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Westlake Legal Group > News and News Media (Page 143)

The Judge In The Larry Nassar Case Is Risking Everything Survivors Fought For

Judge Rosemarie Aquilina ― who made her name advocating for sexual assault survivors during predator Larry Nassar’s sentencing ― is now threatening the very justice she helped get for dozens of victims, several sources and a legal expert tell HuffPost. 

Aquilina, a Michigan Circuit Court Judge, rose to national prominence in early 2018, when she sentenced Nassar, a former USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University team doctor, to 40-175 years in prison for sexually abusing young women. More than 160 survivors and family members read impact statements during a remarkable seven-day sentence hearing in Aquilina’s court.  

But attorneys for Nassar filed an appeal in April, arguing that Aquilina has shown ongoing bias — and that Nassar’s sentence should be thrown out. And now, nearly two years after the famous hearing, some survivors of Nassar’s abuse are worried that Aquilina’s ongoing media appearances and speaking engagements could strengthen Nassar’s chances of winning that appeal.

Madeleine Jones, one of the seven victims whom Nassar admitted, in his plea deal, to abusing, found Aquilina’s behavior during and after sentencing to be inappropriate, she told HuffPost.

“I’ve never really seen a case where the judge gets appearances and interviews for doing their job. It’s very unprecedented and it seems very unnecessary,” Jones, 20, said. “It really does open the door to give slight credibility to Nassar’s appeal.” 

Another Nassar survivor, who wished to remain anonymous, agreed with Jones, telling HuffPost that Aquilina’s actions are affecting her ability to put this case behind her. 

“Judge Aquilina’s public persona doesn’t just jeopardize our case, it also jeopardizes our healing,” she said. “We all feel like we owe her so much ― and we do ― but at the same she’s also the person who’s prolonging our pain.” 

Judge Aquilina’s public persona doesn’t just jeopardize our case, it also jeopardizes our healing. -Nassar survivor

Aquilina did not immediately respond to HuffPost’s request for comment. Nassar’s lawyers have pointed to Aquilina’s strong language during sentencing, ongoing public appearances and barefaced advocacy on social media and in the press as evidence of bias.  

“It is impossible for a judge who has become so enmeshed in the public adoration and celebrity resulting from the severity of her treatment of Dr. Nassar to be seen as neutral and unbiased,” attorneys Malaika Ramsey-Heath and Jacqueline McCann wrote in Nassar’s appeal.  

The judge’s behavior does indicate some appearance of impropriety, Charles Wolfram, a professor at Cornell Law School and an expert in legal ethics, said. 

“Her post-litigation conduct, to me at least, indicates a strong probability that her mind was likely made up about several facts that would otherwise have been relevant to a sentencing judge,” he said. “Given the close connection in time between sentencing and the onset of her repeated conduct, its occurrence post-sentencing should be given just as much weight as if it had occurred before sentencing.” 

There are several possible outcomes from the pending appeal. The Michigan Court of Appeals could simply penalize Aquilina for her behavior but keep her original sentencing in place. The court could also order a completely new sentencing with a new judge where survivors could choose to re-read their gut-wrenching impact statements. 

“Knowingly risking to have him re-sentenced, to me, is the greatest insult to these women,” a source close to the case told HuffPost under the condition of anonymity out of fear of retribution. “Very few of us can really understand what it’s going to be like for them to have to go through that again, and how much pain that’s going to drudge up.”

It is extremely unlikely that Nassar’s sentence of life in prison would change. Oral arguments for the appeal are set to be held before the end of the year.

Westlake Legal Group 5ddda4ce2100007f7e34e29c The Judge In The Larry Nassar Case Is Risking Everything Survivors Fought For

Astrid Stawiarz via Getty Images Judge Rosemarie Aquilina speaks onstage at the 2018 Glamour Women Of The Year Awards on November 12, 2018 in New York City. 

During Nassar’s sentencing, Aquilina took a unique and at times controversial approach. The judge continually told survivors to leave their trauma with her in the courtroom, repeating phrases such as: “This was done to you. It was not done by you,” and, “He’s going to break while you’re healing, and I believe that he will remain broken.”

At one point, she even suggested that what Nassar did to these women should be done to him in prison. In one of her most infamous statements, Aquilina told Nassar she signed his “death warrant” after handing down his sentence. 

Over the last year, Aquilina has built a long resume of press appearances. The judge first appeared at the ESPYs last summer, and she went on to attend several red carpet events and award dinners. She has continued to speak to press, including NBC Nightly News and Glamour, and was even photographed by Annie Leibovitz for Vanity Fair magazine. She told ESPN in August that she could be the next Judge Judy, but “in a classier way.” 

Aquilina takes two to three speaking engagements a month, some paid, and has hired an agent, she told the Lansing State Journal in June. The judge is also listed as a board director for The Army of Survivors, an organization created by Nassar survivors to support other victims of sexual assault. 

Multiple sources told HuffPost that Aquilina has had direct contact with victims ― behavior that judges are supposed to avoid while cases are still under appeal. The anonymous survivor who spoke to HuffPost said that Aquilina used to routinely send her memes depicting the judge and articles about the judge. 

Aquilina is often credited with “allowing” survivors to speak at Nassar’s sentencing. But the extensive victim impact statements were actually part of Nassar’s plea deal, which was crafted by prosecutor Angela Povilaitis, not the judge.

“Judge Aquilina always says, ‘I let every victim speak.’ Which, yes, she let them speak but that wasn’t her idea. At all,” Jones said. “It was Angie’s idea.”

Jones added that she felt Aquilina’s remarks during sentencing were disingenuous. “Her comments were very supportive, they were very kind ― but I remember thinking at the time: ‘This isn’t necessary,’” she said. “It felt like she was trying to get the last word in on my statement.” 

Aquilina’s newfound celebrity calls into question the intent behind her self-described advocacy for “sister survivors.” The survivor who wished to remain anonymous said that she, along with other victims, believe Aquilina’s advocacy has become self-serving and even manipulative. 

“It’s scary to think that we’ve been here before: where the person that is helping us is also the person that’s hurting us,” she said. “It’s a really scary cycle to break, but we have to.”

She said many victims feel similar to her but are nervous to come forward. For all of Aquilina’s shortcomings, the survivor explained, the judge has still helped a lot of young victims heal. Gratitude for that has forced many Nassar survivors to stay quiet even as Aquilina’s ongoing advocacy threatens to dismantle their case. 

“People don’t want to admit that their hero could also be hurting them,” the survivor said. 

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Toni Collette’s ‘Knives Out’ Character Will Make You Think Of Gwyneth Paltrow

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Mia Farrow Resurfaces Photo Of Trump’s Sons Posing With Dead Leopard As Animal Cruelty Becomes Federal Crime

Westlake Legal Group ESkW8sW7NLjy5W9ToqGQojSxmn4mr1nvSqmNU-iAYw0 Mia Farrow Resurfaces Photo Of Trump's Sons Posing With Dead Leopard As Animal Cruelty Becomes Federal Crime r/politics

Mandatory disclaimer: Fuck the Trumps.

Here’s the thing though… The animals hunted by these people are usually already in protection because they are endangered to some degree. Older males that can no longer reproduce become a threat to others in captivity or on the sanctuaries. They can’t impregnate the females, but they’ll still challenge/kill the young males in competition for a mate. This is a threat to the species in and of itself and hinders the conservation efforts.

Two things can be done with these animals (again, older males). They can either be released from the sanctioned area to be hunted and torn apart by lions or other predators because of their age, or they can be hunted by millionaires, the received fees of which go to further conservation, and the meat of which goes to impoverished people in the area.

I don’t necessarily support the practice, but it’s the best thing in a bad situation.

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Bernie Sanders Channels Lizzo To ‘Slow Jam The News’ With Jimmy Fallon

Westlake Legal Group 5dde51512100007f7e34e357 Bernie Sanders Channels Lizzo To ‘Slow Jam The News’ With Jimmy Fallon

Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-Vt.) policies got a seductive twist on Tuesday’s broadcast of “The Tonight Show.”

The Democratic presidential candidate slow-jammed his campaign’s main points with host Jimmy Fallon ― and ended by channeling singer Lizzo’s sleeper hit “Good As Hell.”

“We can no longer tolerate three people owning more wealth than the bottom half of America,” Sanders said at one point. “I have the experience to fight for that bottom half and to create an economy that works for all of us, not just those on top.”

To which Fallon had this sultry reply: “Aww yeah. Bernie Sanders is looking out for your bottom half. He knows it’s been neglected for too long. Now he wants to pay it some extra special attention.”

Check out the clip above.

Elsewhere on the show, Sanders threw free-shots with Fallon:

He also explained why it was so important to tackle the climate crisis:

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Patrick Schwarzenegger on family’s new blended Thanksgiving plans with Chris Pratt and sister Katherine

Westlake Legal Group Patrick-Pratt-Katherine-Getty-Reuters-Getty Patrick Schwarzenegger on family's new blended Thanksgiving plans with Chris Pratt and sister Katherine Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/chris-pratt fox-news/entertainment/genres/family fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9aa509ad-1676-55ea-a2b3-3239d6ffd954

Patrick Schwarzenegger has a large family and it keeps growing.

The actor, 26, opened up about their plans for Thanksgiving while attending Sunday’s American Music Awards and admitted he and new brother-in-law, Chris Pratt, love hitting the dessert table.

“He can eat a lot,” Schwarzenegger told Entertainment Tonight of the “Guardians of the Galaxy” star. “Me and Chris go at it at the desserts. He’s a foodie. We both have the sweet tooth.”

CHRIS PRATT GUSHES OVER MARRIED LIFE WITH KATHERINE SCHWARZENEGGER

Schwarzenegger added that his mother, Maria Shriver, cooks and hosts the big dinner which also includes her other children with ex-husband Arnold Schwarzenegger — Katherine, 29, Christina, 28, and Chris, 22.

“Thanksgiving at our place is great,” he said of the holiday. “On Wednesday, we always go to the church and do, like, a Thanksgiving meal there for people, and then Thursday, we’ll do Thanksgiving at my mom’s.”

“We always do a football game in the morning, and then come back and eat all day, watch football like everybody else,” he added.

MARIA SHRIVER SAYS POLITICS ARE OK AT HER FAMILY’S THANKSGIVING DINNER TABLE

Pratt married Katherine on June 8 at San Ysidro Ranch in Montecito, Calif. and then honeymooned in Hawaii.

He was previously married to actress Anna Faris from 2009 to 2018. The former couple share one son together — Jack, 7.

In a recent post on social media, Katherine opened up about why she’s “thankful” for her husband this year.

KATHERINE SCHWARZENEGGER PRAISES CHRIS PRATT’S EX, ANNA FARIS, OVER SUCCESSFUL PODCAST

“Coming up on Thanksgiving week and feeling so thankful and excited to be with my family and loved ones,” she wrote on Instagram on Saturday. “I know this week comes with a lot of mixed feelings for people about returning home, traveling and missing loved ones. Everyone needs a little extra love as they navigate their way through this time.”

She suggested to her fans that each person “start thinking each day for something or someone you’re thankful for, and tell them.”

She continued: “Today, I am grateful for this bike ride with my wonderful husband and seeing the colors of the fall leaves. While we were riding our bikes, he said let’s give out real honest compliments to people we pass and see what happens.

“This also reminded me how thankful I am to be married to someone who thinks of kind ways to make the world a better place,” Schwarzenegger concluded.

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In May, Schwarzenegger told Fox News her relationship with Pratt is “amazing.”

“I think anyone who finds the person that they get to spend the rest of their life with… it’s a huge gift and a huge blessing, so I feel really lucky,” she shared.

Fox News’ Sasha Savitsky contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Patrick-Pratt-Katherine-Getty-Reuters-Getty Patrick Schwarzenegger on family's new blended Thanksgiving plans with Chris Pratt and sister Katherine Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/chris-pratt fox-news/entertainment/genres/family fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9aa509ad-1676-55ea-a2b3-3239d6ffd954   Westlake Legal Group Patrick-Pratt-Katherine-Getty-Reuters-Getty Patrick Schwarzenegger on family's new blended Thanksgiving plans with Chris Pratt and sister Katherine Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/chris-pratt fox-news/entertainment/genres/family fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9aa509ad-1676-55ea-a2b3-3239d6ffd954

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The Judge In The Larry Nassar Case Is Risking Everything Survivors Fought For

Judge Rosemarie Aquilina ― who made her name advocating for sexual assault survivors during predator Larry Nassar’s sentencing ― is now threatening the very justice she helped get for dozens of victims, several sources and a legal expert tell HuffPost. 

Aquilina, a Michigan Circuit Court Judge, rose to national prominence in early 2018, when she sentenced Nassar, a former USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University team doctor, to 40-175 years in prison for sexually abusing young women. More than 160 survivors and family members read impact statements during a remarkable seven-day sentence hearing in Aquilina’s court.  

But attorneys for Nassar filed an appeal in April, arguing that Aquilina has shown ongoing bias — and that Nassar’s sentence should be thrown out. And now, nearly two years after the famous hearing, some survivors of Nassar’s abuse are worried that Aquilina’s ongoing media appearances and speaking engagements could strengthen Nassar’s chances of winning that appeal.

Madeleine Jones, one of the seven victims whom Nassar admitted, in his plea deal, to abusing, found Aquilina’s behavior during and after sentencing to be inappropriate, she told HuffPost.

“I’ve never really seen a case where the judge gets appearances and interviews for doing their job. It’s very unprecedented and it seems very unnecessary,” Jones, 20, said. “It really does open the door to give slight credibility to Nassar’s appeal.” 

Another Nassar survivor, who wished to remain anonymous, agreed with Jones, telling HuffPost that Aquilina’s actions are affecting her ability to put this case behind her. 

“Judge Aquilina’s public persona doesn’t just jeopardize our case, it also jeopardizes our healing,” she said. “We all feel like we owe her so much ― and we do ― but at the same she’s also the person who’s prolonging our pain.” 

Judge Aquilina’s public persona doesn’t just jeopardize our case, it also jeopardizes our healing. -Nassar survivor

Aquilina did not immediately respond to HuffPost’s request for comment. Nassar’s lawyers have pointed to Aquilina’s strong language during sentencing, ongoing public appearances and barefaced advocacy on social media and in the press as evidence of bias.  

“It is impossible for a judge who has become so enmeshed in the public adoration and celebrity resulting from the severity of her treatment of Dr. Nassar to be seen as neutral and unbiased,” attorneys Malaika Ramsey-Heath and Jacqueline McCann wrote in Nassar’s appeal.  

The judge’s behavior does indicate some appearance of impropriety, Charles Wolfram, a professor at Cornell Law School and an expert in legal ethics, said. 

“Her post-litigation conduct, to me at least, indicates a strong probability that her mind was likely made up about several facts that would otherwise have been relevant to a sentencing judge,” he said. “Given the close connection in time between sentencing and the onset of her repeated conduct, its occurrence post-sentencing should be given just as much weight as if it had occurred before sentencing.” 

There are several possible outcomes from the pending appeal. The Michigan Court of Appeals could simply penalize Aquilina for her behavior but keep her original sentencing in place. The court could also order a completely new sentencing with a new judge where survivors could choose to re-read their gut-wrenching impact statements. 

“Knowingly risking to have him re-sentenced, to me, is the greatest insult to these women,” a source close to the case told HuffPost under the condition of anonymity out of fear of retribution. “Very few of us can really understand what it’s going to be like for them to have to go through that again, and how much pain that’s going to drudge up.”

It is extremely unlikely that Nassar’s sentence of life in prison would change. Oral arguments for the appeal are set to be held before the end of the year.

Westlake Legal Group 5ddda4ce2100007f7e34e29c The Judge In The Larry Nassar Case Is Risking Everything Survivors Fought For

Astrid Stawiarz via Getty Images Judge Rosemarie Aquilina speaks onstage at the 2018 Glamour Women Of The Year Awards on November 12, 2018 in New York City. 

During Nassar’s sentencing, Aquilina took a unique and at times controversial approach. The judge continually told survivors to leave their trauma with her in the courtroom, repeating phrases such as: “This was done to you. It was not done by you,” and, “He’s going to break while you’re healing, and I believe that he will remain broken.”

At one point, she even suggested that what Nassar did to these women should be done to him in prison. In one of her most infamous statements, Aquilina told Nassar she signed his “death warrant” after handing down his sentence. 

Over the last year, Aquilina has built a long resume of press appearances. The judge first appeared at the ESPYs last summer, and she went on to attend several red carpet events and award dinners. She has continued to speak to press, including NBC Nightly News and Glamour, and was even photographed by Annie Leibovitz for Vanity Fair magazine. She told ESPN in August that she could be the next Judge Judy, but “in a classier way.” 

Aquilina takes two to three speaking engagements a month, some paid, and has hired an agent, she told the Lansing State Journal in June. The judge is also listed as a board director for The Army of Survivors, an organization created by Nassar survivors to support other victims of sexual assault. 

Multiple sources told HuffPost that Aquilina has had direct contact with victims ― behavior that judges are supposed to avoid while cases are still under appeal. The anonymous survivor who spoke to HuffPost said that Aquilina used to routinely send her memes depicting the judge and articles about the judge. 

Aquilina is often credited with “allowing” survivors to speak at Nassar’s sentencing. But the extensive victim impact statements were actually part of Nassar’s plea deal, which was crafted by prosecutor Angela Povilaitis, not the judge.

“Judge Aquilina always says, ‘I let every victim speak.’ Which, yes, she let them speak but that wasn’t her idea. At all,” Jones said. “It was Angie’s idea.”

Jones added that she felt Aquilina’s remarks during sentencing were disingenuous. “Her comments were very supportive, they were very kind ― but I remember thinking at the time: ‘This isn’t necessary,’” she said. “It felt like she was trying to get the last word in on my statement.” 

Aquilina’s newfound celebrity calls into question the intent behind her self-described advocacy for “sister survivors.” The survivor who wished to remain anonymous said that she, along with other victims, believe Aquilina’s advocacy has become self-serving and even manipulative. 

“It’s scary to think that we’ve been here before: where the person that is helping us is also the person that’s hurting us,” she said. “It’s a really scary cycle to break, but we have to.”

She said many victims feel similar to her but are nervous to come forward. For all of Aquilina’s shortcomings, the survivor explained, the judge has still helped a lot of young victims heal. Gratitude for that has forced many Nassar survivors to stay quiet even as Aquilina’s ongoing advocacy threatens to dismantle their case. 

“People don’t want to admit that their hero could also be hurting them,” the survivor said. 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Today on Fox News: Nov. 27, 2019

STAY TUNED

On Fox News: 

Fox & Friends, 6 a.m. ET: Special guests include: U.S. Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C.; Tunnel to Towers gives away three mortgage-free homes to Gold Star families.

On Fox News Radio:

The Fox News Rundown podcast: “Eddie Gallagher Controversy Drives a Wedge Between the White House and the Pentagon” – Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher, who was convicted of posing with a hunting knife in a photo with a corpse of a dead Iraqi militant will be able to retire and retain his Trident pin. His controversial case was taken up by President Trump and led to the firing of Navy Secretary Richard Spencer. Fox News national security correspondent Jennifer Griffin breaks down the story and explains why the president’s decision to intervene created some waves at the Pentagon.

Also on the Rundown: Many of the books about the Trump Administration rely on anonymous sources. Author and presidential historian Doug Wead wrote his newest book, “Inside Trump’s White House: The Real Story of His Presidency” after spending time with President Trump and his family. Wead joins the podcast to share a preview of the stories.

Plus, commentary by Charlies Hurt, opinion editor for The Washington Times.

Want the Fox News Rundown sent straight to your mobile device? Subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher.

The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: Doug Schoen, Democratic pollster and consultant; Janice Dean, Fox News senior meteorologist and more.

Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News: Nov. 27, 2019 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 6ab6dc3a-406e-59c7-a274-24030815859c   Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News: Nov. 27, 2019 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 6ab6dc3a-406e-59c7-a274-24030815859c

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Watch The Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade Live In 360

Westlake Legal Group 5ddd32b51f0000dc1adef87c Watch The Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade Live In 360

The holiday season officially kicks off when the 93rd annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade makes its way through New York City on Thursday. Here’s all you need to know about this year’s event.

What: 93rd Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

When: Thursday, 9 a.m. to noon ET

How to watch: The parade will be broadcast by NBC and CBS and livestreamed by any streaming service that offers NBC and CBS, including YouTube TV, Hulu + Live TV, fuboTV, and Sling TV. HuffPost will feature the Verizon 360 livestream above starting at 9 a.m. E.T. For the full Verizon 360° experience on your mobile device, please use the YouTube app.

(HuffPost’s parent company, Verizon Media, is owned by Verizon, which is a sponsor of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.)

New balloons: Astronaut Snoopy, Green Eggs and Ham, Smokey Bear, SpongeBob SquarePants & Gary, and Love Flies Up to the Sky.

Returning balloons: Olaf from Disney’s “Frozen 2,” Chase from “PAW Patrol,” “Diary of a Wimpy Kid,” Goku, Harold the Fireman, “The Elf on the Shelf,” Dr. Seuss’ “The Grinch” and more.

New floats: Blue’s Clues & You! by Nickelodeon, the Brick-changer by The Lego Group, Home Sweet Home by Cracker Barrel Old Country Store, Rexy in the City by COACH, and Toy House of Marvelous Milestones by New York Life.

Performances and appearances by: Billy Porter, The Black Eyed Peas, Natasha Bedingfield, Celine Dion, Chicago, Chris Janson, Ciara, Debbie Gibson, Lea Michele, Idina Menzel and more.

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Florida authorities investigating offer to sell baby for $500 on Craigslist

Someone in Florida posted a Craigslist ad purporting to sell a newborn baby for $500, leading investigators scrambling to determine if the ad was just a hoax.

‘PUNKY BREWSTER’ STAR SOLEIL MOON FRYE SAYS DEMI MOORE HELPED DELIVER HER FOUR CHILDREN

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement opened up an investigation Friday into the online ad, which claimed the baby is a well-behaved 2-week-old who sleeps quietly through the night.

The person who posted the ad said they didn’t want to be judged for “not wanting these kids,” according to The Miami Herald.

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The ad said the alleged baby-seller would provide clothes, formula and even offered to give away the baby’s 4-year-old sister free of charge.

The family, the poster alleged, is from a “quiet influential neighborhood.” They seller claimed to work for the Florida Department of Children and Families.

This story originally appeared in the New York Post

Westlake Legal Group ThinkstockPhotos-474671651_cropped Florida authorities investigating offer to sell baby for $500 on Craigslist New York Post Kenneth Garger fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/tech/topics/cybercrime fnc/us fnc e9c5a80f-94fc-51a9-9064-c159b8a85a6e article   Westlake Legal Group ThinkstockPhotos-474671651_cropped Florida authorities investigating offer to sell baby for $500 on Craigslist New York Post Kenneth Garger fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/tech/topics/cybercrime fnc/us fnc e9c5a80f-94fc-51a9-9064-c159b8a85a6e article

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Trump Keeps Losing in Court. But His Legal Strategy Is Winning Anyway.

Westlake Legal Group 26dc-assess-facebookJumbo Trump Keeps Losing in Court. But His Legal Strategy Is Winning Anyway. United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Suits and Litigation (Civil) Presidents and Presidency (US) Presidential Election of 2020 McGahn, Donald F II Justice Department Jackson, Ketanji Brown (1970- ) impeachment House of Representatives Executive Privilege, Doctrine of Decisions and Verdicts Courts and the Judiciary

WASHINGTON — Critics of President Trump cheered on Monday when a federal judge ruled that the former White House counsel Donald F. McGahn II must testify to Congress — and scathingly labeled “fiction” the administration’s arguments that top White House aides are immune from congressional subpoenas.

Indeed, the outcome was the latest in a string of lower-court losses for Mr. Trump as he defends his stonewalling of lawmakers’ oversight and the impeachment investigation. Other fights are playing out in the courts over Mr. Trump’s financial records and grand-jury evidence in the Russia investigation.

But from a realist perspective, Mr. Trump is winning despite losing.

That is because it is now late November — not May, when Mr. McGahn, on Mr. Trump’s directions, first defied the subpoena, or even August, when the House asked the judge, Ketanji Brown Jackson, to enforce its subpoena.

The proceedings before Judge Jackson consumed nearly a third of the year as she took briefs, conducted oral arguments and then composed a 120-page opinion. And her ruling was merely the end of the first step.

The Justice Department immediately filed an appeal and sought a stay — virtually ensuring that the fight over Mr. McGahn will remain bogged down for the foreseeable future. And even if he someday is forced to show up, a new cycle of litigation will inevitably start over whether specific information he might testify about is subject to executive privilege.

Meanwhile, time is on Mr. Trump’s side. The realistic window for Congress to consider impeaching him is closing, with the 2020 election less than a year away. If the overriding goal is to keep information from coming out while his term and potential re-election hang in the balance, the Trump legal strategy is succeeding despite all the adverse rulings.

“This is not about putting down markers for all time — it’s more about particular short-term objectives,” said Martin Lederman, a Georgetown law professor who worked on executive-power issues as a lawyer in the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel.

Like a football team up late in a game whose defense hangs back to prevent big plays while letting its opponent make shorter gains, Mr. Trump’s legal team is looking to run out the clock, putting forth aggressive legal theories often backed by scant precedent. The strategy risks periodic bad headlines in the short term and could lead to definitive rulings that hamstring future presidents — but it is demonstrably advantageous for consuming time.

The theories include asserting that Congress lacks legitimate legislative authority to conduct oversight of whether government officials are engaged in wrongdoing, even though lawmakers have done so for generations; that impeachment investigators cannot gain access to grand-jury evidence, even though an appeals court permitted just that during Watergate; and that senior presidential aides are immune from subpoenas, even though a judge rejected that theory in 2008.

House Democrats have turned to the courts at an unprecedented tempo in their clashes with Mr. Trump, and they went into court on Tuesday to file yet another case — this one challenging the administration’s defiance of a subpoena for documents about its attempt to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. But they are also growing disillusioned with the courts as a solution.

The Democrat leading the investigation into the Ukraine affair, Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, has made clear that lawmakers will move forward with weighing articles of impeachment rather than getting bogged down in courts. He used another sports metaphor, the tactic of boxers who lean against the ring ropes and trick their opponents into exhausting themselves by ineffectively pummeling them.

“We are not willing to go the months and months and months of rope-a-dope in the courts, which the administration would love to do,” Mr. Schiff said on NBC’s “Meet the Press” on Sunday, explaining that he and his colleagues view their investigation as urgent because Mr. Trump has solicited foreign interference in the 2020 election. Because of that, Mr. Schiff said, they will not wait even for witness testimony and documents they would like to obtain.

Indeed, in another major court development on Monday that got far less attention than the McGahn lawsuit, the Supreme Court blocked an appeals court ruling that the House can subpoena Mr. Trump’s financial records while the justices consider whether to hear the case — alongside a similar case involving the Manhattan district attorney’s push for such records.

Both cases generated headlines when district court judges and then appeals courts ruled against the president. But if the Supreme Court does take the appeals, justices may issue no final judgment until the court’s term ends in seven months.

Mr. Trump suggested he instead had a more principled motive than running out the clock on Tuesday, claiming in a series of tweets that he would be happy to let his current and former aides tell Congress what they know, and insisting that he is only blocking them from talking to ensure that “future Presidents should in no way be compromised.”

“I am fighting for future Presidents and the Office of the President,” Mr. Trump said. “Other than that, I would actually like people to testify.”

His claim that he is blocking aides from disclosing what they know because he wants to strengthen the institution of the presidency over the long term echoes justifications of other presidents in previous disputes, like the George W. Bush administration’s range of efforts to expand presidential power.

The men who drove that Bush agenda — Vice President Dick Cheney and his top lawyer, David S. Addington, a key leader on the administration legal team — held longstanding ideological views about executive power, said Jack Goldsmith, a Harvard professor who led the Office of Legal Counsel in the Bush administration.

But “that is not true of Trump, I don’t think,” Mr. Goldsmith said, noting that Attorney General William P. Barr, who believes in stronger executive power as a lifelong principle, is an exception. Instead, the Trump administration’s legal positions “seem like short-term tactical moves,” Mr. Goldsmith said.

Much of the line where Congress’s power stops and the president’s begins is blurry, with few definitive precedents. That ambiguity gives presidents freedom to maneuver. But, Mr. Goldsmith warned, if an aggressive president pushes an extreme theory all the way to the Supreme Court, it can risk a definitive ruling tying future presidents’ hands.

The danger for the institution of the presidency, Mr. Goldsmith said, is that “really aggressive assertions of executive power often end up creating bad executive power precedents.”

To be sure, Mr. Trump may also be hoping that the Supreme Court — with its majority of five justices appointed by Republicans now including two by him — could eventually rule for him, just as it ultimately voted, 5 to 4, to permit a watered-down version of his travel ban even though lower courts had blocked it.

Many administrations have sometimes made privilege and immunity claims to fend off or delay congressional attempts to pry information out of the executive branch, Mr. Lederman noted. But prior presidents, unlike Mr. Trump, were willing to resolve disputes through negotiation and compromise long before they could reach the Supreme Court.

“If the Supreme Court justices decide they want to drag these disputes out, they can,” Mr. Lederman said.

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