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Westlake Legal Group > Kushner, Jared

House Democrats Approve Subpoenas for Who’s Who of Mueller Witnesses

WASHINGTON — The House Judiciary Committee on Thursday approved a dozen new subpoenas targeting a who’s who of witnesses cited in Robert S. Mueller III’s report as Democrats sought to elevate their showdown with President Trump over episodes of possible obstruction of justice documented by the special counsel.

The panel also approved a separate group of subpoenas seeking information about the Trump administration’s practice of separating children from their families at the border.

And House Democratic leaders set Tuesday for a full House vote to hold Attorney General William P. Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt of Congress over their refusal to relinquish under subpoena documents related to the administration’s efforts to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

“The House will not shirk from its oversight of this administration and its malign effort to silence the voices of millions in our democracy,” said Representative Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland, the majority leader, referring to fears that a citizenship question would dissuade immigrants from answering the census.

Among the prominent figures to be subpoenaed by the Democrats are Jeff Sessions, the former attorney general; Rod J. Rosenstein, his deputy who appointed Mr. Mueller, the special counsel; John F. Kelly, the former White House chief of staff; Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser; and Corey Lewandowski, a former Trump campaign manager. Democrats also authorized a subpoena for David J. Pecker, who as head of American Media helped Mr. Trump during the 2016 presidential campaign buy the silence of a pornographic film actress and a former Playboy model, both of whom claimed to have had sexual relationships with him.

The committee’s actions set up a slew of possible new conflicts with the White House, which has taken a dim view of House Democrats’ continued investigation of matters studied by Mr. Mueller. White House officials could try to intervene to block testimony from many of those subpoenaed on Thursday who are current or former high-level administration officials, as they have with other witnesses.

That would only deepen the standoff between the administration and the House. On the census issue, Mr. Barr and Mr. Ross could still reach an accommodation with the House Oversight and Reform Committee, but more likely, Tuesday’s vote would allow the committee to go to court to try to pry the documents loose and make criminal referrals for Mr. Barr and Mr. Ross to the Justice Department for defying congressional subpoenas.

Despite rancorous Republican opposition, Judiciary Committee Democrats easily pushed the subpoena authorizations through on Thursday along party lines — promising to jump-start two of their highest-priority oversight investigations of Mr. Trump and his presidency. The chairman, Representative Jerrold Nadler of New York, did not indicate when he would deploy the newly authorized orders, but he is likely to wait until after closely anticipated testimony in the committee next week from Mr. Mueller himself.

The first oversight inquiry focuses on Mr. Trump’s attempts to impede federal investigators studying his campaign’s ties to Russia constituted obstruction of justice or an abuse of power.

Westlake Legal Group trump-presidents-investigations-promo-1557500573411-articleLarge-v4 House Democrats Approve Subpoenas for Who’s Who of Mueller Witnesses United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J subpoenas Special Prosecutors (Independent Counsel) Sessions, Jefferson B III Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Rosenstein, Rod J Mueller, Robert S III Lewandowski, Corey (1975- ) Kushner, Jared Kelly, John F (1950- ) Immigration and Emigration House Committee on the Judiciary Flynn, Michael T

Tracking 29 Investigations Related to Trump

Federal, state and congressional authorities are investigating Donald J. Trump’s businesses, campaign, inauguration and presidency.

“The committee on the judiciary has a constitutional obligation to investigate credible allegations of misconduct,” Mr. Nadler said as he opened the hearing. “There is no substitute for primary evidence as the committee makes its decisions.”

Mr. Trump fumed about the new subpoenas on Twitter Thursday morning, urging Democrats to “go back to work” on policy issues rather than trying to take additional “bites at the apple” after the conclusion of Mr. Mueller’s 22-month investigation.

Representative Doug Collins of Georgia, the top Republican on the committee, protested what he called a “subpoena binge” that was designed to provoke political conflicts rather than find information.

“Today’s subpoena binge is an effort to change the narrative,” Mr. Collins said. “It is a show of force. It is a chance for the chairman to prove to his rank and file, and the rest of the Democratic caucus, he can be tough on the Trump administration after being pushed around for six months.”

In addition to Mr. Sessions and Mr. Rosenstein, the Mueller-related subpoenas target Michael T. Flynn, Mr. Trump’s former national security adviser; Jody Hunt, Mr. Sessions’s chief of staff; Rob Porter, a former top White House aide; and Rick A. Dearborn, another former White House official. Mr. Flynn has already been subpoenaed by the House Intelligence Committee.

The immigration-related subpoenas are part of a Judiciary Committee investigation of the Trump administration’s divisive policies at the border. They specifically authorize the committee to demand testimony and documents from current and former administration officials about its so-called zero tolerance policy at the border, the practice of separating migrant families and the standards of detention of migrants.

They are also seeking information about any talk of presidential pardons for Department of Homeland Security officials involved in carrying out the president’s immigration orders, despite the possibility that some might violate existing law.

Mr. Nadler said on Thursday that he was pursuing a compulsory process because the Justice Department had failed to meaningfully comply with voluntary requests for the same information; the Homeland Security and Health and Human Services departments, he added, had largely complied with similar requests.

“We have given the administration ample time to respond to these serious reports of egregious conduct,” Mr. Nadler said. “This committee cannot sit idly by. There must be oversight and accountability.”

The immigration-related subpoenas prompted a fierce debate between Republicans and Democrats on the committee over which party was more committed to addressing the unfolding humanitarian crisis at the southern border. Several Democrats who have visited detention sites there in recent weeks vividly recalled what they saw and pleaded for the Trump administration to adopt higher standards of care, particularly for children.

Mr. Collins accused Democrats of pursuing the subpoenas merely to distract from “a very large and very public intraparty squabble over funding for the humanitarian crisis at the border” that has consumed Democrats in recent weeks after the passage of an aid bill deemed insufficient by liberals.

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House Democrats Subpoena a Who’s Who of Mueller Witnesses

Westlake Legal Group 11dc-judiciary1-facebookJumbo House Democrats Subpoena a Who’s Who of Mueller Witnesses United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J subpoenas Special Prosecutors (Independent Counsel) Sessions, Jefferson B III Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Rosenstein, Rod J Mueller, Robert S III Lewandowski, Corey (1975- ) Kushner, Jared Kelly, John F (1950- ) Immigration and Emigration House Committee on the Judiciary Flynn, Michael T

WASHINGTON — The House Judiciary Committee on Thursday approved a dozen new subpoenas targeting a who’s who of witnesses cited in Robert S. Mueller III’s report as Democrats sought to elevate their showdown with President Trump over episodes of possible obstruction of justice documented by the special counsel.

The panel also approved a separate group of subpoenas seeking information about the Trump administration’s practice of separating children from their families at the border. And House Democratic leaders set Tuesday for a full House vote to hold Attorney General William P. Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in criminal contempt of Congress over their refusal to relinquish documents related to the administration’s efforts to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

“The House will not shirk from its oversight of this administration and its malign effort to silence the voices of millions in our democracy,” said Representative Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland, the majority leader, referring to fears that a citizenship question would dissuade immigrants from answering the census.

Among the prominent figures to be subpoenaed by the Democrats are Jeff Sessions, the former attorney general; Rod J. Rosenstein, his deputy who appointed Mr. Mueller, the special counsel; John F. Kelly, the former White House chief of staff; Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser; and Corey Lewandowski, a former Trump campaign manager. Democrats also authorized a subpoena for David J. Pecker, who as head of American Media helped Mr. Trump during the 2016 presidential campaign buy the silence of a pornographic film actress and a former Playboy model, both of whom claimed to have had sexual relationships with him.

Despite rancorous Republican opposition, Democrats who control the committee were able to push the subpoena authorizations through along party lines — promising to jump-start two of their highest-priority oversight investigations of Mr. Trump and his presidency.

The first is an inquiry into whether Mr. Trump’s attempts to impede federal investigators studying his campaign’s ties to Russia constituted obstruction of justice or an abuse of power.

“The committee on the judiciary has a constitutional obligation to investigate credible allegations of misconduct,” Representative Jerrold Nadler, the chairman of the committee, said as he opened the hearing. “There is no substitute for primary evidence as the committee makes its decisions.”

Mr. Trump fumed about the new subpoenas on Twitter Thursday morning, urging Democrats to “go back to work” on policy issues rather than trying to take additional “bites at the apple” after the conclusion of Mr. Mueller’s 22-month investigation.

Representative Doug Collins of Georgia, the top Republican on the committee, protested what he called a “subpoena binge” that was designed to provoke political conflicts rather than find information.

“Today’s subpoena binge is an effort to change the narrative,” Mr. Collins said. “It is a show of force. It is a chance for the chairman to prove to his rank and file, and the rest of the Democratic caucus, he can be tough on the Trump administration after being pushed around for six months.”

In addition to Mr. Sessions and Mr. Rosenstein, the Mueller-related subpoenas target Michael T. Flynn, Mr. Trump’s former national security adviser; Jody Hunt, Mr. Sessions’s chief of staff; Rob Porter, a former top White House aide; and Rick A. Dearborn, another former White House official. Mr. Flynn has already been subpoenaed by the House Intelligence Committee.

The immigration-related subpoenas are part of a Judiciary Committee investigation of the Trump administration’s divisive policies at the border. They specifically authorize the committee to demand testimony and documents from current and former administration officials about its so-called zero tolerance policy at the border, the practice of separating migrant families and the standards of detention of migrants.

They are also seeking information about any talk of presidential pardons for Department of Homeland Security officials involved in carrying out the president’s immigration orders, despite the possibility that some might violate existing law.

Mr. Nadler said on Thursday that he was pursuing a compulsory process because the Justice Department had failed to meaningfully comply with voluntary requests for the same information; the Homeland Security and Health and Human Services departments, he added, had largely complied with similar requests.

“We have given the administration ample time to respond to these serious reports of egregious conduct,” Mr. Nadler said. “This committee cannot sit idly by. There must be oversight and accountability.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ivanka Trump Tests Her Diplomatic Chops and Riles a Legion of Critics

Set against a tense, eerie silence in the landmine-riddled mountains separating South and North Korea, the Demilitarized Zone may be the highest-stakes negotiation site on earth. It’s not the sort of place for mistakes.

It is the latest spot where Ivanka Trump has tried her hand at statecraft.

On Sunday, Ms. Trump, the president’s elder daughter, used an impromptu meeting between her father and Kim Jong-un, the North Korean leader, to further slip into the role of unofficial spokeswoman and budding stateswoman for the Trump administration. With her husband, fellow senior adviser Jared Kushner, at her side, Ms. Trump delivered news interviews, posed for photos and attended a closed-door meeting between her father and Mr. Kim.

Earlier in the day, Ms. Trump had repeated what her father has often said about dealing with the North: that it would be free of crippling sanctions and clear for an economic boom if Mr. Kim were to dismantle his nuclear program. Scant evidence suggests that Mr. Kim is taking the steps to do this, but on Sunday, two Trumps rewarded him with a visit.

“We are on the precipice of ushering in potentially a golden era for the Korean Peninsula,” Ms. Trump told Bloomberg News in the hours before her father took the historic step of crossing into the North. But by the time she emerged from the closed-door meeting between the leaders hours later, she only had one word for journalists about her encounter with North Korea.

She called it “surreal.”

Others following along called it inappropriate.

“Ivanka Trump is not on the National Security Council — she is not an adviser on the issues being discussed,” Michael A. McFaul, an ambassador to Russia under President Barack Obama, said of Ms. Trump’s presence. “So her presence undermines the professional look of the Trump delegation, both to other countries and to national security professionals in the Trump administration.”

President Trump has come under fire for making family members part of his staff since the beginning of his administration, and then for clinging more tightly to them in a White House racked by turnover. Mr. Kushner alone has overseen portfolios ranging from the federal government’s outdated technology to peace in the Middle East. But for Ms. Trump, 37, the visit to Asia over the past week represented a prominent step onto a bigger stage.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157182618_4cf9b9f7-a698-4d9c-a34d-4d0933fcb179-articleLarge Ivanka Trump Tests Her Diplomatic Chops and Riles a Legion of Critics United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Ivanka Trump, Donald J May, Theresa M Lagarde, Christine Kushner, Jared Group of Twenty Abe, Shinzo

Ms. Trump speaking about women’s empowerment at the Group of 20 summit in Osaka, Japan, on Saturday.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

She appeared ready to assert herself from the start of the trip. She was the most visible woman from the Trump administration to go. Her stepmother, the first lady Melania Trump, stayed behind in Washington, and Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the former White House press secretary and a fixture of recent overseas trips, had just stepped down.

So at the summit of the Group of 20 economic powers in Osaka, Japan — the original purpose of the trip before Mr. Trump threw out a Twitter invitation to meet Mr. Kim at the Demilitarized Zone — Ms. Trump was repeatedly flanked by her father and a roster of world leaders, including Shinzo Abe, the prime minister of Japan, and Mohammed bin Salman, the crown prince of Saudi Arabia.

Observers and critics used a snippet of digital footage as a way to show that she might be out of her depth: A short video posted to Instagram by the office of Emmanuel Macron, the president of France, showed Ms. Trump in conversation with Theresa May, the departing prime minister of Britain, and Christine Lagarde, the International Monetary Fund managing director, as Mr. Macron and Justin Trudeau, the Canadian prime minister, listened.

In the clip, Ms. Trump seemed to be looking to find a place to jump into this diplomatic game of double Dutch. First Mrs. May spoke: “As soon as you charge them with that economic aspect of it, a lot of people start listening who otherwise wouldn’t listen.”

And then Ms. Trump jumped in: “And the same with the defense side of it, in terms of the whole business that’s been, sort of, male-dominated.”

Ms. Lagarde, who was standing next to the president’s daughter, swiveled her head and blinked several times as she listened.

Ms. Trump has made international women’s empowerment a cornerstone of her work in the White House. In February, she unveiled the Women’s Global Development and Prosperity Initiative, a program meant to bring economic security to 50 million women across the world by 2025. In recent weeks, she has crisscrossed the country to bring attention to the Trump administration’s effort to bolster work force development. And in Osaka this weekend, she told world leaders that women should be at the heart of any economic agenda.

Still, the video posted by the French led to rampant discussion online about which doors had been opened for Ms. Trump because of her proximity to her father, and whether she should be engaging with heads of state at a diplomatic event. Among those criticizing her access was Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Democrat of New York.

Ms. Trump with her husband, Jared Kushner, at the G20 summit last week.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

“It may be shocking to some, but being someone’s daughter actually isn’t a career qualification,” Ms. Ocasio-Cortez wrote on Twitter. “It hurts our diplomatic standing when the President phones it in & the world moves on.”

On Sunday, a White House official, who spoke on condition of anonymity to describe internal conversations, pushed back at the characterization that Ms. Trump had interjected or annoyed others in the conversation — particularly Ms. Lagarde, who the official said had, like the others, been attending a women’s empowerment event where Ms. Trump had been invited to speak when the interaction was filmed.

That official said Mr. Trump had requested that his daughter accompany him to several G20 events, and even delayed the start of one so he would not miss her giving an introductory speech. The president keeps the counsel of Ms. Trump and Mr. Kushner closer than anyone, the official said.

A White House spokeswoman, Jessica Ditto, called the video clip a “misrepresentation” and the criticism around it “absolutely pathetic” in an email.

Gone are the days when Ms. Trump and Mr. Kushner kept relatively low profiles inside the West Wing, grappling with waves of bad press as they sought to establish their profiles behind the scenes. And gone are the days when senior aides, such as John F. Kelly, the former chief of staff, tried to curb their influence.

Ms. Trump’s participation in the G20 trip illustrated just how unchecked her ascent in the White House has been in recent months, and how few people who might have raised doubts remain.

If the president has any concern about his daughter playing diplomat, it didn’t show on this trip: During a meeting for troops at a military base outside of Seoul, South Korea, the president introduced his daughter alongside Mike Pompeo, his secretary of state.

“She’s going to steal the show,” Mr. Trump said. “She’ll steal it.”

Glancing at his secretary of state and his daughter, Mr. Trump also offered his thoughts about her appearance: “Beauty and the beast, Mike,” he added.

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A Plan to Mine the Minnesota Wilderness Hit a Dead End. Then Trump Became President.

ELY, Minn. — In the waning months of the Obama administration, a Chilean conglomerate was losing a fight with the United States government over a copper mine that it wanted to build near a pristine wilderness area in Minnesota.

The election of President Trump, with his business-friendly bent, turned out to be a game-changer for the project.

Beginning in the early weeks of Mr. Trump’s presidency, the administration worked at a high level to remove roadblocks to the proposed mine, government emails and calendars show, overruling concerns that it could harm the Boundary Waters, a vast landscape of federally protected lakes and forests along the border with Canada.

Executives with the mining company, Antofagasta, discussed the project with senior administration officials, including the White House’s top energy adviser, the emails show. Even before an interior secretary was appointed to the new administration, the department moved to re-examine leases critical to the mine, eventually restoring those that the Obama administration had declined to renew. And the Forest Service called off an environmental review that could have restricted mining, even though the agriculture secretary had told Congress that the review would proceed.

An Interior Department spokesman said it simply worked to rectify “a flawed decision rushed out the door” before Mr. Trump took office. Several senior department officials with previous administrations, however, said they were surprised by the swift change of course for the little-known Minnesota project, which was not a focal point of Mr. Trump’s presidential campaign.

For the family of the billionaire Andrónico Luksic, which controls the Chilean conglomerate, the policy reversals could provide a big boost to its mining business. Since the change in administration, the Antofagasta subsidiary Twin Metals Minnesota has significantly ramped up its lobbying in Washington, according to federal disclosures, spending $900,000.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 00CLI-HOUSE-luksic-articleLarge A Plan to Mine the Minnesota Wilderness Hit a Dead End. Then Trump Became President. Zinke, Ryan (1961- ) Wilderness Areas Wetlands washington dc United States Politics and Government Trump, Ivanka Trump, Donald J Tidwell, Thomas L Renting and Leasing (Real Estate) Minnesota Mines and Mining Lobbying and Lobbyists Kushner, Jared Kushner, Charles Interior Department Greenhouse Gas Emissions Global Warming Forests and Forestry Forest Service environment Chile Carbon Dioxide Banco de Chile Bachelet, Michelle Appointments and Executive Changes

Andrónico Luksic’s plan for a copper mine in Minnesota was blocked by President Barack Obama. His fortunes have since shifted.CreditMartin Bernetti/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Ivanka Trump, left, and Jared Kushner, second from left, two of the president’s closest advisers.CreditAlex Wong/Getty Images

But the mining project’s breakthrough, already unpopular with environmentalists, has drawn additional scrutiny and criticism because of an unusual connection between Mr. Luksic and two of Mr. Trump’s family members.

Just before Mr. Trump took office, Mr. Luksic added a personal investment to his portfolio: a $5.5 million house in Washington. Mr. Luksic bought the house with the intention of renting it to a wealthy new arrival to Mr. Trump’s Washington, according to Rodrigo Terré, chairman of Mr. Luksic’s family investment office, which handled the purchase.

The idea worked. Even before the purchase was final, real estate agents had lined up renters: Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump.

The rental arrangement has been a point of concern for ethics experts and groups opposed to mining near the Boundary Waters, and has focused national attention, particularly among some Democrats in Congress, on an otherwise local debate.

The Wall Street Journal first reported about the house in March 2017. At that time, Twin Metals was suing the federal government over the mining leases, but the Trump administration’s direction on the mine since then had only begun to take shape.

In recent months, the scrutiny has grown. In March, Representative Raúl M. Grijalva, the Arizona Democrat who is chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, wrote a letter with other lawmakers to the interior and agriculture secretaries raising significant concerns about the proposed mine.

The letter said the two departments’ actions “blatantly ignored scientific and economic evidence.” It also mentioned the “interesting coincidence” surrounding the rental of the Luksic house to Mr. Trump’s relatives. Separately, a group in Minnesota opposed to the mining, Save the Boundary Waters, has called the rental arrangement “deeply troubling” and has seized on it to cast doubt on the administration’s actions.

The White House and representatives for the couple declined to answer questions about whether the rental deal had been reviewed by ethics officials. “Both Mr. Kushner and Ms. Trump follow the ethics advice they received when they entered government service,” said Peter Mirijanian, a spokesman for Mr. Kushner’s lawyer, Abbe Lowell.

Mr. Terré called the lease a simple real estate transaction that happened to involve the incoming president’s family. “I do not believe there was anything unethical or inappropriate about this business transaction,” he said.

Both Mr. Mirijanian and Mr. Terré said the rental was not related to the Minnesota mine. “There is no correlation in any way,” Mr. Mirijanian said. They were “two entirely unrelated matters” and tying them together was “based on unfounded rumors and speculation,” Mr. Terré said.

An Interior Department spokeswoman said that neither Mr. Kushner nor Ms. Trump been involved in discussions about the mine.

Nonetheless, several ethics experts said they would have cautioned Mr. Kushner and Ms. Trump against renting the home, given the Luksic family’s business before the administration.

“There may be nothing wrong,” said Arthur Andrew Lopez, a federal government ethics official for two decades who is now a professor at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. “But it doesn’t look good.”

Antofagasta hopes to mine on the edge of the Boundary Waters, which encompasses more than a million acres of lakes and forest.CreditTim Gruber for The New York Times

The Boundary Waters hold a special place in American geography: More than a million acres of lakes and forests provide a rich habitat for thousands of species, including the gray wolf and Canada lynx. But below the surface and beyond lies richness of another sort, an estimated four billion tons of copper and nickel ore — believed to be one of the world’s largest undeveloped mineral deposits.

The mining giant controlled by the Luksic family, Antofagasta, took full control of the project in 2015, and its executives have called it the company’s “most advanced international opportunity.” Antofagasta, which is publicly traded in London, is poised to benefit from the growing use of copper in renewable-energy technologies like wind and solar. It lists Mr. Luksic as a board member, and his younger brother, Jean-Paul Luksic, as chairman.

The company has spent more than $450 million so far on the project, run by the subsidiary, Twin Metals Minnesota. It says the project will generate hundreds of mining jobs.

The promise of employment resonates in Minnesota’s Iron Range, which has lost a quarter of its mining jobs since 2000. “The mining industry brings a tsunami effect for the community with regard to jobs, schools, everything,” said Andrea Zupancich, the mayor of Babbitt, a town of 1,500 near the proposed mine.

Antofagasta’s environmental record, however, has raised concerns. In Chile, the company’s Los Pelambres copper mine has suffered toxic spills, according to environmental groups. The company said the mine had experienced only “minor incidents involving limited spills” which were not toxic, and said it was proud of its environmental record.

In a 2016 analysis, Thomas Tidwell, who was then chief of the United States Forest Service, warned of risks to the Boundary Waters from the proposed Twin Metals mine, including the leaching of harmful metals. Mining, he concluded, risked “serious and irreplaceable harm to this unique, iconic, and irreplaceable wilderness.”

Twin Metals called the analysis “riddled with errors” and said “environmental risks will be properly managed.”

Still, the fears have divided nearby residents. “In the summer, we drink out of this water,” said Susan Schurke, who runs Wintergreen Northern Wear, an outdoor clothing company. “Once that’s tainted, it’s over. How can we risk that?”

When the Obama administration moved to block the project in 2016, Twin Metals sued. The company said in a statement then that the administration’s move threatened jobs and would “hinder access to one of the world’s largest sources of copper, nickel and platinum — resources of strategic importance to the U.S. economy and national defense.”

Just as the mining company’s hopes appeared to be on the ropes, it got a welcome surprise: Mr. Trump’s election, and the promise of a pro-industry agenda.

“In 100 years, this water is going to be far more valuable a resource here than copper,” Sullen Sack, a wilderness educator, said.CreditTim Gruber for The New York Times
A map of the Boundary Waters at Ely Outfitting Company in Ely, Minn.CreditTim Gruber for The New York Times The region has lost a quarter of its mining jobs since 2000.CreditTim Gruber for The New York Times

With a new administration on its way to Washington, Mr. Luksic contacted a real estate broker he knew for help with an investment idea: buying residential properties in Washington, including a luxury home, to rent out.

With the help of the broker, Rodrigo Valderrama, Mr. Luksic’s family investment office, which through corporate entities owns a portfolio of real estate in the United States, bought two condominiums in the capital. One was never rented and the other was later sold at a loss.

As for the luxury home, Mr. Valderrama spent weeks touring homes and alerting brokers that he had an interested client. One house he saw was on Tracy Place, in the Kalorama neighborhood, being handled by the real estate firm Washington Fine Properties.

Ms. Trump and Mr. Kushner were using the same firm for their hunt for a house to rent. With Mr. Kushner’s parents tagging along, they saw the six-bedroom, 7,000-square-foot Kalorama home as well.

In the space of a week, Mr. Luksic’s representatives agreed to buy the house and closed on the all-cash transaction, while their would-be tenants waited for the purchase to be complete.

The two sides, working through brokers, agreed on rent of $15,000 per month. Mr. Terré described it as being in the “high range” for the area, which some real estate agents confirmed. Still, that rent was significantly lower than what the couple had discussed paying for another more expensive house, according to interviews.

The home rented by Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump in the Kalorama neighborhood of Washington.CreditTom Brenner for The New York Times

Mr. Terré said both sides were aware of each others’ identities before the rental deal was finalized. “We disclosed our name and the name of my boss,” he said in a telephone interview. Mr. Mirijanian said the couple had decided to lease the home before knowing the landlord’s identity. He did not directly respond to questions about whether they learned of that identity before signing the lease.

Mr. Luksic has written on Twitter that he does not know Mr. Trump or any member of his family, and only met Mr. Trump briefly at a New England Patriots football game years ago. Mr. Terré said Mr. Luksic “has not had any interactions with the Trump White House.”

Critics of the Luksic family say they were suspicious of the Washington investments because of Mr. Luksic’s past in Chile, where he has faced claims of attempts to win favor with the family of a former Chilean president. The Luksic family, one of the world’s wealthiest, has interests spanning banking, manufacturing, energy, shipping and beer.

Mr. Luksic came under fire for meeting with the son and daughter-in-law of Michelle Bachelet, who was running to be president of Chile at the time, as they sought a $10 million loan for their company from Banco de Chile, which is controlled by the Luksic family conglomerate. After Ms. Bachelet’s 2013 election, the bank approved the loan.

A spokesman for Ms. Bachelet said an investigation into the meeting didn’t lead to any charges. Representatives for Mr. Luksic said that he never discussed the loan with Ms. Bachelet, and that regulators found “there was absolutely nothing irregular about the bank’s approval of the loan.”

The Trump administration’s efforts to smooth the way for Antofagasta’s mining ambitions began less than two weeks after the inauguration, when Interior Department officials began re-examining the leases, the government emails show.

The message from an early meeting, according to an attendee who spoke on condition of anonymity, was that officials should prepare for a change in direction.

Officials also made sure the incoming interior secretary, Ryan Zinke, not yet in the job, was briefed. In an email, one Interior Department official described that effort as a “fire drill.”

The administration’s efforts are documented in part in thousands of pages of government emails and calendars, many obtained through records requests by Louis V. Galdieri, a documentary filmmaker, and the Sierra Club, an environmental organization.

A key meeting occurred in early May, when Antofagasta’s chief executive, along with other executives and lobbyists, discussed the issue with the White House’s top adviser on domestic energy and the environment, Michael Catanzaro. The company said it wanted to reverse the Obama-era decisions, which it said were illegal and inflicted “undue damage.”

Rock core samples taken by Twin Metals as part of preparations for mining.CreditTim Gruber for The New York Times
Near the Wintergreen Dogsled Lodge outside Ely. Dogsledding in the Boundary Waters wilderness is popular in winter.CreditTim Gruber for The New York Times A slab of taconite iron ore, a major local industry in decades past, on display in Babbitt, Minn.CreditTim Gruber for The New York Times

The next month, Interior Department officials learned that the White House had “expressed interest in the Twin Metals matter,” according to an email sent by a department lawyer marked “TIME SENSITIVE.” Soon after, top interior appointees traveled to the Minnesota site.

That December, the department reversed course on denying the company’s leases, and Twin Metals withdrew its lawsuit. The Interior Department formally renewed the leases last month, with some restrictions.

Twin Metals scored another victory in September when the Forest Service cut short its mining-ban review. An agency spokesman said it had determined that neither the study nor a ban was needed.

A Twin Metals spokesman, David Ulrich, said the company’s outreach was part of a long-running effort to share its views with the federal government. Obama administration officials had also visited the mining site, he said.

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“We are confident that this world-class mineral resource can be developed safely and with a minimal impact to the environment,” he said in a statement.

The mine still faces a yearslong permitting and approval process. Engineers have been drilling boreholes and wells to study the region’s geology and water, and the company is preparing an operating plan.

“The last administration created some challenges,” Mr. Ulrich said during a tour of the site on the Boundary Waters’ edge. “But it was never not moving forward.”

On a trip to Minnesota in April, Mr. Trump was jubilant about the restoration of mining.

“Under the previous administration,” he said at a truck factory, “America’s rich natural resources were put under lock and key.” The changes since then, he said, were “really pretty amazing.”

Moonrise over Garden Lake, on the edge of the Boundary Waters in Minnesota.CreditTim Gruber for The New York Times

Reporting was contributed by Lisa Friedman in Washington, Jesse Drucker and Kate Kelly in New York, and Pascale Bonnefoy in Santiago, Chile. Kitty Bennett and Alain Delaquérière contributed research.

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Deutsche Bank Faces Criminal Investigation for Potential Money-Laundering Lapses

Federal authorities are investigating whether Deutsche Bank complied with laws meant to stop money laundering and other crimes, the latest government examination of potential misconduct at one of the world’s largest and most troubled banks, according to seven people familiar with the inquiry.

The investigation includes a review of Deutsche Bank’s handling of so-called suspicious activity reports that its employees prepared about possibly problematic transactions, including some linked to President Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kushner, according to people close to the bank and others familiar with the matter.

The criminal investigation into Deutsche Bank is one element of several separate but overlapping government examinations into how illicit funds flow through the American financial system, said five of the people, who were not authorized to speak publicly about the inquiries. Several other banks are also being investigated.

The F.B.I. recently contacted the lawyer for a Deutsche Bank whistle-blower, Tammy McFadden, who publicly criticized the company’s anti-money-laundering systems, according to the lawyer, Brian McCafferty.

Ms. McFadden, a former compliance specialist at the bank, told The New York Times last month that she had flagged transactions involving Mr. Kushner’s family company in 2016, but that bank managers decided not to file the suspicious activity report she prepared. Some of her colleagues had similar experiences in 2017 involving transactions in the accounts of Mr. Trump’s legal entities, although it was not clear whether the F.B.I. was examining the bank’s handling of those transactions.

The same federal agent who contacted Ms. McFadden’s lawyer also participated in interviews of the son of a deceased Deutsche Bank executive, William S. Broeksmit. Agents told the son, Val Broeksmit, that the Deutsche Bank investigation began with an inquiry into the bank’s work for Russian money launderers and had expanded to cover a broader array of potential misconduct at the bank and at other financial institutions. One element is the banks’ possible roles in a vast money-laundering scandal at the Danish lender Danske Bank, according to people briefed on the investigation.

The broader scope of the investigations and many details of precisely what is under scrutiny are unclear, and it is not known whether the inquiries will result in criminal charges. In addition to the F.B.I., the Justice Department’s Money Laundering and Asset Recovery Section in Washington and the United States attorney’s offices in Manhattan and Brooklyn are conducting the investigations. Representatives for the agencies declined to comment.

Deutsche Bank has said that it is cooperating with government investigations and that it has been taking steps to improve its anti-money-laundering systems.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 00deutsche3-articleLarge Deutsche Bank Faces Criminal Investigation for Potential Money-Laundering Lapses United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Politics and Government Money Laundering McFadden, Tammy Kushner, Jared Federal Bureau of Investigation Deutsche Bank AG Banking and Financial Institutions

Tammy McFadden said Deutsche Bank managers had declined to send the government a suspicious activity report she wrote.CreditWillie Jr. Allen for The New York Times

Even so, the governmental scrutiny — from regulators, members of Congress and now the Justice Department and F.B.I. — has been a drag on the bank’s stock price, which is hovering near historic lows because of investors’ doubts about its future.

The congressional investigations are focused on Deutsche Bank’s close relationship with Mr. Trump and his family. Over the past two decades, it was the only mainstream financial institution consistently willing to do business with Mr. Trump, who had a history of defaulting on loans. The bank lent him a total of more than $2 billion, about $350 million of which was outstanding when he was sworn in as president.

Two House committees have subpoenaed Deutsche Bank for records related to Mr. Trump and his family, including records connected to the bank’s handling of potentially suspicious transactions. The president has sued to block Deutsche Bank and Capital One, where he also holds money, from complying with the subpoenas. A federal judge rejected Mr. Trump’s request for an injunction, and the president has appealed that ruling.

The Justice Department has been investigating Deutsche Bank since 2015, when agents were examining its role in laundering billions of dollars for wealthy Russians through a scheme known as mirror trading. Customers would use the bank to convert Russian rubles into dollars and euros via a complicated series of stock trades in Europe and the United States.

In early 2017, federal and state regulators in the United States and British authorities imposed hundreds of millions of dollars in civil penalties on Deutsche Bank for that misconduct, but prosecutors never brought a criminal case against the bank. That led some senior Deutsche Bank executives to believe they were in the clear, according to people familiar with their thinking.

By last fall, though, federal agents were investigating a wider range of anti-money-laundering lapses and other possible misconduct at the bank.

F.B.I. agents met this year with Val Broeksmit, whose father was a senior Deutsche Bank executive who committed suicide in January 2014. Mr. Broeksmit said he had provided the agents with internal bank documents and other materials that he had retrieved from his father’s personal email accounts.

Until his death, William Broeksmit sat on the oversight board of a large Deutsche Bank subsidiary in the United States, Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, which regulators have criticized for having weak anti-money-laundering systems.

Many of the bank’s anti-money-laundering operations are based in Jacksonville, Fla., where Ms. McFadden was one of hundreds of employees vetting transactions that computer systems flagged as potentially suspicious.

Ms. McFadden worked in Deutsche Bank’s offices in Jacksonville, Fla. Current employees there have discussed the possibility of the building’s being raided by federal agents.CreditWillie Jr. Allen for The New York Times

Ms. McFadden told The Times that she had warned in summer 2016 about transactions by the Kushner Companies involving money being sent to Russian individuals. Other Deutsche Bank employees prepared reports in 2017 flagging transactions involving legal entities associated with Mr. Trump, including his now-defunct charitable foundation, according to current and former bank employees. In both instances, the suspicious activity reports were never filed with the Treasury Department.

Deutsche Bank officials have said that the reports were handled appropriately and that it is not uncommon for managers to overrule employees and opt not to file suspicious activity reports with the government.

There is no indication that Kushner Companies is under investigation. The company said any allegations regarding its relationship with Deutsche Bank that involved money laundering were false. A Trump Organization spokeswoman said that she had no knowledge of any Deutsche Bank transactions being flagged.

The federal Bank Secrecy Act requires financial institutions to alert the government if they suspect that transactions involve criminal proceeds or are being used for illegal purposes. Banks can face civil or criminal penalties for failing to file reports about transactions that are found to be illegal. In recent years, banks like JPMorgan Chase and HSBC have incurred such penalties.

Banks argue that when they err on the side of reporting potential problems, they end up flooding the government with false leads.

Former Deutsche Bank employees, speaking on the condition of anonymity, told The Times that the company had pushed them to rush their reviews of transactions and that managers sometimes created obstacles that discouraged them from filing suspicious activity reports.

Deutsche Bank has scrambled to toughen its anti-money-laundering procedures.

To address complaints about inadequate staffing, it brought in contractors to supplement its Jacksonville work force, although some employees said that the contractors were inexperienced and lacked the appropriate training.

Deutsche Bank also recently sent letters to hundreds of companies, warning that they could be cut off from the bank’s services if they did not swiftly provide up-to-date information about the sources of their money and the names of their business partners, according to bank employees who saw the letters. Deutsche Bank officials said the letters, first reported by the Financial Times, were part of their efforts to comply with “know your customer” rules, a crucial component of any bank’s anti-money-laundering efforts.

In Jacksonville, Deutsche Bank’s anti-financial-crime staff works in a white, three-story building surrounded by palm trees. The F.B.I. has a field office just down the road, clearly visible from the bank’s campus.

Bank employees recently have taken to joking that when the F.B.I. raids their offices, they will be able to see the agents coming.

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For Trump, London Visit Is a (Royal) Family Affair

LONDON — When Queen Elizabeth II welcomed the president on Monday for his first state visit to Britain, Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner watched from a Buckingham Palace balcony. Later, at a state banquet, Eric Trump posed for photographs. During dinner, Donald Trump Jr. tucked into a menu including lamb and halibut as Tiffany Trump chatted with the queen’s private secretary.

“Looking forward to visiting Buckingham Palace for the first time. The U.K. is a very special place (for so many reasons) and it is an honor for our family to be hosted by Her Majesty,” Eric Trump, who runs the Trump Organization with his brother, Donald Jr., wrote on Twitter before the dinner.

They were also present on Tuesday at Mr. Trump’s news conference with the British prime minister, Theresa May. The president has also said that his children would join him on a tour on Tuesday of the Churchill War Rooms, and American officials said they might go to Normandy for the French leg of the trip, too.

Whether they had official roles in the visit or not, the extended Trump family seemed to materialize in London overnight — all save the president’s youngest son, Barron, who stayed home. But Monday’s lavish audience with the British royals was the culmination of more than a month of planning by White House officials who have grown accustomed to accommodating President Trump’s children, whether that includes redrawing plans for a state visit or evicting guests from their seats at the State of the Union address.

As Mr. Trump presides over a White House with unprecedented turnover, he has relied on his children the same way he has for decades — asking them for advice or seeing them as surrogates in the fight against his real and perceived enemies.

On this visit, another family opportunity surfaced: The Kennedys have long occupied the American political culture as the unofficial royal family, but this week, the Trumps appeared to present themselves as the 2019 version.

“He’s surrounding himself with his family in this kind of certainly royal family, prince-and-princesses way,” Gwenda Blair, the author of “The Trumps: Three Generations That Built an Empire,” said in an interview. “Just as traditionally crowned heads surrounded themselves with their progeny, he has surrounded himself with his progeny.”

Privately, White House officials say that some of the Trump children, particularly those working in the White House, see themselves this way. One senior official, who did not want to speak publicly about internal planning, said that Mr. Kushner and Ms. Trump in particular had grown more emboldened with their requests to be accommodated at official events.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_155867460_4c10c839-aabd-42c9-98ac-69d71b1fecad-articleLarge For Trump, London Visit Is a (Royal) Family Affair Trump, Donald J Royal Families May, Theresa M Kushner, Jared Great Britain Elizabeth II, Queen of Great Britain

President Trump and Queen Elizabeth, with the first lady, Melania Trump, left, at Buckingham Palace on Monday.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

About a month before the Europe trip, several members of the Trump family informed the White House that they wanted to participate. (Ms. Trump said on Twitter that she was “joining the U.S. delegation” for the visit.) There were loose discussions of them traveling on Air Force One, but the plane was already packed with government officials and the first lady, Melania Trump. Ivanka Trump left for Britain on Saturday, while Mr. Kushner traveled separately from the Middle East.

The president landed in Britain fresh from a round of interviews in which he expressed opinions about British foreign policy and after firing off a slew of tweets responding to criticism from the mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, by calling him a “stone cold loser.” But if Mr. Trump’s behavior bothered his hosts — including Prince Harry, whose wife, the Duchess of Sussex, was called “nasty” by Mr. Trump just days earlier — it did not seem to show. (The American-born duchess, formerly known as Meghan Markle, was not in attendance.) The reception that the Trump family received was warm, and the royals seemed interested in engaging and charming their guests, British and American officials said.

But unlike the royals, who wage an endless battle to keep Britain’s voracious tabloids at arm’s length, the Trump children shared behind-the-scenes photographs and tweets of their trip.

“It was an incredible honor to meet Her Majesty The Queen, the longest ruling Monarch in British history,” Ms. Trump wrote of the day on Twitter. “Thank you for a warm welcome to the United Kingdom.”

For Mr. Trump’s children, the Buckingham Palace visit was the highest-profile example of a change in presidential plans made to include them, but it was not the only one.

The weekend before President Trump delivered his State of the Union address in February, several of the special guests who had been invited to sit near the first lady were suddenly told that some changes needed to be made.

Instead of sitting with Melania Trump, half a dozen of the 28 guests she had chosen were told that they would have to sit down the hall from the House chamber, in a room featuring a television, chocolates, tissues and White House aides. The newly available seats were then given to two Tennesseans whose sentences had been cut short by Mr. Trump under a criminal justice overhaul effort that his son-in-law pushed for, and to three of the president’s adult children and two of their spouses.

A few days before the event, Mr. Trump was alerted to the lack of seats by one of his children, and Mrs. Trump was told to make room, according to three White House officials.

In the box that day were Ivanka Trump and Mr. Kushner; Tiffany Trump; Eric Trump and his wife, Lara Trump; and Donald Trump Jr. (Donald Jr., a popular Republican surrogate, had offered to get a seat from one of the members of Congress he is close with instead, officials said.) Among those whose seats were gone was Aubrey Reichard-Eline, the mother of Grace Eline, a 10-year-old cancer survivor who was invited because she works to help other children fight the disease. The man accompanying Joshua Trump, a sixth grader who is not a relative but who was invited because he had been bullied at school over his last name, was also moved down the hall.

Prince Harry, right, with Ivanka Trump at Buckingham Palace. The Trump children, White House officials say, see themselves increasingly as America’s equivalent of a royal family.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

“I think they just had a lot of people in general,” Ms. Reichard-Eline said in an interview, stressing that she had no qualms about the seating change and that she and her daughter treasured being there regardless of seating assignments. “They ended up focusing on the true guests.”

A White House official with knowledge of the last-minute planning said at the time that the guests for the box were invited a month before the address, with the goal of focusing on extraordinary Americans. That person added that seats were changed at the last moment to accommodate the children per their request.

Despite the complicated dynamics that may arise, many commanders in chief have relied heavily on family members once in the Oval Office. And the complications of an extended family with adult children in a White House is not without precedent.

Ronald Reagan, who carried the distinction of being the nation’s first divorced president, had an at-times complicated relationship with his four adult children, who cycled through varying degrees of familial tension before, during and after his ascent to the White House. But in his White House, where his children did not formally work, some were excluded from certain gatherings where the seating was limited.

“I know that we often intentionally did not include them in some events, in state dinners and things like that, even when they were in town,” said Gahl Burt, the former social secretary for Nancy Reagan.

In other administrations, adult children chose to take on official roles: Franklin Roosevelt appointed his eldest daughter, Anna, to serve as White House hostess. Her closeness with her father often led to clashes with her mother, the first lady, Eleanor Roosevelt.

“They were a wealthy, famous family like the Trumps,” Katherine Jellison, a historian who studies first families, said of the Roosevelts in an interview. She pointed to a key difference: “None of F.D.R. and Eleanor’s children were ever policy advisers.”

One of the best-known daughters of a president, Patti Davis, said that it was important for children to bear in mind their impact on the White House. Ms. Davis was 28 when her father, Mr. Reagan, was elected. In an interview, Ms. Davis described her time as first daughter as a period of rebellion that she regrets. She kept her distance from the White House, and said that the Trump children must appreciate that lines can easily be blurred.

“Choose one role or the other,” Ms. Davis said. “If you’re going to have your fingers in the campaign and all that, then you don’t get to pull the family card.”

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What to Know About Prince Mohammed bin Zayed, the Arab Ruler Swaying Trump

The United Arab Emirates has fewer citizens than Rhode Island, but its de facto ruler, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed of Abu Dhabi, is widely regarded as one of the most influential Arab leaders in Washington and across the Middle East.

He may be the richest man in the world: He controls sovereign wealth funds worth $1.3 trillion, more than any other country. His military is the most potent of any Arab state. His influence in the United States is legendary — and never more felt than under President Trump.

Prince Mohammed, 58, is obsessed with two enemies, Iran and the Muslim Brotherhood, and Mr. Trump has sought to move strongly against both. In fact, the president has repeatedly adopted positions favored by the prince over the reservations of cabinet members and career national security officials on subjects including Iran, Qatar, Libya, Saudi Arabia and the Muslim Brotherhood.

[Read our full report on Prince Mohammed.]

Now Prince Mohammed has caught the interest of American prosecutors as well. The special counsel investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election unearthed evidence that the prince tried to help the Russians open back channels to Mr. Trump’s inner circle.

The Times examined the prince and his power. Here are five takeaways.

His special forces are active in Yemen, Libya, Somalia and Egypt’s North Sinai. He has established a ring of ports and bases around the Horn of Africa. He has worked to thwart democratic transitions, helped install a reliable autocrat in Egypt and led a drive to isolate Qatar, his regional rival.

He also helped lift a protégé to power in Saudi Arabia: Prince Mohammed bin Salman, now 33, who has captured the attention of the West, especially since American intelligence agencies concluded that he ordered the killing of the dissident Jamal Khashoggi.

But the Saudi prince’s rise to power was aided by assiduous advocacy in Washington from the elder Prince Mohammed. The Emirati prince was also the first to argue to Washington for some of the aggressive moves that they have undertaken together, including their military intervention in Yemen and their attempt to isolate Qatar — a campaign that began with an act of online sabotage orchestrated by the U.A.E., according to American investigators.

The approach to Israeli-Palestinian peace advocated by Mr. Trump’s son-in-law and adviser, Jared Kushner, in some ways resembles a Persian Gulf-centric approach that Prince Mohammed has advocated since the end of the Obama administration.

In 1991, after Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait, Prince Mohammed came to Washington shopping for weapons, and a senior State Department official, Richard A. Clarke, reassured nervous lawmakers that the United Arab Emirates were “a force for peace” and would never be “an aggressor.” (After leaving the government in 2003, Mr. Clarke founded a consultancy that worked extensively for the U.A.E., and he is the chairman of a think tank that has received significant Emirati funding.)

The Emiratis eventually acquired more than 80 F-16 fighters and 30 Apache combat helicopters. Prince Mohammed hired former American officers to help run his military and former American spies to help set up his intelligence services. And with the advice of retired American generals, Prince Mohammed began to build a domestic Emirati defense industry, which already exports Emirati-made armored vehicles to clients in Libya and Egypt.

Unlike any other Arab state, the United Arab Emirates have also now deployed their forces to fight alongside the United States military in six conflicts: in Iraq, Kosovo, Somalia, Afghanistan and Libya, and against the Islamic State. In the process, Prince Mohammed gained the rare capability of carrying out military actions beyond his own borders — something he is now putting to use.

Prince Mohammed worked against the transition to democracy in Egypt, defied a United Nations embargo to arm a would-be Libyan strongman and ignored American entreaties to end his feud with Qatar, the host of a United States air base.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_155680158_e43395bb-9d4e-4db4-8b9b-2b4b5af25db2-articleLarge What to Know About Prince Mohammed bin Zayed, the Arab Ruler Swaying Trump Yemen United States International Relations United States United Arab Emirates Trump, Donald J Saudi Arabia Mohammed bin Zayed Mohammed bin Salman (1985- ) Lobbying and Lobbyists Kushner, Jared

Prince Mohammed on Friday during an Arab summit meeting in Saudi Arabia.CreditBandar Aldandani/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Many of his interventions have produced mixed results. Egypt is struggling. Qatar is unbowed. He set off a scramble among rivals in the Horn of Africa. Yemen is a military quagmire and a humanitarian disaster.

By arming the United Arab Emirates with advanced surveillance technology, commandos and weaponry, argued Tamara Cofman Wittes, a former State Department official and fellow at the Brookings Institution, “We have created a little Frankenstein.”

Prince Mohammed devotes tens of millions of dollars a year to hiring former American officials, paying lobbyists, donating to charities that Washington cares about and contributing to the city’s research institutes.

Before Mr. Trump took office, the prince secured a secret meeting with the president-elect’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner. He also tried to broker talks between the Trump administration and Russia, turning to a financier and friend of Mr. Kushner’s, Richard Gerson, to help.

One of the prince’s younger brothers introduced Mr. Gerson to a Russian businessman who acts as a liaison between President Vladimir V. Putin and the Persian Gulf monarchs, according to the special counsel’s report. The businessman, Kirill Dmitriev, conferred with Mr. Gerson about a “reconciliation plan” for the United States and Russia, and Mr. Gerson gave Mr. Kushner a summary.

Prince Mohammed later invited Mr. Dmitriev to the Seychelles to meet with Erik Prince, the founder of a private security company and someone the Emiratis thought represented the Trump team.

Prosecutors are continuing to examine the activities of at least five emissaries or operatives working for the prince who tried to insinuate themselves near Mr. Trump. Another investigation is examining the possibility that the United Arab Emirates used cyberespionage techniques from former American operatives to spy on American citizens.

Although he regularly visited the United States for decades, Prince Mohammed has now stayed away for two years, in part because he fears prosecutors might seek to question him or his aides, according to two people familiar with his thinking. (His brother, the foreign minister, has visited.)

American officials invariably describe the prince as concise, inquisitive, even humble. He pours his own coffee. To illustrate his love for America, he tells visitors he has taken his grandchildren to Disney World incognito.

He also tells American visitors that his dread of the Muslim Brotherhood comes from firsthand experience, when a teacher attempted to indoctrinate him. He argues that the Arab world is not ready for democracy because it would elect Islamists.

With American officials, Prince Mohammed emphasizes the United Arab Emirates’ relative liberalism on social issues: About a third of its cabinet ministers are women and, unlike in neighboring Arab countries, Christians, Hindus and Sikhs are allowed to build houses of worship. Although critics note that the Emirati authorities have zero tolerance for political dissent, the prince has created a “Ministry of Tolerance” and declared 2019 the official “Year of Tolerance.”

James Mattis, the former secretary of defense, recently delivered a lecture in Abu Dhabi sponsored by Prince Mohammed. When he joined the Trump administration, Mr. Mattis disclosed that he had received $242,000 in annual fees as well as valuable stock options as a board member at the defense contractor General Dynamics, which does extensive business with Abu Dhabi. He had also worked as an unpaid adviser to Prince Mohammed.

“It’s the Year of Tolerance. How many countries in the world right now are having a year of tolerance?” Mr. Mattis asked. “I don’t know of any,” he said. “You are an example.”

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The Most Powerful Arab Ruler Isn’t M.B.S. It’s M.B.Z.

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates — Prince Mohammed bin Zayed, the 29-year-old commander of the almost negligible air force of the United Arab Emirates, had come to Washington shopping for weapons.

In 1991, in the months after Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait, the young prince wanted to buy so much military hardware to protect his own oil-rich monarchy — from Hellfire missiles to Apache helicopters to F-16 jets — that Congress worried he might destabilize the region.

But the Pentagon, trying to cultivate accommodating allies in the Gulf, had identified Prince Mohammed as a promising partner. The favorite son of the semi-literate Bedouin who founded the United Arab Emirates, Prince Mohammed was a serious-minded, British-trained helicopter pilot who had persuaded his father to transfer $4 billion into the United States treasury to help pay for the 1991 war in Iraq.

Richard A. Clarke, then an assistant secretary of state, reassured lawmakers that the young prince would never become “an aggressor.”

“The U.A.E. is not now and never will be a threat to stability or peace in the region,” Mr. Clarke said in congressional testimony. “That is very hard to imagine. Indeed, the U.A.E. is a force for peace.”

Thirty years later, Prince Mohammed, now 58, crown prince of Abu Dhabi and de facto ruler of the United Arab Emirates, is arguably the most powerful leader in the Arab world. He is also among the most influential foreign voices in Washington, urging the United States to adopt his increasingly bellicose approach to the region.

[Here are five takeaways from our report on Prince Mohammed.]

Prince Mohammed is almost unknown to the American public and his tiny country has fewer citizens than Rhode Island. But he may be the richest man in the world. He controls sovereign wealth funds worth $1.3 trillion, more than any other country.

His influence operation in Washington is legendary (Mr. Clarke got rich on his payroll). His military is the Arab world’s most potent, equipped through its work with the United States to conduct high-tech surveillance and combat operations far beyond its borders.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_155639433_75312a24-fb71-4dc1-941a-39b313e6ea13-articleLarge The Most Powerful Arab Ruler Isn’t M.B.S. It’s M.B.Z. Yemen United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces United Nations Trump, Donald J Saudi Arabia Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Russia Royal Families Rhodes, Benjamin J qatar Putin, Vladimir V Prince, Erik D Pompeo, Mike Obama, Barack Muslim Brotherhood (Egypt) Mohammed bin Salman (1985- ) Middle East Institute Middle East and North Africa Unrest (2010- ) Mattis, James N Libya Lee, Kai-Fu Kushner, Jared Khashoggi, Jamal Hifter, Khalifa Gulf of Aden General Dynamics Corp Falcon Edge Capital Egypt Dubai (United Arab Emirates) Dmitriev, Kirill A (1975- ) Clarke, Richard A Cairo (Egypt) Bush, George W Bolton, John R Blair, Tony Allen, John R Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

Desert Falcons from the United Arab Emirates Air Force flying in formation with United States F-35A Lightning IIs last month.CreditU.S. Air Force, via Associated Press

For decades, the prince has been a key American ally, following Washington’s lead, but now he is going his own way. His special forces are active in Yemen, Libya, Somalia and Egypt’s North Sinai. He has worked to thwart democratic transitions in the Middle East, helped install a reliable autocrat in Egypt and boosted a protégé to power in Saudi Arabia.

At times, the prince has contradicted American policy and destabilized neighbors. Rights groups have criticized him for jailing dissidents at home, for his role in creating a humanitarian crisis in Yemen, and for backing the Saudi prince whose agents killed the dissident writer Jamal Khashoggi.

Yet under the Trump administration, his influence in Washington appears greater than ever. He has a rapport with Mr. Trump, who has frequently adopted the prince’s views on Qatar, Libya and Saudi Arabia, even over the advice of cabinet officials or senior national security staff.

Western diplomats who know the prince — known as M.B.Z. — say he is obsessed with two enemies, Iran and the Muslim Brotherhood. Mr. Trump has sought to move strongly against both and last week took steps to bypass congressional opposition to keep selling weapons to both Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

“M.B.Z. has an extraordinary way of telling Americans his own interests but making it come across as good advice about the region,” said Ben Rhodes, a deputy national security adviser under President Barack Obama, whose sympathy for the Arab Spring and negotiations with Iran brought blistering criticism from the Emirati prince. When it comes to influence in Washington, Mr. Rhodes added, “M.B.Z. is in a class by himself.”

Prince Mohammed worked assiduously before the presidential election to crack Mr. Trump’s inner circle, and secured a secret meeting during the transition period with the president’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner. The prince also tried to broker talks between the Trump administration and Russia, a gambit that later entangled him in the special counsel’s investigation into foreign election interference.

President Trump welcoming Prince Mohammed at the White House in 2017.CreditAl Drago/The New York Times

Today, at least five people working for Prince Mohammed have been caught up in criminal investigations growing out of that inquiry. A regular visitor to the United States for three decades, Prince Mohammed has now stayed away for two years, in part because he fears prosecutors might seek to question him or his aides, according to two people familiar with his thinking. (His brother, the foreign minister, has visited.)

The United Arab Emirates’ Embassy in Washington declined to comment. The prince’s many American defenders say it is only prudent of him to try to shape United States policy, as many governments do, and that he sees his interventions as an attempt to compensate for an American pullback.

But Prince Mohammed’s critics say that his rise is a study in unintended consequences. The obscure young prince whom Washington adopted as a pliant ally is now fanning his volatile region’s flames.

By arming the United Arab Emirates with such advanced surveillance technology, commandos and weaponry, argued Tamara Cofman Wittes, a former State Department official and fellow at the Brookings Institution. “We have created a little Frankenstein.”

Prince Mohammed has overseen a construction boom in the Emirati capital, Abu Dhabi.CreditHamad I Mohammed/Reuters

Most Arab royals are paunchy, long-winded and prone to keep visitors waiting. Not Prince Mohammed.

He graduated at the age of 18 from the British officers’ training program at Sandhurst. He stays slim and fit, trades tips with visitors about workout machines, and never arrives late for a meeting.

American officials invariably describe him as concise, inquisitive, even humble. He pours his own coffee, and to illustrate his love for America, sometimes tells visitors that he has taken his grandchildren to Disney World incognito.

He makes time for low-ranking American officials and greets senior dignitaries at the airport. With a shy, lopsided smile, he will offer a tour of his country, then climb into a helicopter to fly his guest over the skyscrapers and lagoons of Dubai and Abu Dhabi.

“There was always a ‘wow’ factor with M.B.Z.,” recalled Marcelle Wahba, a former American ambassador to the United Arab Emirates.

In the capital, Abu Dhabi, he has overseen a construction craze that has hidden the former coastline behind man-made islands. One is intended to become a financial district akin to Wall Street. Another includes a campus of New York University, a franchise of the Louvre and a planned extension of the Guggenheim.

When he meets Americans, Prince Mohammed emphasizes the things that make the United Arab Emirates more liberal than their neighbors. Women have more opportunities: A third of the cabinet ministers are female.

Unlike Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates allow Christian churches and Hindu or Sikh temples, partly to accommodate a vast foreign work force. (The country is estimated to have nine million residents, but fewer than a million citizens; the rest are foreign workers.)

To underscore the point, the prince last year created a Ministry of Tolerance and declared this the “Year of Tolerance.” He has hosted the Special Olympics and Pope Francis.

Pope Francis celebrated Mass at the Zayed Sports City Stadium in Abu Dhabi in February.CreditAli Haider/EPA, via Shutterstock

“I think he has done admirable work not just in diversifying the economy but in diversifying the system of thought of the population as well,” said Gen. John R. Allen, former commander of United States and N.A.T.O. forces in Afghanistan, now president of the Brookings Institution. (In between, General Allen was an adviser to the United Arab Emirates’ Ministry of Defense.)

The United Arab Emirates are a tiny federation of city-states, yet Abu Dhabi alone accounts for 6 percent of the world’s proven oil reserves, making it a tempting target to a larger neighbor like Iran. In 1971, when the U.A.E. gained independence from Britain, the shah of Iran seized three disputed Persian Gulf islands.

The Muslim Brotherhood, a 90-year-old Islamist movement founded in Egypt, has become mainstream in many Arab countries. On that subject, Prince Mohammed says his dread is more personal.

His father assigned a prominent Brotherhood member, Ezzedine Ibrahim, as Prince Mohammed’s tutor, and he attempted an indoctrination that backfired, the prince often says.

“I am an Arab, I am a Muslim and I pray. And in the 1970s and early 1980s I was one of them,” Prince Mohammed told visiting American diplomats in 2007, as they reported in a classified cable released by WikiLeaks. “I believe these guys have an agenda.”

He worries about the appeal of Islamist politics to his population. As many as 80 percent of the soldiers in his forces would answer the call of “some holy man in Mecca,” he once told American diplomats, according to a cable released by WikiLeaks.

For that reason, diplomats say, Prince Mohammed has long argued that the Arab world is not ready for democracy. Islamists would win any elections.

“In any Muslim country, you will see the same result,” he said in a 2007 meeting with American officials. “The Middle East is not California.”

The United Arab Emirates began allowing American forces to operate from bases inside the country during the Persian Gulf war of 1991. Since then, the prince’s commandos and air forces have been deployed with the Americans in Kosovo, Somalia, Afghanistan and Libya, as well as against the Islamic State.

A demonstration by members of the U.A.E. during the opening of the International Defence Exhibition & Conference in Abu Dhabi in February.CreditChristopher Pike/Reuters

He has recruited American commanders to run his military and former spies to set up his intelligence services. He also acquired more weaponry in the four years before 2010 than the other five Gulf monarchies combined, including 80 F-16 fighters, 30 Apache combat helicopters, and 62 French Mirage jets.

Some American officers describe the United Arab Emirates as “Little Sparta.”

With advice from former top military commanders including former Secretary of Defense James Mattis and General Allen, Prince Mohammed has even developed an Emirati defense industry, producing an amphibious armored vehicle known as The Beast and others that he is already supplying to clients in Libya and Egypt.

The United Arab Emirates are also preparing a low-altitude propeller-driven bomber for counterinsurgency combat — an idea Mr. Mattis had long recommended for the United States, a former officer close to him said.

Prince Mohammed has often told American officials that he saw Israel as an ally against Iran and the Muslim Brotherhood. Israel trusted him enough to sell him upgrades for his F-16s, as well as advanced mobile phone spyware.

To many in Washington, Prince Mohammed had become America’s best friend in the region, a dutiful partner who could be counted on for tasks from countering Iranian influence in Lebanon to funding construction in Iraq.

“It was well known that if you needed something done in the Middle East,” recalled Richard G. Olson, a former United States ambassador to Abu Dhabi, “the Emiratis would do it.”

President Barack Obama welcoming Prince Mohammed at the White House in 2015.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Prince Mohammed seemed to find a kindred spirit when President Barack Obama took office in 2009, White House aides said. Both were detached, analytic and intrigued by big questions. For a time, Mr. Obama sought out phone conversations with Prince Mohammed more than with any other foreign leader, several senior White House officials recalled.

But the Arab Spring came between them. Uprisings swept the region. The Muslim Brotherhood was winning elections. And Mr. Obama appeared to endorse the demands for democracy — though in Syria, where the uprising threatened a foe of the Emiratis, he balked at military action.

Westlake Legal Group 0601-for-webMBZ2map-300 The Most Powerful Arab Ruler Isn’t M.B.S. It’s M.B.Z. Yemen United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces United Nations Trump, Donald J Saudi Arabia Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Russia Royal Families Rhodes, Benjamin J qatar Putin, Vladimir V Prince, Erik D Pompeo, Mike Obama, Barack Muslim Brotherhood (Egypt) Mohammed bin Salman (1985- ) Middle East Institute Middle East and North Africa Unrest (2010- ) Mattis, James N Libya Lee, Kai-Fu Kushner, Jared Khashoggi, Jamal Hifter, Khalifa Gulf of Aden General Dynamics Corp Falcon Edge Capital Egypt Dubai (United Arab Emirates) Dmitriev, Kirill A (1975- ) Clarke, Richard A Cairo (Egypt) Bush, George W Bolton, John R Blair, Tony Allen, John R Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

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Then it emerged that the Obama administration was in secret nuclear talks with Iran.

“They felt not only ignored — they felt betrayed by the Obama administration, and I think Prince Mohammed felt it particularly and personally,” said Stephen Hadley, a national security adviser under President George W. Bush who has stayed close to the prince.

After the uprisings, Prince Mohammed saw the United Arab Emirates as the only one of the 22 Arab states still on its feet, with a stable government, functional economy, able military and “moderate ideology,” said Abdulkhalleq Abdulla, an Emirati political scientist with access to the country’s senior officials.

“The U.A.E. is part of this very dangerous region that is getting more dangerous by the day — full of chaos and wars and extremists,” he said. “So the motivation is this: If we don’t go after the bad guys, they will come after us.”

Tahrir Square in Cairo in 2012. Mr. Obama’s sympathy for the Arab Spring drew blistering criticism from the Emirati prince.CreditMoises Saman for The New York Times

At home, Prince Mohammed hired a company linked to Erik Prince, the founder of the private security company formerly known as Blackwater, to create a force of Colombian, South African and other mercenaries. He crushed any hint of dissent, arresting five activists for organizing a petition for democratic reforms (signed by only 132 people) and rounding up dozens suspected of sympathizing with the Muslim Brotherhood.

The United Arab Emirates revved up its influence machine in Washington, too. They were among the biggest spenders among foreign governments on Washington advocates and consultants, paying as much $21 million in 2017, according to a tally by the Center for Responsive Politics. They earned good will with million-dollar donations after natural disasters, and they sought to frame public debate by giving millions more to major think tanks.

The Middle East Institute recently received $20 million. Its chairman is Mr. Clarke, the former official who pushed through the U.A.E. defense contracts. After leaving government in 2003, he had also founded a consultancy with the United Arab Emirates as a primary client. He did not respond to requests for comment.

Emirati Ambassador Yousef Otaiba hammered his many contacts in the White House and on Capitol Hill, arguing that Mr. Obama was ceding the region to extremists and Iran. The prince himself made the case at the highest levels. He “gave me an earful,” former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates recalled in a memoir.

In the Middle East, Prince Mohammed did more than talk. In Egypt, he backed a military takeover in 2013 that removed an elected president who was a Muslim Brotherhood leader. In the Horn of Africa, he dispatched a force to Somalia first to combat piracy and then to fight extremists. He went on to establish commercial ports or naval bases around the Gulf of Aden.

In Libya, Prince Mohammed defied American pleas and a United Nations embargo by arming the forces of the militia leader and would-be strongman Khalifa Hifter. Emirati pilots carried out airstrikes in Tripoli and eventually established an air base in eastern Libya.

In the past, the prince looked for a “green light” from Washington, said Ms. Wahba, the former American ambassador. Now he may send a heads-up, she said, but “he is not asking permission anymore.”

Saudi Arabia, the giant next door, had quarreled with the United Arab Emirates over borders and, as the regional heavyweight, also constrained U.A.E. foreign policy. By the end of 2014, the position of crown prince — next in line for the throne — had passed to a known foe of the Emirati prince.

The Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, right, with Prince Mohammed in Abu Dhabi last year.CreditBandar Al-Jaloud/Saudi Royal Palace, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

So he plunged into the internal Saudi succession battle and waged an all-out lobbying campaign in Washington on behalf of a little-known alternative: the 29-year-old Prince Mohammed bin Salman, a favorite son of the aged Saudi king.

“M.B.Z.’s message was, if you trust me and you like me, you will like this guy because he is cut from the same cloth,” recalled Mr. Rhodes, the Obama adviser.

By March 2015, the two princes had invaded Yemen together to roll back a takeover by a faction aligned with Iran. Then in 2017, as the Saudi prince consolidated his power, they cut off all trade and diplomatic ties with Qatar to pressure it into abandoning support for the Muslim Brotherhood.

Both the Yemen and Qatar conflicts are routinely described as Saudi-led, but the Emirati prince first sought to sell them to Washington, Mr. Rhodes and other former officials recalled.

By late 2015, American diplomats say, Prince Mohammed was also suggesting that the United Arab Emirates and a new Saudi leadership could be crucial in bringing the Palestinians around to some new peace agreement — the so-called “outside-in” approach to a deal.

But for that, Prince Mohammed awaited a new administration.

The Russian businessman Kirill Dmitriev acts as a liaison between President Vladimir V. Putin and the Persian Gulf monarchs, according to the special counsel’s report.CreditFayez Nureldine/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

It was meant to be a personal farewell.

Despite their sharp differences, Prince Mohammed had remained cordial with Mr. Obama, and the president thought they shared a mutual respect, according to four senior White House officials. So when the prince requested a final meeting, as friends, Mr. Obama agreed to a lunch at the White House in December 2016.

But Prince Mohammed backed out without much explanation. He flew instead to New York for his first face-to-face meeting with Jared Kushner and other advisers to the president-elect, Donald J. Trump.

To arrange the meetings, Prince Mohammed had turned to a financier, Richard Gerson, founder of Falcon Edge Capital. He had worked with the prince for years, and he was also a friend of Mr. Kushner.

“I am always here as your trusted family back channel any time you want to discreetly pass something,” Mr. Gerson wrote to the prince after the election in a private text message, one of several provided to The Times by a third party and corroborated independently. He signed off another message as “your loyal soldier.”

The trip was supposed to be secret, but intelligence agencies detected the prince’s arrival. Mr. Obama’s advisers were stunned. But Prince Mohammed was already working to reverse the administration’s policies, talking to Mr. Trump’s advisers about the dangers of Iran and about Palestinian peace talks, according to two people familiar with the meetings.

“They were deeply impressed with you and already are convinced that you are their true friend and closest ally,” Mr. Gerson wrote to the prince after the meetings.

Prince Mohammed was positioning himself as an intermediary to Russia, too.

One of Prince Mohammed’s younger brothers had introduced Mr. Gerson to a Russian businessman who acts as a liaison between President Vladimir V. Putin and the Persian Gulf monarchs, according to the special counsel’s report. The Russian businessman, Kirill Dmitriev, conferred with Mr. Gerson about a “reconciliation plan” for the United States and Russia, and shortly before the inauguration Mr. Gerson gave a two-page summary of the plan to Mr. Kushner.

Mr. Gerson declined to comment for this article.

The next month, in January, Prince Mohammed invited Mr. Dmitriev to an Emirati retreat in the Seychelles to meet with someone else they thought represented the Trump team: Mr. Prince, the Blackwater founder who had recruited mercenaries for the United Arab Emirates.

Prince Mohammed hired an American security company linked to Erik Prince to create a security force of mercenaries.CreditZach Gibson for The New York Times

Why Prince Mohammed would seek to connect Russia with Mr. Trump’s circle remains a matter of debate, but he has worked for years to try to entice Mr. Putin away from Iran, according to American diplomats and leaked emails from the Emirati ambassador in Washington.

But prosecutors are also investigating the activities of other operatives and go-betweens working for the prince who tried to insinuate themselves around Mr. Trump.

Investigators are still examining the campaign contacts of an Israeli specialist in social media manipulation who has worked for Prince Mohammed and of a Lebanese-American businessman who acted as his emissary. Other prosecutors are investigating whether another top Republican donor whose security company worked for the prince should legally have registered as his agent.

The special counsel’s office has also questioned Rashid al-Malik, an Emirati real-estate developer based in Los Angeles who is close to Prince Mohammed and to his brother — the head of Emirati intelligence. Mr. al-Malik is also close to Mr. Trump’s friend Tom Barrack, and investigators are asking whether Mr. al-Malik was part of an illegal influence scheme, according to two people familiar with the matter.

Another investigation, prompted by a whistle-blower, is examining the possibility that the United Arab Emirates used cyberespionage techniques from former American operatives to spy on American citizens.

Yet the prince’s courtship of the Trump administration has not been damaged. In the two and a half years since his first meeting with Mr. Kushner, Prince Mohammed has received almost everything he sought from the White House.

President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi of Egypt and Prince Mohammed in Cairo last year.CreditEgyptian Presidency, via Reuters

Each winter, Prince Mohammed invites financiers and former officials to Abu Dhabi for a salon that demonstrates his global influence.

The guest list last December included former British Prime Minister Tony Blair; former French President Nicolas Sarkozy; former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice; Mr. Hadley, the Bush-era national security adviser; the American investors Mohamed A. El-Erian, David M. Rubenstein and Thomas S. Kaplan; and the Chinese computer scientist and investor Kai-Fu Lee.

Undeterred, the prince also included Mr. Dmitriev, the Russian businessman linked to Mr. Putin.

Prince Mohammed’s post-Arab Spring interventions have hardly stabilized the region. An aide he sent to Cairo to help turn around the moribund economy has returned in frustration.

Egypt’s military-backed government still depends on billions of dollars a year in assistance from the United Arab Emirates and its Gulf allies, and despite Emirati help and Israeli airstrikes, Cairo has not yet quelled a militant backlash centered in the North Sinai.

The isolation of Qatar has failed to change its policies. In Libya, Khalifa Hifter is mired in a bloody stalemate.

Prince Mohammed’s push in the Horn of Africa has set off a competition for access and influence among rivals like Turkey and Qatar. In Somalia, after allegations of bribery by the fragile central government, Emirati forces have shifted to the semiautonomous regions of Puntland and Somaliland.

Djibouti, alleging neglect, last year replaced its Emirati port managers with a Chinese rival.

“He thinks he is Machiavelli but he acts more like Mussolini,” said Bruce Riedel, a scholar at the Brookings Institution and a former official in the Central Intelligence Agency.

In Saudi Arabia, the Emirati prince has been embarrassed by the conclusion of American intelligence agencies that his Saudi protégé had ordered the brutal murder of Mr. Khashoggi, a Virginia-based Saudi dissident and Washington Post columnist. Their joint, four-year-old intervention in Yemen is turning into a quagmire, with horrific civilian casualties.

A tribute to the Saudi dissident Jamal Khashoggi in Istanbul last year.CreditEmrah Gurel/Associated Press

“The U.A.E. is a stain on the world conscience — the U.A.E. as it is currently governed is violating every norm of the civilized world,” said Representative Ro Khanna, Democrat of California.

Yet the prince’s standing remains strong inside the Trump administration. The “outside-in” proposals for Israeli-Palestinian peace passed over by the Obama administration are at the core of Mr. Kushner’s emerging plans.

Mr. Trump has repeatedly backed the positions of the Emirati prince: by endorsing his Saudi protégé after the Khashoggi killing, by applauding the isolation of Qatar even as the secretary of state and secretary of defense publicly opposed it, by canceling the nuclear deal with Iran, by seeking to designate the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist group, and by vetoing legislation to cut off American military support for Saudi and Emirati forces in Yemen.

Last month, Mr. Trump publicly endorsed the Emiratis’ favored militia leader in Libya one day after a phone call with Prince Mohammed — even through Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had previously urged the same leader to retreat.

Mr. Mattis, the former secretary of defense, last month delivered a lecture in Abu Dhabi sponsored by Prince Mohammed. When he joined the Trump administration, Mr. Mattis disclosed that he had received $242,000 in annual fees as well as valuable stock options as a board member at the defense contractor General Dynamics, which does extensive business with Abu Dhabi. He had also worked as an unpaid adviser to Prince Mohammed.

“It’s the Year of Tolerance. How many countries in the world right now are having a year of tolerance?” Mr. Mattis asked. “I don’t know of any,” he said. “You are an example.”

Jim Mattis, the former United States secretary of defense, in Abu Dhabi in May.CreditEissa Al Hammadi/Saudi Press Agency, via Associated Press

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Immigration Plan Emphasizes Immigrants’ Skills Over Family Ties

Westlake Legal Group merlin_154830909_a2ae6585-40ea-4aa6-91b7-d30898485f7f-facebookJumbo Trump Immigration Plan Emphasizes Immigrants’ Skills Over Family Ties United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Kushner, Jared Immigration and Emigration

WASHINGTON — President Trump will unveil on Thursday a plan to overhaul parts of the nation’s immigration system that would impose new security measures at the border and significantly increase the educational and skills requirements for people who are allowed to migrate to the United States, senior White House officials said Wednesday.

The proposal would vastly scale back the system of family-based immigration that has for decades allowed immigrants to bring their spouses and children to live with them, the officials said. In its place, it would provide new opportunities for immigrants who have specific skills or job offers to work in the United States, provided that they can demonstrate English proficiency, educational attainment and pass a civics exam. But the plan is expected to be deeply unpopular with lawmakers on both sides of the aisle.

Currently, about 12 percent of immigrants qualify based on their skills, while more than half are given permission to enter the United States because of a family connection. Under Mr. Trump’s proposal, those numbers would be reversed, with nearly 60 percent of all visas going to immigrants with particular skills or offers of employment.

The president will reveal some details about the proposal, which was developed by Jared Kushner, his son-in-law, during a Rose Garden ceremony on Thursday afternoon. But officials conceded that the plan is a long way from becoming a legislative reality, with one saying on Wednesday that it represents a “first step toward having that discussion.”

In fact, the broad outlines of the plan are certain to be unpopular with lawmakers in Congress. The plan calls for construction of some of the president’s border wall and upends family-based migration in ways that Democrats and immigration advocates have long opposed. And it contains no provision for providing legal status to people brought to the United States as children, known as Dreamers, or other undocumented immigrants.

At the same time, the plan would not reduce the overall level of immigration into the United States, a longstanding goal of conservative, anti-immigration groups who had hoped that Mr. Trump’s election would finally provide the political backing for keeping immigrants out.

The president’s proposal also comes after a two-year assault on immigration in which the president’s actions have prompted intense controversy around the globe. His attempts to build a wall, ban travel from predominantly Muslim countries, separate families at the border and close the border to asylum seekers have created intense animosity on Capitol Hill and complicated efforts to build bipartisan consensus.

Officials who briefed reporters on the plan on Wednesday said the White House has begun to convert the idea into a bill that could be introduced in Congress, but declined to say whether the president intends to pursue legislation in the weeks or months ahead.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Immigration Plan Emphasizes Immigrants’ Skills Over Family Ties

Westlake Legal Group merlin_154830909_a2ae6585-40ea-4aa6-91b7-d30898485f7f-facebookJumbo Trump Immigration Plan Emphasizes Immigrants’ Skills Over Family Ties United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Kushner, Jared Immigration and Emigration

WASHINGTON — President Trump will unveil on Thursday a plan to overhaul parts of the nation’s immigration system that would impose new security measures at the border and significantly increase the educational and skills requirements for people who are allowed to migrate to the United States, senior White House officials said Wednesday.

The proposal would vastly scale back the system of family-based immigration that has for decades allowed immigrants to bring their spouses and children to live with them, the officials said. In its place, it would provide new opportunities for immigrants who have specific skills or job offers to work in the United States, provided that they can demonstrate English proficiency, educational attainment and pass a civics exam. But the plan is expected to be deeply unpopular with lawmakers on both sides of the aisle.

Currently, about 12 percent of immigrants qualify based on their skills, while more than half are given permission to enter the United States because of a family connection. Under Mr. Trump’s proposal, those numbers would be reversed, with nearly 60 percent of all visas going to immigrants with particular skills or offers of employment.

The president will reveal some details about the proposal, which was developed by Jared Kushner, his son-in-law, during a Rose Garden ceremony on Thursday afternoon. But officials conceded that the plan is a long way from becoming a legislative reality, with one saying on Wednesday that it represents a “first step toward having that discussion.”

In fact, the broad outlines of the plan are certain to be unpopular with lawmakers in Congress. The plan calls for construction of some of the president’s border wall and upends family-based migration in ways that Democrats and immigration advocates have long opposed. And it contains no provision for providing legal status to people brought to the United States as children, known as Dreamers, or other undocumented immigrants.

At the same time, the plan would not reduce the overall level of immigration into the United States, a longstanding goal of conservative, anti-immigration groups who had hoped that Mr. Trump’s election would finally provide the political backing for keeping immigrants out.

The president’s proposal also comes after a two-year assault on immigration in which the president’s actions have prompted intense controversy around the globe. His attempts to build a wall, ban travel from predominantly Muslim countries, separate families at the border and close the border to asylum seekers have created intense animosity on Capitol Hill and complicated efforts to build bipartisan consensus.

Officials who briefed reporters on the plan on Wednesday said the White House has begun to convert the idea into a bill that could be introduced in Congress, but declined to say whether the president intends to pursue legislation in the weeks or months ahead.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com