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Covering The Local Angle. What Is Happening In Fraser, Michigan.

Westlake Legal Group WelcomeToFraser-300x160 Covering The Local Angle. What Is Happening In Fraser, Michigan. Richard Haberman Michigan Front Page Stories Fraser Doug Hagerty corruption Barbara Jennings Allow Media Exception 2019 @MayorDoug

I have for the past 4 years been involved in the local political scene here in Fraser, Michigan. For my friends that are dealing with the hustle and bustle on the national or state level that is amusing to them. I will have to admit if the situations were reversed I would probably think the same thing.

However, the mess locally is where the crap rolls uphill and we all wonder how that happened.

Below are the posts that I have done on this subject and where I will post all the future ones so that people that are interested will be able to find these easily. I hope this helps others decide to get involved in some fashion.

April 24th, 2019

Preventing And Exposing Corruption Starts Locally. Welcome To Fraser, Michigan.

April 29th, 2019

Getting Local: How It All Began.

September 16th, 2019

Something Smells Fishy In Fraser, Michigan.

October 4th, 2019

In Fraser, Ignoring Sexual Harassment Claims At City Hall Means You Should Run For Office

October 6th, 2019

City Of Fraser Had ‘Deficiencies’ In Its 2015 Audit Report. What Were They?

Another new story tomorrow on October 15, 2019.

Super Secret links of interest.

Shortfalls In Budget

City Workers sue for 1 million dollars.

The post Covering The Local Angle. What Is Happening In Fraser, Michigan. appeared first on RedState.

Westlake Legal Group WelcomeToFraser-300x160 Covering The Local Angle. What Is Happening In Fraser, Michigan. Richard Haberman Michigan Front Page Stories Fraser Doug Hagerty corruption Barbara Jennings Allow Media Exception 2019 @MayorDoug   Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

G.M. Strike’s Economic Toll Is Showing: ‘I Might Lose the Business’

Westlake Legal Group 08impact8-facebookJumbo G.M. Strike’s Economic Toll Is Showing: ‘I Might Lose the Business’ United Automobile Workers Strikes Organized Labor Michigan Layoffs and Job Reductions Labor and Jobs General Motors Economic Conditions and Trends Automobiles

The truck drivers at Phoenix Transit & Logistics in Dearborn, Mich., are long gone. Around three dozen of the trailers they once ferried between auto plants — packed with dashboards, engine components, lights and other parts for General Motors — are sitting in a lot with nowhere to go.

It’s an increasingly familiar scene as the strike against G.M. by the United Auto Workers enters its fourth week. From suppliers to shippers to restaurants, the impact of the work stoppage is spreading through the web of businesses whose fates are tied to the biggest American automaker.

Wael Tlaib, the owner of Phoenix Transit & Logistics, said he had laid off nearly his entire staff, including 80 drivers, and had dipped into his personal savings to keep his company afloat. “I might lose the business next week,” Mr. Tlaib said.

The most intense economic pain is being felt in the industrial Midwest, where G.M.’s network of plants and suppliers is thickest. It is a difficult time for the region’s manufacturing industry, which even before the strike was contending with slowing auto sales, a weakening global economy and the trade war.

An economic blow to the Midwest would have broad consequences in part because the region is an important political battleground that will help determine who wins the 2020 presidential election. In 2016, President Trump’s narrow victories in Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin put him over the top in the Electoral College tally.

The state of the auto industry “usually has political ramifications that are beyond its direct economic influence,” said Matt Grossmann, a political-science professor at Michigan State University. “A lot of Democrats here are running on the promise to help the factory workers and the working class, and saying Trump hasn’t done it.”

Nearly 50,000 U.A.W. members walked off the job on Sept. 16, the largest stoppage since G.M. workers went on strike in 2007. The union is pressing for more job security as well as the reopening of plants in the United States that the company has recently idled. For its part, G.M. wants to limit wage increases, slow the growth of health care costs, and gain flexibility in how plants are staffed and operated.

After signs of progress over the last week, the two sides hit a roadblock this weekend on how production might be moved to the United States from Mexico. Terry Dittes, the U.A.W.’s lead negotiator, said on Sunday that the talks had taken a “turn for the worse.”

The impact of the strike stretches from Mexico to Canada, where G.M. plants that depend on American factories have been shuttered, putting thousands out of work. Analysts estimate that G.M. has lost $600 million as a result of the strike.

In the United States, 34 G.M. plants have gone dark. And striking workers are making do with a $250-a-week subsidy from the union.

[Watch “The Weekly,” The Times’s new TV show, report on GM and its workers’ fight to survive in Lordstown, Ohio.]

In the first three weeks of the strike, $412 million in wages were lost, according to Patrick Anderson, chief executive of Anderson Economic Group. “Each week the damage grows geometrically,” Mr. Anderson said. “First you lose your U.A.W. workers, then the immediate suppliers, then the next tiers.”

Michigan has the most exposure to the auto sector, with roughly 8 percent of the state’s economy linked to the industry. Even after factory closures decimated employment in the car industry in recent decades, the state remains dotted with auto plants and suppliers.

Gabriel Ehrlich, director of the University of Michigan’s Research Seminar in Qualitative Economics, estimates that the Michigan economy is growing at an annual rate of 1.4 percent. Without the strike, he said, that number could be 0.1 to 0.2 points higher.

Even before the strike, manufacturing employment in Michigan fell by 1,300 jobs in the first eight months of the year. By comparison, manufacturers added 43,000 jobs nationally in the same period.

“There’s been real damage to the economy,” said Charles Ballard, an economics professor at Michigan State. “It hasn’t been huge yet but the ripple effects will get bigger the longer this goes on.”

In Flint, at least 1,200 truckers and production workers from suppliers have lost their jobs because of the strike. That includes hundreds from a supplier of seats to G.M., Lear Corporation, according to Duane Ballard, the financial secretary for U.A.W. Local 659, which represents employees at that factory.

A Lear spokesman did not respond to a request for comment.

Many of those workers are new hires who have not worked at the Lear plant long enough to qualify for state unemployment insurance, Mr. Ballard said.

On a rainy night last week, more than two dozen people affected by the strike showed up at the Martus Luna Food Pantry in Flint, said Art Luna, who runs the pantry.

They “are the ones that are really hurting,” he said. “They’re anxious to go back to work.”

The fallout has extended beyond the auto industry, disrupting local businesses that serve autoworkers.

On a typical Saturday night, Luigi’s Restaurant, an Italian eatery a short drive from the Lear factory, sees around 350 customers. But in recent weeks, that number has fallen by as many as 60 people, according to Tom Beaubien, who runs the restaurant.

“After one week without pay, everybody starts to suffer, from McDonald’s all the way to Luigi’s Restaurant,” Mr. Beaubien said.

It’s unclear just how many workers have been laid off by G.M.’s suppliers. Magna International, one of the world’s largest auto suppliers, has idled “a few” plants, according to a spokeswoman, Tracy Fuerst. “We attempted to keep our employees at these impacted plants working as long as possible through training, maintenance and inventory,” she said.

Some G.M. suppliers are finding creative ways to keep workers occupied, whether repairing machines or building an inventory of auto components to ship later.

“Your smarter suppliers are being very careful about how they lay people off,” said Michael Robinet, an expert on the auto industry at IHS Markit. “They don’t want to lose their better employees to a competitor or to another occupation.”

Of course, Michigan’s economy is not as dependent on the auto sector as it was even two decades ago. Lansing has two G.M. plants but their economic weight is counterbalanced by the state government and the city’s hospital system, said Andy Schor, the city’s mayor. Another large employer, Michigan State University, is nearby.

“The sooner they resolve this the better but I wouldn’t say everything has shut down in Lansing,” Mr. Schor said. Over all, G.M. and its suppliers account for 6,600 jobs with $250 million in annual wages in the city, which has roughly 118,000 residents.

Mr. Schor said autoworkers had been asking the city-owned utility for more time to pay their electric and water bills.

Yet even at companies that are not highly dependent on G.M., the effect of the strike was immediate. Pridgeon & Clay, a component maker that sells to G.M.’s suppliers, froze hiring right away.

“We heard from our customers within hours,” said R. Kevin Clay, the company’s president. Business had already been a little soft at Pridgeon and Clay, which is based in Grand Rapids, Mich., when the strike began.

G.M. suppliers account for about $13 million of the company’s $300 million in annual revenue. Now parts destined for the automaker are piled up in corners of the company’s distribution center.

Mr. Clay said he was determined to avoid layoffs. “It’s certainly eating into profitability but rather than cut people, you pinch every penny,” he said.

Other manufacturers, like Stripmatic in Cleveland, say manpower has been tight recently, and the strike has freed workers for other tasks.

But Bill Adler, the company’s president, said business could suffer if G.M.’s plants don’t resume production soon. “If the strike goes on much longer, what started out as a very good year could turn into a mediocre year,” he said.

Around the country, G.M. dealers said inventories had grown somewhat tighter.

“We had a pretty deep shelf when the strike started and are at about average inventory right now,” said Mark Scarpelli, president of Raymond Chevrolet in Antioch, Ill.

G.M. said last week that its American dealers had 760,000 vehicles at the end of September, down 5 percent from a year ago. That’s enough to last several weeks, but dealers are nearing the time when they place orders for the brisk sales they usually see around the end of the year.

Back in Dearborn, Mr. Tlaib of Phoenix Transit & Logistics is doing what he can to get trucks back on the road. He emptied five of his trailers into a warehouse, freeing them to carry parts for other companies. But that has made barely a dent in the G.M. inventory in his yard.

“We don’t know what’s going to happen next,” he said. “We just sit down and smoke and watch the news.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

G.M. Strike’s Economic Toll: Idle Trucks, Packed Warehouses

Westlake Legal Group 08impact1-facebookJumbo G.M. Strike’s Economic Toll: Idle Trucks, Packed Warehouses United Automobile Workers Strikes Organized Labor Michigan Layoffs and Job Reductions Labor and Jobs General Motors Economic Conditions and Trends Automobiles

The truck drivers at Phoenix Transit & Logistics in Dearborn, Mich., are long gone. Around three dozen of the trailers they once ferried between auto plants — packed with dashboards, engine components, lights and other parts for General Motors — are sitting in a lot with nowhere to go.

It’s an increasingly familiar scene as the strike against G.M. by the United Auto Workers enters its fourth week. From suppliers to shippers to restaurants, the impact of the work stoppage is spreading through the web of businesses whose fates are tied to the biggest American automaker.

Wael Tlaib, the owner of Phoenix Transit & Logistics, said he had laid off nearly his entire staff, including 80 drivers, and had dipped into his personal savings to keep his company afloat. “I might lose the business next week,” Mr. Tlaib said.

The most intense economic pain is being felt in the industrial Midwest, where G.M.’s network of plants and suppliers is thickest. It is a difficult time for the region’s manufacturing industry, which even before the strike was contending with slowing auto sales, a weakening global economy and the trade war.

An economic blow to the Midwest would have broad consequences in part because the region is an important political battleground that will help determine who wins the 2020 presidential election. In 2016, President Trump’s narrow victories in Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin put him over the top in the Electoral College tally.

The state of the auto industry “usually has political ramifications that are beyond its direct economic influence,” said Matt Grossmann, a political-science professor at Michigan State University. “A lot of Democrats here are running on the promise to help the factory workers and the working class, and saying Trump hasn’t done it.”

Nearly 50,000 U.A.W. members walked off the job on Sept. 16, the largest stoppage since G.M. workers went on strike in 2007. The union is pressing for more job security as well as the reopening of plants in the United States that the company has recently idled. For its part, G.M. wants workers to pick up more of their health care costs and agree to give managers greater flexibility in factory operations.

After signs of progress over the last week, the two sides hit a roadblock this weekend on how production might be moved to the United States from Mexico. Terry Dittes, the U.A.W.’s lead negotiator, said on Sunday that the talks had taken a “turn for the worse.”

The impact of the strike stretches from Mexico to Canada, where G.M. plants that depend on American factories have been shuttered, putting thousands out of work. Analysts estimate that G.M. has lost $600 million as a result of the strike.

In the United States, 34 G.M. plants have gone dark. And striking workers are making do with a $250-a-week subsidy from the union.

In the first three weeks of the strike, $412 million in wages were lost, according to Patrick Anderson, chief executive of Anderson Economic Group. “Each week the damage grows geometrically,” Mr. Anderson said. “First you lose your U.A.W. workers, then the immediate suppliers, then the next tiers.”

Michigan has the most exposure to the auto sector, with roughly 8 percent of the state’s economy linked to the industry. Even after factory closures decimated employment in the car industry in recent decades, the state remains dotted with auto plants and suppliers.

Gabriel Ehrlich, director of the University of Michigan’s Research Seminar in Qualitative Economics, estimates that the Michigan economy is growing at an annual rate of 1.4 percent. Without the strike, he said, that number could be 0.1 to 0.2 points higher.

Even before the strike, manufacturing employment in Michigan fell by 1,300 jobs in the first eight months of the year. By comparison, manufacturers added 43,000 jobs nationally in the same period.

“There’s been real damage to the economy,” said Charles Ballard, an economics professor at Michigan State. “It hasn’t been huge yet but the ripple effects will get bigger the longer this goes on.”

In Flint, at least 1,200 truckers and production workers from suppliers have lost their jobs because of the strike. That includes hundreds from a supplier of seats to G.M., Lear Corporation, according to Duane Ballard, the financial secretary for U.A.W. Local 659, which represents employees at that factory.

A Lear spokesman did not respond to a request for comment.

Many of those workers are new hires who have not worked at the Lear plant long enough to qualify for state unemployment insurance, Mr. Ballard said.

On a rainy night last week, more than two dozen people affected by the strike showed up at the Martus Luna Food Pantry in Flint, said Art Luna, who runs the pantry.

They “are the ones that are really hurting,” he said. “They’re anxious to go back to work.”

The fallout has extended beyond the auto industry, disrupting local businesses that serve autoworkers.

On a typical Saturday night, Luigi’s Restaurant, an Italian eatery a short drive from the Lear factory, sees around 350 customers. But in recent weeks, that number has fallen by as many as 60 people, according to Tom Beaubien, who runs the restaurant.

“After one week without pay, everybody starts to suffer, from McDonald’s all the way to Luigi’s Restaurant,” Mr. Beaubien said.

It’s unclear just how many workers have been laid off by G.M.’s suppliers. Magna International, one of the world’s largest auto suppliers, has idled “a few” plants, according to a spokeswoman, Tracy Fuerst. “We attempted to keep our employees at these impacted plants working as long as possible through training, maintenance and inventory,” she said.

Some G.M. suppliers are finding creative ways to keep workers occupied, whether repairing machines or building an inventory of auto components to ship later.

“Your smarter suppliers are being very careful about how they lay people off,” said Michael Robinet, an expert on the auto industry at IHS Markit. “They don’t want to lose their better employees to a competitor or to another occupation.”

Of course, Michigan’s economy is not as dependent on the auto sector as it was even two decades ago. Lansing has two G.M. plants but their economic weight is counterbalanced by the state government and the city’s hospital system, said Andy Schor, the city’s mayor. Another large employer, Michigan State University, is nearby.

“The sooner they resolve this the better but I wouldn’t say everything has shut down in Lansing,” Mr. Schor said. Over all, G.M. and its suppliers account for 6,600 jobs with $250 million in annual wages in the city, which has roughly 118,000 residents.

Mr. Schor said autoworkers had been asking the city-owned utility for more time to pay their electric and water bills.

Yet even at companies that are not highly dependent on G.M., the effect of the strike was immediate. Pridgeon & Clay, a component maker that sells to G.M.’s suppliers, froze hiring right away.

“We heard from our customers within hours,” said R. Kevin Clay, the company’s president. Business had already been a little soft at Pridgeon and Clay, which is based in Grand Rapids, Mich., when the strike began.

G.M. suppliers account for about $13 million of the company’s $300 million in annual revenue. Now parts destined for the automaker are piled up in corners of the company’s distribution center.

Mr. Clay said he was determined to avoid layoffs. “It’s certainly eating into profitability but rather than cut people, you pinch every penny,” he said.

Other manufacturers, like Stripmatic in Cleveland, say manpower has been tight recently, and the strike has freed workers for other tasks.

But Bill Adler, the company’s president, said business could suffer if G.M.’s plants don’t resume production soon. “If the strike goes on much longer, what started out as a very good year could turn into a mediocre year,” he said.

Around the country, G.M. dealers said inventories had grown somewhat tighter.

“We had a pretty deep shelf when the strike started and are at about average inventory right now,” said Mark Scarpelli, president of Raymond Chevrolet in Antioch, Ill.

G.M. said last week that its American dealers had 760,000 vehicles at the end of September, down 5 percent from a year ago. That’s enough to last several weeks, but dealers are nearing the time when they place orders for the brisk sales they usually see around the end of the year.

Back in Dearborn, Mr. Tlaib of Phoenix Transit & Logistics is doing what he can to get trucks back on the road. He emptied five of his trailers into a warehouse, freeing them to carry parts for other companies. But that has made barely a dent in the G.M. inventory in his yard.

“We don’t know what’s going to happen next,” he said. “We just sit down and smoke and watch the news.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

G.M. Strike’s Economic Toll: Idle Trucks, Packed Warehouses

Westlake Legal Group 08impact1-facebookJumbo G.M. Strike’s Economic Toll: Idle Trucks, Packed Warehouses United Automobile Workers Strikes Organized Labor Michigan Layoffs and Job Reductions Labor and Jobs General Motors Economic Conditions and Trends Automobiles

The truck drivers at Phoenix Transit & Logistics in Dearborn, Mich., are long gone. Around three dozen of the trailers they once ferried between auto plants — packed with dashboards, engine components, lights and other parts for General Motors — are sitting in a lot with nowhere to go.

It’s an increasingly familiar scene as the strike against G.M. by the United Auto Workers enters its fourth week. From suppliers to shippers to restaurants, the impact of the work stoppage is spreading through the web of businesses whose fates are tied to the biggest American automaker.

Wael Tlaib, the owner of Phoenix Transit & Logistics, said he had laid off nearly his entire staff, including 80 drivers, and had dipped into his personal savings to keep his company afloat. “I might lose the business next week,” Mr. Tlaib said.

The most intense economic pain is being felt in the industrial Midwest, where G.M.’s network of plants and suppliers is thickest. It is a difficult time for the region’s manufacturing industry, which even before the strike was contending with slowing auto sales, a weakening global economy and the trade war.

An economic blow to the Midwest would have broad consequences in part because the region is an important political battleground that will help determine who wins the 2020 presidential election. In 2016, President Trump’s narrow victories in Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin put him over the top in the Electoral College tally.

The state of the auto industry “usually has political ramifications that are beyond its direct economic influence,” said Matt Grossmann, a political-science professor at Michigan State University. “A lot of Democrats here are running on the promise to help the factory workers and the working class, and saying Trump hasn’t done it.”

Nearly 50,000 U.A.W. members walked off the job on Sept. 16, the largest stoppage since G.M. workers went on strike in 2007. The union is pressing for more job security as well as the reopening of plants in the United States that the company has recently idled. For its part, G.M. wants workers to pick up more of their health care costs and agree to give managers greater flexibility in factory operations.

After signs of progress over the last week, the two sides hit a roadblock this weekend on how production might be moved to the United States from Mexico. Terry Dittes, the U.A.W.’s lead negotiator, said on Sunday that the talks had taken a “turn for the worse.”

The impact of the strike stretches from Mexico to Canada, where G.M. plants that depend on American factories have been shuttered, putting thousands out of work. Analysts estimate that G.M. has lost $600 million as a result of the strike.

In the United States, 34 G.M. plants have gone dark. And striking workers are making do with a $250-a-week subsidy from the union.

In the first three weeks of the strike, $412 million in wages were lost, according to Patrick Anderson, chief executive of Anderson Economic Group. “Each week the damage grows geometrically,” Mr. Anderson said. “First you lose your U.A.W. workers, then the immediate suppliers, then the next tiers.”

Michigan has the most exposure to the auto sector, with roughly 8 percent of the state’s economy linked to the industry. Even after factory closures decimated employment in the car industry in recent decades, the state remains dotted with auto plants and suppliers.

Gabriel Ehrlich, director of the University of Michigan’s Research Seminar in Qualitative Economics, estimates that the Michigan economy is growing at an annual rate of 1.4 percent. Without the strike, he said, that number could be 0.1 to 0.2 points higher.

Even before the strike, manufacturing employment in Michigan fell by 1,300 jobs in the first eight months of the year. By comparison, manufacturers added 43,000 jobs nationally in the same period.

“There’s been real damage to the economy,” said Charles Ballard, an economics professor at Michigan State. “It hasn’t been huge yet but the ripple effects will get bigger the longer this goes on.”

In Flint, at least 1,200 truckers and production workers from suppliers have lost their jobs because of the strike. That includes hundreds from a supplier of seats to G.M., Lear Corporation, according to Duane Ballard, the financial secretary for U.A.W. Local 659, which represents employees at that factory.

A Lear spokesman did not respond to a request for comment.

Many of those workers are new hires who have not worked at the Lear plant long enough to qualify for state unemployment insurance, Mr. Ballard said.

On a rainy night last week, more than two dozen people affected by the strike showed up at the Martus Luna Food Pantry in Flint, said Art Luna, who runs the pantry.

They “are the ones that are really hurting,” he said. “They’re anxious to go back to work.”

The fallout has extended beyond the auto industry, disrupting local businesses that serve autoworkers.

On a typical Saturday night, Luigi’s Restaurant, an Italian eatery a short drive from the Lear factory, sees around 350 customers. But in recent weeks, that number has fallen by as many as 60 people, according to Tom Beaubien, who runs the restaurant.

“After one week without pay, everybody starts to suffer, from McDonald’s all the way to Luigi’s Restaurant,” Mr. Beaubien said.

It’s unclear just how many workers have been laid off by G.M.’s suppliers. Magna International, one of the world’s largest auto suppliers, has idled “a few” plants, according to a spokeswoman, Tracy Fuerst. “We attempted to keep our employees at these impacted plants working as long as possible through training, maintenance and inventory,” she said.

Some G.M. suppliers are finding creative ways to keep workers occupied, whether repairing machines or building an inventory of auto components to ship later.

“Your smarter suppliers are being very careful about how they lay people off,” said Michael Robinet, an expert on the auto industry at IHS Markit. “They don’t want to lose their better employees to a competitor or to another occupation.”

Of course, Michigan’s economy is not as dependent on the auto sector as it was even two decades ago. Lansing has two G.M. plants but their economic weight is counterbalanced by the state government and the city’s hospital system, said Andy Schor, the city’s mayor. Another large employer, Michigan State University, is nearby.

“The sooner they resolve this the better but I wouldn’t say everything has shut down in Lansing,” Mr. Schor said. Over all, G.M. and its suppliers account for 6,600 jobs with $250 million in annual wages in the city, which has roughly 118,000 residents.

Mr. Schor said autoworkers had been asking the city-owned utility for more time to pay their electric and water bills.

Yet even at companies that are not highly dependent on G.M., the effect of the strike was immediate. Pridgeon & Clay, a component maker that sells to G.M.’s suppliers, froze hiring right away.

“We heard from our customers within hours,” said R. Kevin Clay, the company’s president. Business had already been a little soft at Pridgeon and Clay, which is based in Grand Rapids, Mich., when the strike began.

G.M. suppliers account for about $13 million of the company’s $300 million in annual revenue. Now parts destined for the automaker are piled up in corners of the company’s distribution center.

Mr. Clay said he was determined to avoid layoffs. “It’s certainly eating into profitability but rather than cut people, you pinch every penny,” he said.

Other manufacturers, like Stripmatic in Cleveland, say manpower has been tight recently, and the strike has freed workers for other tasks.

But Bill Adler, the company’s president, said business could suffer if G.M.’s plants don’t resume production soon. “If the strike goes on much longer, what started out as a very good year could turn into a mediocre year,” he said.

Around the country, G.M. dealers said inventories had grown somewhat tighter.

“We had a pretty deep shelf when the strike started and are at about average inventory right now,” said Mark Scarpelli, president of Raymond Chevrolet in Antioch, Ill.

G.M. said last week that its American dealers had 760,000 vehicles at the end of September, down 5 percent from a year ago. That’s enough to last several weeks, but dealers are nearing the time when they place orders for the brisk sales they usually see around the end of the year.

Back in Dearborn, Mr. Tlaib of Phoenix Transit & Logistics is doing what he can to get trucks back on the road. He emptied five of his trailers into a warehouse, freeing them to carry parts for other companies. But that has made barely a dent in the G.M. inventory in his yard.

“We don’t know what’s going to happen next,” he said. “We just sit down and smoke and watch the news.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

City Of Fraser Had ‘Deficiencies’ In Its 2015 Audit Report. What Were They?

Westlake Legal Group burning-money-300x200 City Of Fraser Had ‘Deficiencies’ In Its 2015 Audit Report. What Were They? Richard Haberman Michigan Front Page Stories Fraser Doug Hagerty Barbara Jennigs Allow Media Exception 2019

Money To Burn In Fraser.
Free image via Pixabay

If you think that Washington D.C. has cornered the market on the ineptitude of government officials than you should take a closer look at where they learned these tactics. Most likely it was in your hometown and right under your nose.

Take for example my Lil hometown of Fraser, Michigan. A small town of 14,616 according to Data USA from 2017.

This town nestled warmly on the banks of the not so mighty Doobie Creek ( inside joke for the locals) and has in the past three years experienced political turmoil that would make cities like Detroit and Chicago blush.

I have covered some of these issues here and will continue to do so being I feel it is important to do so.

Here are some of the things I have touched on recently…

Preventing And Exposing Corruption Starts Locally. Welcome To Fraser, Michigan.

Something Smells Fishy In Fraser, Michigan.

In Fraser, Ignoring Sexual Harassment Claims At City Hall Means You Should Run For Office

The above articles give a glimpse into how backward and even corrupt a small town and its politics can be.

With the last two articles listed above, I have been going into detail about the election coming up in Nov 2019 and in particular the tenure of the former City Manager who now wants a seat on the council. Richard Haberman was removed as Fraser’s City Manager after close to six years at the helm of the city.

As I list in one of the stories above referencing Haberman’s time as C.M. along with his gal pal, Barbara Jennings, who was at the time a city councilperson herself and says she was propositioned by the Mayor at the time to extend Haberman’s contract for one year. All she had to do was vote for a contract for a company awarding the city’s towing services to the one that the Mayor wanted. She reported this to police according to press reports at the time being she was horrified that she was offered such a deal.

However, four years later she happily went to the former Mayor she accused of propositioning her for an illegal vote to get his signature to get her boyfriend on the ballot.

In the other story listed above, Haberman was also mentioned in a sexual harassment lawsuit where his employees came to him to report unacceptable behavior by two elected officials who were later removed by the council for those actions. Haberman instructed one of the ladies to “Get a Lawyer” according to one of the depositions.

The ladies did just that and the city has now settled that lawsuit for around $230,000.

Now, we shall take a look at what Richard Haberman lists on his campaign flyer as one of the reasons for his seeking office in a city he once led.

*Re-establish fiscal responsibility.

After Haberman left his job at the city at the beginning of Jan 2017, the city was facing some financial challenges that had to be tackled. In an article from Detroit News at the end of 2017 the situation was described like this…

Faced with a $14 million budget and about $12 million in revenues, the budget knives came out.

In a money-saving effort, the City Council approved cuts, including a layoff of eight of its police officers, by a 5-1 vote, after a proposed 3-mill increase was turned down by voters last month. The millage would have raised $1.1 million a year.

And more cuts are expected, according to Wayne O’Neal, the city’s manager.

“We’re a train wreck,” O’Neal said. “But these cuts were predicted some time ago by other city managers if something wasn’t done.

“There is not enough revenue to support city services as enjoyed by residents, but it took a new City Council to understand the gravity of the situation, and there really is no other choice. This is not something you can ‘budget’ out of to resolve.

“And it’s going to get worse. I expect this place will be broke in 18 months and run out of cash.”

Once again, back to Haberman’s flyer, he claims that his *Knowledge* left a balanced budget and more than a two million dollar fund balance and using creative services to not raise taxes and maintaining services.

So what happened then in those twelve months where everything was rosy to all of a sudden the wheels almost coming off from the city’s financial wagon.

Well, you have to look into Haberman’s final years as C.M. to get an idea.

I obtained an email responding to councilperson Patrice Schornack from the city finance director Tim Sadowski from October 2nd of this year. One of the things Patrice was wondering, was how were the financial audits under Haberman.

Here was Mr. Sadowski’s response.

From: Tim Sadowski [mailto:tims@micityoffraser.com]
Sent: Wednesday, October 2, 2019 10:04 AM
To: Patrice Schornak <patrices@micityoffraser.com> Subject: RE: Information needed please

Good morning Patrice,

First, Attached is the letter to the State of Michigan Local Government Finance Service Division acknowledging she brought in a “government accountant” for budgeting, bank reconciliations and to correct the deficiencies in the APR. The City spent $121,891.76 on Plante Moran assisting her from 2015-2017 (Attached) and $118,260.55 on The Woodhill Group assisting her from 2016-2017 (Attached) (this number does not include the interim finance director contract for The Woodhill Group from July 2017 through September 2017).

Second, the impact of the early retirements/buyouts and financial impacts to City including MERS/OPEB is a complicated formula including 1) the buyout amount, 2) if the positions were replaced and 3) the difference of the benefit each individual is receiving during their early retirement compared to their projected “regular” retirement date.

Timothy Sadowski

City Treasurer

City of Fraser

33000 Garfield Rd

Fraser, MI 48026

(586) 293-3100 ext 120 work

(586) 293-1045 fax

Attached to the email was a letter from Jan-11-2015 from the previous city finance director, Mary Jaganjac to the state of Michigan concerning some “deficiencies” listed on the audit process report. Mary indicates that they have hired an outside firm to help with this.

The letter is listed below.

Jan-11-2015 Letter Admitting City’s Deficiencies on the Auditing Procedures Report

Two firms were used during the time frame from 2015-2017

Plante Moran

Plante Moran – Professional Services from 2015-2017 – $121,891.76

The Woodhill Group

The Woodhill Group – Professional Services from 2016-2017 – $118,260.55

How bad were Fraser’s books that Richard Haberman had to hire two outside firms and pay them $240,152,31 to make sure the state was satisfied with its results?

What creative solutions were being used?

What measure of fiscal responsibility allows you to have to spend almost a QUARTER OF A MILLION DOLLARS in addition to your finance director’s salary of 70K plus and allows you to say everything is good?

Also, what exactly were the deficiencies that the state was alerted to that needed to be corrected?

These are serious questions that need to be asked. The voters deserve to know what these answers are.

The candidate who once was the head of this city during this time needs to answer them to see if he is competent enough to serve as a dependable elected official for the next four years.

 

More to come…….

 

Check out my other posts here on Red State and my podcast Bourbon On The Rocks plus like Bourbon On The Rocks on Facebook and follow me on the twitters at IRISHDUKE2 

The post City Of Fraser Had ‘Deficiencies’ In Its 2015 Audit Report. What Were They? appeared first on RedState.

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Detroit’s Police Chief Fires Back at Rashida Tlaib Over Her Racist Comments About His Department

Westlake Legal Group 6380c248-42e9-42ad-92a4-1b81ffd7ed6f-620x317 Detroit’s Police Chief Fires Back at Rashida Tlaib Over Her Racist Comments About His Department rashida tlaib racism Politics Michigan Front Page Stories Featured Story Facial Recognition Technology double standard Detroit Police democrats Allow Media Exception

Michigan’s Rep. Rashida Tlaib embarrassed her state when she told Detroit Police Chief James Craig that when it comes to DPD’s facial recognition technology, the people running it should only be black.

Her reasoning? Apparently everyone who is not black can’t differentiate one black person from another.

“Non-African-Americans think African-Americans all look the same,” said Tlaib.

This is a very stupid thing to say on multiple levels. For one, it assumes that every other race is too stupid or ignorant to be able to tell one black person from another, which is demonstrably nonsensical.

Tlaib uses the example of people confusing Rep. John Lewis and Rep. Elijah Cummings. While it’s unfortunate that this happens, it’s not indicative of every other race of people being unable to identify one black person from another. This is simply because both men are actually very similar in background and appearance.

You won’t see people confusing Lewis with someone like Justice Clarence Thomas or Rep. Tim Scott.

In the video where Tlaib is making the suggestion, Craig can be seen attempting to reason with Tlaib only to be shut down. Afterward, Craig made the very measured response that he has faith in people regardless of their skin color or sex.

Later on, Craig noted that had he made a similar comment, Tlaib’s people would be screaming for his resignation.

“Here’s what’s troubling,” Craig said, “As a police chief who happens to be African-American in this city, if I made a similar statement, people would be calling for my resignation … Is it a double-standard?

The answer to Craig’s question is “yes.”

That Tlaib can say something like that without a meltdown is indicative of a very serious problem, not just in our media, but our society. What Tlaib said was clearly racist toward, not just white people, but anyone who isn’t black and has the training and expertise to do this job.

This was the point Craig also brought up.

Tlaib insulted many people here with a short-sighted position on top of a virtue signal about our police departments being prone to racially profiling all at the same time. However, no one will come after Tlaib. If the shoe were on the other foot and a Republican Tlaib suggested that only white people should run the board to prevent black police from mistaking one white person from another, there’d be eight kinds of hell to pay.

Yes, Craig, it is a double-standard.

The post Detroit’s Police Chief Fires Back at Rashida Tlaib Over Her Racist Comments About His Department appeared first on RedState.

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In Fraser, Ignoring Sexual Harassment Claims At City Hall Means You Should Run For Office

Westlake Legal Group CreepyHabermanBlackAndWhite In Fraser, Ignoring Sexual Harassment Claims At City Hall Means You Should Run For Office Michigan Front Page Stories Fraser Allow Media Exception 2019

Get A Lawyer Kid And Vote For MEEEEE!

I know I keep saying this but local government is just as odd and even corrupt as anything we see on the state or local level. In fact, it might even be worse and it is definitely where corrupt people begin to move up the ladder of corruption and bad behavior.

I have written previously here at Red State about what is going on in my local town. My latest was about how people who accuse each other of crimes can later support one another to run for office. Something Smells Fishy In Fraser, Michigan.

Pretty novel right? Almost like the Harry Reid and Mitt Romney love fest we are seeing now nationally.

Now we move into the next phase of WTF that can happen anywhere but seems to happen a bit too much in this small sleepy town of just under 15,000 people. ( Which will not go over 15k after the 2020 census, sorry Doug.)

How exciting!!

The person I referenced in the story listed above who is now running for office, Richard Haberman, was once the city manager of this quaint Lil Hamlet. As referenced in the story above he was here for over 5 years and when he left the city was in a bit of a financial predicament. I will be following up on that part of the story this coming Monday.

Haberman, however, claims in campaign literature that his experience of over 25 years is one of the reasons the people of the city should elect him and help guide the city he once was paid handsomely lead.

There is just one small problem.

His inaction as city manager according to a lawsuit that was just settled by the city of Fraser with three female employees of the city, claims he looked the other way and allowed elected officials to harass and intimidate those three female employees. The situation was so bad that the council voted to remove the two people accused after Haberman was let go of his position as C.M. according to the Detroit Free Press.

From the Freep…

They’re out.

Fraser City Council voted Monday night to remove Mayor Joe Nichols and Councilman Matt Hemelberg from office after a two-hour tribunal hearing over accusations that the pair sexually harassed female city workers.

City employee Leah Brown testified that Nichols looked her up and down, and she said he said that not everyone can wear leggings like she could. She said Hemelberg told her supervisor “that’s a nice view over there. I was the only thing in his direction.”

She testified that the former officials had a conversation at City Hall about photos they had taken with half-dressed women. She said Councilwoman Yvette Foster was present.

Councilwoman Patrice Schornak said that the prior city manager knew what was going on and told staff to hire an attorney.

“We are here to defend individuals who work for this city,” she said

Being this a family-friendly site I won’t go into what was said about what some of the ladies’ body parts looked like according to these fellas that were removed.

However, for those of you following along at home, the previous city manager was Haberman.

According to multiple people I have talked to the city settled for 75,000 apiece for each of the ladies plus all the other incidentals of deductibles and what this will cost the city in increased premiums for insurance coverage. We are looking at 250,000 to 300,000 dollars for looking the other way while employees were being harassed.

According to the depositions taken in Leah Brown vs The City of Fraser, the environment was not pretty.

Kelly Doland who is the city clerk for Fraser said this on page 80 of her deposition…

Q. When you raised the issue of the alleged harassment at the dept head meeting, was there any response by Mr. Haberman?

A. Yes

Q. What did he say?

A. He said, I would advise you to get an attorney.

Q. Was that his sole response?

A. That’s’ the best I can recall.

From Michelle Kwiatkowski, who is the Systems Admistrator/ IT director for the city of Fraser said this from page 42 of her deposition…

Q. Did you make anybody aware that you thought this was inappropriate and hostile in 2015?

A. Mr. Haberman.

Q. What did you tell Mr. Haberman specifically in 2015 as it related to Mr. Nichols?

A. At that time we were still going back and forth because they wanted access to public safety. I told them there was no way they were getting access to public safety. He told me that– I specifically said– especially the way they come in and the way they treat women, there is no way they’re going over to public safety. I won’t sign off on it. I had to sign off on it in order to meet the LEIN requirements. he said he would talk to them about not coming in so much and he never did.

The semi amusing part of this is that Nichols wanted to roam around the public safety side of City Hall after being arrested by the same dept in 2007 for larceny according to the Macomb Daily. He plead guilty on that charge to ripping off a change purse.

Now, the city has just settled a lawsuit in the era of #MeToo where city employees say they went to their boss, Mr. Haberman, and complained about feeling intimated and harassed by elected officials. The city manager, who also in this town happens to the defacto Human Resources guy shrugs his shoulders and either ignores those pleas or says “Get a Lawyer.”

Maybe that is the 2019 definition of leadership. Would you want someone who did that elected as a council person?

The inaction in this case though is not the only example of money flying out the door under the leadership of Mr. Haberman. That story will be covered Monday when I go over how much money was blown with the finance director Haberman picked and than left a mess of the cities books.

In the meantime, you can contact me at the info below or if you have any questions for Richard Haberman please feel free to contact him at rhaberman62@gmail.com.

Check out my other posts here on Red State and my podcast Bourbon On The Rocks plus like Bourbon On The Rocks on Facebook and follow me on the twitters at IRISHDUKE2 

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A Case That Is Being Portrayed as a Win for Religious Freedom Is Actually a Road Map for Our Perpetual Defeat

Westlake Legal Group Freedom-of-religion-stand-up A Case That Is Being Portrayed as a Win for Religious Freedom Is Actually a Road Map for Our Perpetual Defeat religion Politics Michigan Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission LGBT judge robert jonker gay rights Front Page Stories Featured Story democrats dana nessel Culture & Faith Catholic Charities buck vs. gordon bigotry anti-religious left Allow Media Exception adoption

There is a major struggle going on right now over the fate of religious freedom in this country. It is safe to say that the left is actively hostile to religion once it leaves the doors of the church (many are hostile even before then but I’ll give the entire mob of them the benefit of the doubt) and they have adopted FDR’s obscene Freedom of Worship as their catchphrase. The lay of the land isn’t much more favorable elsewhere. Many people who style themselves as conservative are actually worshippers at the idol or “tolerance” and are perfectly willing to see religious freedom made subservient to that goal. Some are even claiming that religion is on par with homosexual marriage and telling us that is a good thing.

On Thursday, US District Court Judge Robert Jonker (a Bush appointee) ruled that Catholic Charities could not be barred from acting as an adoption agency in Michigan because it refused to place children in homes of homosexual couples. The decision did not look at the suitability of homosexuals to be adoptive parents, but rather on the process that was used to exclude Catholic Charities and the actions of rabidly anti-Christian Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel who has made a career out of castigating orthodox Christians as hatemongers. Here’s how she described the Trump administration policy which shields Catholic hospitals from performing abortions, assisted suicides, and genital mutilations…I’m sorry, I meant “gender reassignment surgery.”

“This display of contempt for the doctrine of separation between church and state is alarming and terrifying,” said Nessel. “According to our federal government, healthcare providers, from doctors to clerical staff, can decide who deserves medical care ranging from the most routine check-ups to lifesaving medical treatment – all based upon the purported religious, moral, or ethical beliefs of the provider. Healthcare treatment should be dictated by approved medical standards and a patient’s decisions about the type of care he or she wishes to receive, not the personal beliefs of those who hold themselves out as medical professionals. The imposition of this rule catapults our nation further toward America devolving into a virtual theocracy.”

The state social services agency tried to have any mention of Nessel removed from the case on the grounds that they, not the state attorney general, made the decision to bar Catholic Charities. Judge Jonker called bullsh** on this ploy. This is from Judge Jonker’s ruling:

The State Defendants seek dismissal of Defendant Nessel from the case. They contend that she is simply the State’s chief legal counsel, is not responsible for Michigan’s change in policy, and does not belong in the case. The record undercuts the claim. Based on the record to date, Defendant Nessel is at the very heart of the case. She referred to proponents of the 2015 law as hate-mongers” and said the only purpose of the 2015 law was “discriminatory animus.” She described the 2015 law as “indefensible” during her campaign. These statements raise a strong inference of a hostility toward a religious viewpoint. Based on the present record, she was also a pivotal player in the State’s total reversal of position in the Dumont litigation. It was her assessment of risk that led the State to move from defending St. Vincent’s position to abandoning it in the first month of her term – and this despite the 2015 law, the language of the contracts, and well- established practice. All of this supports a strong inference that St. Vincent was targeted based on its religious belief, and that it was Defendant Nessel who targeted it. See Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Comm’n, 138 S. Ct. 1719, 1729-31 (2018) (detailing disparaging statements of government decision-makers regarding particular religious beliefs and emphasizing the “State’s duty under the First Amendment not to base laws or regulations on hostility to a religion or religious viewpoint”). On this record, dismissal of Defendant Nessel from the case is not warranted.

In other words, just like in the Masterpiece Cakeshop ruling, the case was decided on the overt record of animus both the Colorado Civil Rights Commission and the Michigan attorney general had shown towards religious people and organizations.

This is how National Review’s David French describes the ruling:

The last point is key. As stated above, there was no evidence that St. Vincent prevented any qualified couple from adopting. In fact, if the state forced St. Vincent’s to choose between upholding the teachings of its faith or maintaining its contractual relationship with the state, then it risked shrinking the available foster or adoption options in the state of Michigan. The state demonstrated that it was more interested in taking punitive action against people of faith than it was in maintaining broader access to foster and adoption services for its most vulnerable citizens.

The judge rightly called the state’s actions a “targeted attack on a sincerely held religious belief.” Once again, Masterpiece Cakeshop pays religious-liberty dividends. Once again, a court declares — in no uncertain terms — that in the conflict between private faith and public bigotry, religious liberty will prevail.

This is the kind of whistling past the graveyard that drives me nuts. This decision was not a victory for religious liberty, rather it simply ratified a roadmap for zealous anti-Christians to stamp out religious liberty. A better ruling would have hammered home that an organization cannot be forced from the public square because of its beliefs. What this ruling did was put the bigots on notice that they have to find other reasons, that they have to keep their meetings private with no minutes taken, that they can’t actively appeal to anti-religious bias.

Rod Dreher covers the story in a story called Why Federal Judges Matter. They do. It would have been horrible to lose a ruling such as this. But timid, half-measures judges don’t make things better. They just delay the reckoning.

In short, rulings like this simply point people like Nessel to how white politicians in the South after Brown vs. Board of Education worked to keep black Americans from voting, from holding jobs in certain professions, and to keep schools segregated despite the Supreme Court rulings. We’re not done here. Not by a long damned shot. We’ll have to fight this battle again and again and eventually we’ll face people who aren’t idiots and judge who isn’t sympathetic.

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AOC Acts Stupidly, Says It Was “Not Easy” for Reps. Waters and Tlaib to Be First to Call for Impeachment

Westlake Legal Group AOCAPphoto-620x317 AOC Acts Stupidly, Says It Was “Not Easy” for Reps. Waters and Tlaib to Be First to Call for Impeachment washington D.C. Social Media rashida tlaib Politics North Carolina New York Michigan Media Maxine Waters Impeachment of President Trump impeachment Front Page Stories Front Page Featured Story Featured Post donald trump democrats Culture Congress California AOC Allow Media Exception Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., makes an objection to a Republican argument as the House Oversight and Reform Committee considers whether to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, 6/12/19. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Over the weekend, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (NY) took to the Twitter machine to express much love to her BFFs Reps. Rashida Tlaib (MI) and Maxine Waters (CA) for the “not easy” job of being on the early “Impeach!!” bandwagon.

Here’s what she wrote:

Because, ya know, it’s super-difficult to call for the impeachment of a Republican president when almost every Democrat you work with and most of the hardline Democrats in your solidly blue district want it, too.

She continued on:

Death threats are, of course, always unacceptable but as to the “criticism”? It mostly came from people who the AOCs, Tlaibs, and Mad Maxines of America view as accomplices to the corruption and who have “blood on their hands” because they support gun rights and don’t view everything from the unhinged prism of Orange Man Bad.

Just for the record, let’s take a look at what Ocasio-Cortez is really praising here:

As I wrote last week, Maxine Waters was calling for Trump’s impeachment barely two weeks after he was inaugurated. And she wasn’t doing it over any allegations of impeachable offenses, because there weren’t any. She did it over political disagreements. Waters is the same Democrat who raged in 1998 that Republicans were using impeachment as a political tool due to the “hatred” they felt for President Bill Clinton.

Waters even went so far as to call Republican impeachment efforts against a president who had lied under oath a “coup-d’etat”:

Two years before she was elected to Congress, security staff dragged former Michigan state legislator Rashida Tlaib out of an August 2016 speech being given by then-nominee Donald Trump in Detroit.

Watch:

She later wrote an opinion piece comparing her actions to those of Rosa Parks:

I have heard critics calling it unbecoming of a former state legislator. Well, I believe it is unbecoming of any American to not stand up to Trump’s hate-filled rhetoric and tactics. Growing up the daughter of Palestinian immigrants in Detroit, I was taught about how Walter Reuther, Coleman Young, Rosa Parks, Viola Liuzzo and other great Detroiters risked their lives for justice. I still remember at the age of 12, learning that segregation had been permitted only a couple of decades before I was born and that a woman’s right to vote was not even a century old. But it was great Americans who stood up, some dying for the cause, to make our country better.

As I wrote in tweet response to AOC, this has been about Orange Man Bad from the start, not any alleged corruption. Trump had not even been elected in 2016 when Tlaib was having rage fits about him and and in 2017 after barely two weeks in office, Waters was floating impeachment based on political disagreement:

——
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –

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Twitter Tough Gal AOC Gets Ragey After NRA Releases Video Showing the Squad Dodging 2nd Amendment Questions

Westlake Legal Group SquadAOCOmarTlaibPressley-620x317 Twitter Tough Gal AOC Gets Ragey After NRA Releases Video Showing the Squad Dodging 2nd Amendment Questions washington D.C. The Squad Social Media rashida tlaib Politics nra North Carolina New York Minnesota Michigan Media Massachusetts Ilhan Omar Guns gun rights gun control Front Page Stories Featured Story democrats Culture Congress Ayanna Pressley AOC Allow Media Exception Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez 2nd Amendment 2A

U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., speaks as, from left, Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., and Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., listen during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, July 15, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

In light of Democratic presidential candidates like Beto O’Rourke calling for gun confiscation programs, and the fact that members of the Squad have called gun rights advocates “murderers” with “blood on their hands”, the NRA sent a representative to Washington, DC to ask AOC and the rest of the Queenie Quartet a few questions.

It didn’t go well.

The gun rights organization posted a 2 minute video on Wednesday of their reporter having to practically sprint to keep up with all four freshman Congresswomen as they were asked about Beto’s plan, whether they wanted to take away guns and gun rights, and in AOC’s case if she even knew what an AR-15 looked like.

The video showed that AOC in particular was the most belligerent of the four, only answering questions by asking other questions, labeling the NRA as supporters of white supremacists and advocates of murdering Latino Americans, and all but running away from the woman trying to speak with her:

Watch:

Ocasio-Cortez got wind of the video from Moms Demand’s Shannon Watts and proceeded to launch into a temper tantrum, demanding the “full” video be released:

When the NRA ignored her, she again opened up her elementary school sandbox playbook and gave it another go:

It didn’t work.

I dunno if there is a “full, unedited video” out there or not, but it really doesn’t matter. She’s clearly on record as (again) characterizing law-abiding American citizens as white supremacists who want to see Latino American’s murdered. It’s disgusting, and releasing any supposed “unedited” video won’t change that.

Something else the video makes crystal clear is the fact that neither the AOC nor the rest of the members of The Squad like to be on the receiving end of their own medicine. They love do dish out hate against people who disagree with them on social media, at Democrat-friendly gatherings, on liberal podcasts, and the like. But when it’s them on the hot seat they either clam up or give questioners the “how dare you” treatment.

It’s easy to be a keyboard warrior or a beloved leftist when you only have to play to your adoring crowds. But when you’re in mixed political company, the dynamic changes and they don’t like it.

Bless their hearts.

—–
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –

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