8e-5fcc-5087-bf21-8cd2583aaa24   Westlake Legal Group facebook-eye 11 questions you always wanted to ask about social media The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/tech fnc/tech fnc article 5c5ffb8e-5fcc-5087-bf21-8cd2583aaa24

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

9 clever ways thieves steal your identity – and how you can stop them

Identity theft isn’t just someone stealing your credit card. Criminals are coming up with plenty of innovative ways to rip us off. New account fraud, a tactic in which someone opens an account in your name, is on the rise. So are cases of hackers using clever social engineering tactics to fool victims into giving up sensitive information.

Think it can’t happen to you? Watch as a white hat hacker shows just how easy it is to fool even a tech pro — me.

One recent example is a new type of identity fraud that tricks victims into thinking they’ve received a two-factor authentication text from their bank. This is especially shocking as it looks so real. Tap or click here to read all about it.

More than 14 million Americans fell victim to identity theft in 2018, according to a 2019 study by Javelin Strategy & Research. Fraud is still rampant and can cause serious financial damage — not to mention all the time and effort it can take to undo it.

That’s why knowing the tactics thieves to steal your identity is essential. Avoid these pitfalls and stay protected.

1. Think before you share

We live in a generation of oversharing. People have been oversharing the details of their personal lives on reality TV shows for years.

These days, it seems everyone shares everything on social media platforms like Facebook. It’s often innocent oversharing, like your friend who “checks in” to every restaurant so you always know where she is and what she’s eating. Tap or click to secure your Facebook account once and for all.

Unfortunately, it’s easy to overshare with hackers, too. How often do you mindlessly click through buttons that say “Allow Access?” If you’re playing an online game or entering a contest, it’s understandable because you want a chance to win.

RELATED: Not sure who to turn to for tech help? I’ve got your back. 12 questions about social media you’re too embarrassed to ask.

But stop and think about what you’re doing before you give away your information. Take a second to read terms and conditions before you agree online, and be smart about what you post on the web.

You should never post your address, phone number or other personal information on social media sites. Platforms like Facebook are too careless with our privacy as it is, and you don’t want your sensitive information in the wrong hands.

2. Blast from the past

Remember MySpace accounts? From about 2005 to 2008 it was the most popular social media site in the world. Not so much anymore. Most MySpace users have moved on. Unfortunately, many forgot to delete their accounts.

Leaving old accounts active can be a security nightmare. Think about all the personal information you have just sitting there, waiting to be scavenged by cybercriminals. Let’s face it, Tom from MySpace probably isn’t keeping up with security protocols.

It’s critical to be proactive and delete all of your old accounts you no longer use.

Go through your browser, your email and wrack your brain for all the accounts and services you’ve signed up for. If you find some you’re not using, don’t just let them linger. Take the time to shut down your old accounts the right way.

This can be a lot of work, but there’s a site that can help make the process easy. It’s called AccountKiller and will help you wipe the slate clean. Tap or click here to learn more about AccountKiller and easily get rid of those old accounts.

3. Some things are supposed to stay between you and your doctor

According to a survey by security company Carbon Black, a frightening 84% of health care organizations say they have seen an increase in cyberattacks over the past year. Cybercriminals have been targeting hospitals and clinics due to the sheer amount of data these places store.

It’s not all just patient information, either. There’s also data on doctors and insurance companies. Stolen information is sold on the Dark Web and ranges mostly from forgeries to health insurance credentials.

If someone steals your identity, you could be subject to medical identity theft. This act means you might be denied coverage because someone has already used your medical insurance benefits.

How can you protect yourself? Only share your insurance card when it’s absolutely necessary, and report a missing card to your insurance company right away. Avoid posting about health issues online; the less info potential scammers know about you, the better. Check any statements or bills you receive thoroughly, and contact your insurance company or doctor if you see a charge or service you don’t recognize.

PRIVACY PRO TIP: Creepy data broker sites collect a shocking amount of information — but you can remove your data and opt out. Tap or click here to take this important privacy step.

4. Don’t be fooled

When criminals first started sending phishing emails, they were pretty easy to spot. Tons of grammatical and spelling errors tipped us off to the fact that no, our banks couldn’t possibly have sent that message.

However, today’s crooks have learned that lesson and are now sending professional looking messages. They spoof logos that look so real they can be difficult for even experts to spot. The most important rule to outsmarting phishing scams is to avoid clicking malicious links. That means you shouldn’t click on web links or open PDF attachments found in unsolicited email messages — ever.

If you need to conduct business with a company, it’s always best to type its web address directly into your browser. Never trust a link inside a message, and be wary of downloading anything you didn’t specifically ask for.

5. Before you hit ‘buy’

Shopping online is convenient and takes out all the hassles associated with heading to the mall. But have you ever heard of e-skimming? It’s when your credit card information is skimmed by a criminal while you’re buying stuff online. You don’t even know it’s happening until it’s too late.

This epidemic is getting worse as hackers have figured out how to skim credit cards from ordinary online retailers without being detected. They do this by using tricky bits of code while they lie in wait and capture your data as you’re typing it in.

Does that mean you need to stop shopping online all together? No, but you should take steps to shop smarter. For starters, check the connection to the site you’re on. Look for a lock or a URL that begins with HTTPS instead of just HTTP. If it’s not secure, find what you’re shopping for elsewhere.

Be wary of any deals that seem too good to be true. Coupons for crazy discounts or free products could be a trap to get your payment info.

You should also consider ditching your credit card all together when you buy online. Tap or click for 3 safer ways to pay online.

6. Not worth the risk

One of the biggest mistakes people make is connecting to unsecured Wi-Fi networks. Sure, everyone wants to save on data, but joining a public Wi-Fi network at the coffee shop or airport is a terrible idea.

Crooks are always trolling these public networks, watching and waiting for new victims to rip off. If you must use a public network, always use a VPN when you connect. The free ones are slow. You’re better off paying a small monthly fee for a robust VPN.

7. Stay up to date

Shelling out over a grand for the latest and greatest smartphone isn’t very economical. But if you are using a super old device that can’t support updates, you could be putting your personal data at risk.

That’s because many operating system updates come with critical security patches that keep crooks from stealing your information. Without these patches, you’re a serious contender for identity theft, which could wind up costing you more than what you’d pay for a new phone.

Keep all your devices updated to the latest software you can, and seriously consider a new smartphone if yours is several versions behind.

Not updating your OS is just one silly thing you may be doing that puts you at risk online. Tap or click for 7 security basics you really need to stop ignoring.

8. Low-tech tricks

Though criminals have sophisticated hacking tools at their disposal, there are old-fashioned spying tricks that still work to this day.

We’re talking about the common thief rummaging through your trash, hoping to find personal information you may have written down and thrown away. Take the time to shred any sensitive documents before carelessly throwing them in the trash. This includes bank statements, financial documents, medical bills and anything else with identifying information.

Also, be careful of what you say out loud. Eavesdroppers might be listening in if you’re in public making a payment over the phone and reading your credit card information out loud.

When in doubt, assume someone is watching or listening and guard your info accordingly.

9. Threats at home, too

It’s sad I have to mention this, but it’s not just hackers who can steal your identity. It could be a family member or friend.

That’s why it’s essential to keep passwords and important documents in a safe place. Don’t just leave things with information like Social Security numbers and banking information sitting around the house.

Keep sensitive documents locked in a drawer, cabinet or safe deposit box. Stop writing down passwords and login info, and store or shred financial statements as soon they arrive in the mail.

BONUS TIP FOR EXTRA KNOW-HOW: Practical Tech Tip: Find out who really sent you an email

There was a time when our house phones would ring off the hook with annoying, unknown and unwanted calls. The immediate reaction would be to use *69 to trace where the call originated from.

Today, these annoying messages are coming in the form of emails. Each of these messages leads down the same road, which ends with a phishing scam or some sketchy request to reveal your personal data.

If you really want to check the credibility or authenticity of an email, you’ll need to dig deeper and establish where the email originated from — a virtual *69 if you will.

Tap or click to take a deeper look at your emails.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group komandokomandokomandopic3 9 clever ways thieves steal your identity – and how you can stop them The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/hackers fnc/tech fnc article 25927b52-028f-5cdd-b85a-195c97864b59   Westlake Legal Group komandokomandokomandopic3 9 clever ways thieves steal your identity – and how you can stop them The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/hackers fnc/tech fnc article 25927b52-028f-5cdd-b85a-195c97864b59

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Smart TV hackers, video doorbell security, AirPods as hearing aids and more: Tech Q&A

Each week, I receive tons of questions from my listeners about tech concerns, new products, and all things digital.

Sometimes, choosing the most interesting questions to highlight is the best part of my job.

This week, I received questions about smart TV hackers, video doorbell security, AirPods as hearing aids, PC bloatware, and more.

Do you have a question you’d like to ask me?

Tap or click here to email me directly.

Smart TV hacker threat

Q: I bought a smart TV at Costco. It was a great price, but I heard you say something about the FBI, hackers and TVs. Should I have not bought it?

A: If you follow us at komando.com, you already know some of the dangers of having Internet of Things (IoT) appliances in your home. These are products that connect to the internet, like smart light bulbs, smart refrigerators, and smart doorbells.

The FBI recently stated your smart TV could be a gateway for hackers to come into your home. They may not be able to access your locked-down computer directly, but it’s possible an unsecured smart TV could give them a simple backdoor through your router, allowing them to take control of your set.

Low-risk threats include changing channels, adjusting the TV volume and showing kids inappropriate videos. Worst-case scenarios involve turning your bedroom TV’s camera and mic into a stalking and spying device. Yikes!

Tap or click here for steps you need to take to protect your network and family.

Video doorbell security settings

Q: My wife got me a video doorbell for Christmas. I am really worried about who has access to these videos. It’s my house and my privacy. Are there security settings on these things?

A: While traditional doorbells are sufficient at letting you know when someone is at your door, newer video doorbells, such as the Google Nest Hello, provide a real-time view of who is outside your home. The initial setup is straightforward, but there are a few settings you will want to adjust to improve your experience.

Tap or click here for the steps to lock down your video doorbell.

Be tech-savvy in 2020

Q: I want to learn more about tech in 2020. You are my trusted source because you never know what you’ll find with a Google search! But the local radio station pre-empts you for sports. How can I listen to your show?

A: I hate when that happens! To listen to my show on your schedule, get the podcast. It’s super easy to subscribe, and when you do, my show is automatically delivered to you — even while you’re sleeping! Each radio show is three hours, so you have 12 hours of quality tech programming and entertainment each month.

You can fast-forward or listen to parts again — and there are no commercial breaks.

Tap or click here to subscribe to my national radio show podcasts.

Be gone, new PC bloatware

Q: I finally got rid of my 8-year-old Windows computer. This new one is fast, but dang, there’re a lot of junk programs on it. What’s the fastest and safest way to clean it up?

A: It can be fun setting up a new PC. Customizing your desktop, so it looks just right, downloading new apps, and sitting down to use it for the first time feels fantastic. Unfortunately, it isn’t always as simple as going through a quick setup process, selecting a few colors for fonts and windows, and going from there.

Tap or click here to learn how to customize your computer.

Many pre-built computers come with at least a modicum of extraneous, unwanted apps and software on them: bloatware. Bloatware can include trials of games you don’t want; apps you’ll never use or proprietary software that can slow down your computer.

Tap or click here for steps to get rid of bloatware.

Use AirPods as hearing aids

Q: I love my Apple AirPods. I thought I heard that you could use them as hearing aids. What’s the insider pro trick to doing that?

A: If you have ever had difficulty hearing someone during a conversation, AirPods can be your on-demand hearing aid. Apple introduced a feature, starting with iOS 12, called Live Listen.

Once set up, you can place your iPhone closer to the person you want to hear and the AirPods will produce clearer audio for you. There are other AirPod tricks you might like, like finding them when you lose them (it will happen!), having Siri announce calls and making your AirPods play nice with all your other devices.

Tap or click here for 10 AirPods secret tricks any owner should know.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2020, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on the Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group SmartTVGetty2012 Smart TV hackers, video doorbell security, AirPods as hearing aids and more: Tech Q&A The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/topics/privacy fox-news/tech/topics/computers fox-news/tech/technologies/tvs fox-news/tech/companies/apple fnc/tech fnc article 94188476-f604-5e4b-a971-baac29035eb6   Westlake Legal Group SmartTVGetty2012 Smart TV hackers, video doorbell security, AirPods as hearing aids and more: Tech Q&A The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/topics/security fox-news/tech/topics/privacy fox-news/tech/topics/computers fox-news/tech/technologies/tvs fox-news/tech/companies/apple fnc/tech fnc article 94188476-f604-5e4b-a971-baac29035eb6

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

9 Apple AirPods tricks you’ll wish you knew before now

AirPods were a holiday season top seller, and if you haven’t already cut the cord on your earbuds, you can expect to do so soon. Small, sleek, and Bluetooth-enabled, AirPods have turned regular old earphones into dynamic devices in their own right, and they have only improved with each generation.

Yet, many people are concerned that AirPods may cause cancer since they are embedded within one’s ear canal, directly exposing the inner ear to EMF radiation. The proximity to the brain is also alarming to many scientists. Tap or click here to read the research 250 scientists presented to the United Nations and World Health Organization.

The earbuds are pricey, retailing from $159 to $259 on Apple’s site. But one clever Redditor built his own Airpods using parts purchased on eBay. Tap or click here to learn how he made AirPods for $4.

If you’re new to AirPods, here are 9 helpful tips that will enhance your auditory experience. I bet you’ll find more than one on this list you’ll use time and time again.

1. Use only one pod when in a pinch

Although you can expect your AirPods to last several hours on a single charge, here’s a clever, quick fix for when you’re in a battery pinch. Leave one AirPod in the charging case while you use the other. Swap them when necessary.

2. Put Siri to work for you

If you installed the latest operating system, Siri can read your incoming messages via your AirPods, using nothing but your voice. After listening to your messages, you also have the option to reply to texts with a voice command.

The latest models of AirPods let you summon Siri with the simple “Hey Siri” command. You can request Siri to help with any number of additional tasks, such as change songs, turn up the volume or get the weather forecast.

Do proceed with caution, though. Apple gives you the option to disable Siri’s audio collection. Tap or click here to learn which privacy setting you must change to keep Siri from spying on you.

3. Easily connect your AirPods to your various devices

Users routinely connect their AirPods to their iPhone, Macbook, iPad, and Apple Watch simultaneously. AirPods automatically switch audio between the two devices. But there may be occasions you want to put down your iPhone and use your AirPods to listen to the audio from your Mac or iPad.

The transition requires little effort if you pair your AirPods with your iPhone first. That’s the trick. This process connects the headset to your Apple account, which will allow the buds to work across all of your Apple devices.

To switch up devices open Control Center (swipe down the home screen on iPhone X or newer and swipe up on an iPhone 8 or older). Press down on the audio card in the upper right corner of Music and tap on the device you want to use.

Get tech know-how and breaking news on the go. Click here to download the free Komando.com App.

4. Share the AirPod love

Because AirPods are wireless, you can opt to share the earbuds with someone else when listening to music or watching a movie. Even if you receive a phone call while sharing your earbuds, you both can hear the phone conversation. Do keep in mind because only one mic is active at a time; only one person can speak to the caller.

5. Find your lost AirPod

AirPods are super easy to lose. If you need to replace one AirPod, a 2nd gen is $69 each, and an individual AirPod Pro is $89. Make it routine that when you are done using your AirPods, you drop them directly back into its charging case. Knowing that might not always happen, it’s essential to take precautionary steps now.

If you have the “Find my iPhone” feature activated on your portable device and have paired it with your AirPods, you can also use this feature to locate your lost earbuds. When you need to find missing AirPods, go into your iPhone Settings, and tap your name. Click Find My and enable Find My iPhone and Send Last Location.

6. Know who’s calling without looking

Thanks to your AirPods and Siri, you can hear who is calling without needing to check your iPhone. To enable this feature, go into your iPhone Settings and tap on Phone, then tap Announce Calls and select Always. Nice.

7. Use your AirPods with non-Apple products

Despite what you may think, AirPods are not exclusive to Apple products. You can use your earbuds with other iOS gear not logged into an iCloud account or with Android devices.

With your AirPods in the closed case, open the lid, press and hold down the pairing button on the back of the case. Launch the Bluetooth settings on your device, the select AirPods to confirm pairing. To re-pair with your iPhone when done, reselect AirPods within your iPhone’s Bluetooth settings.

If you’re wondering how AirPods compare to Bose, Beats, Echo and Sony’s similar products, tap or click here for my complete buying guide.

8. Turn your AirPods into a makeshift hearing aid

If you have ever had difficulty hearing someone during a conversation, AirPods can be your on-demand hearing aid. Apple introduced a feature, starting with iOS 12, called Live Listen. Once set up, you can place your iPhone closer to the person you want to hear, and the AirPods will produce clearer audio for you.

To set up this feature, go into your iPhone Settings and click Control Center. Select Customize Controls and tap the plus sign next to Hearing. When ready, place the AirPods in your ears, and either swipe down your iPhone X (or newer) home screen or up on an iPhone 8 or older and click the ear icon. Tap Live Listen.

9. Customize how you use your AirPods

Although the default double-tap settings on your AirPods are functional as is, you may wish to change them. It’s easy to customize both the double-tap or press-and-hold settings for either earbud.

With your AirPods connected to your iPhone or iPad, go into Settings and select Bluetooth. Click on the “i” icon next to your AirPods and choose the left or right to make changes. Options include play, pause, play genre and skip to next track.

You can get information like this delivered right to your email. Sign up for my free email newsletters now while you’re thinking of it at Komando.com/Subscribe.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2019, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on The Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Westlake Legal Group apple-airpod 9 Apple AirPods tricks you’ll wish you knew before now The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/technologies/wearable-tech fox-news/tech/companies/apple fnc/tech fnc article 9e5dc2eb-0282-5552-8e56-efdd76c0301a   Westlake Legal Group apple-airpod 9 Apple AirPods tricks you’ll wish you knew before now The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fox-news/tech/technologies/wearable-tech fox-news/tech/companies/apple fnc/tech fnc article 9e5dc2eb-0282-5552-8e56-efdd76c0301a

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com