web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu

Debbie Dingell Gets Support From Another Widow Whose Husband Trump Has Mocked: Cindy McCain

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-dingell-facebookJumbo Debbie Dingell Gets Support From Another Widow Whose Husband Trump Has Mocked: Cindy McCain United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Michigan McCain, Cindy impeachment House of Representatives Dingell, John D Jr Dingell, Deborah

WASHINGTON — One widow instantly knew how the other one felt.

“I’m preparing for the first holiday season without the man I love,” one said.

“I’m terribly sorry,” the other replied. “Please know I am thinking about you.”

The Twitter exchange sounded like a salutation between two women facing the season alone, but the message of support from Cindy McCain, the widow of John McCain, the Arizona senator, to Representative Debbie Dingell, Democrat of Michigan, was about a different shared experience.

It was a message of solidarity sent after President Trump had mocked Ms. Dingell (“You know Dingell? You ever hear of her, Michigan? Debbie Dingell, that’s a real beauty.”) and implied that her husband — John D. Dingell Jr., the former Michigan congressman who died in February — was “looking up” from hell. Ms. McCain’s own husband has been the object of relentless presidential attacks since he died.

In an interview on Thursday, hours after Mr. Trump became the third president in history to be impeached — an outcome she voted for — Ms. Dingell said that her husband “was never afraid to fight for what was right” but that the president’s remarks about him had cut deep.

“He hurt me,” Ms. Dingell said. “I think there’s some things that should be off limits.”

Mr. Trump has freely and frequently brought the power of his office down on a variety of journalists, lawmakers, Foreign Service officers and members of the military he has seen as standing in his way.

But Ms. Dingell is now joining the ranks of a more select group that includes the McCains and a Gold Star military family, who have suffered profound loss only to see it mocked and used as political ammunition by the president.

Ms. Dingell said on Thursday that she was still grieving the loss of her husband, who was the longest-serving congressman in American history. He retired from Congress in 2014 after serving his district, just outside Detroit, for 59 years. His wife, who now holds his seat, called for civility as she faced her first Christmas in 38 years without her husband.

“If anything good comes out of this,” Ms. Dingell said, “maybe people will take a deep breath and think about it.”

But Mr. Trump is not prone to contemplation. At his rally on Wednesday night, Mr. Trump was speaking off the cuff to supporters as he called out Democrats like Ms. Dingell, who had voted in favor of the two articles of impeachment against him. But the president singled her out because she had done so after he approved an “A-plus treatment” for her husband’s burial.

“So she calls me up: ‘It’s the nicest thing that’s ever happened; thank you so much,’” Mr. Trump said at the rally, mocking the congresswoman’s voice while recounting their call. He suggested that Ms. Dingell had begged for him to lower American flags to half-staff and, apparently impersonating her, said: “Do this, do that, do that. Rotunda.”

Mr. Dingell did not lie in state in the Capitol Rotunda — Ms. Dingell said on Thursday that that had not been one of his requests. Still, Mr. Trump said Ms. Dingell had said her husband would be thrilled as he looked down and saw how the country was honoring him.

“Maybe he’s looking up,” Mr. Trump said at one point. “I don’t know. I don’t know, maybe. Maybe. But let’s assume he’s looking down.”

Ms. Dingell said the president had ordered American flags lowered, but beyond that, Mr. Dingell’s military service in World War II made him eligible for the only request he had made, which was to be buried at Arlington National Ceremony. At the time, she said, she had welcomed the president’s call — emphasizing that he called her.

“He was very kind,” Ms. Dingell said. “He had told me that he heard he was a great man and I thought it was very thoughtful for him to call at a time when I was really grieving.”

But Mr. Trump’s public remarks about their exchange were condemned by both Republicans — including Representative Fred Upton, who faces re-election next year in Michigan — and Democrats, including former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., a leading 2020 candidate whose own political life has been punctuated by loss.

“This is equally as cruel as it is pathetic,” Mr. Biden, whose son Beau died in 2015, said on Twitter, “and it is beyond unconscionable that our President would behave this way.”

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who has also been called “crazy” and “nervous” by Mr. Trump as she steered her caucus toward impeachment, said there was nothing funny about what Mr. Trump said.

“What the president misunderstands is that cruelty is not wit,” she said. “It’s not funny at all. It’s very sad.”

Mr. Upton, a close friend of Mr. Dingell’s who delivered a eulogy for him, called on the president to apologize, and said on Twitter, “There was no need to ‘dis’ him in a crass political way.”

Representative Paul Mitchell, another Michigan Republican, also said the president’s comments warranted an apology. “To use his name in such a dishonorable manner at last night’s rally is unacceptable from anyone, let alone the president of the United States,” he said. “An apology is due, Mr. President.”

The Trump campaign had no comment about whether the president’s comments could affect his political fortunes in Michigan, a state he narrowly won in 2016. Ronna McDaniel, the chairwoman of the Republican National Committee, also sidestepped the question.

“I have great respect for the Dingells’ decades of service to the state of Michigan and I’m very sorry for Representative Debbie Dingell’s loss,” Ms. McDaniel said in a statement. “I was glad to see the late Representative John Dingell honored so highly by the president when he passed away.”

As the criticism mounted, the White House did not apologize and instead suggested that the public consider how Mr. Trump might feel about being impeached.

“He has been under attack, and under impeachment attack, for the last few months, and then just under attack politically for the last two and a half years,” Stephanie Grisham, the White House press secretary, said in an interview with ABC on Thursday. “I think that as we all know, the president is a counterpuncher.”

She declined to explain how Mr. Dingell, who died 10 months ago, had thrown the first punch.

The president’s rough comments on his adversaries have earned him condemnation from grieving families before. In 2016, Mr. Trump criticized the parents of Capt. Humayun Khan, a Muslim soldier killed in Iraq, who had denounced the president during the Democratic National Convention. Mr. Trump said Captain Khan’s father had delivered the entire speech because his mother was not “allowed” to speak.

Khizr Khan, the soldier’s father, said he felt a sense of recognition when he heard that Mr. Trump had mocked the Dingell family.

“All three of them have served this nation and they have passed,” Mr. Khan said of his son, Mr. Dingell and Mr. McCain. “They deserve to be respected.”

Mr. Trump has particularly fixated on Mr. McCain, who died in 2018 from complications from brain cancer and, as he was dying, made plans to keep the president away from his funeral.

After Mr. McCain died, Mr. Trump waited days to issue a proclamation marking the senator’s death, relenting only under enormous pressure. He has repeatedly brought up Mr. McCain’s vote against repealing the Affordable Care Act at his political rallies. And when Mr. Trump traveled to Japan in May, the White House asked the Navy to hide a destroyer named after Mr. McCain during the president’s visit to Yokosuka Naval Base.

The senator’s daughter, Meghan McCain, offered her own sharp criticism on Thursday.

“The comments from Trump about Rep Dingell is utterly sick and cruel,” Ms. McCain said on Twitter. “Take heed in knowing he only attacks people for whom he is threatened by their great legacies. History will forever judge him very harshly.”

The McCain family declined to comment further. But for her part, Ms. Dingell said she did not want the president to call her again, even if he had an apology.

“No,” Ms. Dingell said. “He’s taken his shot.”

Eileen Sullivan contributed reporting. Kitty Bennett contributed research.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Debbie Dingell Gets Support From Another Widow Whose Husband Trump Has Mocked: Cindy McCain

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-dingell-facebookJumbo Debbie Dingell Gets Support From Another Widow Whose Husband Trump Has Mocked: Cindy McCain United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Michigan McCain, Cindy impeachment House of Representatives Dingell, John D Jr Dingell, Deborah

WASHINGTON — One widow instantly knew how the other one felt.

“I’m preparing for the first holiday season without the man I love,” one said.

“I’m terribly sorry,” the other replied. “Please know I am thinking about you.”

The Twitter exchange sounded like a salutation between two women facing the season alone, but the message of support from Cindy McCain, the widow of John McCain, the Arizona senator, to Representative Debbie Dingell, Democrat of Michigan, was about a different shared experience.

It was a message of solidarity sent after President Trump had mocked Ms. Dingell (“You know Dingell? You ever hear of her, Michigan? Debbie Dingell, that’s a real beauty.”) and implied that her husband — John D. Dingell Jr., the former Michigan congressman who died in February — was “looking up” from hell. Ms. McCain’s own husband has been the object of relentless presidential attacks since he died.

In an interview on Thursday, hours after Mr. Trump became the third president in history to be impeached — an outcome she voted for — Ms. Dingell said that her husband “was never afraid to fight for what was right” but that the president’s remarks about him had cut deep.

“He hurt me,” Ms. Dingell said. “I think there’s some things that should be off limits.”

Mr. Trump has freely and frequently brought the power of his office down on a variety of journalists, lawmakers, Foreign Service officers and members of the military he has seen as standing in his way.

But Ms. Dingell is now joining the ranks of a more select group that includes the McCains and a Gold Star military family, who have suffered profound loss only to see it mocked and used as political ammunition by the president.

Ms. Dingell said on Thursday that she was still grieving the loss of her husband, who was the longest-serving congressman in American history. He retired from Congress in 2014 after serving his district, just outside Detroit, for 59 years. His wife, who now holds his seat, called for civility as she faced her first Christmas in 38 years without her husband.

“If anything good comes out of this,” Ms. Dingell said, “maybe people will take a deep breath and think about it.”

But Mr. Trump is not prone to contemplation. At his rally on Wednesday night, Mr. Trump was speaking off the cuff to supporters as he called out Democrats like Ms. Dingell, who had voted in favor of the two articles of impeachment against him. But the president singled her out because she had done so after he approved an “A-plus treatment” for her husband’s burial.

“So she calls me up: ‘It’s the nicest thing that’s ever happened; thank you so much,’” Mr. Trump said at the rally, mocking the congresswoman’s voice while recounting their call. He suggested that Ms. Dingell had begged for him to lower American flags to half-staff and, apparently impersonating her, said: “Do this, do that, do that. Rotunda.”

Mr. Dingell did not lie in state in the Capitol Rotunda — Ms. Dingell said on Thursday that that had not been one of his requests. Still, Mr. Trump said Ms. Dingell had said her husband would be thrilled as he looked down and saw how the country was honoring him.

“Maybe he’s looking up,” Mr. Trump said at one point. “I don’t know. I don’t know, maybe. Maybe. But let’s assume he’s looking down.”

Ms. Dingell said the president had ordered American flags lowered, but beyond that, Mr. Dingell’s military service in World War II made him eligible for the only request he had made, which was to be buried at Arlington National Ceremony. At the time, she said, she had welcomed the president’s call — emphasizing that he called her.

“He was very kind,” Ms. Dingell said. “He had told me that he heard he was a great man and I thought it was very thoughtful for him to call at a time when I was really grieving.”

But Mr. Trump’s public remarks about their exchange were condemned by both Republicans — including Representative Fred Upton, who faces re-election next year in Michigan — and Democrats, including former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., a leading 2020 candidate whose own political life has been punctuated by loss.

“This is equally as cruel as it is pathetic,” Mr. Biden, whose son Beau died in 2015, said on Twitter, “and it is beyond unconscionable that our President would behave this way.”

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who has also been called “crazy” and “nervous” by Mr. Trump as she steered her caucus toward impeachment, said there was nothing funny about what Mr. Trump said.

“What the president misunderstands is that cruelty is not wit,” she said. “It’s not funny at all. It’s very sad.”

Mr. Upton, a close friend of Mr. Dingell’s who delivered a eulogy for him, called on the president to apologize, and said on Twitter, “There was no need to ‘dis’ him in a crass political way.”

Representative Paul Mitchell, another Michigan Republican, also said the president’s comments warranted an apology. “To use his name in such a dishonorable manner at last night’s rally is unacceptable from anyone, let alone the president of the United States,” he said. “An apology is due, Mr. President.”

The Trump campaign had no comment about whether the president’s comments could affect his political fortunes in Michigan, a state he narrowly won in 2016. Ronna McDaniel, the chairwoman of the Republican National Committee, also sidestepped the question.

“I have great respect for the Dingells’ decades of service to the state of Michigan and I’m very sorry for Representative Debbie Dingell’s loss,” Ms. McDaniel said in a statement. “I was glad to see the late Representative John Dingell honored so highly by the president when he passed away.”

As the criticism mounted, the White House did not apologize and instead suggested that the public consider how Mr. Trump might feel about being impeached.

“He has been under attack, and under impeachment attack, for the last few months, and then just under attack politically for the last two and a half years,” Stephanie Grisham, the White House press secretary, said in an interview with ABC on Thursday. “I think that as we all know, the president is a counterpuncher.”

She declined to explain how Mr. Dingell, who died 10 months ago, had thrown the first punch.

The president’s rough comments on his adversaries have earned him condemnation from grieving families before. In 2016, Mr. Trump criticized the parents of Capt. Humayun Khan, a Muslim soldier killed in Iraq, who had denounced the president during the Democratic National Convention. Mr. Trump said Captain Khan’s father had delivered the entire speech because his mother was not “allowed” to speak.

Khizr Khan, the soldier’s father, said he felt a sense of recognition when he heard that Mr. Trump had mocked the Dingell family.

“All three of them have served this nation and they have passed,” Mr. Khan said of his son, Mr. Dingell and Mr. McCain. “They deserve to be respected.”

Mr. Trump has particularly fixated on Mr. McCain, who died in 2018 from complications from brain cancer and, as he was dying, made plans to keep the president away from his funeral.

After Mr. McCain died, Mr. Trump waited days to issue a proclamation marking the senator’s death, relenting only under enormous pressure. He has repeatedly brought up Mr. McCain’s vote against repealing the Affordable Care Act at his political rallies. And when Mr. Trump traveled to Japan in May, the White House asked the Navy to hide a destroyer named after Mr. McCain during the president’s visit to Yokosuka Naval Base.

The senator’s daughter, Meghan McCain, offered her own sharp criticism on Thursday.

“The comments from Trump about Rep Dingell is utterly sick and cruel,” Ms. McCain said on Twitter. “Take heed in knowing he only attacks people for whom he is threatened by their great legacies. History will forever judge him very harshly.”

The McCain family declined to comment further. But for her part, Ms. Dingell said she did not want the president to call her again, even if he had an apology.

“No,” Ms. Dingell said. “He’s taken his shot.”

Eileen Sullivan contributed reporting. Kitty Bennett contributed research.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Debbie Dingell Calls for Civility After Trump Insults Her Late Husband

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-dingell-facebookJumbo Debbie Dingell Calls for Civility After Trump Insults Her Late Husband United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Michigan impeachment House of Representatives Dingell, John D Jr Dingell, Deborah

WASHINGTON — One day after the House impeached President Trump largely along party lines, Republicans and Democrats found themselves in agreement on something: the president’s swipe at a beloved late Democratic congressman was neither funny nor appropriate.

Representative Debbie Dingell, Democrat of Michigan, said Thursday that Mr. Trump’s words about her late husband, former Representative John D. Dingell Jr., “hurt me.”

She called for civility as she faced her first Christmas in 38 years without her husband.

The president’s comments, suggesting that Mr. Dingell went to hell after he died, came during a rally in Western Michigan on Wednesday, as Democrats in Washington voted to impeach him.

Mr. Dingell died earlier this year. He announced his retirement from Congress in 2014 after serving his district, just outside of Detroit, for 59 years. Ms. Dingell was elected to his seat.

The president’s decision to go after the Dingells, a long-respected political family in Michigan — a key state in the upcoming presidential election — struck a familiar tone. Mr. Trump repeatedly attacked Senator John S. McCain, Republican of Arizona, for months after his death in 2018.

The president’s bit did not go over well at the rally where the crowd was heard booing after his swipe at Mr. Dingell.

After complaining about the hypocrisy he faces in Washington, Mr. Trump described the respect he displayed for Mr. Dingell after he died, offering accounts of reverent gestures he made that in some cases, according to Ms. Dingell, were inaccurate.

Mr. Trump said Ms. Dingell called him and thanked him profusely for steps he took to honor her husband and recalled that she said her husband would be thrilled as he looked down and saw how the country was honoring him.

“Maybe he’s looking up,” Mr. Trump said during the rally. “I don’t know. I don’t know, maybe. Maybe. But let’s assume he’s looking down.”

In an opinion piece published Tuesday, Ms. Dingell explained why she planned to vote to impeach Mr. Trump.

“If we don’t address this abuse of power, we abdicate our constitutional and moral responsibility,” she wrote. “Failing to address it would also condone these actions as acceptable for future administrations.”

The president’s two-hour speech began as Ms. Dingell and most other Democrats were voting to impeach Mr. Trump. Ms. Dingell’s vote appeared to surprise the president, who described how grateful she was for the tributes he had paid to Mr. Dingell.

Ms. Dingell responded on Twitter on Wednesday and asked the president to “set politics aside.”

“I’m preparing for the first holiday season without the man I love,” she wrote. “You brought me down in a way you can never imagine and your hurtful words just made my healing much harder.”

Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday that there was nothing funny about what Mr. Trump said.

“What the president misunderstands is that cruelty is not wit,” she said. “It’s not funny at all, it’s very sad.”

Two Republican representatives from Michigan called on Mr. Trump to apologize for what he said about Mr. Dingell.

“To use his name in such a dishonorable manner at last night’s rally is unacceptable from anyone, let alone the president of the United States. An apology is due, Mr. President,” Representative Paul Mitchell said on Thursday.

His colleague, Representative Fred Upton, said, “There was no need to ‘dis’ him in a crass political way.”

Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina and a staunch Trump defender most of the time, said he had not seen the president’s comments but, “If he said that, I think he should apologize.”

Asked about the remarks, a White House spokesman, Hogan Gidley, said Thursday that Mr. Trump respected Mr. Dingell’s military service and decades in Congress, and it was because of his respect that the president lowered the flags after he died.

“He appreciates her and him,” Mr. Gidley said on Fox Business. “And you know, your heart goes out to her for her loss. There’s no question about that.”

The president is a “counterpuncher,” he added, and then conceded that Ms. Dingell had not thrown a punch his way.

On Thursday, Ms. Dingell said the country should take a lesson from the president’s comments. “We need more civility in this country,” she said on CNN. And in an interview with Fox Business, she recognized the gravity of the vote to impeach the president for just the third time in the country’s history.

“Yesterday was a very difficult day for this democracy,” she said. “And I think we know that.”

Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Katie Rogers contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump, Unbowed, Uses Rally to Strike Back Against Impeachment Vote

Westlake Legal Group 18dc-trump-2-facebookJumbo-v4 Trump, Unbowed, Uses Rally to Strike Back Against Impeachment Vote Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Republican Party Pence, Mike Michigan House of Representatives

Describing the impeachment vote as an attempt to “nullify the ballots of tens of millions of patriotic Americans,” President Trump struck a defiant tone on Wednesday night, lashing out at Democrats and saying he had done nothing wrong at all.

Moments after the House finished passing two articles of impeachment against him, Mr. Trump used a campaign rally in Battle Creek, Mich., to tout the strong economy, mock the Democratic presidential field, relive his 2016 victory and claim that Democrats made up the charges against him.

“They said there’s no crime,” he said. “There’s no crime. I’m the first person to ever get impeached and there’s no crime. I feel guilty. It’s impeachment lite.”

He paused before adding, “I don’t know about you, but I’m having a good time.”

His rejoinder created the remarkable image of a combative president — even as he was becoming the third to be impeached — standing unbowed before his core base of supporters heading into a year in which he will be seeking re-election.

Characteristically, there was no reflection about the gravity of the moment in his address, much less contrition about the pressure campaign he waged against Ukraine, seeking a commitment from the country’s new president to investigate former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and look into various allegations about the 2016 election, including an unfounded theory that Ukrainians rather than Russians had stolen emails from the Democrat National Committee.

Mr. Trump seemed intent at times on diverting attention from the impeachment proceedings unfolding back in Washington. His discursive remarks touched on everything from light bulbs to sinks, showers and toilets to Beto O’Rourke, the former Democratic presidential candidate who quit the race over a month ago.

“It doesn’t really feel like we’re being impeached,” Mr. Trump said. “The country is doing better than ever before. We did nothing wrong. We have tremendous support in the Republican Party like we’ve never had before.”

At the moment when the House approved the first article of impeachment against Mr. Trump, for abuse of power, about 17 minutes after he took the stage, he was bragging about how F-35 pilots were better looking than the actor Tom Cruise.

Mr. Trump’s decision to hold a rally and immerse himself in the warmth of an adoring crowd at the critical juncture in his presidency was an echo of how he handled his worst public humiliation — the revelation of the “Access Hollywood” tape on Oct. 7, 2016, during the final days of his 2016 presidential campaign.

After holing up at Trump Tower the day after that video was released, Mr. Trump emerged after seeing on television that a crowd supporters had gathered on Fifth Avenue. He walked through the glass doors, pumped his fist in the air, and then walked back into his building, clapping his hands as if cheering himself on.

On Wednesday night, Mr. Trump appeared to rally his own spirits by reminiscing about his 2016 victory in front of an adoring crowd, and taunting the 2020 Democratic presidential field. “She’s gasping for air,” he said of Senator Elizabeth Warren, while poking fun at the pronunciation of Mayor Pete Buttigieg’s name.

The rambling performance was vintage Trump, hitting on his favorite targets, like Lisa Page, the former F.B.I. lawyer, and James Comey, the former F.B.I. director. “Did I do a great job when I fired his ass?” he said.

But his anger at the House Democrats rang through his speech. At one point, Mr. Trump said that Americans would show up next year to “vote Pelosi the hell out of office.”

The crowd later seemed perplexed when he attacked Representative Debbie Dingell of Michigan, who he noted voted for impeachment despite the fact that Mr. Trump lowered the flags for her late husband, longtime Representative John Dingell. “Maybe he’s looking up” instead of looking down, Mr. Trump said.

Mr. Trump, described by his aides as having been in a frustrated, snappish mood for days, traveled to the rally in an electorally vital state after watching the impeachment debate on television and tweeting or retweeting more than 50 times.

“They want to Impeach me (I’m not worried!),” he wrote in one post on Wednesday morning. “And yet they were all breaking the law in so many ways. How can they do that and yet impeach a very successful (Economy Plus) President of the United States, who has done nothing wrong? These people are Crazy!”

The first image of Mr. Trump on Wednesday came as he cut across the South Lawn, alone, dressed in a dark overcoat and prepared to depart for Michigan. Instead of making a beeline for the cameras and microphones gathered outside of the Oval Office, as he typically does, he silently trudged over to a small group of supporters before leaving without taking any questions from reporters.

Earlier, Kellyanne Conway, a counselor to the president, stood in the White House briefing room and said Mr. Trump was in good spirits. “The president is fine,” Ms. Conway said, “his mood is good.”

Trump campaign aides and White House officials like Ms. Conway have been projecting confidence that the impeachment inquiry has only served as fuel for the president’s campaign, bolstering its fund-raising efforts as well as its volunteer recruitment. But privately, people who know him said, Mr. Trump has been aware of the historic nature of a charge of “high crimes and misdemeanors” and has been aggrieved at what he views as a stain on his legacy, a desire by Democrats to harm him personally and what he sees as the failure of Republicans to state with more conviction that he did nothing wrong.

Some of that anger played out online on Wednesday as Mr. Trump watched cable news coverage of the impeachment debate. “SUCH ATROCIOUS LIES BY THE RADICAL LEFT, DO NOTHING DEMOCRATS. THIS IS AN ASSAULT ON AMERICA, AND AN ASSAULT ON THE REPUBLICAN PARTY!!!!” he wrote on Twitter.

His all-caps burst of online frustration came minutes after the White House press secretary, Stephanie Grisham, tried to convey a sense of business as usual in the West Wing, saying in a statement that the president would be “working all day” and catching some of the impeachment proceedings “between meetings.”

Other aides were also committed to a “just another Wednesday” narrative, noting that legislative affairs officials were busy on Capitol Hill working on the revised trade agreement with Mexico and Canada as well as two spending bills.

But Mr. Trump’s grievance-infused state of mind was laid out clearly in a six-page letter the White House sent on Tuesday to Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

“You have cheapened the importance of the very ugly word, impeachment!” he wrote. “By proceeding with your invalid impeachment, you are violating your oaths of office, you are breaking your allegiance to the Constitution, and you are declaring open war on American Democracy.”

Mr. Trump drafted the letter with the help of three aides: Stephen Miller, his top policy adviser; Eric Ueland, his legislative affairs director; and Mike Williams, a counselor to the acting chief of staff.

The president purposefully did not consult with the White House counsel, Pat Cipollone, according to people involved with drafting the letter because he did not want to be told what he could and could not say — he simply wanted to vent.

In the audience in Battle Creek, Mr. Trump’s supporters were finally expressing the sentiments he had been wanting to hear more forcefully from Republican lawmakers.

“How they even have a right to say he did something wrong is baffling,” said Jonathan Anderson, a resident of nearby Portage.

Michigan promises to be crucial to Mr. Trump’s re-election fortunes, and will probably be tightly contested. Mr. Trump unexpectedly won Michigan by a fraction of a percentage point in 2016, or just over 10,000 votes more than Hillary Clinton. His final 2016 campaign stop, late at night, was in Grand Rapids. Battle Creek, a city of just over 50,000, is the hub of a county that voted for Mr. Trump but is surrounded by more liberal cities, including Kalamazoo and East Lansing. Residents still consider it an industrial town, even as empty storefronts dot the downtown. Kellogg’s, the major cereal producer, still employs thousands of people and churns out Raisin Bran and Rice Krispies at a plant that sends cereal scents into the city’s air.

Local officials said the arena would hold around 6,500 people. On Wednesday morning, a large screen in a plaza outside the building cycled through clips featuring Mr. Trump’s family, including his daughter-in-law Lara Trump, who interviewed Diamond and Silk, two pro-Trump internet personalities. Parka and scarf-wearing rally attendees lined up early in the morning, huddling in a parking garage to keep warm.

Annie Karni reported from Washington, Maggie Haberman from New York, and Michael Crowley and Noah Weiland from Battle Creek, Mich.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Slotkin, Backing Trump’s Impeachment, Draws Instant Protests, and Applause

Westlake Legal Group 16dc-slotkin-facebookJumbo Slotkin, Backing Trump’s Impeachment, Draws Instant Protests, and Applause United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Slotkin, Elissa Michigan impeachment Elections, House of Representatives

ROCHESTER, Mich. — The blowback began on Monday even before Representative Elissa Slotkin took the lectern to announce she would vote to impeach President Trump.

Dozens of angry Trump supporters bearing “Impeach Slotkin, Keep Trump” signs shouted down Ms. Slotkin, a first-term congresswoman, at a packed town hall-style meeting in a university ballroom, chanting “Hey, hey! Ho, ho! Elissa Slotkin has got to go!” and “One-term congresswoman!” and “C.I.A. Hack!” — a reference to Ms. Slotkin’s past work as a C.I.A. analyst.

Keeping her composure, Ms. Slotkin plowed through her statement — “Guys, let’s try to have a civil conversation,” she said at one point — and then took questions, though her pleas for civility were ignored.

The more she explained her decision to constituents in her district north of Detroit, one that Mr. Trump won in 2016, the angrier and louder the protests grew.

“MAGA! MAGA!” attendees shouted, repeating the president’s campaign slogan. “Four more years! Four more years!”

But the voices on the other side, though not nearly as loud, were present in force. Most in the crowd of about 400 people who gathered here on Monday leaped to their feet and applauded when Ms. Slotkin announced her intention to vote “yes” on Wednesday when the House holds its vote on the articles of impeachment.

One of her supporters arrived with a competing sign: “We’ve got your back, Representative Slotkin.”

So it has been all year for Ms. Slotkin, who served in Iraq as a C.I.A. analyst and in the Obama Defense Department before she ran for Congress in 2018, winning a seat that had been held by Republicans for 20 years. Caught in the middle of the United States’ red-blue divide, she resisted impeachment for months, even after Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel, issued a report detailing at least 10 instances of obstruction of justice by Mr. Trump.

The story of how she arrived at her impeachment decision is the story of so many moderate Democrats in this year’s historic freshman class. Moved to run for public office to counter the rise of Mr. Trump, they flipped Republican seats and are now in danger of becoming one-term members of Congress — possibly costing their party control of the House — over a decision they tried mightily to avoid.

Ms. Slotkin announced her decision in an opinion piece on Monday morning in The Detroit Free Press, making instant headlines here. She had submitted it the night before, as she pored through a thick, leather-bound binder containing the House Intelligence Committee’s report on Mr. Trump’s dealings with Ukraine and a thick tome containing the House of Representatives’ manual of rules, procedures and precedents.

“I didn’t dream of being a politician,” Ms. Slotkin said in an interview Sunday night. “My whole life. This was not part of my normal plan. And if this district sees fit to elect someone else, then I will accept that and walk away with my head held high that I’ve made decisions based on principle, and not political calculus.”

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Slotkin, Backing Impeachment, Draws Instant Protests, and Applause

Westlake Legal Group 16dc-slotkin-facebookJumbo Slotkin, Backing Impeachment, Draws Instant Protests, and Applause United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Slotkin, Elissa Michigan impeachment Elections, House of Representatives

ROCHESTER, Mich. — The blowback began on Monday even before Representative Elissa Slotkin took the lectern to announce she would vote to impeach President Trump.

Dozens of angry Trump supporters bearing “Impeach Slotkin, Keep Trump” signs shouted down Ms. Slotkin, a first-term congresswoman, at a packed town hall-style meeting in a university ballroom, chanting “Hey, hey! Ho, ho! Elissa Slotkin has got to go!” and “One-term congresswoman!” and “C.I.A. Hack!” — a reference to Ms. Slotkin’s past work as a C.I.A. analyst.

Keeping her composure, Ms. Slotkin plowed through her statement — “Guys, let’s try to have a civil conversation,” she said at one point — and then took questions, though her pleas for civility were ignored.

The more she explained her decision to constituents in her district north of Detroit, one that Mr. Trump won in 2016, the angrier and louder the protests grew.

“MAGA! MAGA!” attendees shouted, repeating the president’s campaign slogan. “Four more years! Four more years!”

But the voices on the other side, though not nearly as loud, were present in force. Most in the crowd of about 400 people who gathered here on Monday leaped to their feet and applauded when Ms. Slotkin announced her intention to vote “yes” on Wednesday when the House holds its vote on the articles of impeachment.

One of her supporters arrived with a competing sign: “We’ve got your back, Representative Slotkin.”

So it has been all year for Ms. Slotkin, who served in Iraq as a C.I.A. analyst and in the Obama Defense Department before she ran for Congress in 2018, winning a seat that had been held by Republicans for 20 years. Caught in the middle of the United States’ red-blue divide, she resisted impeachment for months, even after Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel, issued a report detailing at least 10 instances of obstruction of justice by Mr. Trump.

The story of how she arrived at her impeachment decision is the story of so many moderate Democrats in this year’s historic freshman class. Moved to run for public office to counter the rise of Mr. Trump, they flipped Republican seats and are now in danger of becoming one-term members of Congress — possibly costing their party control of the House — over a decision they tried mightily to avoid.

Ms. Slotkin announced her decision in an opinion piece on Monday morning in The Detroit Free Press, making instant headlines here. She had submitted it the night before, as she pored through a thick, leather-bound binder containing the House Intelligence Committee’s report on Mr. Trump’s dealings with Ukraine and a thick tome containing the House of Representatives’ manual of rules, procedures and precedents.

“I didn’t dream of being a politician,” Ms. Slotkin said in an interview Sunday night. “My whole life. This was not part of my normal plan. And if this district sees fit to elect someone else, then I will accept that and walk away with my head held high that I’ve made decisions based on principle, and not political calculus.”

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Corruption Inquiry Spreads to U.A.W. Lakeside Resort

Westlake Legal Group 24resort1-facebookJumbo Corruption Inquiry Spreads to U.A.W. Lakeside Resort Williams, Dennis (1953- ) United Automobile Workers Suits and Litigation (Civil) Reuther, Walter Philip Organized Labor Michigan Jones, Gary (1956- ) Corruption (Institutional) Bribery and Kickbacks Automobiles

ONAWAY, Mich. — The United Auto Workers union is based in Detroit, but its spiritual home lies 250 miles to the north, in a dense and remote forest on the shores of Black Lake.

Here, 40 miles from the nearest Starbucks, the U.A.W. owns a spartan retreat known to few people outside the auto industry, though it opened nearly 50 years ago. Covering 1,000 acres, the gated compound includes cabins, lodges, a banquet hall and a recreation center with an Olympic-size swimming pool. An eternal flame marks the hilltop resting place of the ashes of Walter Reuther, who built the U.A.W. into one of the most powerful unions in the country in the 1950s and 1960s.

This tranquil scene was disrupted in August when the F.B.I. raided the compound, seizing documents and records. The raid was the latest chapter in a yearslong Justice Department investigation into corruption at the union that has thrown the U.A.W. into turmoil and embroiled two of Detroit’s Big Three automakers — Fiat Chrysler and General Motors.

The resort was one of a half-dozen locations government agents searched. The raids signaled that investigators were not done with their work, despite having charged or won convictions of a dozen union officials and three Fiat Chrysler executives.

Last week, the U.A.W. president, Gary Jones, resigned as the union’s executive board was preparing to remove him for the submission of false expense reports and using union money for personal gain. The U.A.W. said Mr. Jones had concealed the use of more than $1 million in union funds for luxury travel, extravagant dinners and purchases of high-price cigars, golf clubs and apparel for himself, his family and his lieutenants.

What drew federal agents to Black Lake is not clear. But union members and labor experts have criticized the U.A.W.’s unusual decision to build a luxury lakeside cabin at the resort for the exclusive use of Mr. Jones’s predecessor as president, Dennis Williams. Federal agents searched the cabin and separately raided a home owned by Mr. Williams in Corona, Calif. The union is reviewing other financial transactions for possible wrongdoing, and now plans to sell the cabin and the land that it sits on in a secluded corner of the retreat, said Brian Rothenberg, a U.A.W. spokesman.

The decision to sell the cabin was part of a set of reforms instituted by the acting president, Rory Gamble, after he took the helm from Mr. Jones. “Restoring the full faith and trust of our membership and protecting their interests is the top priority,” Mr. Rothenberg said.

The U.A.W. provided more modest, rustic cabins within the retreat complex for other previous retired presidents, and the union is considering ending that practice, too.

Union members and supporters say it is particularly disappointing that the resort — formally called the Walter P. and May Reuther Family Education Center — has been pulled into the investigation. The union uses it as a place for members to study the past and plan for the future in training seminars and conferences.

“Black Lake serves a critical purpose for the union,” said Harley Shaiken, a labor relations professor at the University of California, Berkeley, who has attended and taught seminars at the retreat since the 1970s. “It’s historically important for the union. It’s meant to get people together to debate critical issues. It’s a place of thinking and engaging.”

When the retreat opened in 1970, it was heralded for its timbered beams and spare Scandinavian design.

Today, rather than a showplace for the U.A.W., Black Lake is a part of the union’s financial difficulties. The union spends several million dollars a year to operate it — money that is classified as a loan to the subsidiary that operates Black Lake. In 2018, the accumulated debt amounted to more than $60 million.

Anyone can book a stay there. During a recent overnight stay, I found it dated. Guest rooms feature few of the amenities found in modern hotels, like Wi-Fi and cable TV. Some hallways were marked by musty odors. But a golf course the U.A.W. built just outside the retreat in 2000, at a cost of $6.7 million, is considered one of the best in Michigan.

At the main gate, I was told only union-made vehicles were allowed on the grounds. I had to park my Volkswagen in a lot outside the perimeter. Some Chevrolets and Fords were parked there, too, because vehicles made in Mexico are not welcome, either.

Credit…Neal E. Boudette/The New York Times Credit…Neal E. Boudette/The New York Times

That week Black Lake was hosting about 150 workers for a weeklong seminar on the history of organized labor and the U.A.W. Any member is welcome to attend such courses. The union covers the cost and offsets the wages workers would have earned that week. Participants said they spent much of the day in lectures — instructors take attendance. One afternoon is set aside for recreation.

When I visited, the large gymnasium with two full-size basketball courts and the pool were empty most of the day. Six pool tables remained untouched in a darkened room.

These days, senior union officials often hold meetings in places like Orlando, Fla., Washington, D.C., and May, N.J. Before becoming the U.A.W. president in 2018, Mr. Jones ran a regional office in Hazelwood, Mo., and held annual conferences in Palm Springs, Calif. Court filings by federal prosecutors and an internal union complaint against Mr. Jones claim that he and other union officials booked luxury villas for four weeks or more, even though the Palm Springs conferences lasted less than a week.

In raids at Mr. Jones’s home and elsewhere, agents seized thousands of dollars in cash, hundreds of bottles of high-price liquor, hundreds of golf shirts, multiple sets of golf clubs and large quantities of cigars that had been billed to union accounts, according to court filings. One dinner described by prosecutors ran up a bill of $6,599.87 that included $1,760 for four bottles of Louis Roederer Cristal Champagne.

A lawyer for Mr. Jones, J. Bruce Maffeo, said the suggestion that the conference expenses had been concealed “is without any basis in fact.” Spending for the conferences in Palm Springs was “laid out in sufficient detail to the U.A.W. accounting department over a period of years.”

A close associate of Mr. Jones who helped organize the conferences in Palm Springs and has been charged by federal prosecutors, Vance Pearson, resigned from the U.A.W. on Sunday. The union had been taking steps to remove him from his post as a regional director.

Back at the union’s Black Lake resort, the stone and glass cabin for Mr. Williams, the former president, is in a fenced-off area more than a mile from the main complex. But it is accessible from the lake. Wading in to its shoreline, I found the home with picture windows facing the lake. According to the county planning office, the 1,885-square-foot residence has cherry cabinets, granite countertops, three-and-a-half baths and a stone patio.

Mr. Reuther hoped the union would train future generations of leaders in the contemplative setting far from the toil of assembly lines. At one time, it had a day care center — Mr. Reuther imagined workers’ families joining them on their retreats.

He also hoped it would be a place where the U.A.W. could use its power to solve societal problems. The first event held at Black Lake was a conference on the environment that the union organized with the United Nations in the summer of 1970.

Such was the U.A.W.’s reach that it could attract foreign government officials to Northern Michigan. But Mr. Reuther didn’t attend the event. He died in a plane crash while traveling to Black Lake a few months earlier.

Shortly after the resort opened, the union waged a bitter strike against G.M., and it eventually prevailed, coming away with significant wage increases. The strike was tough on the union, which depleted its strike fund and went into debt, even mortgaging Black Lake to the Teamsters for a time.

By the 1980s, the Big Three auto companies and the union were in a slow decline. Today, the U.A.W.’s membership has fallen to about 400,000, from as many as 1.5 million when Mr. Reuther ran it. But it still remains a potent force, recently winning higher wages and bonuses for G.M. workers after a 40-day strike.

Around the time G.M. and Chrysler were in bankruptcy in 2009, the U.A.W. tried sell the resort, which was viewed as a luxury when thousands of workers were losing their jobs. But the union couldn’t find a buyer.

That’s good news, said JoAn Matney, a retired autoworker from Toledo. “It’s empowering and fun to go there,” she said. “I definitely think they should keep it.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Sex Harassment Lawsuit Was Just Settled For Close To 300k In Fraser, Michigan. Here Is The Proof.

Westlake Legal Group WelcomeToFraser-300x160 Sex Harassment Lawsuit Was Just Settled For Close To 300k In Fraser, Michigan. Here Is The Proof. sex harassment Richard Haberman Michigan Front Page Stories Fraser Featured Story Doug Hagerty Allow Media Exception 2019

This is going to be a fun week.

With only 8 days left until ELECTION 2019 occurs, I am continuing my expose into some of the ridiculous things that are going on in politics. You might think I’m talking national but this is all local.

Here are my previous offerings…

Covering the Local Angle. What Is Happening in Fraser, Michigan.

Today I am following up on a previous article I posted about the sexual harassment lawsuit that was just settled last month here in the city of Fraser. Three women ( Leah Brown, Kelly Doland, and Michelle Kwiatkowski) sued the city in the case of Leah Brown v. City of Fraser in the county of Macomb in the State of Michigan.

A brief summary of the case is this…

Two elected officials, Joe Nichols who was Mayor and Councilman Matt Hemelberg were removed from office for unwelcome sexual harassment and creating a hostile work environment with these three ladies. Others also reported similar complaints but did not want to participate in the tribunal that was held by the council to see if their conduct warranted removal.

The council did decide to remove Nichols and Hemelberg in September of 2017. Both men appealed the decision before a circuit court and the Michigan Court of Appeals but ultimately lost. The local county paper covered the C.O.A. decision below.

From The Macomb Daily

In a 15-page opinion Tuesday, the appellate court said Nichols through his attorneys showed no legal basis that the tribunal hearing – a procedure established by the Fraser City Charter for the council to consider removal of one of their own – was improper, or that Caretti abused his discretion in rejecting Nichols’ request that the judge authorize superintending control to put Nichols back in office.

“In this case, the cause for removal was misconduct in office; specifically, Nichols’ sexual harassment of city employees in his official capacity as the mayor,” the appeals judges wrote. “Because we concluded … that there was sufficient evidence for the City Council to find that Nichols’ unwelcome sexual conduct and communication created a hostile work environment, it follows that the record of the hearing contained substantial evidence to support the removal decision. In other words, the City Council members could conclude from the evidence that the charge of misconduct in office was sufficiently established, warranting a vote to remove Nichols from office.”

The ladies eventually sued the city for the hostile workplace and just settled a couple of weeks before this was supposed to go to trial for a total of $85,000 dollars apiece. Listed below are the documents from the court confirming the settlement and the amount.

Leah Brown

Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

Kelly Dolland

Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

Michelle Kwiatkowski

Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

( Note: The last page with Michelle Kwiatkowski I did not receive the signed copy in the FOIA request but she has confirmed she did agree to the settlement)

All three ladies settled for $85,000 each which comes to $255,000 dollars. Add in the deductibles for insurance and other miscellaneous add ons and you are close to a $300,000 to close an ugly chapter in this city’s history.

Yet as the late great Billy Mays used to say “But Wait, There’s More”!

The ladies all reported the harassment by Nichols and Hemelberg to the city manager who at the time was a fella by the name of Richard Haberman. You would think that any person who was in charge of the city would be making sure the work environment was safe and non-threatening. That any leader would have wanted to protect the female employees from this type of behavior.

Yet, according to the depositions, Haberman failed badly.

Adding tons of salt to the wound of this debacle is the fact that Haberman is now running for council being he wants to help fix the overall mess he left as city manager.

What a peach.

Here are just some snippets from the depositions from the ladies in the case.

Kelly Doland who is the city clerk for Fraser said this on page 80 of her deposition…

Q. When you raised the issue of the alleged harassment at the dept head meeting, was there any response by Mr. Haberman?

A. Yes

Q. What did he say?

A. He said, I would advise you to get an attorney.

Q. Was that his sole response?

A. That’s’ the best I can recall.

I also have confirmed with others in that meeting that Haberman was told of the harassment and he did say to get a lawyer.

Michelle Kwiatkowski, who is the Systems Administrator/ IT director for the city of Fraser said this from page 42 of her deposition…

Q. Did you make anybody aware that you thought this was inappropriate and hostile in 2015?

A. Mr. Haberman.

Q. What did you tell Mr. Haberman specifically in 2015 as it related to Mr. Nichols?

A. At that time we were still going back and forth because they wanted access to public safety. I told them there was no way they were getting access to public safety. He told me that– I specifically said– especially the way they come in and the way they treat women, there is no way they’re going over to public safety. I won’t sign off on it. I had to sign off on it in order to meet the LEIN requirements. he said he would talk to them about not coming in so much and he never did.

Both ladies indicate they went to Haberman to inform him of the harassment. In the case of Kelly Doland, he told her to “get a lawyer” which the women ultimately did and it has now set the city back almost 300k. Haberman’s inaction also forced the council to hold a tribunal to remove two members.

Pretty embarrassing stuff.

I have been interviewing those running for council and the only one to not respond to me has been Haberman. I happened to catch him at the local V.F.W. hall on Wednesday, October 23 to ask him about this settlement and a couple of other questions.  He was not pleased to see me being I was doing a facebook live feed. He tried to knock the phone out of my hand and proceeded to run into a bar where only V.F.W members are allowed.

Westlake Legal Group MadHaberman-169x300 Sex Harassment Lawsuit Was Just Settled For Close To 300k In Fraser, Michigan. Here Is The Proof. sex harassment Richard Haberman Michigan Front Page Stories Fraser Featured Story Doug Hagerty Allow Media Exception 2019

As you can see he was not happy with me and his girlfriend was even more displeased and had some choice words for me that I shall not repeat here on the family-friendly pages of Red State.

The whole point of this sad story is that it is critical you do some homework with ANY candidates that are running to represent you.

In the city of Fraser, the former city manager is running for office to represent the city he once left in a mess. The city removed two people who were harassing employees and he could have prevented all of it but he looked the other way instead of doing his job and he now won’t discuss this.

I’m sure all across the United States there are similar cases like this in every town. You need to become informed and help weed these people out before they can influence public policy.

Otherwise, we all lose.

Check out my other posts here on Red State and my podcast Bourbon On The Rocks plus like Bourbon On The Rocks on Facebook and follow me on the twitters at IRISHDUKE2 

The post Sex Harassment Lawsuit Was Just Settled For Close To 300k In Fraser, Michigan. Here Is The Proof. appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group WelcomeToFraser-300x160 Sex Harassment Lawsuit Was Just Settled For Close To 300k In Fraser, Michigan. Here Is The Proof. sex harassment Richard Haberman Michigan Front Page Stories Fraser Featured Story Doug Hagerty Allow Media Exception 2019   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Michigan Senate: Two New Polls Show Democratic Sen. Gary Peters Has Some Trouble, and His Name Is John James

Westlake Legal Group JohnJamesMIAPimage-620x317 Michigan Senate: Two New Polls Show Democratic Sen. Gary Peters Has Some Trouble, and His Name Is John James republicans polls Polling Politics North Carolina Michigan John James Gary Peters Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post elections democrats debbie stabenow Congress Campaigns Allow Media Exception 2020 Elections 2020 2018 elections 2018

Republican U.S. Senate candidate John James speaks at a primary night election party in Detroit, Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Republican nominee John James gave Michigan’s senior Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow a run for her money in 2018 in a closely-watched Senate race, but fell short.

Westlake Legal Group StabenowVs.JamesMISenate2018-620x371 Michigan Senate: Two New Polls Show Democratic Sen. Gary Peters Has Some Trouble, and His Name Is John James republicans polls Polling Politics North Carolina Michigan John James Gary Peters Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post elections democrats debbie stabenow Congress Campaigns Allow Media Exception 2020 Elections 2020 2018 elections 2018

Screen grab via the NYT.

But James, a West Point grad and U.S. Army veteran who served in Iraq, is not someone who gives up easily. This time around he wants to take on Michigan’s junior Sen. Gary Peters, and two new polls show James’ hard work is paying off:

That “oh, oh” you hear from the Democratic camp of U.S. Senator Gary Peters is that, in one week, two polls are out showing his race against Republican challenger John James is a statistical dead heat and for an incumbent to be in that spot one year before the election is hardly good news.

In the Vanguard, Dennis, Pubic Sector Consultant poll last May it was Mr. Peters 42% and a generic Republican 36%. It is now 39.5% for Mr. Peters and 39.3% for Mr. James.

The race today is a toss-up.

And then there was this poll from earlier this month:

The poll, conducted by the Michigan-based Marketing Resource Group, a firm with ties to Republicans, shows Peters leading businessman and Iraq War veteran John James (R) by a slim 43 percent to 40 percent margin.
[…]
James may have a better chance against Peters, who is seeking his second term in office. Peters is less well-known among Michiganders than his senior colleague; while 75 percent of state voters polled said they were aware of Peters, only 35 percent knew enough about him to say whether they felt positively, 20 percent, or negatively, 15 percent
[…]
The poll shows a tighter race than a Target Insyght survey last month, which showed Peters leading by a 53 percent to 37 percent margin.

His third quarter fundraising haul was pretty impressive, too:

We still have a little over a year between now and election time so obviously a lot of things can change, but the fact that James has a strong showing and is doing well in the fundraising department at this stage in the game is a good sign that the inroads he made with voters during the last campaign cycle are paying off.

His only primary opponent as of right now is a man named Bob Carr, and he dropped out of the 2018 Senate race before the primary. He’s also a former Democrat. The Michigan primary is August 4, 2020.

Even with all that encouraging news, James or whoever the Republican nominee ends up being will still end up having a major uphill battle to clear the final hurdle:

Beyond that, beating the professorial Peters will require doing something no one has done in Michigan in 67 years: defeating a sitting Democratic U.S. senator. The last was Blair Moody in 1952, who had been appointed to serve out a term the previous year and lost an election bid to Charles Potter.

Also, though President Trump won Michigan in 2016, his approval numbers there right now are not good according to the Michigan state chart from Morning Consult (make sure to scroll down and click the Michigan tab). This could carry over in down ballot races if that sentiment doesn’t change between now and November 2020.

In any event, put this one on your list of races to watch next year. The Michigan Senate race in 2018 was closer than people thought it would be and that’s just one of many reasons why Republicans feel like James has a real shot at an upset the second time around.

Stay tuned.

(Hat tip: Legal Insurrection)

——-
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 16+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –

The post Michigan Senate: Two New Polls Show Democratic Sen. Gary Peters Has Some Trouble, and His Name Is John James appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group JohnJamesMIAPimage-300x153 Michigan Senate: Two New Polls Show Democratic Sen. Gary Peters Has Some Trouble, and His Name Is John James republicans polls Polling Politics North Carolina Michigan John James Gary Peters Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post elections democrats debbie stabenow Congress Campaigns Allow Media Exception 2020 Elections 2020 2018 elections 2018   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Huh: Another poll shows John James statistically tied with Dem Sen. Gary Peters in Michigan

Westlake Legal Group jj Huh: Another poll shows John James statistically tied with Dem Sen. Gary Peters in Michigan vanguard The Blog Senate Pubic Sector Consultant poll Michigan John James Gary Peters Dennis

I sure hope this is for real. And it may be: Recall that James fell just six points short of formidable incumbent Debbie Stabenow last fall, on a night when Democrats were cleaning up in House races coast to coast. Also recall that a separate poll published last week found James trailing Gary Peters by three points, 43/40.

Now here comes a new one putting Peters and James less than a point apart.

Imagine if Democrats have a big night in the Senate next fall, picking up three net seats — and their dream of a Senate majority ends up in ashes because Gary “Who?” Peters couldn’t hold off James in supposedly blue Michigan.

In the Vanguard, Dennis, Pubic Sector Consultant poll last May it was Mr. Peters 42% and a generic Republican 36%. It is now 39.5% for Mr. Peters and 39.3% for Mr. James

At this point in the campaign last year when Senator Debbie Stabenow took on Mr. James, she had a comfortable lead.

But he closed the gap on her and now she is saying, “this is a make or break race and we’re at a critical moment.”

She notes Mr. James raised more money than Mr. Peters in the third quarter but Peters continues to have more money in his coffers than the challenger.

How bad could it get theoretically for the GOP in November 2020? Well, start with the positive. No matter how poorly things go nationally, Alabama’s likely to dump Doug Jones for a Republican to be named later. That’s GOP +1. Assume James stuns Michigan by knocking off Peters, a big ask but not an impossible. That’s GOP +2, a total of 55 Senate seats — if all Republican incumbents hold their seats. And that’s really the best-case scenario. There are no other ripe pick-up opportunities for Republicans.

Things are different for Democrats. In Maine, one lefty poll has Susan Collins at 50 percent disapproval. In Colorado, Cory Gardner looks to be in trouble against John Hickenlooper. In Arizona, Mark Kelly is already ahead of Martha McSally. And in North Carolina, at least one poll taken last month shows Thom Tillis narrowly trailing his Democratic challenger. A Morning Consult survey of various battleground races published last week found slippage in the job approval of five different vulnerable GOP senators, with Joni Ernst sliding the furthest at nine points. That’s what the impeachment saga is apparently doing to Republicans. The good news is that impeachment will long since have ended by the time voters vote next fall. The bad news is that the GOP will doubtless be forced to defend Trump on other matters various and sundry by then, with the Ukraine matter lurking in the background of voters’ minds. How will that shake out?

In the ultimate worst-case scenario, Collins, Gardner, McSally, Tillis, and Ernst all get wiped out and maybe one or both of the Senate seats on the ballot in increasingly purple Georgia go the other way too. If that happened, it would mean a national disaster for the GOP, in which case John James — and Trump — are likely losers too. Conceivably, Democrats could have a net gain of five or six seats and control of the White House. Which would mean nothing would be standing in the way of Chuck Schumer nuking the filibuster and enacting President Warren’s “share the wealth” agenda. Gulp.

Trump’s job approval in Michigan, by the way, was 43/53 last month. It’s not unthinkable that James will run ahead of him on the ballot next fall; it happened in Florida in 2016, for instance, with Marco Rubio winning 200,000 more votes in his Senate race than Trump did in the presidential contest. If Trump can make Michigan as close in 2020 as he did in 2016, James could potentially win narrowly even if Trump loses narrowly. But a presidential job approval above 43 percent on Election Day would be … preferable, needless to say.

The post Huh: Another poll shows John James statistically tied with Dem Sen. Gary Peters in Michigan appeared first on Hot Air.

Westlake Legal Group jj-300x153 Huh: Another poll shows John James statistically tied with Dem Sen. Gary Peters in Michigan vanguard The Blog Senate Pubic Sector Consultant poll Michigan John James Gary Peters Dennis   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com