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Westlake Legal Group > Latest News

Police cruiser strikes, kills pedestrian in Falls Church

Police in Fairfax County, Virginia, say one of their own struck and killed a pedestrian in Falls Church early Sunday morning.

It happened just after midnight in the eastbound lanes of Route 50 near Graham Road.

The person who was struck and killed died at the hospital shortly after arrival.

The crash happened in an area that sees lots of pedestrian activity, thanks to the large volume of shopping centers and nearby apartments. The road is four to six lanes wide, and also buttressed by access roads on either side.

While there are lots of stop lights and cross walks in this stretch, the area also has a history of seeing pedestrians take risks and cross against traffic anyway.

In this case it’s still unclear who had the right of way. Fairfax County Police said the chief is likely to brief the public on the circumstances of this crash later Sunday afternoon.

All affected lanes of Route 50 had reopened by 5 a.m.

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Reston’s Electrify America partners with Ford for EV charging network

Westlake Legal Group 101719_ford-pass_instory Reston’s Electrify America partners with Ford for EV charging network virginia news reston Latest News jeff clabaugh ford Fairfax County, VA News Electrify America electric vehicles Business & Finance
The FordPass app can monitor a vehicle’s current state of charge and, based on long-distance trip plans entered by the owner, plan out efficient station-to-station routes. (Courtesy Ford Motor Company)

Ford has partnered with two companies currently building out electric vehicle charging networks for its own FordPass, a seamless network of EV charging stations that Ford owners will have app-based access to.

Ford is currently working on its first two all-electric vehicles: a Mustang-inspired crossover SUV and an electric version of its popular F-150 pickup truck.

Reston-based Electrify America, whose coast-to-coast network already includes more than 120 ultrafast charging stations at Walmart stores in 34 states, will support the FordPass app with a comprehensive data feed that will show real-time locations and charger status data to Ford vehicles’ touch screens.

The app can also monitor a vehicle’s current state of charge and, based on long-distance trip plans entered by the owner, plan out efficient station-to-station routes.

Electrify America, which is building its EV charging network with funding from Volkswagen’s settlement with U.S. regulators over the carmaker’s diesel emissions-cheating scandal, has set a goal 800 charging stations (with a total of 3,500 charging plugs) in 45 states and D.C. by 2021.

Los Angeles-based Greenlots, a subsidiary of Shell which is also building an EV charging network, will operate the software that runs the FordPass app.

Ford EV owners will not only be directed to the participating charging stations but will be able to pay for the charge through the app, rather than through the charging station operator.

“Among people who already own or want to purchase electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids, 48% say that a lack of charging stations is one of their main concerns,” said Ted Cannis, Ford’s director of global electrification.

“By offering industry-leading charging access we are dismantling those barriers.”

Ford is investing $11.5 billion in electrified vehicles through 2022. The electric SUV will come out in late-2020. The electric pickup may come to market as early as 2021.

In addition to Greenlots and Electrify America, other companies building out charging networks are expected to join the FordPass network.

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Fairfax Co. prosecutor ‘prays’ Supreme Court upholds sniper Malvo’s sentence

Westlake Legal Group malvo_comp Fairfax Co. prosecutor ‘prays’ Supreme Court upholds sniper Malvo’s sentence virginia news Supreme Court News sniper Ray Morrogh Prince William County, VA News neal augenstein National News Local News linda franklin lee boyd malvo Latest News john allen muhammad Fairfax County, VA News dc sniper Crime News craig cooley beltway sniper
Lee Boyd Malvo is seen in 2003 and 2019. (AP/Virginia Department of Corrections)

The Fairfax County, Virginia prosecutor who helped convict younger Capital Beltway sniper Lee Boyd Malvo says “I hope and pray” the U.S. Supreme Court doesn’t disturb Malvo’s four life sentences in the commonwealth.

The high court will consider whether Malvo — who was 17 in October 2002, when he and John Allen Muhammad, 41, killed 10 strangers in a three-week sniper spree — should be resentenced in Virginia, because of recent Supreme Court rulings on life sentences for juveniles.

He is currently serving four life sentences for two murders in Virginia, but his defense is hoping he will be resentenced, given recent Supreme Court rulings on life sentences for juveniles.

“I’ve heard a number of people say this isn’t about releasing Malvo, but that’s not true. It’s all about releasing Malvo,” said Fairfax County Commonwealth’s Attorney Ray Morrogh, who was co-counsel when when Malvo was convicted and sentenced for the capital murder of FBI analyst Linda Franklin.

“There are some who don’t believe in life sentences for juvenile offense, and I myself agree that a life sentence for a juvenile should be very rare,” said Morrogh.

“I, for one, don’t want to run into Malvo in the supermarket, someday.”

Franklin was shot Oct. 14, 2002, while loading packages in the parking lot at Home Depot in Falls Church, Virginia. A Chesapeake, Virginia, jury declined to recommend execution, and Malvo was sentenced to two life sentences without parole for Franklin’s murder.

“Today I’m thinking of Linda Franklin,” Morrogh told WTOP. “I’ll never forget that night — I know her husband won’t, or any of us.”

Franklin’s husband, Ted, witnessed the murder and placed a frenzied 911 call, which was played as prosecution evidence during Malvo’s trial.

Malvo later pleaded guilty in Spotsylvania County, and received two more life sentences. He was subsequently sentenced to six life sentences in Montgomery County, Maryland.

In 2017, the U.S. Appeals Court for the 4th Circuit ruled Malvo should be resentenced for his four Virginia convictions in light of recent Supreme Court decisions. Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring appealed the ruling to the nation’s highest court.

While execution for juveniles was still an option when Malvo was sentenced in 2003, the Supreme Court has since made several rulings about how young murderers should be punished.

In 2005, the court ruled capital punishment was unconstitutional for juveniles. In 2012, Miller v. Alabama determined juveniles could not be sentenced to mandatory life sentences. In 2016, Montgomery v. Louisiana determined the Miller ruling should apply retroactively to earlier life sentences for juveniles.

Morrogh said the judge heard argument that, despite his youth, Malvo was at least equally culpable as Muhammad, who was sentenced to death and executed in 2009.

“Malvo was less than four months away from turning 18,” said Morrogh.

“He had a history of abusing cats and other animals as a child, a history of criminality, some evidence of violence and he literally laughed during his confession — chortled, actually, in describing some of the killings.”

In Maryland, Malvo’s convictions were upheld in 2017, but he has appealed the decision to the Court of Appeals.

Defense attorney Craig Cooley has said, even if Malvo is granted a resentencing for his Virginia convictions, Malvo knows he will never walk free.

“Malvo is a serial killer — this is a very evil, evil person, who should never be released,” Morrogh said.

“I hope and pray that the court feels the same way.”

Source

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Project to widen Route 29 in Va. gets a green light

A plan to widen part of Route 29 in Virginia to help pedestrians, cyclists and drivers in the Clifton area has been given the go-ahead.

The 1.5-mile project between Union Mill Road and the Fairfax County Parkway will widen the highway from four lanes to six lanes in an area that the Virginia Department of Transportation projects will serve 10,000 additional vehicles a day by 2043.

Springfield District Supervisor Pat Herrity announced on Twitter the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors’ approval of the design and project.

“This project eliminates a major east-west bottleneck and will provide a continuous six-lane road, with bike and pedestrian facilities from Fairfax City to Centreville,” Herrity said in an email.

A shared use path will be added and/or improved along both sides of Lee Highway and connect to pedestrian/bicycle trails up at the Fairfax County Parkway-West Ox Road interchange.

The process of buying up property needed to widen the highway will begin early next year. Construction is expected to begin in late 2022.

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New policy for students who need prescription CBD oil at Fairfax Co. schools

Fairfax County has a new policy for how nurses and school employees can administer cannabidiol oil to kids.

In lining up with Virginia law requiring school boards to  adopt a policy toward the somewhat controversial treatment, the new policy essentially treats CBD oil and THC-A like any other prescription administered to a child at school.

The regulation says a student who may have previously had to leave, or even miss, school if they needed cannabidiol or THC-A oil to be administered can now present a form from their doctor outlining the reason for the medication, when and how often it’s taken and the exact dosage, among other requirements.

The policy also protects school nurses and employees from prosecution for possessing, storing and distributing CBD oil or THC-A.

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‘No bullet’ as Fairfax Co. examines flood-mitigation options

Westlake Legal Group 5d6be5014f8c4.image_ ‘No bullet’ as Fairfax Co. examines flood-mitigation options Weather News virginia news rainstorm Local News Latest News inside nova Floods flood mitigation Fairfax County, VA News
Rain inundated Fairfax County in July 2019. (Courtesy InsideNova.com)

This article was written by WTOP’s news partner InsideNoVa.com and republished with permission. Sign up for InsideNoVa.com’s free email subscription today.

The July 8 rainstorm that inundated Northern Virginia has lit a fire under Fairfax County supervisors to upgrade the county’s stormwater-management systems.

But as Department of Public Works and Environmental Services director Randy Bartlett made clear during the Oct. 8 meeting of the Board of Supervisors’ Environmental Committee, none of the available options is a panacea.

“There is no silver bullet, no one solution that solves everything,” he said.

The July 8 storm dumped 5 inches of water on the county in just one hour – something that in theory should happen about once every 1,000 years. Supervisors said the storm-frequency terminology used by county staff – while standard for the industry – seemed inadequate in the face of extreme weather that appears to be occurring more often.

To mitigate flood impacts, Bartlett said the county could:

• Enhance overland-relief protection and flood-proof homes: Overland methods of allowing water to run off of properties have the highest capacity, but can cause flooding in roads and often are impeded by obstacles, such as fences or gardens, placed in their path.

• Improve stormwater-conveyance systems: This would involve building such systems where none exist and installing larger pipes in existing systems. While these methods provide defined pathways for stormwater and can protect structures during routine storms, such systems tend to be overwhelmed by massive storms, can cause erosion from the concentrated water flow at the end of their pipes and effectively transfer the problem elsewhere.

This option also suffers from high costs, underground-utility conflicts, lack of space between houses and the need for property acquisitions.

“It’s not fair to push the stormwater problem onto somebody else,” said Supervisor Linda Smyth (D-Providence). “It’s going to take retrofitting to help with this.”

• Upsize the stormwater conveyance system: Putting in larger pipes would increase the system’s capacity, but also would be extremely expensive and difficult to construct on develop properties, have major utility conflicts, result in more concentrated downstream water flow and still be overwhelmed by huge storms.

• Upgrade existing road culverts: Fairfax County and the Virginia Department of Transportation since fiscal year 2016 have been pursuing this option together on 51 projects worth $4 million. This option protects roads and reduce upstream backups and vehicle losses due to flooding, but is expensive, entails utility conflicts and land-acquisition hurdles, and may require stream stabilization at the projects’ outfalls.

•  Voluntarily acquire property: County officials could buy and raze homes in flood-prone areas and use those sites to improve water quality or detain floodwaters. But property acquisitions and home demolitions are expensive, inconvenient for homeowners, entail maintenance costs and may not qualify for Federal Emergency Management Agency hazard-mitigation grants.

• Implement stricter infill-development requirements: These could include limiting impervious-surface coverage on residential developments, requiring on-site stormwater detention and mandating that properties retain up to the first 2.5 inches of rainfall from the new impervious areas. These would have impacts only on a piecemeal basis, might lack sufficient space for on-site detention and would rely on homeowner maintenance.

• Enact administrative and financial provisions for new development or redevelopment: These could include development restrictions in flood-prone areas, prohibiting basements in floodplains, educating homeowners about risks and urging them to buy flood insurance and install flood-proofing measures. But these actions also would restrict land use,  affect structures and not address current flooding issues.

Bartlett showed how much more intensive county stormwater-management efforts have become in the last 80 years. County officials installed a stormwater-conveyance-pipe system in the 1940s to deal with nuisance flooding; implemented an erosion-and-sediment-control plan and developed floodplain restrictions in the 1970s; and conceived a master drainage plans and a regional stormwater-management plan, implemented a water-supply protection-overlay district and developed stormwater-detention requirements in the 1980s.

The 1990s saw increase water-quality-protection efforts, including adoption of stormwater best-management practices requirements and institution of the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Ordinance and Resource Protection Areas. Those efforts intensified during the 2000s with the implementation of stream physical assessments, watershed-management plans and a stormwater-management tax based on assessed property value.

Bartlett showed aerial photos of the same neighborhood, one taken in 1990 and the other in 2017. The latter photo showed several bigger houses had replaced smaller ones, increasing the amount of impervious surface and making stormwater management more challenging.

Supervisor Jeff McKay (D-Lee) suggested the county could use stormwater revenues to buy some homeowners associations’ stormwater facilities and then enhance their capacity.

Bartlett’s recommended the county use stormwater funds for roadway stormwater improvements; when upsizing pipes, install ones capable of handling 100-year storms; map minor floodplains; require designation of overland-relief paths on plats; purchase properties if mitigation solutions are more expensive; and encourage people to buy flood insurance.

Residents usually prefer that stormwater flows in a channel, not over land, said Supervisor Penelope Gross (D-Mason).

“Water does run downhill,” she said. “We can legislate all we want, but we can’t change nature.”

Supervisor John Foust (D-Dranesville) agreed, adding he had photos of flooded streets “where you’d think you were on the Colorado River.”

“We need to get more water into some kind of conveyance system that is not freely flowing,” Foust said.

 

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Act on Addiction Summit provides education, support for families in Northern Virginia

Admiral James ‘Sandy’ Winnefeld was one of the most important military figures in the United States from 2011 to 2015, when he was the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

But even a man who had access to all kinds of resources could not prevent his son from becoming addicted to opioids just a couple years later. Winnefeld’s son died of a drug overdose during his first semester of college in 2017.

While dealing with the death of his son, Winnefeld went on to help found an organization called Stop the Addiction Fatality Epidemic, known as SAFE.

Winnefeld visited The Act on Addiction Summit on Saturday at Fairfax High School, an event that attracted health care professionals, keynote speakers and families interested in talking about, and learning ways to identify those who may be dealing with addiction and to prevent families from having to deal with addiction in the first place. Northern Virginia health care provider Inova led the summit, while nonprofits like SAFE provided their expertise.

Winnefeld said his mission is to provide awareness for parents and families.

Westlake Legal Group act-on-addiction-summit-1672x1254 Act on Addiction Summit provides education, support for families in Northern Virginia winnefeld virginia news opioid Melissa Howell Local News Living News Latest News Health & Fitness News Fairfax County, VA News Education News addiction act on addiction
Concerned families, health care providers and expert speakers came to Fairfax High on Saturday to discuss the prevention of opioid addiction.
(WTOP/Melissa Howell )
Westlake Legal Group act-on-addiction-summit-2-1672x1254 Act on Addiction Summit provides education, support for families in Northern Virginia winnefeld virginia news opioid Melissa Howell Local News Living News Latest News Health & Fitness News Fairfax County, VA News Education News addiction act on addiction
Healthcare experts say one of the best ways to prevent addiction is to ease the stigma of it and discuss it more openly.
(WTOP/Melissa Howell )

(1/2)

Westlake Legal Group act-on-addiction-summit-260x174 Act on Addiction Summit provides education, support for families in Northern Virginia winnefeld virginia news opioid Melissa Howell Local News Living News Latest News Health & Fitness News Fairfax County, VA News Education News addiction act on addiction
Westlake Legal Group act-on-addiction-summit-2-260x174 Act on Addiction Summit provides education, support for families in Northern Virginia winnefeld virginia news opioid Melissa Howell Local News Living News Latest News Health & Fitness News Fairfax County, VA News Education News addiction act on addiction

“We could have crawled into a little ball of anger, grief and shame, but we decided to try and put together a nonprofit that would try to help the nation reverse the opioid epidemic,” he said. “We’re trying to prevent families everyday from going through what we went through.”

According to Inova, nearly 20 million adults in the U.S. suffer from addiction. A recent survey conducted in Northern Virginia also found that 65% of adults and 70% of millennials say they know someone who struggles with addiction. The survey also found nearly half of those who responded said they did not know how to help their loved ones struggling with addiction.

“If we knew then what we know now, we would still have our son with us,” said Winnefeld, acknowledging the complexity of substance abuse.

Inova’s Dr. Michael Clark said people need to be more comfortable talking openly about addiction.

“If we’re talking about it, then we can strategize about how to break down the stigma, the barriers to care and how to bring people back into the productive aspects of our community,” Clark said.

Clark also said everyone can prevent young adults from getting access to prescription drugs, tobacco and alcohol at home. It’s a concerning issue, he said, but the solution he doesn’t require a lot of effort.

“It’s even more incumbent for all of us to think about how should we care for these substances, how should we dispose of these substances, how can we limit the unintended access,” Clark said.

The Act on Addiction Campaign is part of a larger $16 million project in Fairfax County focused on recovery and effective treatment for community members in need.

Source

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Act on Addiction Summit provides addiction education, support for Va. families

Admiral James ‘Sandy’ Winnefeld was one of the most important military figures in the United States from 2011 to 2015, when he was the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

But even a man who had access to all kinds of resources could not prevent his son from becoming addicted to opioids just a couple years later. Winnefeld’s son died of a drug overdose during his first semester of college in 2017.

While dealing with the death of his son, Winnefeld went on to help found an organization called Stop the Addiction Fatality Epidemic, known as SAFE.

Winnefeld visited The Act on Addiction Summit on Saturday at Fairfax High School, an event that attracted health care professionals, keynote speakers and families interested in talking about, and learning ways to identify those who may be dealing with addiction and to prevent families from having to deal with addiction in the first place. Northern Virginia health care provider Inova led the summit, while nonprofits like SAFE provided their expertise.

Winnefeld said his mission is to provide awareness for parents and families.

Westlake Legal Group act-on-addiction-summit-1672x1254 Act on Addiction Summit provides addiction education, support for Va. families winnefeld virginia news opioid Melissa Howell Local News Living News Latest News Health & Fitness News Fairfax County, VA News Education News addiction act on addiction
Concerned families, health care providers and expert speakers came to Fairfax High on Saturday to discuss the prevention of opioid addiction.
(WTOP/Melissa Howell )
Westlake Legal Group act-on-addiction-summit-2-1672x1254 Act on Addiction Summit provides addiction education, support for Va. families winnefeld virginia news opioid Melissa Howell Local News Living News Latest News Health & Fitness News Fairfax County, VA News Education News addiction act on addiction
Healthcare experts say one of the best ways to prevent addiction is to ease the stigma of it and discuss it more openly.
(WTOP/Melissa Howell )

(1/2)

Westlake Legal Group act-on-addiction-summit-260x174 Act on Addiction Summit provides addiction education, support for Va. families winnefeld virginia news opioid Melissa Howell Local News Living News Latest News Health & Fitness News Fairfax County, VA News Education News addiction act on addiction
Westlake Legal Group act-on-addiction-summit-2-260x174 Act on Addiction Summit provides addiction education, support for Va. families winnefeld virginia news opioid Melissa Howell Local News Living News Latest News Health & Fitness News Fairfax County, VA News Education News addiction act on addiction

“We could have crawled into a little ball of anger, grief and shame, but we decided to try and put together a nonprofit that would try to help the nation reverse the opioid epidemic,” he said. “We’re trying to prevent families everyday from going through what we went through.”

According to Inova, nearly 20 million adults in the U.S. suffer from addiction. A recent survey conducted in Northern Virginia also found that 65% of adults and 70% of millennials say they know someone who struggles with addiction. The survey also found nearly half of those who responded said they did not know how to help their loved ones struggling with addiction.

“If we knew then what we know now, we would still have our son with us,” said Winnefeld, acknowledging the complexity of substance abuse.

Inova’s Dr. Michael Clark said people need to be more comfortable talking openly about addiction.

“If we’re talking about it, then we can strategize about how to break down the stigma, the barriers to care and how to bring people back into the productive aspects of our community,” Clark said.

Clark also said everyone can prevent young adults from getting access to prescription drugs, tobacco and alcohol at home. It’s a concerning issue, he said, but the solution he doesn’t require a lot of effort.

“It’s even more incumbent for all of us to think about how should we care for these substances, how should we dispose of these substances, how can we limit the unintended access,” Clark said.

The Act on Addiction Campaign is part of a larger $16 million project in Fairfax County focused on recovery and effective treatment for community members in need.

Source

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Sprouts Farmers Market opens store in Herndon

Westlake Legal Group 1002_herndonsprouts1-1024x768 Sprouts Farmers Market opens store in Herndon virginia news Sprouts Farmer's Market Real Estate News Local News Living News Latest News jeff clabaugh herndon Food & Restaurant News Fairfax County, VA News Business & Finance
The ribbon-cutting ceremony to open the new Sprouts in Herndon, Virginia. (Courtesy Sprouts Farmers Market)

Phoenix-based Sprouts Farmers Market, whose slogan is “Healthy Living for Less,” opened its first Washington-area store Wednesday in Herndon, Virginia.

The store, at 494 Elden Street in Herndon Centre, takes over a former Kmart space.

Sprouts says it hired 150 full- and part-time workers to staff the new Herndon store.

It is Sprouts’ first D.C.-area store, though it has others in the Baltimore area.

Sprouts store layouts put fresh produce at the center of the store. Its stores also have large bulk food sections and large vitamin departments.

Stores also have prepared entrees, and large meat and seafood departments.

As part of its Herndon opening, its nonprofit arm, The Sprouts Healthy Communities Foundation, is making a $5,000 donation to the YMCA of Reston and a $5,000 donation to Food for Neighbors.

The Herndon store will also donate unsold and edible groceries to the Capital Area Food Bank. It says its 325 stores across the country donated 27 million pounds of food to nonprofit organizations in 2018.

Source

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Northern Va. accounts for 40% of tourist spending in state

Westlake Legal Group 093019_virginia_tourism Northern Va. accounts for 40% of tourist spending in state virginia news vacation Travel News Tourism Northern Virginia Loudoun County, VA News Local News Living News Latest News jeff clabaugh Fairfax County, VA News Business & Finance Arlington, VA News
All five Northern Virginia counties rank among the top 10 in the commonwealth for tourism. (Wilsilver77 /iStock / Getty Images Plus)

Virginia’s tourism industry generated a record $26 billion in tourist spending in 2018 — and 40% of that, or $10.3 billion, was spent in Northern Virginia.

Both Arlington and Loudoun counties had record years for tourism last year.

Arlington County, Fairfax County and Loudoun County rank as the top three counties in Virginia for individual tourism spending. All five Northern Virginia Counties rank among the top 10 in the commonwealth for tourism.

Each county has its own tourism marketing offices. But they also pull together to market the region through the Northern Virginia Tourism Partnership, which includes marketing organizations from Alexandria and the counties of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun and Prince William.

“Each of our destinations has its own truly unique array of visitor experiences, from iconic attractions to hotels, shopping, culinary adventures, arts, recreation and more,” said Emily Cassell, president of the Northern Virginia Tourism Partnership.

“Promoting Northern Virginia together as a region helps visitors fully experience the area’s great offerings and is an even bigger win for us and for the commonwealth,” she said.

Tourism accounted for more than 91,400 jobs in Northern Virginia in 2018.

Among the newest additions to tourist attractions in Northern Virginia will be the Tall Ship Providence, a replica of an 18th-century ship, that opens to the public in Old Town Alexandria this fall, and the National Museum of the United States Army, which opens in Arlington in June 2020.

Tourism is the fifth-largest employer in Virginia, supporting 234,000 jobs statewide, according to the Virginia Tourism Corp. Domestic tourists spend roughly $71 million a day in Virginia.

Source

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