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Westlake Legal Group > News and News Media (Page 114)

Kindergarten Class Represents At Pal’s Final Adoption Hearing

Westlake Legal Group 5de9da4e1f0000143cdf09cc Kindergarten Class Represents At Pal’s Final Adoption Hearing

They were squirmy and noisy and not paying attention all the time, but what judge couldn’t be charmed by an entire kindergarten class invited by one of their own for his final adoption hearing?

Michael Clark Jr. was one of 37 children whose adoptions were finalized in a courtroom Thursday in Kent County, Michigan, on Adoption Day. But Michael’s classmates from Wealthy Elementary in East Grand Rapids only had eyes — and red paper hearts they waved — for him.

Michael, 5, has been living with Andrea Melvin and Dave Eaton for about year. He declared on camera: “I love my mommy” — but he told his dad that his class was kind of his family, too.

Check out the video above.

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Rep. Doug Collins claims Jerry Nadler hung up on him during Trump impeachment discussion

Westlake Legal Group ENC3_132200754244990000-1 Rep. Doug Collins claims Jerry Nadler hung up on him during Trump impeachment discussion fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/jerrold-nadler fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz cdcb0963-8166-5a15-8259-34ebaf816378 article

House Judiciary Committee ranking member Doug Collins, R-Ga., says he has tried in vain to get an idea of how the panel will proceed in the impeachment process — but claims the committee’s Democratic chairman won’t keep him informed.

In fact, Collins told Laura Ingraham Thursday on “The Ingraham Angle” that Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., even hung up on him when he called Nadler to get information.

“He never gets back to me,” Collins said. “I’m trying to get a definition of what’s going on — ‘Don’t worry Doug, we’ll talk to you.’ Just the other day as I was trying to get information from him, he just gets tired of talking to me and just hangs up.”

MAN WHO CONFRONTED BIDEN OVER UKRAINE REBUFFS HECKLER: ‘STICK IT UP YOUR A–‘

The North Georgia lawmaker said Nadler’s alleged action is a symptom of the larger issue in the committee.

“They are so lost and so scared that they are going to lose this moment to get at this president,” he said, calling the legislative panel a “farce.”

Collins said one of the other senior Republicans on the committee, Rep. James Sensenbrenner of Wisconsin, has requested per committee rules a hearing for the GOP minority to call their own witnesses.

The response from Nadler or his fellow Democrats has thus far been unclear, Collins said.

“They don’t want the truth to come out,” he remarked, adding that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi reportedly questioned Republicans’ understanding of their oaths of office in regard to impeaching President Trump.

“It’s not [used] to persecute a president that started in November 2016 in Brooklyn with tears flowing down your face because your candidate lost,” he said, referring to Hillary Clinton’s supporters at the candidate’s New York City headquarters.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“The American people deserve better than this.”

He added that when the results of the House Intelligence Committee’s part of the impeachment investigation are presented next week, it will be an example of Nadler “trying to make chicken salad out of chicken Schiff.”

Westlake Legal Group ENC3_132200754244990000-1 Rep. Doug Collins claims Jerry Nadler hung up on him during Trump impeachment discussion fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/jerrold-nadler fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz cdcb0963-8166-5a15-8259-34ebaf816378 article   Westlake Legal Group ENC3_132200754244990000-1 Rep. Doug Collins claims Jerry Nadler hung up on him during Trump impeachment discussion fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/jerrold-nadler fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz cdcb0963-8166-5a15-8259-34ebaf816378 article

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What to Expect from the November Jobs Report

Westlake Legal Group 06jobs2-facebookJumbo What to Expect from the November Jobs Report Wages and Salaries United States Economy Unemployment Trump, Donald J Labor Department (US) Labor and Jobs Interest Rates

The Labor Department will release the latest hiring and unemployment figures for November at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time. Here’s what to watch for:

  • Wall Street analysts are forecasting a stronger showing than the previous month, with payroll gains of 180,000, up from the 128,000 initially reported for October.

  • The unemployment rate is expected to be unchanged at 3.6 percent.

  • Average hourly earnings are expected to rise 0.3 percent, after moving up 0.2 percent in October. That would bring the year-over-year increase to 3 percent.

However fat — or thin — November’s payrolls gains may look, the jump in hiring will not be as big as the report’s totals might suggest. Nearly 50,000 striking workers at General Motors returned to their jobs last month. Their six-week walkout meant that they were not included in the government’s October surveys.

Diane Swonk, chief economist at the accounting firm Grant Thornton, said the job creation numbers could be further inflated by another 12,000 workers at auto suppliers and related businesses, who were also not working because of the G.M. strike and have now been rehired. She is also keeping her eye out for job losses related to reductions in the number of temporary Census workers.

Thus, she and other analysts say, it will be more important than usual to look at the categories where the job gains are the strongest and weakest.

One of the best consequences of a tight labor market is that the American work force has been expanding. Employers have widened their scope and become more open to recruiting people whom they might not have a few years earlier, including those who have disabilities or criminal records. Older baby boomers are working past retirement age, and stay-at-home parents are switching to paid employment.

The labor force participation rate inched up through most of the spring and fall, driven in part by an increase in women ages to 34 getting jobs or looking for work. Over the last year, nearly 1.7 million more people joined the ranks of workers.

As Michael Gapen, chief United States economist at Barclays, points out, a bounce in participation is the equivalent of a bounce in productivity. “Progress is coming in a way that’s not inflationary,” he said, and it makes it easier for the Federal Reserve to hold off increasing its benchmark interest rate. October’s participation rate was 63.3 percent. Look for even small increases, especially among 25-to-54 year-olds, who are considered to be in their prime working years.

If you want to know more about how the jobs report is put together, this story explains it all.

And remember, the monthly report provides a single snapshot of the labor market and by extension, the American economy. The overall trend is more important than any individual report.

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Elizabeth Warren Goes After Pete Buttigieg’s Private Fundraisers

Westlake Legal Group 5de9db0c1f0000683ddf09cd Elizabeth Warren Goes After Pete Buttigieg’s Private Fundraisers

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) took direct aim at 2020 presidential rival Pete Buttigieg on Thursday, chastising the South Bend, Indiana, mayor for holding closed-door fundraisers and urging him to reveal his big-money donors.

“I think that Mayor Pete should open up the doors so that anyone can come in and report on what’s being said,” Warren told reporters in Boston, referring to media blackouts at some of Buttigieg’s private events. “Those doors shouldn’t be closed, and no one should be left to wonder what kind of promises are being made to the people that then pony up big bucks to be in the room.”

The comments reflect one of Warren’s first public attacks against a Democratic opponent as the 2020 race to unseat President Donald Trump heats up. Buttigieg has vaulted to the front of some polls, including a Des Moines Register/CNN/Mediacom tally last month that showed him leading in Iowa two months before the state’s caucuses.

But that popularity has translated into scrutiny in recent weeks. Both Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) have eschewed big-money donors and private fundraisers, instead leaning on grassroots supporter networks that have garnered tens of millions of dollars. Buttigieg and former Vice President Joe Biden have also raked in supporter dollars, but both men have held traditional political fundraisers and courted supporters with deep pockets (Biden has opened up his events to the press, however).

Lis Smith, a senior communications adviser for Buttigieg’s campaign, lambasted Warren in a response on Twitter later Thursday. She said the senator should up her own campaign’s transparency and could “start by opening up the doors to the decades of tax returns she’s hiding from her work as a corporate lawyer — often defending the types of corporate bad actors she now denounces.”

Buttigieg’s campaign did not immediately respond to HuffPost’s request for further comment.

Warren has released a decade of tax returns, which are posted on her campaign website. The documents cover her entire time in public service.

Buttigieg has also come under fire over his past work at McKinsey & Co. amid a joint report from The New York Times and ProPublica that the consulting firm helped the Trump administration carry out its hard-line immigration policies, specifically for Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The mayor worked at the management consulting firm for three years but has declined to answer questions about what he did there, citing a nondisclosure agreement he signed as an employee.

The Wall Street Journal reported last month that employees and organizations affiliated with McKinsey had donated about $55,000 to his campaign, more than any other Democrat at the time. Warren didn’t directly criticize his work at the firm on Thursday but said Buttigieg should reveal more information about his donors.

“It is even more important that candidates expose possible conflicts of interest right now,” Warren said, according to The New York Times. “And that means, for example, that the mayor should be releasing who’s on his finance committee, who are the bundlers who are raising big money for him, who he’s given titles to and made promises to.”

Buttigieg’s campaign said Thursday he was “frustrated and disappointed” by the reports about McKinsey and said that if any money had been donated to his campaign by one of its employees “involved in this [ICE] project … we would immediately return their donation.”

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When Pete Buttigieg Was One of McKinsey’s ‘Whiz Kids’

Westlake Legal Group 00pete-mckinsey-01-facebookJumbo When Pete Buttigieg Was One of McKinsey’s ‘Whiz Kids’ Presidential Election of 2020 McKinsey&Co Consultants Buttigieg, Pete (1982- )

Among the hoops that candidates for plum consulting jobs at McKinsey & Company had to jump through in late 2006 was a bit of play acting: They were given a scenario involving a hypothetical client, “a business under siege,” and told they would be meeting with its chief executive the next day. How would they structure the conversation?

One contender stood out that year: a 24-year-old Rhodes scholar named Pete Buttigieg.

“He was the only one who put all the pieces together,” recalled Jeff Helbling, a McKinsey partner at the time who was involved in recruiting. Mr. Buttigieg soon won the other candidates over to his approach.

“He was very good at taking this ambiguous thing that he literally had no background on and making sense of it,” Mr. Helbling said. “That is rare for anyone at any level.”

The preternatural poise that got Mr. Buttigieg hired at McKinsey has helped him rise from obscurity to the top tier of the 2020 Democratic primary presidential contest.

On the way there, he ticked all the boxes. Harvard. Rhodes scholar. War veteran. Elected mayor of a midsize city before age 30.

Mr. Buttigieg sells his candidacy, in large part, on his mayoralty of South Bend, Ind., and a civic revitalization there rooted in the kind of data-driven techniques espoused by McKinsey. His nearly three years at “the firm” set him apart from many of his campaign rivals, underpinning his position as a more centrist alternative to progressive front-runners like Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

Yet Mr. Buttigieg’s time at the world’s most prestigious management-consulting company is one piece of his meticulously programmed biography that he mentions barely, if at all, on the campaign trail.

As Mr. Buttigieg explains it, that is not a matter of choice. For all of his efforts to run an open, accessible campaign — marked by frequent on-the-record conversations with reporters on his blue-and-yellow barnstorming bus — McKinsey is a famously secretive employer, and Mr. Buttigieg says he signed a nondisclosure agreement that keeps him from going into detail about his work there.

But as he gains ground in polls, his reticence about McKinsey is being tested, including by his rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination. Senator Warren, responding last month to needling by Mr. Buttigieg that she release more than eight years of her tax returns to account for her private-sector work, retorted, “There are some candidates who want to distract from the fact that they have not released the names of their clients and have not released the names of their bundlers.”

Beyond Mr. Buttigieg’s agreement with McKinsey, this is something of an awkward moment to be associated with the consultancy, especially if you happen to be a Democratic politician in an election year shadowed by questions of corporate power and growing wealth inequality. The firm has long advocated business strategies like raising executive compensation, moving labor offshore and laying off workers to cut costs. And over the last couple of years, reporting in The New York Times and other publications has revealed episodes tarnishing McKinsey’s once-sterling reputation: its work advising Purdue Pharma on how to “turbocharge” opioid sales, its consulting for authoritarian governments in places like China and Saudi Arabia, and its role in a wide-ranging corruption scandal in South Africa. (All of these came after Mr. Buttigieg left the firm.)

Just this week, ProPublica, copublishing with The Times, revealed that McKinsey consultants had recommended in 2017 that Immigration and Customs Enforcement cut its spending on food for migrants and medical care for detainees.

After a campaign event on Wednesday in Birmingham, Ala., Mr. Buttigieg remarked on the latest revelations. “The decision to do what was reported yesterday in The Times is disgusting,” he said. “And as somebody who left the firm a decade ago, seeing what certain people in that firm have decided to do is extremely frustrating and extremely disappointing.”

The Buttigieg campaign says he has asked to be let out of his nondisclosure agreement so he can be more forthcoming about that formative time in his life. A McKinsey spokesman said Mr. Buttigieg “worked with several different clients” during his time with the firm, but “beyond that, we have no comment on specific client work.”

But interviews with six people who were involved in projects that Mr. Buttigieg worked on at McKinsey, along with gleanings from his autobiography, fill in some of the blanks.

Mr. Buttigieg was recruited by McKinsey at Oxford. The company seeks out Rhodes scholars like him, banking that their intellects will make up for their lack of M.B.A.s from traditional recruiting grounds like Harvard Business School.

Yet even during the recruitment process, Mr. Helbling recalled, Mr. Buttigieg made it known that, like many applicants, he saw the business experience on offer at McKinsey as a good job “in the near term,” in his case an asset on the way to a career in public service.

The work he did in his first year and a half at the firm — nearly a 10th of his adult life — is effectively a blank slate, though tax records give some hints. In 2007, his first year with the company, he filed tax returns in Illinois, where he worked out of the Chicago office, as well as in his home state of Indiana. But he also filed in Michigan, and in the city of Detroit, where he worked on a McKinsey project. In 2008, he filed a return in Connecticut (McKinsey has an office in Stamford). The next year, he filed in Connecticut and in California.

In early 2009 Mr. Buttigieg was spending his days, and many nights, in a glass-walled conference room in suburban Toronto. He was analyzing Canadian grocery prices, plugging the numbers into a database running on a souped-up laptop his colleagues nicknamed “Bertha.” PowerPoint slides and spreadsheets crept into his dreams.

He knew this wasn’t his calling.

“And so it may have been inevitable that one afternoon, as I set Bertha to sleep mode to go out to the hallway for a cup of coffee, I realized with overwhelming clarity the reason this could not be a career for very long: I didn’t care,” Mr. Buttigieg wrote in his autobiography, “Shortest Way Home.”

It was the only experience at McKinsey that Mr. Buttigieg wrote about in any detail. His next act at the firm didn’t merit a single complete sentence in the book. But it was a radically different, and for him far more interesting, public-spirited project: More than four years before he would be deployed as a Navy Reserve officer, he was heading to Iraq and Afghanistan.

McKinsey’s focus in Iraq during the latter part of George W. Bush’s presidency and the early years of Barack Obama’s was to help the defense department identify Iraqi state-owned enterprises that could be revived. The idea was to provide employment for men who might otherwise join the insurgency against the American-led occupation.

The McKinsey consultants on the ground in 2006 and 2007 were almost exclusively military veterans like Alan Armstrong, who flew fighters for the Navy and had an M.B.A. from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Armstrong, in an interview, said that while the reasoning behind the program was sound, the ongoing insurgency and a crippled infrastructure — electricity, for example, was spotty or nonexistent — made execution very difficult.

But the program was popular among the top brass at the Pentagon. In 2006, the defense secretary, Donald H. Rumsfeld, met with the team in Iraq and asked about the “whiz kids” from McKinsey, which struck Mr. Armstrong as an obvious parallel to the Vietnam War era, when whiz kids of an earlier generation had worked for another defense secretary: Robert S. McNamara.

“McKinsey was more than willing to play along — they were being paid extraordinary rates to keep playing,” Mr. Armstrong said.

Another former McKinsey consultant who worked in Iraq recalled a surreal moment preparing a PowerPoint presentation while on a convoy to a shuttered food-processing factory, under the watchful eye of a burly private security guard. “It felt like we were completely half-assing everything — it wasn’t particularly effective,” he said.

Other former McKinsey consultants who worked on the Iraq project, Task Force for Business and Stability Operations, have a more positive recollection of the firm’s work.

“Over all I’m very proud of it,” said one consultant, who had met Mr. Buttigieg in Washington, where most of the McKinsey consultants assigned to the project worked when not visiting Iraq. Four of the six former McKinsey employees spoke on the condition that their names not be used, citing confidentiality agreements or the press policies of their current employers.

By 2009, the security situation in Baghdad was stable enough that McKinsey allowed in some nonveterans like Mr. Buttigieg, who had studied Arabic at Harvard. He went to Iraq aware of the stark similarities between the American experiences there and in Vietnam decades earlier.

At Harvard, his senior thesis had drawn parallels between the United States’ seeking to “save” Vietnam from “godless Communism,” and the 17th-century Puritan ministers who had come to America to civilize “savage lands.” In his autobiography and in an interview that has drawn charges of out-of-touch elitism from some quarters, he reflected on that history by quoting a passage from “The Quiet American” by Graham Greene: “Innocence is like a dumb leper who has lost his bell, wandering the world, meaning no harm.”

“I had protested the Iraq war,” Mr. Buttigieg said in an interview with The Times. “But I also believed that it was important to try to do my part to help have good outcomes there.” He found echoes, he said, of “the stories I had studied about well-intentioned Americans sometimes causing as many problems as they addressed.”

Mr. Buttigieg recalled spending only two nights in Baghdad, where McKinsey consultants were quartered in a building near the Tigris River, and “going to a ministry.” He never left the city during his time there, he said.

“Remember I’m like the junior guy, kind of new,” Mr. Buttigieg said. “It’s not like I was the one whose expertise was needed to sort out what was going on in the provinces.

“Eventually I knew what I was doing a little more and was more useful by the time I got to the Afghan side.”

Mr. Buttigieg spent more time in Afghanistan. While Iraq had a fairly well-educated populace, a modern road system and large oil revenues, Afghanistan was far less developed. But the mission was similar: identify small and medium-size businesses to nurture so that they could employ Afghans, providing an attractive alternative to joining the Taliban while fueling economic growth.

Citing his nondisclosure agreement, Mr. Buttigieg declined to specify in the interview what he had worked on, though he mentioned having looked at opportunities in the agricultural industry — onions, tomatoes, olive oil — as well as paint manufacturing.

“They had some things to work with,” he said, “but would have benefited from support on things like business planning, more resources on how to plug in and eventually connections to markets too.”

In the years after Mr. Buttigieg left McKinsey, that program came under criticism from the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction. McKinsey had been awarded $18.6 million for the project, but the Pentagon watchdog wrote in an April 2018 report that it had been able to find just one piece of related work product: a 50-page report on the economic potential of the city of Herat.

A former McKinsey consultant who worked in Afghanistan described a more extensive McKinsey presence there, involving work in the mining industry and a government transparency project, along with the Herat study.

“One of those sounds just exactly like what I was doing,” Mr. Buttigieg said. When asked which one, he said, “I can’t think of a way to answer that without getting in trouble with the N.D.A.”

Mr. Buttigieg’s work on the Afghanistan project ended in late 2009, close to the time he was commissioned as an officer in the Navy Reserve. And that October, when he was still several months from leaving McKinsey, he set in motion the next phase of his life: He registered as a candidate for office with the State of Indiana.

The next year, he lost a bid for state treasurer, after emphasizing his McKinsey experience during the campaign. (He recounted at one campaign event that after his Rhodes scholarship, “I came back and went into business, and I worked for a company where my job was to do math. I’m a card-carrying nerd.”) In 2011, at age 29, he was elected mayor of South Bend.

The full range of Mr. Buttigieg’s work at McKinsey isn’t clear, though in his autobiography he says that he worked on other projects, including “energy efficiency research” to help curb greenhouse-gas emissions for a client he didn’t name. He also found time in the summer of 2008 to travel to Somaliland, the autonomous region in the Horn of Africa. He went as a tourist, but while there talked to local officials and wrote an account of his experience for The International Herald Tribune.

Mr. Buttigieg has been asked on the presidential campaign trail about his time at McKinsey and, in several interviews this year, has sought to reconcile the company’s recent troubles with his own work there.

For Mr. Buttigieg, the solution to McKinsey’s ethical pitfalls may come in a rethinking of the rules that business abides by. Maximizing shareholder value, the North Star of modern American capitalism, has a downside when the rules of the game leave many people worse off, he said.

“The challenge is that’s not good enough at a time when we are seeing how the economy continues to become more and more unequal, and we are seeing the ways in which a lot of corporate behavior that is technically legal is also not acceptable in terms of its impact,” he said. “There has got to be a higher standard.”

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Three UPS drivers robbed in California in separate incidents; search underway for 2 suspects, police say

Westlake Legal Group ups-thumb Three UPS drivers robbed in California in separate incidents; search underway for 2 suspects, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime/manhunt fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 8a6f5e79-809c-5960-b814-02f2780f67fc

A manhunt was underway in Northern California on Thursday night for two suspects who allegedly robbed three United Parcel Service drivers at gunpoint this week in separate incidents.

The suspects, armed with a handgun, demanded the drivers in each robbery open the door to their delivery trucks before grabbing several packages and fleeing in a black Honda, the San Jose Police Department said, according to KRON-TV.

FLORIDA HIGH-SPEED CHASE OF HIJACKED UPS TRUCK ENDS IN GUNFIRE, 4 REPORTED DEAD

All three robberies happened within 10 miles of each other in San Jose.

The first robbery was on Tuesday evening and the other two were within 45 minutes of each other Wednesday evening, KRON reported.

Surveillance video obtained by KPIX-TV shows the driver in the latest robbery lying facedown on the street as his truck is robbed.

“To even think that maybe that person was following the truck driver and [this week being] Cyber Monday … ,” a neighbor who didn’t want to be identified told the station. “These are scary days. People are getting desperate.”

“These are scary days. People are getting desperate.”

— Neighbor near San Jose crime scene

No injuries were reported in the robberies.

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Separately, a UPS driver was killed in Florida on Thursday after two suspects hijacked a delivery truck and led police on a chase that ended in gunfire. Both robbers were killed along with a driver in another vehicle.

Westlake Legal Group ups-thumb Three UPS drivers robbed in California in separate incidents; search underway for 2 suspects, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime/manhunt fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 8a6f5e79-809c-5960-b814-02f2780f67fc   Westlake Legal Group ups-thumb Three UPS drivers robbed in California in separate incidents; search underway for 2 suspects, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime/manhunt fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 8a6f5e79-809c-5960-b814-02f2780f67fc

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Pelosi says Clinton was impeached for ‘being stupid,’ downplays House Democrats’ effort against Trump

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113387833001_6113386263001-vs Pelosi says Clinton was impeached for 'being stupid,' downplays House Democrats' effort against Trump Gregg Re fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 43e9b88b-2045-5d58-a31f-8016e1cfc873

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi sought to move on from questions about impeachment during a televised town hall Thursday night, even as she insisted she wasn’t bothered at all by polls showing sagging support for the probe against President Trump.

Pelosi, who also claimed former President Bill Clinton was impeached only for “being stupid,” made her comments at the CNN event just hours after she appeared at a fiery news conference to direct the House Judiciary Committee to begin drafting articles of impeachment against Trump.

“Can we not have any more questions about impeachment?” Pelosi asked at one point. “I don’t mind questions, but to ask me questions through the prism of the White House is like, what?”

Moderator Jake Tapper noted that polls in swing districts show that moderate voters have begun to oppose impeachment, and asked whether Pelosi would regret the proceedings if they ultimately help Trump win re-election.

“This isn’t about politics at all,” Pelosi insisted. “This is about patriotism. It’s not about partisanship. It’s about honoring our oath of office. This is the first president that has committed all of these things as the constitutional experts said yesterday. Nobody has ever even come close. Not Richard Nixon even came close to his dishonoring his own oath of office.”

“This is the first president that has committed all of these things … Nobody has ever even come close. Not Richard Nixon even came close to his dishonoring his own oath of office.”

— House Speaker Nancy Pelosi

PELOSI SNAPS AT REPORTER, INSISTS BEING CATHOLIC MEANS SHE CANNOT HATE ANYONE

The Trump campaign highlighted internal polling on Thursday showing that moderate Democrats in districts won by the president in 2016 were turning against impeachment.

“Nancy Pelosi is marching members of her caucus off the plank and into the abyss,” Trump 2020 Campaign manager Brad Parscale tweeted, alongside polling data. “Impeachment is killing her freshman members and polling proves it.”

“Nancy Pelosi is marching members of her caucus off the plank and into the abyss. Impeachment is killing her freshman members and polling proves it.”

— Brad Parscale, Trump 2020 Campaign manager

The House is now composed of 431 members, meaning 217 yeas are needed to impeach the president. There are currently 233 Democrats, meaning Democrats can lose only 16 of their own members and still impeach the president. 31 House Democrats represent districts Trump carried in 2016.

Sensing a possible opening, the Republican National Committee (RNC) has ramped up the pressure on these Democrats in pro-Trump districts. As reported by The Daily Caller, the RNC is running ads urging voters to pick a lawmaker who “won’t waste taxpayer $$$ on partisan impeachment.” And, Wall Street Journal Editorial Page Deputy Editor Dan Henninger told Fox News that some of these 31 Democrats are “really reluctant to take this vote,” especially now.

DOES PELOSI HAVE THE VOTES ON IMPEACHMENT?

Earlier in the day, Tapper pointed out that Rep. Jeff Van Drew, D-N.J., had broken with party leadership and announced his opposition to impeachment. That means opposition to impeachment is now bipartisan, even as no Republicans have supported impeachment — a blow to Pelosi, who has previously said impeachment would need to be bipartisan.

But, Pelosi made clear her mind had changed on that point.

“The facts are clear,” she told Tapper at the town hall. “The Constitution is clear. The president violated the Constitution. And so I think it is important for us to proceed. If we were not to proceed, it would say to any president, any future president, whoever she or he may be, Democratic or Republican, that our democracy is gone, the president is king, he can do whatever he wants in violation of the law, ignoring the acts of Congress, undermining our system of checks and balances.”

The speaker also elaborated on her outburst earlier in the day after a reporter asked her whether she “hates” the president. Pelosi, at the time, emphasized that she was a Catholic and does not hate anyone, although she said she felt Trump was a corrupt coward.

“The word ‘to hate’ a person, that just doesn’t happen,” Pelosi said at the town hall. “The word ‘hate’ is a terrible word. You might reserve it for vanilla ice cream for something like that, I’m a chocoholic, but not for a person. And so for him to say that was really disgusting to me. And of course he was quoting somebody else.”

Pelosi further argued that Clinton was impeached for “being stupid,” in response to Republican claims that Democrats were hypocritical on the issue. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., had blasted impeachment in 1998 as the “undoing of a national election” and argued that it should be reserved for extreme situations.

“Some of these same people are saying, ‘Oh, this doesn’t rise to impeachment,'” Pelosi said at one point in the CNN event. “Right there, impeaching Bill Clinton for being stupid in terms of something like that. I mean, I love him, I think he was a great president, but being stupid in terms of that, what would somebody do, not to embarrass their family, but in any event, so they did Bill Clinton, now they want me to do George Bush, I didn’t want it to be a way of life in our country.”

Clinton was impeached by the GOP-held House for perjury and obstruction of justice in December 1998, only to be acquitted by the Democrat-controlled Senate in February 1999. Clinton had been accused of making false statements in connection with a sexual harassment lawsuit filed by Paula Jones, a former Arkansas state employee, and had falsely denied under oath that he had “sexual relations” or been alone with a White House intern, Monica Lewinsky.

Amid the impeachment effort, lawmakers also have to deal with a looming government shutdown that could take effect Dec. 20 unless Congress passes spending legislation to avoid it. With just over two weeks to do so — and holidays coming soon after — impeachment could find itself on the House’s back burner until the new year.

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At the town hall, Pelosi said she didn’t think “we’re headed for a shutdown” this month, and floated the possibility of a continuing resolution to delay the issue.

“But I hope we don’t have to do that,” she said.

“I have to admit that today was quite historic,” Pelosi added. “It was taking us across a threshold on this, that we just had no choice. I do hope that it would be remembered in a way that honors the vision of our founders, what they had in mind for establishing a democracy.”

Fox News’ Chad Pergram and Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113387833001_6113386263001-vs Pelosi says Clinton was impeached for 'being stupid,' downplays House Democrats' effort against Trump Gregg Re fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 43e9b88b-2045-5d58-a31f-8016e1cfc873   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113387833001_6113386263001-vs Pelosi says Clinton was impeached for 'being stupid,' downplays House Democrats' effort against Trump Gregg Re fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 43e9b88b-2045-5d58-a31f-8016e1cfc873

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Pelosi says Clinton was impeached for ‘being stupid,’ downplays House Democrats’ effort against Trump

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113387833001_6113386263001-vs Pelosi says Clinton was impeached for 'being stupid,' downplays House Democrats' effort against Trump

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi sought to move on from questions about impeachment during a televised town hall Thursday night, even as she insisted she wasn’t bothered at all by polls showing sagging support for the probe against President Trump.

Pelosi, who also claimed former President Bill Clinton was impeached only for “being stupid,” made her comments at the CNN event just hours after she appeared at a fiery news conference to direct the House Judiciary Committee to begin drafting articles of impeachment against Trump.

“Can we not have any more questions about impeachment?” Pelosi asked at one point. “I don’t mind questions, but to ask me questions through the prism of the White House is like, what?”

Moderator Jake Tapper noted that polls in swing districts show that moderate voters have begun to oppose impeachment, and asked whether Pelosi would regret the proceedings if they ultimately help Trump win re-election.

“This isn’t about politics at all,” Pelosi insisted. “This is about patriotism. It’s not about partisanship. It’s about honoring our oath of office. This is the first president that has committed all of these things as the constitutional experts said yesterday. Nobody has ever even come close. Not Richard Nixon even came close to his dishonoring his own oath of office.”

“This is the first president that has committed all of these things … Nobody has ever even come close. Not Richard Nixon even came close to his dishonoring his own oath of office.”

— House Speaker Nancy Pelosi

PELOSI SNAPS AT REPORTER, INSISTS BEING CATHOLIC MEANS SHE CANNOT HATE ANYONE

The Trump campaign highlighted internal polling on Thursday showing that moderate Democrats in districts won by the president in 2016 were turning against impeachment.

“Nancy Pelosi is marching members of her caucus off the plank and into the abyss,” Trump 2020 Campaign manager Brad Parscale tweeted, alongside polling data. “Impeachment is killing her freshman members and polling proves it.”

“Nancy Pelosi is marching members of her caucus off the plank and into the abyss. Impeachment is killing her freshman members and polling proves it.”

— Brad Parscale, Trump 2020 Campaign manager

The House is now composed of 431 members, meaning 217 yeas are needed to impeach the president. There are currently 233 Democrats, meaning Democrats can lose only 16 of their own members and still impeach the president. 31 House Democrats represent districts Trump carried in 2016.

Sensing a possible opening, the Republican National Committee (RNC) has ramped up the pressure on these Democrats in pro-Trump districts. As reported by The Daily Caller, the RNC is running ads urging voters to pick a lawmaker who “won’t waste taxpayer $$$ on partisan impeachment.” And, Wall Street Journal Editorial Page Deputy Editor Dan Henninger told Fox News that some of these 31 Democrats are “really reluctant to take this vote,” especially now.

DOES PELOSI HAVE THE VOTES ON IMPEACHMENT?

Earlier in the day, Tapper pointed out that Rep. Jeff Van Drew, D-N.J., had broken with party leadership and announced his opposition to impeachment. That means opposition to impeachment is now bipartisan, even as no Republicans have supported impeachment — a blow to Pelosi, who has previously said impeachment would need to be bipartisan.

But, Pelosi made clear her mind had changed on that point.

“The facts are clear,” she told Tapper at the town hall. “The Constitution is clear. The president violated the Constitution. And so I think it is important for us to proceed. If we were not to proceed, it would say to any president, any future president, whoever she or he may be, Democratic or Republican, that our democracy is gone, the president is king, he can do whatever he wants in violation of the law, ignoring the acts of Congress, undermining our system of checks and balances.”

The speaker also elaborated on her outburst earlier in the day after a reporter asked her whether she “hates” the president. Pelosi, at the time, emphasized that she was a Catholic and does not hate anyone, although she said she felt Trump was a corrupt coward.

“The word ‘to hate’ a person, that just doesn’t happen,” Pelosi said at the town hall. “The word ‘hate’ is a terrible word. You might reserve it for vanilla ice cream for something like that, I’m a chocoholic, but not for a person. And so for him to say that was really disgusting to me. And of course he was quoting somebody else.”

Pelosi further argued that Clinton was impeached for “being stupid,” in response to Republican claims that Democrats were hypocritical on the issue. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., had blasted impeachment in 1998 as the “undoing of a national election” and argued that it should be reserved for extreme situations.

“Some of these same people are saying, ‘Oh, this doesn’t rise to impeachment,'” Pelosi said at one point in the CNN event. “Right there, impeaching Bill Clinton for being stupid in terms of something like that. I mean, I love him, I think he was a great president, but being stupid in terms of that, what would somebody do, not to embarrass their family, but in any event, so they did Bill Clinton, now they want me to do George Bush, I didn’t want it to be a way of life in our country.”

Clinton was impeached by the GOP-held House for perjury and obstruction of justice in December 1998, only to be acquitted by the Democrat-controlled Senate in February 1999. Clinton had been accused of making false statements in connection with a sexual harassment lawsuit filed by Paula Jones, a former Arkansas state employee, and had falsely denied under oath that he had “sexual relations” or been alone with a White House intern, Monica Lewinsky.

Amid the impeachment effort, lawmakers also have to deal with a looming government shutdown that could take effect Dec. 20 unless Congress passes spending legislation to avoid it. With just over two weeks to do so — and holidays coming soon after — impeachment could find itself on the House’s back burner until the new year.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

At the town hall, Pelosi said she didn’t think “we’re headed for a shutdown” this month, and floated the possibility of a continuing resolution to delay the issue.

“But I hope we don’t have to do that,” she said.

“I have to admit that today was quite historic,” Pelosi added. “It was taking us across a threshold on this, that we just had no choice. I do hope that it would be remembered in a way that honors the vision of our founders, what they had in mind for establishing a democracy.”

Fox News’ Chad Pergram and Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113387833001_6113386263001-vs Pelosi says Clinton was impeached for 'being stupid,' downplays House Democrats' effort against Trump   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113387833001_6113386263001-vs Pelosi says Clinton was impeached for 'being stupid,' downplays House Democrats' effort against Trump

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Coast Guard rescues Florida dog spotted swimming for its life

Westlake Legal Group Dog-Rescue-1 Coast Guard rescues Florida dog spotted swimming for its life Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/coast-guard fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox news fnc/us fnc article 190ebb51-1747-5a39-8e2d-ece58d319985

Sometimes what works for people works for man’s best friend.

A U.S. Coast Guard crew in southwest Florida used their training for recovering people in the water to rescue a pup found swimming offshore Wednesday night, Fox 13 Tampa Bay reported.

“While our crew was out underway for a night patrol, we received a call for a dog in distress swimming off Fort Myers Beach/Bowditch Point,” Coast Guard Station Fort Myers Beach wrote on Facebook.

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The crew of the U.S. Coast Guard Station Fort Myers Beach safely pulled the dog on board their vessel.

“Thanks to the crew’s expertise in intercepting non-compliant vessels (NCV) and recovering a person in the water (PIW), our ‘star’ of the night was safely recovered and returned to her owner!” they added.

Click for more from FOX 13 Tampa Bay.

Frank Miles is a reporter and editor covering geopolitics, military, crime, technology and sports for FoxNews.com. His email is Frank.Miles@foxnews.com.

Westlake Legal Group Dog-Rescue-1 Coast Guard rescues Florida dog spotted swimming for its life Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/coast-guard fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox news fnc/us fnc article 190ebb51-1747-5a39-8e2d-ece58d319985   Westlake Legal Group Dog-Rescue-1 Coast Guard rescues Florida dog spotted swimming for its life Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/coast-guard fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox news fnc/us fnc article 190ebb51-1747-5a39-8e2d-ece58d319985

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Wisconsin governor to release findings of sexual-assault probe of state National Guard

Westlake Legal Group AP19339646566956 Wisconsin governor to release findings of sexual-assault probe of state National Guard Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/wisconsin fox-news/us/military/national-guard fox-news/us/military fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc d6f252af-4797-5f7e-89d0-ddabc1da473e article

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said he will release the findings of a seven-month probe on how the state’s National Guard handled a half-dozen cases of sexual assault allegations after federal investigators brief the Guard’s top commander this weekend, according to a letter to lawmakers on Thursday.

Evers said the National Guard Bureau’s Office of Complex Investigations (OCI) briefed him on their findings on Nov. 25, which was the result of an overarching investigation of the Guard’s protocols for reporting, investigating and prosecuting sexual assault.

The investigation was ordered by Evers and Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., after Master Sgt. Jay Ellis notified Baldwin in November 2018 of the alleged incidents of sexual assault within his 115th Fighter Wing security squadron dating back to 2002 that were brushed aside by senior officers.

BLACK HAWK HELICOPTER IN MINNESOTA CRASHES AFTER TAKEOFF, KILLING 3 ABOARD, GOVERNOR SAYS

Investigators plan to meet with Maj. Gen. Donald Dunbar on Saturday to go over their findings.

Evers also extended an invitation to legislative leaders to attend an OCI briefing on Monday to understand the review “due to the gravity of the situation and the report’s findings.”

Excerpts from the OCI report obtained by The Capital Times revealed that an investigator told an accuser, who said she was assaulted by a male soldier in 2015 in their unit, that the Guard’s response to her case was “an absolute train wreck.”

In that case, the male soldier was charged with four sexual assault violations of the Wisconsin Code of Military Justice, but the military prosecutor missed several administrative deadlines and eventually failed to advance the case. The alleged perpetrator eventually pleaded guilty to one count of indecent conduct for having consensual sex with the woman.

The investigator said in the report that the bungled court-martial was a result of Guard officials’ incompetence.

Prior attempts by State Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald in February to glean answers about potential sexual misconduct in the Guard hit a snag when Dunbar said the Guard has “zero tolerance” for sexual assault and harassment but didn’t offer any recommendations for improvement on the process for reporting or handling such cases. Fitzgerald said then that he wasn’t happy with the response and questioned whether the Guard follows its own policies.

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Fitzgerald, who is running for Congress in a heavily conservative southeastern Wisconsin district next year, said in a statement Thursday that he wants to hear what the OCI has to say about shortfalls in the Guard, according to reports by The Associated Press.

“Clearly changes must be made,” he said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group AP19339646566956 Wisconsin governor to release findings of sexual-assault probe of state National Guard Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/wisconsin fox-news/us/military/national-guard fox-news/us/military fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc d6f252af-4797-5f7e-89d0-ddabc1da473e article   Westlake Legal Group AP19339646566956 Wisconsin governor to release findings of sexual-assault probe of state National Guard Vandana Rambaran fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/wisconsin fox-news/us/military/national-guard fox-news/us/military fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc d6f252af-4797-5f7e-89d0-ddabc1da473e article

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