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Purcellville’s annual Cabin Fever Film Fest returns for a third year

Westlake Legal Group cabin-fever-film-fest-logo Purcellville’s annual Cabin Fever Film Fest returns for a third year winter festival Things to Do Features Things to Do Short Films performing arts Movies movie local filmmakers filmmaker filming film Festivals Events documentary documentaries director cinematography annual festival
Image courtesy of Liz Jarvis

For the third year in a row, artists and cinephiles of Purcellville will gather together for a weekend celebration of film at the Cabin Fever Film Fest, taking place Friday, Jan. 24 and Saturday, Jan. 25. Co-sponsored by the Purcellville Arts Council and the Franklin Park Arts Center, the event will showcase local and regional films, all with unique ties to the Loudoun County area. 

“When I first thought about bringing something like this to the area, I wanted it to be truly hyper-local, surrounding the talent in our town,” says chair of the Town of Purcellville Arts Council Liz Jarvis, who worked in the film business in Los Angeles for many years. “When I brought up the idea, we realized it would be best to have it when nothing else was really happening, when everyone had cabin fever. And that was it.”

This year’s festival features 11 films, each of which have some connection to the Northern Virginia region, and are primarily documentaries. On the second day of the festival, several high school filmmakers will also have the opportunity to share their creations with audience members, which is an essential aspect of the annual event.

“As a result of our first festival, one of the high school student filmmakers started a film club in Loudoun County and she has now morphed into this incredible filmmaker and it’s amazing to see her growth,” says Jarvis. “That’s kind of what it is all about.”

Today, Jarvis works primarily with the manager of the Franklin Park Arts Center, Elizabeth Bracey, to put on the event, as it takes place within the center each year. For Bracey, the question-and-answer sessions with each filmmaker are what make this local affair stand out.

“I think audiences appreciate the films even more when they begin to understand the time it takes to create the magic they watch on screen,” Bracey explains. “A short film of three minutes could be something that was months in the making. These artists have certainly earned my respect and admiration.”

The opening reception on Friday, Jan. 24 will consist of question-and-answer sessions and the screening of three films, including A Brush with History, a short documentary put together by director and Alexandria resident Nora Kubach and her team. The short tells the tale of Alexandria’s Torpedo Factory Art Center and how its 100-year-old history has led to its present state of being.

Before she makes her way to Purcellville for the third annual event, we chatted with Kubach about why she wanted to tell this story and what she’s looking forward to most about the festival. Find highlights from our conversation below. 

Westlake Legal Group nora-kubach-director Purcellville’s annual Cabin Fever Film Fest returns for a third year winter festival Things to Do Features Things to Do Short Films performing arts Movies movie local filmmakers filmmaker filming film Festivals Events documentary documentaries director cinematography annual festival
Nora Kubach’s documentary ‘A Brush with History’ will be featured at this year’s Cabin Fever Film Fest. (Photo courtesy of Nora Kubach)

When did you first get involved with this film?
It happened about a year and a half ago when we were looking for the next great story we could tell. We became friends with Brett Johnson, the director of the Torpedo Factory, and he started telling us about the history of the place, which is 100 years old and used to serve the country. A lot of people know about the arts center but they don’t really know how it was founded. Community members came in and basically rebuilt this entire place, transforming it into a free art space for the public. We did this pro bono; we just wanted to tell the story. 

Talk to us about the filming process. Did you run into any challenges throughout?
Pretty early on we decided it was going to be a short film, and we knew we had to tell a lot of history in a short amount of time. I worked with the Torpedo Factory to decide our key players in the film. We did a lot in pre-production in terms of nailing down who we wanted to speak with. We talked to the original founder of the arts center, a Naval historian, the current director and also two specific artists. With one of them, her grandpa actually worked in the factory making torpedos, and now she is in there making jewelry, which is amazing. And the other woman was a kid when the art factory first came to be and she saw firsthand the transition. Now her work is there too. 

What are you most looking forward to about the Cabin Fever Film Fest?
I’m excited just to attend because I have never been. They approached us because they loved the story. I’ve been told that a lot of student filmmakers come out and I am just so excited to meet other filmmakers and see the great stories.

Stay up to date on all the fun events coming to NoVA with our Things to Do newsletter.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Disney Drops Fox From 20th Century and Searchlight Studio Names

Westlake Legal Group 17disneyfox-1-facebookJumbo Disney Drops Fox From 20th Century and Searchlight Studio Names Walt Disney Company Twentieth Century Fox Movies

LOS ANGELES — Sound the trumpets: 20th Century Fox, a name and klieg-lit logo that stretches back 85 years in Hollywood, is dropping the word Fox, a move that may prevent consumers mistakenly thinking the movie studio has anything to do with Rupert Murdoch’s polarizing Fox News media empire.

The Walt Disney Company bought most of Mr. Murdoch’s entertainment assets last year in a $71.3 billion deal. That included the 20th Century Fox studio and its art-house sibling, Fox Searchlight. On Friday, employees at the main movie studio arrived to a new email format (@20thcenturystudios) without the Fox. A Disney spokesman confirmed that both labels, now officially known as 20th Century Studios and Searchlight Pictures, would drop Fox from their logos. Disney had no further comment.

“Downhill,” a comedic drama starring Will Ferrell and Julia Louis-Dreyfus, will be the first movie to bear the Searchlight Pictures name. It arrives in theaters on Feb. 14. “The Call of the Wild,” set for release on Feb. 21 and starring Harrison Ford, will carry the 20th Century logo. The trumpet fanfare (composed by Alfred Newman in 1933), klieg lights and familiar monolith logo will remain.

It is not surprising that Disney would rename the movie operations. In October, 20th Century Fox Television, a small-screen studio that Disney bought as part of the deal, became part of a new entity, Disney Television Studios.

Mr. Murdoch still owns the Fox broadcast network, Fox News and a chain of 28 local Fox television stations, among other media assets. His new company is called Fox Corporation, and one of his sons, Lachlan Murdoch, is chief executive. (The old company was called 21st Century Fox.)

The Fox brand became synonymous with Mr. Murdoch starting in the mid-1980s, when he bought a stake in the 20th Century Fox movie studio and founded the Fox broadcast network to compete with ABC, CBS and NBC. He eventually took full control of the movie studio. Fox News arrived on the cable scene in 1996 as an alternative to CNN and grew into a behemoth that dwarfed the film company as a moneymaker.

Fox News remains a media superpower, but its brand has become a polarizing one. The network’s founding chairman, Roger Ailes, and one of its most popular on-air personalities, Bill O’Reilly, became the focus of sexual harassment scandals in recent years. Its prime-time opinion hosts are vocal supporters of President Trump.

Hollywood figures have grown more vocal in their criticism of Fox News. In 2018, for instance, Steve Levitan, the creator of “Modern Family,” which airs on ABC but is produced by the Fox studio that Disney now owns, wrote on Twitter that he was “disgusted to work at a company that has anything whatsoever to do with @FoxNews.” His comments came amid the 24-hour news channel’s coverage of the Trump administration’s border security policy.

Movies have been branded with the Fox name for more than a century. The name dates to 1915, when William Fox, a Hungarian immigrant, left the fur and garment industry to start a motion picture company. The 1929 stock market crash, among other misfortunes, forced the Fox Film Corporation to merge with a competitor, Twentieth Century Pictures, to form 20th Century Fox in 1935. The combined company made such Hollywood classics as “The Sound of Music,” “All About Eve,” “Alien” and “Die Hard.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Disney Drops Fox From Names of Studios It Bought From Rupert Murdoch

Westlake Legal Group 17disneyfox-1-facebookJumbo Disney Drops Fox From Names of Studios It Bought From Rupert Murdoch Walt Disney Company Twentieth Century Fox Movies

LOS ANGELES — Sound the trumpets: 20th Century Fox, a name and klieg-lit logo that stretches back 85 years in Hollywood, is dropping the word Fox, a move that may prevent consumers mistakenly thinking the movie studio has anything to do Rupert Murdoch’s polarizing Fox News media empire.

The Walt Disney Company bought most of Mr. Murdoch’s entertainment assets last year in a $71.3 billion deal. That included the 20th Century Fox studio and its art-house sibling, Fox Searchlight. On Friday, employees at the main movie studio arrived to a new email format (@20thcenturystudios) without the Fox. A Disney spokesman confirmed that both labels, now officially known as 20th Century Studios and Searchlight Pictures, would drop Fox from their logos. Disney had no further comment.

“Downhill,” a comedic drama starring Will Ferrell and Julia Louis-Dreyfus, will be the first movie to bear the Searchlight Pictures name. It arrives in theaters on Feb. 14. “The Call of the Wild,” set for release on Feb. 21 and starring Harrison Ford, will carry the 20th Century logo. The trumpet fanfare (composed by Alfred Newman in 1933), klieg lights and familiar monolith logo will remain.

It is not surprising that Disney would rename the movie operations. In October, 20th Century Fox Television, a small-screen studio that Disney bought as part of the deal, became part of a new entity, Disney Television Studios.

Mr. Murdoch still owns the Fox broadcast network, Fox News and a chain of 28 local Fox television stations, among other media assets. His new company is called Fox Corporation, and one of his sons, Lachlan Murdoch, is chief executive. (The old company was called 21st Century Fox.)

The Fox brand became synonymous with Mr. Murdoch starting in the mid-1980s, when he bought a stake in the 20th Century Fox movie studio and founded the Fox broadcast network to compete with ABC, CBS and NBC. He eventually took full control of the movie studio. Fox News arrived on the cable scene in 1996 as an alternative to CNN and grew into a behemoth that dwarfed the film company as a moneymaker.

Fox News remains a media superpower, but its brand has become a polarizing one. The network’s founding chairman, Roger Ailes, and one of its most popular on-air personalities, Bill O’Reilly, became the focus of sexual harassment scandals in recent years. Its prime-time opinion hosts are vocal supporters of President Trump.

Hollywood figures have grown more vocal in their criticism of Fox News. In 2018, for instance, Steve Levitan, the creator of “Modern Family,” which airs on ABC but is produced by the Fox studio that Disney now owns, wrote on Twitter that he was “disgusted to work at a company that has anything whatsoever to do with @FoxNews.” His comments came amid the 24-hour news channel’s coverage of the Trump administration’s border security policy.

Movies have been branded with the Fox name for more than a century. The name dates to 1915, when William Fox, a Hungarian immigrant, left the fur and garment industry to start a motion picture company. The 1929 stock market crash, among other misfortunes, forced the Fox Film Corporation to merge with a competitor, Twentieth Century Pictures, to form 20th Century Fox in 1935. The combined company made such Hollywood classics as “The Sound of Music,” “All About Eve,” “Alien” and “Die Hard.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Disney Drops Fox From 20th Century Name

Westlake Legal Group 17disneyfox-1-facebookJumbo Disney Drops Fox From 20th Century Name Walt Disney Company Twentieth Century Fox Movies

LOS ANGELES — Sound the trumpets: 20th Century Fox, a name and klieg-lit logo that stretches back 85 years in Hollywood, is dropping the word Fox so that consumers do not mistakenly think the movie studio has anything to do Rupert Murdoch’s polarizing Fox News media empire.

The Walt Disney Company bought most of Mr. Murdoch’s entertainment assets last year in a $71.3 billion deal. That included the 20th Century Fox studio and its art-house sibling, Fox Searchlight. On Friday, the employees at the main movie studio arrived to a new email format (@20thcenturystudios) without the Fox. A Disney spokesman confirmed that both labels would drop Fox from their logos. Disney had no further comment.

“Downhill,” which arrives in theaters on Feb. 14 will be the first movie to bear the Searchlight Pictures name. “The Call of the Wild,” set for release on Feb. 21, will carry the 20th Century logo. The trumpet fanfare, klieg lights and familiar monolith logo will remain.

It is not surprising that Disney would rename the movie operations. In October, the 20th Century Fox television studio that Disney bought as part of the deal was changed as part of an integration with Disney’s television businesses.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

We’re Living in a Subscriptions World. Here’s How to Navigate It.

Westlake Legal Group 15Techfix-illo-facebookJumbo We’re Living in a Subscriptions World. Here’s How to Navigate It. Video Recordings, Downloads and Streaming Spotify Netflix Inc Music Movies Mobile Applications Data Storage Computers and the Internet Cloud Computing

Nowadays we don’t really buy things. We just subscribe to online services.

And how can we resist? The streaming revolution has brought us vast amounts of video and music entertainment at the click of a button. In an era of cloud storage, where we store our data on remote computer servers, tech companies like Google and Apple take care of the headache of managing our information so that we no longer lose important files or progress on our work.

For many of us, giving up control and ownership to these services is the point. But for others, there is a downside to losing some flexibility and freedom. While Spotify may not have all the music we want to listen to, if we cancel our subscription, we lose access to its large catalog of music. With cloud storage services, putting our documents and other files online is simple, but pulling them out can be a pain.

This can make some people feel trapped. We could always resort to the obvious old-school methods, like buying discs of music and carrying around thumb drives of our files and documents, but who wants to do that?

Fortunately, there are some approaches to taking control of our media while enjoying the benefits of subscription services. Those steps range from the obvious, like creating local copies of your data, to more advanced methods, like making a personal cloud using an internet-connected storage device that acts like a miniature server.

All it takes is some forethought and technological know-how. Here’s what you need to know.

Cloud storage services like Google Drive and Apple’s iCloud — which let you store small amounts of data online free and which charge a few dollars a month to hoard larger amounts — offer major benefits. Namely, we can get access to our data from any device with an internet connection, and because our files are copied onto a company’s servers, we can’t lose them.

But beware of becoming over-reliant on the cloud. What if one day you decide to cancel your subscription? For anything that is stored exclusively online, you would then have to download each piece of data to your own drive, which can be frustrating and time-consuming.

That’s why, as a rule of thumb, people should continue creating local copies of their data for their computers and smartphones and store only important files on the cloud.

Here are the tools you will need:

  • An external hard drive. Portable hard drives can store vast amounts of data, and they are generally cheap. Seagate’s Backup Plus Slim 2, a Wirecutter recommendation, costs about $60 and holds two terabytes of data, which is probably enough to store backups of your computer, tablet and smartphone.

  • A software program for creating computer backups. Mac computers include Apple’s Time Machine backup tool. Microsoft’s Windows 10 includes a free tool called File History. Both apps can be set up to automatically back up your computer data.

  • An app for backing up your smartphone data. Apple users can back up their iPhones to their computers via the Finder or iTunes apps. Android users with Windows computers can access their data via “My Computer,” and on a Mac, Android users can use the app Android File Transfer.

From there, the steps vary slightly depending on which device and apps you use, but the processes are generally the same. To back up your computer data, you plug your external hard drive into your computer and run the backup program. To back up your smartphone data to your computer, you plug the smartphone into the computer and run your backup app. (If you need more steps, Wirecutter published a comprehensive guide on creating data backups.)

This way, if we become dissatisfied with a cloud service, we can cancel the subscription and have the ease and flexibility to take our files elsewhere.

Streaming services like Netflix, Apple TV Plus and Hulu offer a buffet of TV shows and movies to binge on. Similarly, Spotify and Apple Music give you instant access to millions of songs. But streaming services don’t have access to everything out there, like obscure art house films or live performances by music artists.

So here’s how you can take control of the content you stream to your devices. There’s a clever approach that involves creating your own media cloud, which acts like an online locker for your own content.

Michael Calore, an editor for Wired and a part-time D.J., said that when Spotify lacks his favorite music, he extracts the songs from a disc and uploads them to Google Play Music, Google’s online music service. Then he plays the music on the Google Play Music app from his smartphone.

“It’s basically like my own private streaming music service,” he said. In general, people can apply this approach to any songs they can’t get on streaming services.

For movies, I’ll share my setup, which is not for the faint of heart.

As a film studies student, I owned a collection of hundreds of DVDs, many of them obscure indie titles that are nowhere to be found on any streaming service. So I converted the titles into digital video formats, which I stored on a network-attached storage device, essentially a miniature server.

From there, I installed the Plex video-streaming app on my Apple TV, and on my smartphone, I installed Infuse 6, another video-streaming app. I set up both apps to pull movies from my mini server. This way, I can still enjoy the ability to stream my special collection of art house movies via my own equipment.

Of course, for many of a certain (younger) age, physical discs are unheard-of, and newer obscure titles will more likely be released on a streaming service. Still, for those wanting to tailor the content they stream, physical media is worth exploring.

So here’s what you will need to create personal clouds for your movies and music:

  • Tech to extract content from discs. First, you will need an optical drive, which is still included with some desktop computers, to read discs.

    Second, you will need apps to “rip” the content and turn the movies into digital files. For videos, special computer programs like Handbrake can extract movies from discs and convert them into video files. For audio, programs like iTunes and Windows Media Player can rip digital music files from CDs.

  • Tech to create a video server. Basically, you need an internet-connected device with some storage for movies, which essentially acts as a miniature server. There are plenty of options, like the $150 Nvidia Shield TV, or the Synology DiskStation DS218+, which costs about $300.

  • Tech to play media over the internet. For music, Google Play Music lets you upload your own songs to a cloud library and stream them through the app. For movies, streaming apps like Plex or Infuse 6 let you play movies from a TV app or smartphone.

If that all sounds complicated, that’s because setting up your content to be easily accessible over the internet is no easy feat. But these options exist for people who want more freedom.

Mr. Calore said that despite having a nice setup for streaming media via a personal cloud, he still consumed the vast majority of music and movies from paid streaming services.

“We’ve lost the excitement and the specialness of a physical idea,” he said. “But what we’ve gained in exchange is abundance at a scale that we could never have imagined. That is very much worth the trade-off.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

We’re Living in a Subscriptions World. Here’s How to Navigate It.

Westlake Legal Group 15Techfix-illo-facebookJumbo We’re Living in a Subscriptions World. Here’s How to Navigate It. Video Recordings, Downloads and Streaming Spotify Netflix Inc Music Movies Mobile Applications Data Storage Computers and the Internet Cloud Computing

Nowadays we don’t really buy things. We just subscribe to online services.

And how can we resist? The streaming revolution has brought us vast amounts of video and music entertainment at the click of a button. In an era of cloud storage, where we store our data on remote computer servers, tech companies like Google and Apple take care of the headache of managing our information so that we no longer lose important files or progress on our work.

For many of us, giving up control and ownership to these services is the point. But for others, there is a downside to losing some flexibility and freedom. While Spotify may not have all the music we want to listen to, if we cancel our subscription, we lose access to its large catalog of music. With cloud storage services, putting our documents and other files online is simple, but pulling them out can be a pain.

This can make some people feel trapped. We could always resort to the obvious old-school methods, like buying discs of music and carrying around thumb drives of our files and documents, but who wants to do that?

Fortunately, there are some approaches to taking control of our media while enjoying the benefits of subscription services. Those steps range from the obvious, like creating local copies of your data, to more advanced methods, like making a personal cloud using an internet-connected storage device that acts like a miniature server.

All it takes is some forethought and technological know-how. Here’s what you need to know.

Cloud storage services like Google Drive and Apple’s iCloud — which let you store small amounts of data online free and which charge a few dollars a month to hoard larger amounts — offer major benefits. Namely, we can get access to our data from any device with an internet connection, and because our files are copied onto a company’s servers, we can’t lose them.

But beware of becoming over-reliant on the cloud. What if one day you decide to cancel your subscription? For anything that is stored exclusively online, you would then have to download each piece of data to your own drive, which can be frustrating and time-consuming.

That’s why, as a rule of thumb, people should continue creating local copies of their data for their computers and smartphones and store only important files on the cloud.

Here are the tools you will need:

  • An external hard drive. Portable hard drives can store vast amounts of data, and they are generally cheap. Seagate’s Backup Plus Slim 2, a Wirecutter recommendation, costs about $60 and holds two terabytes of data, which is probably enough to store backups of your computer, tablet and smartphone.

  • A software program for creating computer backups. Mac computers include Apple’s Time Machine backup tool. Microsoft’s Windows 10 includes a free tool called File History. Both apps can be set up to automatically back up your computer data.

  • An app for backing up your smartphone data. Apple users can back up their iPhones to their computers via the Finder or iTunes apps. Android users with Windows computers can access their data via “My Computer,” and on a Mac, Android users can use the app Android File Transfer.

From there, the steps vary slightly depending on which device and apps you use, but the processes are generally the same. To back up your computer data, you plug your external hard drive into your computer and run the backup program. To back up your smartphone data to your computer, you plug the smartphone into the computer and run your backup app. (If you need more steps, Wirecutter published a comprehensive guide on creating data backups.)

This way, if we become dissatisfied with a cloud service, we can cancel the subscription and have the ease and flexibility to take our files elsewhere.

Streaming services like Netflix, Apple TV Plus and Hulu offer a buffet of TV shows and movies to binge on. Similarly, Spotify and Apple Music give you instant access to millions of songs. But streaming services don’t have access to everything out there, like obscure art house films or live performances by music artists.

So here’s how you can take control of the content you stream to your devices. There’s a clever approach that involves creating your own media cloud, which acts like an online locker for your own content.

Michael Calore, an editor for Wired and a part-time D.J., said that when Spotify lacks his favorite music, he extracts the songs from a disc and uploads them to Google Play Music, Google’s online music service. Then he plays the music on the Google Play Music app from his smartphone.

“It’s basically like my own private streaming music service,” he said. In general, people can apply this approach to any songs they can’t get on streaming services.

For movies, I’ll share my setup, which is not for the faint of heart.

As a film studies student, I owned a collection of hundreds of DVDs, many of them obscure indie titles that are nowhere to be found on any streaming service. So I converted the titles into digital video formats, which I stored on a network-attached storage device, essentially a miniature server.

From there, I installed the Plex video-streaming app on my Apple TV, and on my smartphone, I installed Infuse 6, another video-streaming app. I set up both apps to pull movies from my mini server. This way, I can still enjoy the ability to stream my special collection of art house movies via my own equipment.

Of course, for many of a certain (younger) age, physical discs are unheard-of, and newer obscure titles will more likely be released on a streaming service. Still, for those wanting to tailor the content they stream, physical media is worth exploring.

So here’s what you will need to create personal clouds for your movies and music:

  • Tech to extract content from discs. First, you will need an optical drive, which is still included with some desktop computers, to read discs.

    Second, you will need apps to “rip” the content and turn the movies into digital files. For videos, special computer programs like Handbrake can extract movies from discs and convert them into video files. For audio, programs like iTunes and Windows Media Player can rip digital music files from CDs.

  • Tech to create a video server. Basically, you need an internet-connected device with some storage for movies, which essentially acts as a miniature server. There are plenty of options, like the $150 Nvidia Shield TV, or the Synology DiskStation DS218+, which costs about $300.

  • Tech to play media over the internet. For music, Google Play Music lets you upload your own songs to a cloud library and stream them through the app. For movies, streaming apps like Plex or Infuse 6 let you play movies from a TV app or smartphone.

If that all sounds complicated, that’s because setting up your content to be easily accessible over the internet is no easy feat. But these options exist for people who want more freedom.

Mr. Calore said that despite having a nice setup for streaming media via a personal cloud, he still consumed the vast majority of music and movies from paid streaming services.

“We’ve lost the excitement and the specialness of a physical idea,” he said. “But what we’ve gained in exchange is abundance at a scale that we could never have imagined. That is very much worth the trade-off.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hollywood Assistants Are Fed Up and No Longer Afraid to Say So

LOS ANGELES — Kiran Subramaniam was in her mid-20s when she was hired as an assistant at ICM, one of the Big Four talent agencies in Los Angeles. The job paid $12 an hour. One day, her boss, an agent, tossed a small package at her head after she had placed it on his desk in a way he didn’t like. She ducked, but it grazed her face. When she threatened to quit, he apologized, saying he had thrown the box as a joke. Ms. Subramaniam decided to stay — like a “sad sack,” she said.

Not long afterward, the boss told her that he had parked his Porsche somewhere and couldn’t find it. She left the ICM building and walked past Cartier and Chanel, inspecting the Porsches along Rodeo Drive, none of which belonged to him. She expected another bad reaction when she got back to the office, but all he said was, “I’ll either find it or buy a new one.”

This is the life of the Hollywood assistant, a job that has long served as a proving ground for future executives and producers, schooling them in the ins and outs of the entertainment industry and showing them the reality behind the glamorous facade. But while previous generations put up with it, the new crop of Hollywood’s entry-level workers, emboldened by the #MeToo movement, have banded together in an effort to get better pay and better treatment from their sometimes mercurial bosses.

“I just don’t think we can be silent on certain things anymore,” Ms. Subramaniam, 31, said.

On a recent Sunday, Ms. Subramaniam, an aspiring TV writer who is no longer working at ICM, was among a group of more than 100 assistants who gathered for a town-hall-style discussion. They shared workplace horror stories and talked about how their wages had not kept pace with escalating rents. Increasingly, they said, the industry works against people who do not have outside financial backing, meaning that low-level jobs tend to go to people who can afford to take them.

Many at the meeting had taken part in an online survey tagged #PayUpHollywood. More than 100 of the 1,500 respondents reported that a boss had thrown something at them, and the majority said they made $50,000 a year or less. In a city where rent is $2,500 a month, on average, they would be considered rent burdened, a term the Pew Research Center uses to describe people who spend a third or more of their income on housing.

The #PayUpHollywood survey was put together by Liz Alper, a member of the Writers Guild of America West board of directors; Deirdre Mangan, a writer on the television show “Roswell, New Mexico”; and Jamarah Hayner, a media consultant who has worked with Senator Kamala Harris and Michael R. Bloomberg.

The veteran writers John August and Craig Mazin recently brought attention to the plight of assistants through their podcast, “Scriptnotes.” At the town-hall discussion, Mr. August, whose script credits include the indie film “Go” and the Disney blockbuster “Aladdin,” said the industry was stacked against younger workers in a way it hadn’t been when he started out.

“Traditionally, you start and you climb up the ladder,” he told the audience. “Some people can’t even get to the start of the ladder because of the structures that we have here.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group 00HOLLYWOODASSISTANTS-02-articleLarge Hollywood Assistants Are Fed Up and No Longer Afraid to Say So West Hollywood (Calif) Wages and Salaries Television Movies Labor and Jobs ICM Partners Creative Artists Agency August, John

John August, whose podcast called attention to the plight of Hollywood assistants, with his assistant, Megana Rao.Credit…Rozette Rago for The New York Times

When Mr. August worked as an assistant in the 1990s, he said, his bed was a mattress on top of egg crates and his pay was about $500 a week before taxes, more than twice the minimum wage at the time.

“My salary was enough that I could afford a one-bedroom in West Hollywood, which would be extravagant now,” he said in an interview.

Since 2000, the median rent in Los Angeles County has gone up more than 40 percent, according to data from the Census Bureau, and a number of assistants said their weekly pay had not budged from what Mr. August made more than 20 years ago — about $500 after taxes.

In September, Mr. August and Mr. Mazin, the showrunner of HBO’s “Chernobyl,” asked their podcast listeners to tell them about open secrets in Hollywood. An email from Kelley Mathys, a 30-year-old assistant, piqued their interest: “I think there will be a big ‘come to Jesus’ moment in the next few years about how low assistant pay is.” She added that her first job, in 2011, had paid $375 a week, which amounted to $19,500 a year.

Mr. August and Mr. Mazin asked to hear more, a request that drew more than 100 emails from assistants describing low pay, long hours and bullying bosses.

In an interview, Ms. Mathys said she did not buy the argument that Hollywood’s difficult work conditions were necessary for toughening young people who wanted to make it.

“We’re not Navy SEALs,” she said. “This is not life and death. So to suggest that there has to be this mental fortitude in order to work in development, I don’t understand that.”

Low pay is another issue for the assistants, along with a lack of job security. Olga Lexell, 27, said she had made the minimum wage, plus overtime, as a writers’ production assistant on a TV show in 2016. The job came with a guarantee of 60 hours a week, which worked out to about $700 before taxes.

When the studio cut her hours the next season, Ms. Lexell and a colleague approached a showrunner for a raise. But like many of the more than 30 assistants interviewed for this article, Ms. Lexell said workers in her position had little or no leverage to negotiate.

The showrunner said, “You guys are lucky to have these jobs,” Ms. Lexell remembered. “I can find people to do it for free.”

During the weeks when the show was not in production, Ms. Lexell said, she resorted to filing for unemployment.

Other assistants working in television said it was common practice for them to file for unemployment when shows went dark. They added that some showrunners asked the staff writers to kick in for the assistants before the holiday season.

“That’s definitely the writers subsidizing the studios,” said Matt McRee, 39, who has worked as an assistant on several television shows.

Many assistants said they were discouraged from filing for overtime.

“I’ve worked jobs where they filled out your timecard and brought it to you,” Mr. McRee said. “If you do complain, they just won’t hire you again.”

Because assistants work irregular hours, it’s hard to supplement their income with a second job, they said.

“I couldn’t even get a bartending job, because it’s not even like I get off work every day at 7,” said Noah Silverman, 27, an assistant at a film and television production company.

Low wages mean that Hollywood’s entry-level workers are likely to be those who have outside financial support, the assistants said. The result is that — in an industry that likes to be seen as championing diversity and other progressive causes — the people who get a foot in the door tend to come from more privileged backgrounds. The #PayUpHollywood survey found that the great majority of those who relied on outside financial assistance identified themselves as white.

The lack of diversity has put assistants of color in difficult positions. Jerrica Long remembered being one of two black women who worked as floaters — filling in for assistants on different agents’ desks — at Creative Artists Agency’s New York office. She said she had quit after overhearing an offensive conversation among some white assistants.

“They were talking about how if slavery existed today, they would own them,” Ms. Long said. “That was the day that I turned in my notice.”

C.A.A. said in a statement that it found the overheard comment to be “abhorrent and entirely counter to our values.” The company added, “There is no record during that time, nor in Ms. Long’s exit interview, of the alleged incident.”

Ms. Long, 28, is now working as a showrunner’s assistant and living in North Hollywood.

One of the attractions of the job is being privy to much of what’s happening behind the scenes. But being close to the action also shows the assistants that the private behavior of the industry’s typically liberal power players is at odds with their public pronouncements.

“You’ll see a big A-list person or a high-powered studio or network person give a speech on the red carpet or the Golden Globes,” Mr. Silverman said. “But some of these people treat their assistants horribly.”

Health care coverage is another concern. Andi Royer, a 32-year-old assistant with Type 1 diabetes, said she was not offered health care as part of the benefits package that went with her job on “Bluff City Law,” a new hourlong drama produced by Universal Television, an arm of NBCUniversal.

She said she had accepted the job, a 60-hour-a-week position that paid $14.25 per hour, on the assumption that it would come with benefits similar to what she had received when she was a postproduction assistant on a Warner Bros. show. She also assumed that federal law required Universal to offer health coverage within her first 90 days of employment.

According to Ms. Royer, the human resources department told her that Universal did not offer health coverage on shows that were in their first seasons, and that employees had to work for the company for one year to become eligible.

Ms. Royer said she had contacted various Universal administrators and executives, to no avail. Without insurance, she said, her medications would cost $1,200 a month. Eventually, she gave up, and her husband added her to his employer’s plan, which she said cost hundreds of dollars more a month than her Warner Bros. coverage.

“If I wasn’t married to him, I wouldn’t be able to live here and have a job out here,” she said.

In a statement, Universal said it was compliant with the law because it considered all employees on its first-season shows to be temporary, “regardless of the exact number of months worked.” The company also pointed to a law that allows it to exclude up to 5 percent of its work force from health coverage.

The efforts of the new generation of assistants have led to tangible improvements. The Hollywood talent agency Verve announced last month that it would raise the pay of mailroom employees and assistants by 25 to 40 percent starting Jan. 1.

“#PayUpHollywood certainly made us aware that here are issues within the community and potentially within our own walls,” Bill Weinstein, a founding partner at the agency, said.

ICM announced last month that its assistants would receive an additional month of salary on top of their bonus pay.

About the agent who was said to have thrown a package at his assistant’s head, ICM said in a statement, “We do not condone this kind of behavior and are committed to a safe, professional and supportive work environment.”

Ben Casselman contributed reporting.

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Carlos Ghosn Flirted With Hollywood, Then Delivered a Plot Twist

TOKYO — Carlos Ghosn, the fallen head of the Nissan-Renault auto alliance, didn’t know much about making movies, but he seemed willing to learn.

Sitting in his rented home in a tony Tokyo neighborhood one day in December, he walked John Lesher, a Hollywood producer behind the Oscar-winning 2014 Michael Keaton film, “Birdman,” through the plot of his own story, describing what he sees as his unjust imprisonment by Japanese officials and his struggle to prove his innocence, said people familiar with the discussions.

The theme was redemption. The villain was the Japanese justice system.

The talks were preliminary and did not get far, the people said. And in any case, Mr. Ghosn was preparing to deliver a shocking plot twist.

Mr. Ghosn fled Japan for Lebanon this week, avoiding criminal charges of financial wrongdoing and giving the world an improbable real-life tale of suspense and intrigue. All the elements of a Hollywood-style thriller are there: a private plane whisking a fugitive into the sky, multiple passports, rumors of shadowy forces at work and people in power denying they knew anything about it.

Mr. Ghosn’s conversations with Mr. Lesher could offer a glimpse into his thinking in the days before his escape from a country that had kept him under heavy surveillance for months.

As court proceedings dragged on, Mr. Ghosn studied the cases of prominent defendants who had fought Japan’s intractable justice system. He became convinced that he could never get a fair trial in Japan, with its 99 percent conviction rate, people who know him say.

Authorities around the world are only beginning to piece together the details of his escape.

Officials in Turkey detained seven people who they believe helped Mr. Ghosn flee, according to Turkish news outlets, including the state-run Anadolu news agency. He left Japan late Sunday aboard a business jet from Osaka to Istanbul Ataturk Airport, where he boarded a second plane and flew to Beirut, they reported.

Once in Beirut, Mr. Ghosn met Lebanon’s president, Michel Aoun, and spoke to him about his legal issues, according to a person with knowledge of the meeting who requested anonymity because the person was not authorized to discuss it. Mr. Aoun has denied the meeting.

In Japan, official silence continued as the authorities appeared to be looking for answers. On Thursday afternoon, Japanese prosecutors raided Mr. Ghosn’s two-story house in a leafy Japanese enclave of central Tokyo, just doors down from the home of the billionaire SoftBank founder Masayoshi Son.

Mr. Ghosn’s Japanese defense attorneys said they had been holding his French, Lebanese and Brazilian passports. But the Japanese national broadcaster NHK, citing anonymous sources, reported that a judge had allowed Mr. Ghosn to carry around a copy of his French passport in a locked case.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 02GhosnJapan-2-articleLarge Carlos Ghosn Flirted With Hollywood, Then Delivered a Plot Twist Nissan Motor Co Movies Japan Ghosn, Carlos Fugitives Automobiles
Prosecutors raided Mr. Ghosn’s Tokyo residence on Thursday as journalists waited outside.Credit…Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters

It is not clear exactly when Mr. Ghosn began planning his escape. But his meeting with Mr. Lesher was one of several that he had during his last months in Tokyo as he contemplated the ending to the story of his fight against the Japanese justice system. In discussions, he wondered whether a movie could make him more sympathetic to the Japanese system.

He also wanted to learn how others had fought, even if they lost. In July, he met with Jake Adelstein, an American journalist who closely covers the Japanese criminal justice system, to discuss the prospects for his trial.

Mr. Adelstein had recently published a book on Mark Karpelès, the former head of cryptocurrency exchange Mt. Gox, who spent over five years in a bruising fight with Japan’s legal system after being charged with falsifying data, embezzlement and breach of trust. In March, Mr. Karpelès was found guilty on the first charge and received a prison sentence of two and a half years in prison, suspended for four years.

Mr. Adelstein said Mr. Ghosn had grilled him about the trial, seeking parallels with his own case and trying to understand the prosecutors’ approach.

“I told him, ‘They don’t care about justice, Carlos; they care about winning,’” said Mr. Adelstein, who wrote about Mr. Ghosn in The Daily Beast this week.

“The best-case scenario,” he said, “is you get a suspended sentence.” In the worst case, he warned, the 65-year-old Mr. Ghosn could be stranded in Japan for the rest of his life.

Mr. Ghosn also reached out to Takafumi Horie, an entrepreneur who was sentenced to two and a half years in jail after a conviction on violating securities laws.

In a video posted to YouTube on Tuesday, Mr. Horie said Mr. Ghosn had made an appointment through a third party to meet him in early January.

“He wanted to ask my opinions,” he said. “I still haven’t heard any of the details, but unfortunately, our dinner date was canceled.”

Speaking through a representative, Mr. Horie declined to comment.

Questions had swirled around the handling of Mr. Ghosn’s case from the moment Japanese prosecutors first detained him in November 2018.

Mr. Ghosn and his lawyers have argued that the arrest was a corporate coup aimed at stopping him from orchestrating a merger between Renault — controlled by the French government — and Nissan, one of the crown jewels of Japan’s auto industry.

Before he was released on bail, Mr. Ghosn spent weeks in solitary confinement, where he was subject to interrogation by prosecutors without his own lawyer present, drawing harsh comparisons with how executives held for financial crimes are treated in the United States and elsewhere.

Mr. Ghosn’s lead lawyer on the case, Junichiro Hironaka, and his team spent months condemning Japan’s system of “hostage justice,” as part of a public relations strategy aimed at questioning whether it was possible for Mr. Ghosn to get a fair trial in the country.

Regardless of the truth of the accusations against Mr. Ghosn, he found himself at a severe disadvantage as he prepared for trial.

Ultimately, Mr. Ghosn was arrested and indicted four times, detained and repeatedly interrogated for more than 130 days. As a condition of his bail, he was forbidden from almost all interactions with his son or wife, who prosecutors feared might help him tamper with witnesses.

His lawyers accused Nissan of becoming close to the prosecutors. For months, Nissan’s efforts to cooperate with the investigation were led by Hari Nada, a top official at the company who is expected to be a key witness against Mr. Ghosn. Internal documents from Nissan showed concerns within the company that the arrangement had created deep conflicts of interest, potentially compromising the investigation’s results.

The company has said the investigation was handled appropriately.

Despite the challenges, Mr. Ghosn continued to insist that he would prove his innocence in court. In the months leading up to his escape, he spent most of his time at Mr. Hironaka’s office, preparing for his trial, according to people familiar with his movements.

In his off hours, he lived in a Tokyo rental with bare walls and little more than a stair-climbing machine for furniture. Neighbors often saw him shopping for groceries at the local import market or eating croissants at his favorite French cafe around the corner. His daughters visited frequently, and his excursions with them — which took him as far afield as Japan’s ancient capital, Kyoto — became fodder for Japanese reporters.

But the former chief executive, who had once traveled the globe as easily as most people go to the corner market, chafed at the unaccustomed restrictions on his movements, according to people familiar with his thinking.

As conditions on his bail, cameras above his door surveilled his comings and goings. His phone use was restricted, and he was not allowed to use the internet outside his lawyer’s office. And most egregiously, for him, in recent months the court allowed him only two brief phone calls with his wife, while lawyers listened in.

Throughout it all, he remained determined to defend his innocence in court. But his attitude took a dramatic shift on Christmas Day, according to a person familiar with his thinking. A Japanese court had just denied a request by his defense team to spend the holiday with his wife.

Instead, he found himself in a Tokyo courtroom, where his lawyers argued with prosecutors over the details of his upcoming trial.

During the session, Mr. Ghosn learned that the case could be tried in stages, potentially making it drag on for years. This led Mr. Ghosn to assume that the Japanese intended to force him to confess or to hold him indefinitely, the person said.

“When you look at the situation Mr. Ghosn was put in, it seems likely that his decision was driven by a feeling of despair,” said Nobuo Gohara, a former prosecutor who now works as a defense lawyer.

Now back in Lebanon, Mr. Ghosn, may be hoping to get his Hollywood ending.

Preparations are being made for a news conference in Beirut next week. Mr. Ghosn and his attorneys are expected to raise the idea of facing a trial in Lebanon instead of Japan, according to multiple people familiar with the discussions.

Lebanon, at least, may be receptive: Salim Jreissati, a top government official, told a local paper this week that he had asked Japanese officials for Mr. Ghosn to be handed over to a Lebanese court to be tried under international anticorruption laws.

Reporting was contributed by Makiko Inoue and Eimi Yamamitsu from Tokyo; Emily Flitter from New York; and Ben Hubbard from Beirut, Lebanon.

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Apple Deal Returns Former HBO Boss Richard Plepler to Spotlight

Westlake Legal Group 02PLEPLER-01-facebookJumbo Apple Deal Returns Former HBO Boss Richard Plepler to Spotlight Television Plepler, Richard Movies Home Box Office Cue, Eddy Appointments and Executive Changes Apple TV Plus

In the 10 months since Richard Plepler stepped down as HBO’s chief executive, the final season of “Game of Thrones” came and went, CBS and Viacom merged, and Disney and Apple rolled out new streaming services.

The entertainment world is in flux, and to start the new year, Mr. Plepler is making changes of his own. The gregarious executive, a quintessential New York power player who spent 27 years at HBO and left eight months after AT&T became its owner, is rebooting himself as a producer. And he will do it with Apple.

In a recently signed five-year deal, Mr. Plepler’s new company, Eden Productions, will make television series, documentaries and feature films exclusively for Apple TV Plus, the streaming platform that started in November. The arrangement gives Mr. Plepler a significant role in an expanding streaming universe soon to include HBO Max, a supersize platform that has been a focus of his former corporate home since he departed in February after having lost some of his autonomy.

“It was instantaneously clear to me that I had a wonderful and very privileged run at HBO and I wasn’t going to be able to duplicate that again,” Mr. Plepler said in his first interview since leaving the network. “And I didn’t want to try to duplicate that again. It felt very clear to me that I just wanted to do my own thing.”

Mr. Plepler, 61, was a key figure in helping make HBO into an original-programming powerhouse. In the years he was in charge, the network won more than 160 Emmys, including for series like “Game of Thrones,” “Big Little Lies” and “Veep.”

Apple is hopeful he still has the magic touch, this time as a producer. The company has not yet disclosed the number of Apple TV Plus subscribers or how many people have watched its series. Reviews for its first slate of shows have been mixed, even for its big-budget flagship program, “The Morning Show,” starring Reese Witherspoon and Jennifer Aniston, which landed three Golden Globe nominations, including for best drama.

At Apple, Mr. Plepler has had a longtime admirer in Eddy Cue, the company’s senior vice president of internet software and services. Mr. Cue is the executive who hired Zack Van Amburg and Jamie Erlicht from Sony’s television studio to run Apple’s entertainment division.

Mr. Cue and Mr. Plepler worked closely together when Apple and HBO collaborated on the streaming service HBO Now in 2015. And the mix of Apple TV Plus programming reflects HBO’s boutique approach, rather than the all-things-to-all-viewers strategy favored by Netflix.

Mr. Plepler said that he had conversations with several people about his next step, but that his only “serious” talks were with Apple. “I thought that Apple was the right idea very quickly, just because it was embryonic enough that I thought maybe, you know, I could make a little contribution there,” he said.

A New Yorker through and through, Mr. Plepler intends to provide series and movies for the Cupertino, Calif., company from the second floor of a townhouse on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, which he has been using as his office since August. On a mirror is a taped sign of a Ted Williams quote that he has carted to nearly every office he has inhabited in his long career: “Don’t ever let anyone monkey with your swing.”

Mr. Cue contacted Mr. Plepler soon after his abrupt departure from HBO.

“As you can imagine, in the days and the first couple weeks after I left, I received an enormous amount of well-wishing calls, and Eddy was among those people,” Mr. Plepler said. “He was generous enough to say on that call, ‘Look, when you settle down and you think about whatever it is you want to do, know that we’re all here and we’ll talk.’”

In July, Mr. Plepler had a meeting scheduled with Mr. Cue at the Allen & Company Sun Valley conference, an annual gathering of media and technology executives. He planned to broach the idea of producing for Apple, but only if Mr. Van Amburg and Mr. Erlicht were on board.

The week before the Sun Valley trip, Mr. Plepler had lunch with the two Apple TV Plus executives at the Mark Restaurant, an Upper East Side power-lunch spot at the Mark Hotel run by the chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten.

“If they weren’t responsive,” Mr. Plepler said of Mr. Van Amburg and Mr. Erlicht, “I didn’t want to pursue the conversation. And they could not have been both more generous and more enthusiastic. So that was my first conversation. And I followed that up with Eddy in Sun Valley, and we started putting this together.”

Mr. Van Amburg said he and Mr. Erlicht welcomed the addition of Mr. Plepler to Apple TV Plus.

“Jamie and I ran a studio for years, and we know how exciting it is to produce and start businesses,” he said. “We have a longstanding mutual admiration with Richard, and we’re looking forward to helping him build a dynamic production company and seeing him thrive with us at Apple.”

One topic Mr. Plepler did not want to discuss in detail: his exit from HBO.

“New people came in and bought the company,” he said. “And it was just the right time for me to go on to the next chapter in my life.”

When AT&T made its bid for HBO’s former corporate parent, Time Warner, in 2016, Mr. Plepler told The New York Times that there needed to be a “Chinese wall” between the premium cable network and the rest of the company. That did not happen.

John Stankey, the veteran AT&T executive who was appointed to oversee the collection of properties now called Warner Media, has made it a mission to knock down the silos between HBO, TNT, TBS and the Warner Bros. film studio.

The executive now in charge of Warner Media’s entertainment offerings, Robert Greenblatt, suggested in a December interview with The Hollywood Reporter that HBO cannot afford to stand aloof from the rest of the company, now that streaming has upended the industry. HBO Max, Mr. Greenblatt said, can become a formidable digital player only if it makes room for a broader array of content. HBO Max, which will debut in May with 10,000 hours of programming, is set to include fare that would not have been a fit for the old HBO, shows like the mainstream sitcoms “Friends” and “The Big Bang Theory.”

“Look, the dirty little secret is that HBO has hit a ceiling,” Mr. Greenblatt said in the interview. “It can’t grow. In a world where there’s Netflix and Amazon, the only way to grow, I guarantee you, is to bundle it with something else that’s going to lift it.”

When asked about Mr. Greenblatt’s remarks, Mr. Plepler said, “I can’t get into that.”

And when asked if he had signed an agreement that prevented him from discussing his departure from HBO, he declined to comment. Nor would he entertain the idea that Apple and HBO are now rivals — although they very much are.

“There is plenty of room out there for everybody to do well and for everybody to produce their version of good content, and I don’t think of it for two minutes as rivaling HBO,” he said. “I don’t think of it that way objectively, and I don’t think of it that way emotionally.”

Mr. Plepler has set himself apart from other entertainment-industry heavyweights by hobnobbing with politicians and writers, including Christopher Dodd, Henry Louis Gates Jr., Fran Lebowitz, Shimon Peres and David Remnick. In September, he co-hosted a book party for the Times opinion columnist Bari Weiss and a dinner at his home for the Democratic presidential candidate Cory Booker. With the Vanity Fair editor Radhika Jones, he also hosted a book party for the former Time magazine managing editor Richard Stengel at the Council on Foreign Relations, where he is a board member.

Although Mr. Plepler is known as an executive, he said repeatedly that he wanted to stick to producing. Invoking the small vessels that torpedoed enemy craft during World War II, he said: “All I want to do, and I mean this at the bottom of my heart, is run my own little PT boat. If I am successful at it as I hope I can be over the coming years, it will be more than enough work for me.

“But I do not want to run anything again,” he continued. “I’ve done that.”

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3 family-friendly movies hitting theaters this winter

No matter the time of year in Northern Virginia, a movie night with the kids is always a good idea. Yet in the winter it seems almost ideal, as it provides entertainment for the entire family while staying warm and avoiding the chill of seasonal activities like ice skating or sledding. 

From now until February, three family-friendly films packed with highly acclaimed actors are coming to the box office, and here we share details about them all. 

Dolittle

Premiering Friday, Jan. 17
More than 50 years later, animal-whisperer Dr. Doolittle is coming back to big screens everywhere. This time, Robert Downey Jr. stars as the physician whose only companions are an array of exotic animals that he can, in fact, speak with. In this adaptation, Dr. Dolittle and his furry friends must leave the safety of their 19th-century manor in England to find the cure for Queen Victoria’s life-threatening sickness on a mythical, unknown island. Kids will delight in the entertaining tale, and adults will recognize the voices of a few of their favorite stars, like Emma Thompson, Michael Sheen, Selena Gomez and many more. 

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Sonic the Hedgehog

Premiering Friday, Feb. 14
While millennial-age individuals will recognize the name from the action-packed video game created by Sega, blue superhero Sonic is entering the real world this year in the newly adapted film Sonic the Hedgehog. In this one-of-a-kind story, Sonic mysteriously lands in the rural town of Green Hills and accidentally attracts attention from government officials due to his powers. In order to escape the wrath of Dr. Ivo Robotnik, played by Jim Carrey, Sonic befriends small town cop Tom Waschowski (James Marsden). Watch it all unfold in theaters starting Valentine’s Day. 

The Call of the Wild

Premiering Friday, Feb. 21
Over a century ago ago, legendary novel The Call of the Wild made its debut on bookshelves across the country, telling of strong sled dogs who fought for survival on a daily basis in Yukon, Canada. This February, families will get an inside look at the life of Buck, a unique dog who was taken from his home to become a sled dog. The animated figure will become the support system of John Thornton, played by highly acclaimed actor Harrison Ford. Through the intricate scenes and the well-written plot, originally by Jack London, this film is sure to catch the attention of viewers of all ages.

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