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Westlake Legal Group > News and News Media (Page 116)

Jonathan Turley tells lawmakers if they impeach Trump, ‘It’s your abuse of power’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6112966115001_6112973416001-vs Jonathan Turley tells lawmakers if they impeach Trump, ‘It’s your abuse of power’ fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Brian Flood article 5c20b80b-c1f1-5743-9cfd-cfd083cc15ba

Constitutional scholar and George Washington University law professor Jonathan Turley told lawmakers on Wednesday during the Trump impeachment inquiry hearing that it would be an abuse of their power to impeach President Trump.

Appearing before the House Judiciary Committee, Turley accused lawmakers of doing “precisely” what they’re condemning Trump for doing and urged the committee to respect the separation of powers during the process or risk abusing their positions.

“I can’t emphasize this enough and I’ll say it just one more time: If you impeach a president, if you make a high crime and misdemeanor out of going to the courts; it is an abuse of power,” Turley said. “It’s your abuse of power.”

JUDICIARY COMMITTEE TO BEGIN IMPEACHMENT HEARINGS BY FEATURING FOUR LAW PROFESSORS

“You’re doing precisely what you’re criticizing the president for doing. We have a third branch that deals with conflicts at the other two branches, and what comes out of there, what you do with it, is the very definition of legitimacy,” Turley added.

Turley, the only witness called by Republicans to testify on Wednesday, argued against impeaching the president. He said impeachments against former Presidents Bill Clinton and Richard Nixon came after clear, undeniable crimes were committed.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“The record does not establish obstruction in this case,” Turley said.

Stanford Law professor Pamela Karlan, Harvard Law professor and Bloomberg columnist Noah Feldman and University of North Carolina Law professor Michael Gerhardt were called by Democrats on the committee, and they said Trump’s actions were impeachable.

Fox News’ Andrew O’Reilly contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6112966115001_6112973416001-vs Jonathan Turley tells lawmakers if they impeach Trump, ‘It’s your abuse of power’ fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Brian Flood article 5c20b80b-c1f1-5743-9cfd-cfd083cc15ba   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6112966115001_6112973416001-vs Jonathan Turley tells lawmakers if they impeach Trump, ‘It’s your abuse of power’ fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Brian Flood article 5c20b80b-c1f1-5743-9cfd-cfd083cc15ba

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The GOP’s only impeachment witness on Wednesday contradicted his own previous testimony

Westlake Legal Group ery5QEBqpEqhlBtIt-JfVzM8qn8gKVzv_mCHwduBpdQ The GOP's only impeachment witness on Wednesday contradicted his own previous testimony r/politics

So- I think it’s important not to discredit Turley because of this. He has a long career as an esteemed legal scholar. And yes, he is a Fox News contributor, but is also/has been the legal analyst for NBC, USA Today, CBS, and the BBC. He, to me, struck me in the same way Fiona Hill did- calm, cool, clearly an expert in their field, there to deliver things as straightforward as possible. He knows every inch of the law, and unfortunately for us, the hearings aren’t “do you want him out of office?” but “do the actions fit these specific legal definitions”. Jonathan Turley has traditionally been a staunch advocate for many progressive causes.

I would love nothing more than to see Trump impeached and booted out, but give credit where it’s due.

From his Wikipedia :

“What Turley has called his “socially liberal agenda”[12] has led liberal and progressive thinkers to consider him a champion for their causes, especially on issues such as separation of church and state, environmental law,[14][23] civil rights,[11][24] and the illegality of torture.[25][26][27] Politico has referred to Turley as a “liberal law professor and longtime civil libertarian.”[28]

Turley has nevertheless exhibited his disagreement with rigid ideological stances in contradiction to the established law with other stated and published opinions.[14][28]

In numerous appearances on Countdown with Keith Olbermann and The Rachel Maddow Show, he called for criminal prosecution of Bush administration officials for war crimes, including torture.[29]”

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Former President Jimmy Carter Discharged From Hospital

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1140189994-c27929556cabcb0c7d9a5b36fdae3ca7e06d8d37-s1100-c15 Former President Jimmy Carter Discharged From Hospital

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter attending Maranatha Baptist Church before teaching Sunday school in his hometown of Plains, Georgia in April. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  Former President Jimmy Carter Discharged From Hospital

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter attending Maranatha Baptist Church before teaching Sunday school in his hometown of Plains, Georgia in April.

NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Former President Jimmy Carter has been released from a Georgia-area hospital after being admitted over the weekend to receive treatment for a urinary tract infection.

The Carter Center announced Wednesday the 39th president “looks forward to further rest and recovery at home.”

“Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter was discharged from Phoebe Sumter Medical Center this afternoon,” Carter Center spokesperson Deanna Congileo said in a statement.

“He said he looks forward to further rest and recovery at home in Plains, Georgia. He and Mrs. Carter wish everyone peace and joy this holiday season.”

As NPR has reported, Carter, 95 has suffered from a series of recent health challenges, including an operation last month to relieve pressure on his brain following two falls at his home.

There were “no complications from the surgery” the Carter Center announced after his procedure last month.

Carter served as president from 1977 to 1981. Prior to that, he served as governor of Georgia.

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Marine arrested for alleged human smuggling after Chinese woman found in car trunk

Westlake Legal Group US-Mexico-Border-iStock Marine arrested for alleged human smuggling after Chinese woman found in car trunk Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/us/crime fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox news fnc/us fnc article 2bf2450d-3cca-5c7e-9821-8ff497e85c63

A Marine stationed in Southern California was arrested Monday on suspicion of attempting to smuggle two Chinese women in the trunk of a car across the U.S.-Mexico border.

The unidentified junior-enlisted Marine was taken into custody at the San Ysidro port of entry near San Diego around 1:30 p.m., Marine spokesman Lt. Cameron Edinburgh said in a statement to Fox News.

The 20-year-old is assigned to the 1st Marine Division’s headquarters battalion at Camp Pendleton, Calif.

16 MARINES ARRESTED ON ACCUSATIONS RANGING FROM HUMAN SMUGGLING TO DRUGS, OFFICIALS SAY

Customs officials found the two women in the trunk of a 2007 Ford Mustang when the Marine was pulled aside for additional screening. Customs and Border Patrol officials are investigating the incident.

“The Marine is currently being held in civilian custody.,” Edinburgh said.”The determination as to the adjudicating authority has not yet been made.”

The Marine is expected to face federal charges, a CBP spokesperson said.

Edinburgh said the Marine has not served in the Southwest Border Support Mission, where U.S. troops are assisting border agents on the U.S.-Mexico border.

Monday’s arrest comes as several other Marines stationed at Camp Pendleton are facing human trafficking charges. Six out of two dozen Marines recently pled guilty to human trafficking and drug charges at military court-martials.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Sixteen of the Marines charged were arrested in July during a battalion formation that has since been ruled unlawful and a violation of their rights.

In July, Border Patrol agents arrested two Marines, Lance Cpl. Byron Darnell Law II and Lance Cpl. David Javier Salazar-Quintero near the border when they were caught with three undocumented immigrants in the back seat of their vehicle.

Westlake Legal Group US-Mexico-Border-iStock Marine arrested for alleged human smuggling after Chinese woman found in car trunk Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/us/crime fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox news fnc/us fnc article 2bf2450d-3cca-5c7e-9821-8ff497e85c63   Westlake Legal Group US-Mexico-Border-iStock Marine arrested for alleged human smuggling after Chinese woman found in car trunk Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/us/crime fox-news/tech/topics/us-marines fox news fnc/us fnc article 2bf2450d-3cca-5c7e-9821-8ff497e85c63

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US, Sudan to exchange ambassadors, ending 23-year pause, Pompeo says

Westlake Legal Group Pompeo100119 US, Sudan to exchange ambassadors, ending 23-year pause, Pompeo says Morgan Phillips fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox-news/politics/finance/sanctions fox news fnc/politics fnc c0fbf94c-35c4-5765-86a0-8841a4599827 article

The United States and Sudan have agreed to begin exchanging ambassadors again after not doing so for more than two decades, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a statement Wednesday.

Relations have warmed between the two nations since Sudan’s 30-year dictator Omar al-Bashir was deposed in a coup in April and a civilian transitional government was formed in August.

The announcement came as Sudan’s new prime minister, Abdalla Hamdok, wrapped up his first visit to Washington.

The last ambassador sent to Sudan was terminated in 1996 with the suspension of U.S. embassy operations. The U.S. had designated Sudan as a “state sponsor of terrorism” three years before. The embassy reopened in 2002 but has been run by a charge d’affaires rather than a Senate-confirmed ambassador.

NEARLY 630 PAKISTAN GIRLS, WOMEN SOLD AS BRIDES TO CHINESE MEN: REPORT

“This decision is a meaningful step forward in strengthening the U.S.-Sudan bilateral relationship, particularly as the civilian-led transitional government works to implement the vast reforms under the political agreement and constitutional declaration” in August, Pompeo said in a statement.

Hamdok was in Washington seeking support for his nation’s transition toward democracy. One of his priorities was to win Sudan’s removal from the U.S. “state sponsor of terrorism blacklist,” which subjects the African nation to U.S. sanctions, making it ineligible for debt relief and financing from the IMF and World Bank.

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION FINALLY RELEASES AID TO LEBANON WITH NO EXPLANATION 

Pompeo praised Hamdok for installing a civilian cabinet and making key personnel changes to break with the previous regime. Pompeo made no mention of the terrorism designation. Administration officials said Sudan is making progress toward removal but has not met all conditions.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Bashir served as Sudan’s president from 1989 to 2019 when he was removed from his post by Sudanese Armed Forces after months of protests and uprisings. His administration was marred by corruption and accusations of genocide. He is now in detention and is being tried by the International Criminal Court.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group Pompeo100119 US, Sudan to exchange ambassadors, ending 23-year pause, Pompeo says Morgan Phillips fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox-news/politics/finance/sanctions fox news fnc/politics fnc c0fbf94c-35c4-5765-86a0-8841a4599827 article   Westlake Legal Group Pompeo100119 US, Sudan to exchange ambassadors, ending 23-year pause, Pompeo says Morgan Phillips fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox-news/politics/finance/sanctions fox news fnc/politics fnc c0fbf94c-35c4-5765-86a0-8841a4599827 article

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Impeachment Hearing Updates: Scholars Testify Trump’s Conduct Was Impeachable

Video

Westlake Legal Group 04vid-impeachment-live-2-videoSixteenByNine3000 Impeachment Hearing Updates: Scholars Testify Trump’s Conduct Was Impeachable Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry

The Judiciary Committee House panel begins its hearings to debate and determine articles of impeachment. They will hear from four legal scholars about the basis for impeachment.CreditCredit…Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_165421116_48a4c371-3d52-456b-a2d8-424bdda35a80-articleLarge Impeachment Hearing Updates: Scholars Testify Trump’s Conduct Was Impeachable Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry

Noah Feldman, left, Pamela S. Karlan, and Michael Gerhardt were sworn in to testify before Congress on Wednesday.Credit…Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times

Three constitutional scholars invited by Democrats to testify at Wednesday’s impeachment hearings said that President Trump’s efforts to pressure Ukraine for political gain clearly met the historical definition of impeachable offenses.

The three law professors appeared in the first impeachment hearing before the House Judiciary Committee as it kicked off a debate about whether to draft articles of impeachment against the president.

Noah Feldman, a professor at Harvard, argued that attempts by Mr. Trump to withhold a White House meeting and military assistance from Ukraine as leverage for political favors constitute impeachable conduct, as was the act of soliciting foreign assistance on a phone call with Ukraine’s leader.

“President Trump has committed impeachable high crimes and misdemeanors by corruptly abusing the office of the presidency,” Mr. Feldman said. “Specifically, President Trump has abused his office by corruptly soliciting President Volodymyr Zelensky to announce investigations of his political rivals in order to gain personal advantage, including in the 2020 presidential election.”

Michael J. Gerhardt, a professor at the University of North Carolina, argued that Mr. Trump had “committed several impeachable offenses” by taking actions regarding Ukraine that were worse than Richard Nixon’s misconduct during Watergate.

“If left unchecked, the president will likely continue his pattern of soliciting foreign interference on his behalf in the next election,” Mr. Gerhardt said, adding that Mr. Trump’s actions “are worse than the misconduct of any prior president.”

Pamela S. Karlan, a Stanford law professor, told lawmakers that the president’s attempt to “strong arm a foreign leader” would not be considered politics as usual by historical standards.

“It is, instead, a cardinal reason why the Constitution contains an impeachment power,” she said. “Put simply, a president should resist foreign interference in our elections, not demand it and not welcome it. If we are to keep faith with the Constitution and our Republic, President Trump must be held to account.”

Jonathan Turley, a law professor at George Washington University who was invited to testify by the committee’s Republicans, offered the lone dissent, arguing in his opening statement that Mr. Trump should not be impeached.

In a 53-page written statement submitted to the committee, Mr. Turley made it clear that he is not a supporter of the president and believes that the Ukraine matter warranted investigation. But he argued that the Democratic impeachment case is dangerously “slipshod” and premature.

“I am concerned about lowering impeachment standards to fit a paucity of evidence and an abundance of anger,” he said. “If the House proceeds solely on the Ukrainian allegations, this impeachment would stand out among modern impeachments as the shortest proceeding, with the thinnest evidentiary record, and the narrowest grounds ever used to impeach a president.”

Offering an exhaustive and colorful account of the history of impeachment, Mr. Turley agreed with the other panelists that “a quid pro quo to force the investigation of a political rival in exchange for military aid can be impeachable, if proven.”

But for that to be the case, he said, the evidence has to be stronger. Witnesses like Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, and John R. Bolton, the former national security adviser, must be heard from — not just spoken about by other witnesses. He argued the current case is destined for “collapse in a Senate trial.”

Westlake Legal Group 00impeachment-archetypes-videopromo-image-articleLarge-v2 Impeachment Hearing Updates: Scholars Testify Trump’s Conduct Was Impeachable Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry

The Impeachment Inquiry’s Main Players

Here are the lawmakers to watch as the process unfolds.

The witnesses disagreed about one of the major legal issues facing the House: whether, if Mr. Trump did condition his performance of official actions like holding a White House meeting and releasing military aid on whether Ukraine would announce the investigations he wanted, that amounted to solicitation of a bribe — one of the specific offenses listed in the Constitution as grounds for impeachment.

Ms. Karlan, a witness invited by Democrats, put it bluntly: “If you conclude that he asked for the investigation of Vice President Biden and his son for political reasons, that is to aid his re-election, then, yes, you have bribery here.”

But Mr. Turley, the Republican-invited witness, said it was not a clear case of bribery. He said that a specific case of bribery the writers of the Constitution discussed was when a French king gave money and “other benefits, including apparently a French mistress,” to an English king in exchange for signing a secret treaty and converting to Catholicism. Mr. Turley suggested that example was too different from the accusation against Mr. Trump.

He also noted that the Supreme Court in 2016 unanimously threw out the public corruption conviction of Bob McDonnell, the former governor of Virginia, whom prosecutors had accused of taking gifts from a businessman while performing official acts that benefited him. The court said what counted as bribery under a federal statute had to be interpreted narrowly.

But Mr. Feldman said that the meaning of the word “bribery” for impeachment purposes was broader than any federal statute — because a federal statute can’t change the Constitution.

“Bribery had a clear meaning,” to the framers, Mr. Feldman said. “If the House believes that the president solicited something of value in the form of investigations or an announcement of investigations, and that he did so corruptly for personal gain, then that would constitute bribery under the meaning of the Constitution and it would not be lawless. It would bribery under the law.”
— Charlie Savage

Speaker Nancy Pelosi convened a rare members-only Democratic Caucus meeting Wednesday morning to rally her rank-and-file as the impeachment proceedings against President Trump got underway.

“Are you ready?” Ms. Pelosi asked a roomful of Democrats.

They were, the lawmakers responded in unison, according to multiple people in the room who described the private meeting on condition of anonymity.

The Democrats gave a standing ovation to Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, who has spearheaded the impeachment investigation. Mr. Schiff presented his panel’s 300-page report made public on Tuesday detailing the Democrats’ case against the president and fielded questions.

“Nancy said, ‘Keep your cool and read the report,’” said Representative Donna Shalala, Democrat of Florida.

Representative Dean Phillips, Democrat of Minnesota said the tenor of the room was, “Unanimity.”

As Ms. Pelosi mobilized her members, Vice President Mike Pence was delivering his own battle cry to Republicans at their weekly conference meeting. Mr. Pence praised the lawmakers and said he and Mr. Trump were proud of them for their strong impeachment defense, said an official familiar with the remarks.

But Mr. Pence also issued a marching order: “Turn up the heat” on House Democrats, he said.
Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Catie Edmondson

Within the first hour of the House Judiciary Committee, the panel lived up to its reputation for partisan rancor. Republicans interrupted the proceedings to present Representative Jerrold Nadler, Democrat of New York and the committee’s chairman, with a letter demanding a day of minority hearings.

They also forced votes on motions to call Mr. Schiff to testify before the panel and to suspend and postpone the hearing.

Democrats knocked each down along party lines, but the proceeding stood in stark contrast with those of the relatively staid and orderly proceedings of Intelligence Committee that carried the impeachment inquiry for the last two months. And it was a harbinger of things to come as the impeachment battle enters a more intensive phase as Democrats rush toward a vote before Christmas.

In between the Republican parliamentary maneuvers, Mr. Nadler made no effort to cover up the unruly circumstances, but he put the blame on Mr. Trump.

“Ladies and gentlemen, the storm in which we find ourselves today was set in motion by President Trump,” Mr. Nadler said. “I do not wish this moment on the country. It is not a pleasant task that we undertake today. But we have each taken an oath to protect the Constitution, and the facts before us are clear.”

When his turn to speak arrived, Representative Doug Collins of Georgia, the panel’s top Republican, offered a hard-edged rebuke of the Democrats.

“This may be a new time, a new place and we may be all scrubbed up and looking pretty for impeachment,” Mr. Collins said. “This is not an impeachment. This just a simple railroad job and today’s is a waste of time.”

Nicholas Fandos

As the minority party, Republicans have considerably less power in the Judiciary Committee than majority Democrats, but they can use parliamentary procedures to put up a fight and slow the proceedings. Republicans began availing themselves of those rights almost from the moment the hearing began, repeatedly interjecting and proposing motions, at times interrupting the witnesses mid-statement, and forcing Mr. Nadler to halt the process and hold a vote to lay aside the Republican objections.

They lost each time in party-line votes.

  • Mr. Trump repeatedly pressured President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine to investigate people and issues of political concern to Mr. Trump, including the former vice president. Here’s a timeline of events since January.

  • A C.I.A. officer who was once detailed to the White House filed a whistle-blower complaint on Mr. Trump’s interactions with Mr. Zelensky. Read the complaint.

Video

transcript

Admit It: You Don’t Know How Impeachment Works. We Can Help.

Explosive testimony. News media frenzies. A trial in the Senate. Here is how impeachment works — and how it has played out in the past.

“Impeachment by its nature, it’s a political process.” “What people think is going to happen can turn out to be very different from what happens.” “Because it has to do with elected officials holding another elected official to account for their conduct.” When the framers of the Constitution created a process to remove a president from office, they were well … kind of vague. So to understand how it’s going to play out, the past is really our best guide. “I think we’re just all in for a really crazy ride.” Collectively, these New York Times reporters have covered U.S. politics for over 150 years. “I’m also a drummer in a band, so …” They’ve reported on past impeachment inquiries. “Yea, I’m lost in Senate wonderland.” And they say that the three we’ve had so far have been full of twists and turns. “The president of the United States is not guilty as charged.” In short, expect the unexpected. First, the process. Impeachment is technically only the initial stage. “Common misconceptions about impeachment are that impeachment by itself means removal from office. It doesn’t. The impeachment part of the process is only the indictment that sets up a trial.” The Constitution describes offenses that are grounds for removing the president from office as bribery, treason and — “They say high crimes and misdemeanors, which, really, is in the eye of the beholder.” “The framers didn’t give us a guidebook to it. They simply said, that the House had the responsibility for impeachment and the Senate had the responsibility for the trial.” One of the things missing from the Constitution? How an impeachment inquiry should start. And that has generally been a source of drama. Basically, anything goes. “In fact, in the Andrew Johnson case they voted to impeach him without even having drafted the articles of impeachment.” For Richard Nixon, his case started with several investigations that led to public hearings. That part of the process went on for two years, and yielded revelation after revelation, connecting Nixon to a politically-motivated burglary at D.N.C. headquarters — “… located in the Watergate office building.” — and its subsequent cover-up. “Mr. Butterfield, are you aware of the installation of any listening devices in the Oval Office of the president?” “I was aware of listening devices. Yes, sir.” “This was a shocker. Everybody in the White House recognized how damaging this could be.” As the House drafted articles of impeachment, Nixon lost the support of his party. “O.K., I shall resign the presidency effective at noon tomorrow.” “I was asked to write the farewell piece that ran the morning after Nixon resigned. And this is what I wrote: The central question is how a man who won so much could have lost so much.” So for Nixon, it more or less ended after the investigations. But for Bill Clinton, that phase was just the beginning. “This is the information.” An independent counsel’s investigation into his business dealings unexpectedly turned into a very public inquiry about his personal life. “The idea that a president of the United States was having an affair with a White House intern and then a federal prosecutor was looking at that, it was just extraordinary.” That investigation led to public hearings in the House Judiciary Committee. “When the Starr Report was being delivered to Congress it was a little bit like the O.J. chase, only a political one. There were two black cars. They were being filmed live on CNN. They were heading towards the Capitol. We were watching it and a little bit agog.” Public opinion is key. And the media plays a huge part in the process. This was definitely true for Clinton. “You know it was just a crazy time. We worked in the Senate press gallery.” “All your colleagues are kind of piled on top of each other.” “We had crummy computers, the fax machine would always break. The printer would always break.” After committee hearings, the House brought formal impeachment charges. “It was very tense. I thought that the Saturday of the impeachment vote in the House was one of the most tense days I’d experienced in Washington.” And it turned out, also, full of surprises. “The day of impeachment arrived, everyone’s making very impassioned speeches about whether Bill Clinton should or should not be impeached and Livingston rises to give an argument for the House Republicans. He started to talk about how Clinton could resign.” “You, sir, may resign your post.” “And all of a sudden people start booing and saying, ‘Resign, resign’!” “So I must set the example.” “He announced he was resigning because he had had extramarital affairs and challenged President Clinton to do the only honorable thing, in his view —” “I hope President Clinton will follow.” “— to resign as well, so there was all this drama unfolding even in the midst of impeachment.” Then it went to the Senate for trial. The Constitution gets a little more specific about this part. “The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court is supposed to preside over that trial.” “Rehnquist, he showed up in this robe he had made for himself, which had gold stripes on the sleeves because he liked Gilbert and Sullivan.” “The Senate is the actual jury.” “You will do impartial justice according to the Constitution and laws. So help you, God.” “This is a copy of the rules of the Senate for handling impeachment. They’re actually very specific.” “Meet six days a week.” “Convene at noon. The senators have to sit at their desks and remain quiet in their role as jurors. And not talk, which trust me, is going to be a problem for some of the senators who are used to talking all the time.” It’s just like a courtroom trial. There are prosecutors who present the case against the president. “That was perjury.” Only, they’re members of the House, and they’re called managers. Then the senators, or the jurors, vote. And things are still, unpredictable. “The options are guilty or not guilty. But there was one senator —” “Arlen Specter, a moderate Republican from Pennsylvania.” “Under Scottish law, there are three possible verdicts: guilty, not guilty and not proved.” “— which is not a thing.” “And everybody just looks, you know, how do you even record that vote?” In the end, there were not enough votes to oust Clinton. “What’s amazing about this whole thing to me wasn’t so much the constitutional process. It was that it felt to me like the beginning of really intense partisanship, the weaponization of partisanship.” And here’s the thing: An impeachment charge has never gotten the two-thirds majority it needs in the Senate to actually oust a president from office. “So you could end up having a situation where the president is impeached, acquitted and runs for re-election and wins re-election.” And that would be a first. “This is my ticket to the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton. I don’t think you’ll find these on StubHub.”

Westlake Legal Group xx-impeachment-explainer-vid-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Impeachment Hearing Updates: Scholars Testify Trump’s Conduct Was Impeachable Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry

Explosive testimony. News media frenzies. A trial in the Senate. Here is how impeachment works — and how it has played out in the past.CreditCredit…Photo illustration by Aaron Byrd

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‘No Time to Die’ trailer reveals big change to 007’s Aston Martin DB5

James Bond’s old car has some new tricks.

In the first trailer for the upcoming installment in the 007 film series, “No Time to Die,” Daniel Craig’s Bond takes the wheel of an Aston Martin DB5, as the superspy has many times before.

Westlake Legal Group bond-full 'No Time to Die' trailer reveals big change to 007's Aston Martin DB5 Gary Gastelu fox-news/entertainment/movies/james-bond fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/auto/make/aston-martin fox-news/auto/attributes/collector-cars fox news fnc/auto fnc de3699e9-993b-52f5-8807-e45710427825 article

This time, he finds himself in an old town square surrounded by machine-gun wielding baddies blasting away at the silver coupe with little effect.

Westlake Legal Group bond-balls 'No Time to Die' trailer reveals big change to 007's Aston Martin DB5 Gary Gastelu fox-news/entertainment/movies/james-bond fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/auto/make/aston-martin fox-news/auto/attributes/collector-cars fox news fnc/auto fnc de3699e9-993b-52f5-8807-e45710427825 article

(Eon Productions/United Artists)

While past iterations of the sports car had only a bulletproof shield that popped out of the trunk to cover the rear window, the car now appears to be fully-armored. And that’s not the only change.

Westlake Legal Group BOND-LIGHTS 'No Time to Die' trailer reveals big change to 007's Aston Martin DB5 Gary Gastelu fox-news/entertainment/movies/james-bond fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/auto/make/aston-martin fox-news/auto/attributes/collector-cars fox news fnc/auto fnc de3699e9-993b-52f5-8807-e45710427825 article

(Eon Productions/United Artists)

The vehicle (a replica of which was recently sold for $6.4 million) has previously been depicted with a pair of .30 caliber single-barrel machine guns that extended from behind its front turn signals, the car now has a set of Gattling guns hidden in the headlights for added firepower.

Westlake Legal Group BOND-GUNS 'No Time to Die' trailer reveals big change to 007's Aston Martin DB5 Gary Gastelu fox-news/entertainment/movies/james-bond fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/auto/make/aston-martin fox-news/auto/attributes/collector-cars fox news fnc/auto fnc de3699e9-993b-52f5-8807-e45710427825 article

(Eon Productions/United Artists)

Bond puts it to good use by doing a donut to sweep the area clear of his attackers, but a quick glance at the control panel suggests it also has a flamethrower and missiles ready to go.

Westlake Legal Group bond-fire 'No Time to Die' trailer reveals big change to 007's Aston Martin DB5 Gary Gastelu fox-news/entertainment/movies/james-bond fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/auto/make/aston-martin fox-news/auto/attributes/collector-cars fox news fnc/auto fnc de3699e9-993b-52f5-8807-e45710427825 article

(Eon Productions/United Artists)

Just in case.

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Westlake Legal Group bond-full 'No Time to Die' trailer reveals big change to 007's Aston Martin DB5 Gary Gastelu fox-news/entertainment/movies/james-bond fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/auto/make/aston-martin fox-news/auto/attributes/collector-cars fox news fnc/auto fnc de3699e9-993b-52f5-8807-e45710427825 article   Westlake Legal Group bond-full 'No Time to Die' trailer reveals big change to 007's Aston Martin DB5 Gary Gastelu fox-news/entertainment/movies/james-bond fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/auto/make/aston-martin fox-news/auto/attributes/collector-cars fox news fnc/auto fnc de3699e9-993b-52f5-8807-e45710427825 article

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Discussion Thread: Day One of House Judiciary Impeachment Hearings – 12/04/2019 | Part III

This morning the House Judiciary Committee will hold their initial round of public hearings in preparation for possible Impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. Today’s hearing is titled ‘The Impeachment Inquiry into President Donald J. Trump: Constitutional Grounds for Presidential Impeachment’ and is intended to ‘explore the framework put in place to respond to serious allegations of impeachable misconduct like those against President Trump’

Chairman Jerry Nadler’s letter to President Trump inviting his participation in the hearing can be read here. The invitation was declined by the White House


Today’s hearing will call four Constitutional Scholars, as witnesses, to review and consider the House Intelligence Committee’s Report on Impeachment Inquiry and the constitutional grounds for impeachment.

Democrats call:

  • Noah Feldman, Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

  • Pamela Karlan, Kenneth and Harle Montgomery Professor of Public Interest Law, Stanford Law Shool

  • Michael Gerhardt, Burton Craige Distinguished Professor of Jurisprudence, UNC School of Law

Republicans call:

  • Jonathan Turley, J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law, George Washington University Law

House Intelligence Committee Report on Impeachment Inquiry – Executive Summary

House Intelligence Committee Report on Impeachment Inquiry – Complete Report


The hearing is scheduled to begin at 10:00m EST. You can watch live online on CSPAN or PBS or House Judiciary. Many major networks will also air live coverage on TV or online.

You can also listen online via C-Span or download the C-Span Radio App


Today’s hearing is expected to follow the format for Impeachment Hearings as laid out in H.R. 660

  • Opening statements by Chairman Jerrold Nadler, Ranking Member Douglas Jones, along with 10 minute opening statements by each witness, followed by:

  • Two continuous 45 minutes sessions of questioning, largely led by staff counsel, followed by:

  • Committee Members each allowed 5 minutes of time for questions and statements, alternating from Dem to Rep, followed by:

  • Closing statements by Ranking Member Doug Jones and Chairman Jerry Nadler

Discussion Thread Part I

Discussion Thread Part II

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Feldman: If we cannot impeach a president who abuses his office then “we live in a monarchy or we live under a dictatorship”

Westlake Legal Group jeG_fR0w9T6qMKLphJowOHg92ZLv_7NBAkJW6B13dQs Feldman: If we cannot impeach a president who abuses his office then "we live in a monarchy or we live under a dictatorship" r/politics

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China Rebukes House Bill Condemning Crackdown On Uighurs

Westlake Legal Group ap_19338180710579-e7548a6c977492ce7052aa3dc027af562dcef76e-s1100-c15 China Rebukes House Bill Condemning Crackdown On Uighurs

China has responded with swift condemnation after U.S. Congress overwhelmingly approved a bill targeting its mass crackdown on ethnic Muslim minorities. The bill decries what China describes as educational centers and the U.S. says are detention facilities. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

Westlake Legal Group  China Rebukes House Bill Condemning Crackdown On Uighurs

China has responded with swift condemnation after U.S. Congress overwhelmingly approved a bill targeting its mass crackdown on ethnic Muslim minorities. The bill decries what China describes as educational centers and the U.S. says are detention facilities.

Ng Han Guan/AP

Chinese officials have expressed outrage after the House passed a bill late Tuesday condemning Beijing’s crackdown on China’s Muslim Uighur minority.

The bipartisan bill, which passed the House in a 407-1 vote, condemns “gross human rights violations” against the Uighurs and calls “for an end to arbitrary detention, torture, and harassment of these communities inside and outside China.”

Beijing has long vociferously objected to any perceived interference in its internal affairs, particularly in sensitive regions such as Tibet and Xinjiang, a restive region in China’s west where the vast majority of the Uighurs live.

“The U.S. attempts to sow discord among various ethnic groups in China … and contain China’s growth,” Hua Chunying, a spokesperson for China’s Foreign Ministry, said in a statement. “But its attempt will never succeed.”

The bill, which now goes to the Senate where passage seems certain, could further complicate movement toward a deal with China to end the ongoing trade war with Washington.

It comes close on the heels of yet another bipartisan measure, signed by President Trump last week that supports Hong Kong’s five-month-old pro-democracy movement and requires the State Department to conduct an annual review to ensure that the territory’s autonomous political structure is maintained as a condition for continuing favorable U.S.-China trade relations.

That law, which also allows the U.S. to impose sanctions on people responsible for human rights violations in Hong Kong, was likewise sharply rebuked by Chinese authorities.

The measure passed Tuesday states that since 2014, Chinese authorities have detained some 800,000 Uighurs and other ethnic minorities and subjected them to brutal conditions.

It also calls on President Trump to take action to sanction senior Chinese officials involved in the abuses in Xinjiang. The measure also calls for imposing export restrictions on technologies used to surveil the minority populations.

On Wednesday, Trump stated that the ongoing tense trade discussions with China are “going very well,” according to Reuters.

But a Chinese government spokesperson suggested that the bill could jeopardize any agreement.

“Do you think if America takes actions to hurt China’s interests we won’t take any action?” Hua Chunying answered when she was asked about the bill’s impact on a possible trade deal, Reuters reported. “I think any wrong words and deeds must pay the due price.”

After the latest measure passed last night, Hua stated that it “deliberately smears the human rights condition in Xinjiang, slanders China’s efforts in de-radicalization and counter-terrorism and viciously attacks the Chinese government’s Xinjiang policy.”

Beijing has denied maintaining a vast network of detention centers in the region designed to house political dissidents, describing them instead as educational centers. “Trainees take courses that prepare them to succeed under local employment conditions,” the Chinese Embassy in the U.S. said in a tweet on Tuesday.

NPR’s Rob Schmitz recently visited the camps and heard a different story from detainees.

“They said they were more like political indoctrination camps where inmates were forced to repeat communist slogans and had to attend classes that taught them their religious traditions were backwards and harmful,” Schmitz reported. Detainees told him they were constantly hungry and that it wasn’t clear if they could leave, as China claims they can.

The lone vote against the Uighur bill passed Tuesday was from Rep. Thomas Massie, a Republican from Kentucky. “When our government meddles in the internal affairs of foreign countries, it invites those governments to meddle in our affairs,” he wrote on Twitter in a message explaining his vote.

The White House has not signaled whether the president will sign the bill. The Senate passed a similar measure in September. Sen. Marco Rubio, a sponsor of the bill, said, “I look forward to working with my Senate colleagues to get it passed and sent to the President for enactment.”

Uighur advocates are applauding the move. “Tonight’s action gives Uyghurs hope,” Omer Kanat, the executive director of Uyghur Human Rights Project, said in a statement. “This action by the U.S. Congress paves the way for other countries to act.”

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