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Westlake Legal Group > News and News Media (Page 15)

Trump names Secret Service official Anthony Ornato as new deputy chief of staff for operations

Westlake Legal Group dc2517c1-Trump-Speech Trump names Secret Service official Anthony Ornato as new deputy chief of staff for operations Morgan Phillips fox-news/politics/executive fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc d1570fd6-7a54-5c97-856d-4e1856ffcdc5 article

President Trump named U.S. Secret Service Deputy Assistant Director Anthony Ornato as his new Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations on Saturday.

“I have worked with Tony for 3 years – he will do a fantastic job!,” the president tweeted. “Thank you to Dan Walsh for his great service, and congratulations to Tony!”

While serving as Special Agent in Charge, Ornato accompanied the president to the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) in North Korea to meet with the country’s leader Kim Jong Un in June. False reports had circulated that Trump walked into North Korea without Secret Service protection.

RUTH BADER GINSBURG TEMPORARILY BLOCKS RELEASE OF TRUMP’S FINANCIAL RECORDS

The White House said last month that Walsh would leave the office of operations, which plans foreign trips for the Trump administration and allocates resources for White House aides.

The role is one of three White House Deputy Chief of Staff positions and serves just under the White House Chief of Staff. The other two positions are Principal Deputy Chief of Staff, a role filled by Emma Doyle, and Deputy Chief of Staff for Policy Coordination, currently Chris Liddell.

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Walsh was one of the few current White House officials who had served the Trump administration since its inception; he had been a government employee for nearly three decades. Walsh has now accepted a job in the private sector, according to The Washington Post.

Westlake Legal Group dc2517c1-Trump-Speech Trump names Secret Service official Anthony Ornato as new deputy chief of staff for operations Morgan Phillips fox-news/politics/executive fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc d1570fd6-7a54-5c97-856d-4e1856ffcdc5 article   Westlake Legal Group dc2517c1-Trump-Speech Trump names Secret Service official Anthony Ornato as new deputy chief of staff for operations Morgan Phillips fox-news/politics/executive fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc d1570fd6-7a54-5c97-856d-4e1856ffcdc5 article

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Buttigieg Struggles to Square Transparency With Nondisclosure Agreement

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_165551226_c1ecc24c-4d71-4251-989f-e5a969a392ea-articleLarge Buttigieg Struggles to Square Transparency With Nondisclosure Agreement Warren, Elizabeth United States Politics and Government Presidential Election of 2020 Nondisclosure Agreements Iowa Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- )

Pete Buttigieg after participating in a presidential forum in Waterloo, Iowa, on Friday.Credit…Jordan Gale for The New York Times

MT. VERNON, Iowa — Pete Buttigieg rose from small-city obscurity to the top of Iowa’s presidential polls by saying yes to every interview and presenting himself as an aggressively transparent candidate poised to take on President Trump and his array of known and unknown conflicts.

Yet the South Bend, Ind., mayor now faces cascading questions he has been unable to answer about his work at McKinsey & Company, the management consulting firm that accounts for the entirety of his private-sector career. He hasn’t revealed his clients, citing a nondisclosure agreement he signed at the outset of his employment.

The three years Mr. Buttigieg spent at McKinsey represent one-fifth of his professional resume. His campaign on Friday night for the first time disclosed broad strokes beyond the most elemental details of his work, some of which he also discussed in his memoir, which was published in February.

The pressure to disclose more about his work at McKinsey comes as the 37-year-old mayor also faces increased scrutiny about his lack of appeal to African-American voters, and amid increasing calls from Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, who does not hold closed-door fund-raising events, to reveal details about his campaign’s fund-raising operation — including the names of his bundlers.

“This is about the conflicts that he is creating every single day right now,” Ms. Warren told reporters Saturday in New Hampshire.

For his part, Mr. Buttigieg has called on Ms. Warren to release more than the 11 years of personal tax returns she has already disclosed. Ms. Warren released a list of more than 50 legal clients in May.

Which Democrats are leading the 2020 presidential race?

All of this comes as Mr. Buttigieg has established himself as the front-runner in Iowa, where Democrats hold the first-in-the-nation nominating caucuses Feb. 3. Democrats here are increasingly focused on selecting a candidate who will be the strongest in a general election against President Trump, who has refused to release any of his tax returns and did not divest himself from businesses that profit from his administration and campaign.

The pressure on Mr. Buttigieg to reveal more about his work at McKinsey is coming not only from his 2020 rivals like Ms. Warren, who in recent days has become far more aggressive in her attacks on him, but also from other Democratic politicians.

On Friday night in Waterloo, Iowa, Mayor Lori Lightfoot of Chicago, who had spoken favorably of Mr. Buttigieg just weeks earlier, told Mr. Buttigieg during an onstage interview that he should reveal for whom he did work at McKinsey.

“You said you can’t talk about your work at McKinsey because of a nondisclosure agreement, and I think you said today you’ve got to honor your commitment to McKinsey,” said Ms. Lightfoot, a corporate lawyer herself. “I’m asking you, should you break that N.D.A. so you have the moral authority and the high ground against somebody like Trump, who hides behind the lack of transparency to justify everything that he’s doing?”

Mr. Buttigieg first tried to dodge the question from Ms. Lightfoot, quipping that it was his first job out of school and it was “not like I was the C.E.O.”

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He added: “I pushed as much information as I can, without breaking the promise that I made in writing. And I am asking my former employer to do the right thing, to not make me choose between claiming the moral high ground and going back on my word.”

Mr. Buttigieg told reporters later that he would not unilaterally break the nondisclosure agreement with his former employer.

“It’s important to me to keep my word, and it’s also very important to me to offer as much transparency as possible,” he said. “I’m squaring that circle the best I can by pushing out the information that we did.”

The McKinsey question has hung over Mr. Buttigieg as he has grown into a more formidable presidential candidate. In June his campaign first asked McKinsey which details of his work there could be revealed. In September he told reporters aboard his campaign bus that his McKinsey tenure wasn’t “something that I think is essential in my story,” though when he ran for office in Indiana in 2010 he used his McKinsey experience as evidence of his grasp on private-sector economics.

In recent days, as scrutiny of his work with the firm reached new heights following revelations McKinsey helped the Trump administration carry out its immigration policies, Mr. Buttigieg himself publicly requested to be released from his nondisclosure agreement.

And on Friday night the campaign released its most detailed timeline yet of his work for the firm, laying out details of the type of work he performed but not revealing the names of his clients.

While Mr. Buttigieg’s rivals spent Friday and Saturday salivating online over his McKinsey ties, there was little evidence the story had broken through yet in Iowa.

“It’s the first I heard of it and I just don’t see the importance of it right now,” said Lon Gingerich Feil, who came to see Mr. Buttigieg Saturday in Mt. Vernon. She added: “I don’t believe that anybody’s completely blameless in anything as far as politics goes.”

Mr. Buttigieg’s political allies insist that anger over his McKinsey tenure is manufactured by his political opponents and is not widely shared among early-state Democrats.

“He answers the questions about it with the fact it was a first-time job,” said Laura Hubka, the Democratic Party chairwoman in Howard County, Iowa, who has endorsed Mr. Buttigieg. “Every attack on Pete is making him look more attractive to middle-of-the-road voters.”

And the Buttigieg campaign has not shifted into crisis mode over the McKinsey story. Representative Don Beyer of Virginia, the first member of Congress to endorse Mr. Buttigieg, said the campaign had not circulated any talking points about the mayor’s McKinsey tenure.

“I think he’s got a perfectly clear explanation, which is that he signed a nondisclosure agreement and McKinsey is famously secretive,” Mr. Beyer said Saturday.

Yet Mr. Buttigieg’s handling of calls to name his McKinsey clients echoes the most politically damaging episode of his years as mayor: the city’s withholding of secret recordings of police officers that led Mr. Buttigieg to demote a black police chief.

The mayor removed the chief in 2012, he has long said, after learning that the F.B.I. was investigating the chief for violating wiretap laws. But Mr. Buttigieg declined to release the tapes, citing federal privacy laws as he fought a subpoena for the tapes from the City Council. In South Bend, reports and rumors have circulated for years that the tapes include white officers using racist language and describing illegal activity.

Mr. Buttigieg has admitted that his initial response to the crisis was overly legalistic. He failed to understand that his actions sent a broader message that reinforced black residents’ distrust of the police.

(Today, the mayor himself calls for the tapes’ release, though their fate is tied up in court, with the police officers heard on the recordings fighting disclosure.)

In the case of Mr. Buttigieg’s McKinsey clients, he may be similarly at risk of offering an overly legalistic defense of nondisclosure, while misjudging the deep suspicions that liberal voters harbor for corporate influence on politics.

Mr. Buttigieg’s appeal to many voters is his rejection of a lucrative private-sector career to enter public service; part of his good government credo has long been greater transparency in the city he runs. He first ran for municipal office in 2011 promising a breakthrough in the city’s transparency. In many ways he delivered. The city now uploads online data on police use of force and complaints against officers, vacant and abandoned properties, and many details of city spending. In 2017 the mayor and his staff celebrated fulfilling 10,000 requests under Indiana’s open records law.

Another transparency effort, a $1.5 million purchase of body cameras for police officers, ended up at the center of a political crisis for the mayor this summer. A white officer failed to activate his camera during an encounter in which he fatally shot a black man in downtown South Bend, sending the city, and Mr. Buttigieg’s campaign, into turmoil. Mr. Buttigieg suspended campaigning to face angry and anguished residents. The narrative of distrust of the police was projected on the national stage.

Mr. Buttigieg has emerged as perhaps the most polarizing figure among Democratic insiders.

He is the subject of the most open contempt among his rivals, a feeling that often extends to their supporters.

Kim Miller, a Warren backer who works for the teachers union in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, said Monday after a Warren event at the University of Iowa that Mr. Buttigieg’s resume — Harvard, McKinsey, Navy veteran, small-town mayor — was not sufficient to make him the Democratic standard-bearer.

“What qualifies him to even run? It’s pretty presumptuous,” Mr. Miller said. “It’s amazing that he’s taken off. Iowans are weird.”

Sydney Ember reported from Mt. Vernon; Reid J. Epstein reported from Washington; Trip Gabriel reported from South Bend, Ind. Jonathan Martin contributed reporting from Iowa City.

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Florida Shooting Updates: Gunman Showed Videos of Mass Shootings at Party

Video

transcript

‘You Just Don’t Expect This,’ Sheriff Says of Pensacola Shooting

A gunman killed three people at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida before he was fatally shot by officers. It was the second shooting this week at a Navy base.

“Walking through the crime scene was like being on the set of a movie. And as the mayor eloquently put, you just don’t expect this to happen at home. This doesn’t happen in Escambia County, it doesn’t happen in Pensacola. It doesn’t happen to our friends and neighbors who are members of the United States Navy. But it did. And it has. And so for now, we’re here to pick up the pieces.” “This is a tragic day for the city of Pensacola. NAS (Naval Air Station) is incredibly an important part of our community — for 200 years this has been a part of the city of Pensacola — and we’re a military town. Our hearts and prayers are connected to all those that serve us every day, and certainly the expectation that this would happen here at home was unexpected.”

Westlake Legal Group 06pensacola-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Florida Shooting Updates: Gunman Showed Videos of Mass Shootings at Party United States Navy United States Defense and Military Forces PENSACOLA, Fla. Military Bases and Installations mass shootings

A gunman killed three people at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida before he was fatally shot by officers. It was the second shooting this week at a Navy base.CreditCredit…WEAR-TV, via Associated Press

Here’s what you need to know:

The Saudi trainee who carried out the attack on a Florida naval base showed videos of mass shootings at a dinner party the night before he carried out the shooting, according to a person briefed on the investigation but not authorized to speak publicly.

The gunman, who killed three people and injured eight others, did not have any apparent ties to international terrorist groups and appeared to have radicalized on his own, according to a senior American official who was also not authorized to speak.

The gunman, identified as Second Lt. Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, was killed by a sheriff’s deputy who responded to the attack. Lieutenant Alshamrani was training to become a pilot and initially entered the United States in 2018, according to initial assessments by intelligence and counterterrorism officials. But at some point Lieutenant Alshamrani returned to Saudi Arabia and then re-entered the United States in February 2019.

The lieutenant reported for his training program at the naval air station about three days before the shooting, according to the officials. It was unclear what Lieutenant Alshamrani was doing in the United States between February and when he reported for training, but he was apparently living in the Pensacola area for much of that period.

Six other Saudi nationals were detained for questioning near the scene of the shooting, which took place over two floors in a classroom on the base. Three of the Saudis who were detained had been seen filming the entire incident, according to another person briefed on the investigation.

It was not known whether the six Saudis detained were students in the classroom building, and there was no immediate indication that those filming the incident were connected to the gunman, the person said.

The authorities have said that there is no credible threat to the Pensacola community, and one of the senior officials said that all Saudi trainees on base had been accounted for.

On Facebook, family members identified Joshua Kaleb Watson as one of the victims. Adam Watson wrote in a post that his youngest brother “saved countless lives today with his own.”

“After being shot multiple times he made it outside and told the first response team where the shooter was and those details were invaluable,” he wrote. “He died a hero and we are beyond proud but there is a hole in our hearts that can never be filled.”

Mr. Watson’s father, Benjamin Watson, told The Pensacola News Journal that his 23-year-old son was shot five times. A rifle team captain, he had reported to the base two weeks earlier for flight training, his father told the newspaper.

Capt. Timothy F. Kinsella Jr., the base’s commanding officer, said the victims were “part of the Navy family.”

The authorities have not officially released the victims’ names. Sheriff Morgan said two of the eight were deputies responding to the scene. One was shot in the arm and one in the knee, but both are expected to recover and one was released from the hospital on Saturday, a spokeswoman for the Sheriff’s Office said.

At a vigil for the victims on Saturday, Chip W. Simmons, the chief deputy of the Escambia County Sheriff’s office, said the injured deputy in the hospital was in good spirits.

Investigators were trying to determine what motivated the gunman.

Senator Rick Scott, Republican of Florida, and Representative Matt Gaetz, a Republican whose district includes Pensacola, both described the shooting as an act of terrorism. But federal law enforcement officials said it was too early to establish the gunman’s motive.

The SITE Intelligence Group, which monitors jihadist activity, cited a Twitter account with a name matching the gunman that had posted a “will” calling the United States a “nation of evil” and criticizing its support for Israel.

SITE said the account had also quoted Osama bin Laden, the former Qaeda leader, and was critical of United States foreign policy.

“I’m not against you for just being American,” the posts said. “I don’t hate you because your freedoms, I hate you because every day you supporting, funding and committing crimes not only against Muslims but also humanity.”

The account could not be independently verified, and law enforcement officials did not confirm that it was connected to the gunman.

The lieutenant was a trainee with the Saudi Air Force. Saudi pilots have trained at the Pensacola base since 1995.

The gunman used a locally purchased Glock 45 9-millimeter handgun with an extended magazine and had four to six other magazines in his possession, according to one of the people briefed on the investigation.

At a vigil for the victims on Saturday, Mayor Grover C. Robinson IV of Pensacola said that as far as he knew, the Pensacola Police had never had any interactions with the gunman.

Captain Kinsella said that about 200 international students were training at the base. They are from countries like Italy and Norway, in addition to Saudi Arabia, and are trained to fly helicopters or F-15s, according to a Navy pilot familiar with the program. Americans and Saudis go through initial training together before embarking on separate programs.

Mr. Robinson said the Naval Air Station had deep roots in northwest Florida, with a military history that went beyond its status as a state. It was a key fort for the Spanish, he said, and for “as long as we’ve been flying planes, 100 years, they have been flying planes out of that base.”

Defense Secretary Mark Esper said on Saturday that he had directed the Pentagon to look at vetting procedures for foreign nationals who came to the United States to study and train with the American military.

Mr. Esper, speaking at the Reagan Defense Forum in Simi Valley, insisted that the shooting would not affect military-to-military relations between the Saudi Arabia and the United States.

The announcement followed criticism from officials like Mr. Scott and Mr. Gaetz, who blamed the shooting, in part, on what they called insufficient federal vetting standards. The senator said he wanted a “full review” of military programs that train foreign nationals in the United States.

“Whether this individual was motivated by radical Islam or was simply mentally unstable, this was an act of terrorism,” Mr. Scott said in a statement on Friday. “There is no reason we should be providing state-of-the-art military training to people who wish us harm.”

Mr. Robinson acknowledged that the incident raised serious questions about vetting, but said he would leave issues of national security to the federal authorities. “We depend on allies,” he said. “This is the first time this has happened and NAS has been doing this for decades. We train a number of people to help fight against these adversaries.”

King Salman of Saudi Arabia called President Trump to offer his condolences and to condemn the actions of the gunman, who he said did not represent the Saudi people, according to Mr. Trump.

“The King said that the Saudi people are greatly angered by the barbaric actions of the shooter,” Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter.

The shooting happened early on Friday morning across two floors of a classroom building at the Naval Air Station in Pensacola, where foreign military trainees have studied for decades.

Law enforcement officials said they began receiving emergency calls at about 6:50 a.m., and the base was put on lockdown. It was the second shooting at a Navy base this week.

Chief Simmons, of the Escambia County Sheriff’s office, recounted the shock of hearing words law enforcement officials have come to dread come over the police radio: “active shooter” and “officer down.”

The building was covered in broken glass, shell casings and signs of horror, Chief Simmons said, and the police used every possible person available to search every room in the multistory building.

“It isn’t till everything settles down that you realize what you’ve seen,” Chief Simmons said. “What you are experiencing is what you have seen on TV. What you are experiencing is loss of life.”

Patricia Mazzei, Adam Goldman, Helene Cooper and Liam Stack contributed reporting.

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Judiciary Committee Report Offers Legal Rationale for Impeachment Case

Westlake Legal Group merlin_165426090_7426432b-f78c-47c7-b864-c9785d03b3c2-facebookJumbo Judiciary Committee Report Offers Legal Rationale for Impeachment Case Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Nixon, Richard Milhous impeachment House of Representatives House Committee on the Judiciary

WASHINGTON — House Democrats released a report on Saturday intended to lay out the legal and historical underpinnings of their case for impeaching President Trump while also countering Republican accusations that the investigation of the president’s conduct in office has been unfair and illegitimate.

Democrats have accused the president of abusing his power by trying to pressure the Ukrainian government to announce investigations into his political rivals. They also claim that Mr. Trump obstructed the congressional inquiry by blocking witnesses from testifying and refusing to provide documents.

The 52-page report by the Democratic staff of the House Judiciary Committee argues that the framers of the Constitution intentionally provided a way to remove the occupant of the Oval Office for just such misconduct.

“A president who perverts his role as chief diplomat to serve private rather than public ends has unquestionably engaged in ‘high crimes and misdemeanors’— especially if he invited, rather than opposed, foreign interference in our politics,” concludes the report, titled “Constitutional Grounds for Presidential Impeachment.”

On Monday, the committee will formally receive the evidence against Mr. Trump in a public hearing. Democratic and Republican lawyers for the House Intelligence Committee, which spent two months investigating the president’s actions, will testify and answer questions, the committee announced on Saturday.

Lawyers for the Judiciary Committee will also testify at the hearing as the panel’s 41 members begin a weeklong debate on whether to approve articles of impeachment against the president. Representative Jerrold Nadler, Democrat of New York and the chairman of the committee, has made no pretense about where that will lead.

“The Framers worst nightmare is what we are facing in this very moment,” he said on Twitter on Saturday as the report was released. “President Trump abused his power, betrayed our national security, and corrupted our elections, all for personal gain. The Constitution details only one remedy for this misconduct: impeachment.”

The report — which echoes a well-regarded 1974 document created by the same committee during the debate about whether to impeach President Richard M. Nixon — is an attempt to provide Democratic lawmakers with the constitutional rationale to support impeaching a president for only the third time in American history.

Both the 1974 report and the new one trace the origins of impeachment from monarchical England, where it was developed to hold the king’s ministers to account, to colonial America, where the framers of the Constitution believed it was a necessary remedy to ensure that the leaders of the new republic did not corrupt it for their personal benefit.

Both reports primarily focus on how to define “treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors,” the offenses enumerated by the Constitution for impeachment.

But the current document is clearly meant to be a road map for Democrats, tracking closely with the allegations they have already made about Mr. Trump’s conduct. It lays out several offenses that could form the basis for articles of impeachment, including bribery, which is specifically cited in the Constitution.

“Impeachable bribery occurs when the president offers, solicits, or accepts something of personal value to influence his own official actions,” the report states. “By rendering such bribery impeachable, the framers sought to ensure that the nation could expel a leader who would sell out the interests of ‘We the People’ for his own personal gain.”

The report also makes the case for impeaching a president who abuses the power of his office through actions that are legal but not motivated by the national interests — a not-so-subtle nod to allegations that Mr. Trump’s decision to hold up Ukraine’s military aid was intended to help him personally

“At minimum, that duty requires presidents ‘to exercise their power only when it is motivated in the public interest rather than in their private self-interest,’” the report argues. “A president can thus be removed for exercising power with a corrupt purpose, even if his action would otherwise be permissible.”

Saturday’s report is also a legal rebuttal to the repeated attacks on the impeachment inquiry by Mr. Trump and his Republican allies in Congress. They have accused Democrats of orchestrating a “sham” impeachment that ignored historical traditions and did not provide the president with the right to defend himself.

The report’s authors say the inquiry followed rules similar to previous impeachments and note that if he is impeached, Mr. Trump will face a Senate trial, “where he may be afforded an opportunity to present an evidentiary defense and test the strength of the House’s case.”

The report also rejects the Republican argument that some evidence in the case should be ignored because it came from secondhand witnesses. “At this fact-finding stage, no technical ‘rules of evidence’ apply,” the report says. And it dismisses the argument by Mr. Trump and his aides that he did nothing wrong because Ukraine never delivered the investigations he wanted.

“The nation is not required to cross its fingers and hope White House staff will persist in ignoring or sidelining a president who orders them to execute ‘high crimes and misdemeanors.’” the report says. “Nor can a President escape impeachment just because his corrupt plan to abuse power or manipulate elections was discovered and abandoned.”

Saturday’s report comes three days after the committee convened a panel of four constitutional scholars to discuss how to apply the history and legal grounding of impeachment to the evidence collected by the House.

Three of the scholars, all of whom were invited by Democrats, argued that Mr. Trump’s conduct toward Ukraine as presented by the inquiry clearly rose to the level of impeachable bribery or abuse of power and that his efforts to conceal it from Congress could also be construed as an impeachable offense.

A fourth scholar, called by Republicans, said the allegations could be impeachable but argued that Democrats had not sufficiently made that case in a rush to complete the process.

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Dan Gainor: Media criticize Democrats – A rare break from their attacks on Trump and Republicans

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113309027001_6113307075001-vs Dan Gainor: Media criticize Democrats – A rare break from their attacks on Trump and Republicans fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/cory-booker fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc Dan Gainor d039e6fe-47d9-54d5-bde4-172bdf27088f article

Journalists grew concerned about a political party’s supposed racism this week. Only this time the media were complaining about the Democratic Party.

What took them so long?

Democratic presidential candidate and Sen. Kamala Harris of California ended her campaign for the nation’s highest office, likely resulting in an all-white group of candidates appearing on stage for the sixth televised debate of Democratic presidential contenders Dec. 19.

JULIÁN CASTRO ACCUSES MEDIA OF ‘DOUBLE STANDARD’ IN COVERING KAMALA HARRIS CAMPAIGN

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey, who is African-American, went off about it on MSNBC’s “All In with Chris Hayes.”

“We’re spiraling towards a debate stage that potentially – we’re still fighting to get on it, but could have six people with no diversity whatsoever,” he complained. (Democrats used to consider gender part of diversity. Oh well.)

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Booker barely scratched the surface of the problem. A series of controversies had reporters covering stories they ordinarily try to ignore or downplay. The scandals involved top-tier candidates Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

But the Harris narrative finally captivated a news media that had eagerly forgotten the controversy regarding Democratic Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s college yearbook photo showing one person in blackface and another in Ku Klux Klan garb.

NBC News carried a story headlined: “With Sen. Kamala Harris’ exit, Democrats can’t avoid a tough conversation about diversity.”

NPR agreed, asking: “#DemsSoWhite? Kamala Harris’ Exit Raises Hard Questions About Race And Power.”

It was an unusual spot for journalists who typically depict those on the right as racist and those on the left as enlightened.

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary and current presidential candidate Julián Castro blamed the news media for what Buzzfeed described as “treating candidates of color differently.”

“To me, they held her to a different standard, a double standard, to other campaigns,” Castro said.

Castro criticized The Washington Post, New York Times and Politico for “writing very gossipy-sounding big articles trashing the campaign.”

The Root was upset that “Kamala Harris Wasn’t Allowed to Fail Up Like a White Boy.” Senior Reporter Terrell Jermaine Starr said the media fixated on her previous job as a “lock ’em up prosecutor” and attorney general.

Starr added that former Vice President Joe Biden’s own background is far worse and Biden is still running. “If Harris is a cop, Biden is the police chief,” he wrote.

And MSNBC host Al Sharpton added: “Women are held to a different standard and black women especially.”

The Democrats’ problems with race didn’t stop there.

Warren once more addressed her phony past claims to be a Native American. She spoke at a presidential forum on Native American issues, according to The New York Times. She “offered a direct, public apology for the ‘harm’ she caused with her past claims of Native American ancestry and pledged to uplift Native people as president.”

“I shouldn’t have done it. I am not a person of color,” Warren told the audience, according to Bloomberg News.

Journalists have repeatedly defended Warren on this issue and bashed President Trump for nicknaming the senator “Pocahontas” because of her lie.

The New York Times called Trump’s comment a “slur” and a “racially incendiary jibe.” The Times Magazine devoted more than 8,000 words to profiling Warren, but included just one paragraph to her about her pivotal controversy.

MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” Host Joe Scarborough had called the president’s criticism of Warren coded racism and an appeal to “the white nationalist wing of, of this movement.”

Meanwhile, a staffer whose tweets “contain anti-Semitic, homophobic, misogynistic and racist language” is no longer with the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign, according to ABC News.

The Washington Free Beacon revealed how new Deputy Director of Constituency Organizing Darius Khalil Gordon’s past on Twitter was filled with a ton of things that I won’t quote here.

Of course, traditional outlets didn’t discover the comments, so kudos to the Free Beacon for doing actual research.

New candidate Michael Bloomberg was even caught in the controversy. His opponent Booker also found it “stunning” when he learned Bloomberg had referred to him as “well-spoken.” It was a gaffe reminiscent of Biden’s comment about then-candidate Sen. Barack Obama as “the first mainstream African-American who is articulate and bright and clean and a nice-looking guy.”

Not to be left out, the Buttigieg campaign had “a gathering of African American supporters in South Bend,” reported NBC News. The kicker was that Buttigieg was interrupted by a man wearing a Black Lives Matter shirt.

Liberal racism, sexism and anti-Semitism have been the donkey in the room for a long time. The media were finally forced to confront it, at least briefly.

Nancy Pelosi blasts reporter

Journalists are quick to defend anyone in the media who is criticized by the president. But when a reporter is criticized by the Democratic speaker of the House, the rules change.

Sinclair Broadcast Group reporter James Rosen asked Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California a simple question: “Do you hate the president, Madam Speaker?”

Pelosi, who has bashed Rosen before as “Mr. Republican Talking Points,” used the opportunity to claim she had the moral high ground.

“As a Catholic, I resent your using the word ‘hate’ in a sentence that addresses me,” she said.

The news media, who love it when Pelosi opposes the pope and the Catholic Church on abortion, rallied around her faith when it suited them. Both CBS and NBC promoted an identical Pelosi quote: “Don’t mess with me.”

Imagine the media reaction to a Republican politician calling out a reporter, pointing a finger directly at the journalist and telling him “Don’t mess with me.”

Actually, you don’t have to imagine it. We see it daily when the press rallies in defense against every criticism they get from the right.

USA Today Washington Bureau Chief Susan Page described Pelosi as “fierce.”

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NBC News Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent and MSNBC anchor Andrea Mitchell took Pelosi’s side readily. Mitchell said that the speaker, “as a person of deep faith, which we know to be the case with her, really took offense at anyone questioning.”

Mitchell didn’t seem to recall that Pelosi’s “deep faith” has strident disagreement with the Catholic Church on abortion.

CNN loved it as well. Chief Legal Analyst Jeffrey Toobin described Pelosi comments as “one of the many iconic Nancy Pelosi moments from this period.”

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MSNBC talking heads were just as excited. “Morning Joe” co-host Mika Brzezinski was thrilled that Pelosi went “right to her Catholic roots.”

Joe Scarborough mocked the reporter for daring to ask a question. “Maybe James Rosen would like to ask Donald Trump, do you hate children, or do you hate Jesus?”

The confrontation was a reminder of how faith is both a sword and a shield for the press. They wield it against anyone they disagree with and use it to defend those they support.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113309027001_6113307075001-vs Dan Gainor: Media criticize Democrats – A rare break from their attacks on Trump and Republicans fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/cory-booker fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc Dan Gainor d039e6fe-47d9-54d5-bde4-172bdf27088f article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113309027001_6113307075001-vs Dan Gainor: Media criticize Democrats – A rare break from their attacks on Trump and Republicans fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/cory-booker fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc Dan Gainor d039e6fe-47d9-54d5-bde4-172bdf27088f article

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How to Protect Your Children From Online Sexual Predators

Westlake Legal Group 07sextortion-advice-facebookJumbo How to Protect Your Children From Online Sexual Predators Sex Crimes parenting Mobile Applications Computer and Video Games Child Abuse and Neglect

Sexual predators have found an easy access point into the lives of young people: They are meeting them online through multiplayer video games and chat apps, making virtual connections right in their victims’ homes.

Many of the interactions lead to crimes of “sextortion,” in which children are coerced into sending explicit imagery of themselves.

[Read The New York Times’s investigation into the problem.]

We asked two experts how families could best navigate gaming and other online activity that can expose children to sexual predators.

Dr. Sharon W. Cooper is a forensic pediatrician at the University of North Carolina and an expert on sexual exploitation. Michael Salter is an associate criminology professor at the University of New South Wales in Australia. Both are internationally recognized for their work in the field of child sexual abuse.

The following recommendations have been condensed and edited for clarity.

Dr. Cooper: The conversation on online safety should begin with a statement that there will be rules because a parent loves his or her children and wants to see them be safe and have the best that is in store for them.

I empower parents to know that they control access and should always exert that control. Research has shown that parents who mediate online behavior have the most resilient children. It is about time online (not too much), content (age-appropriate and prosocial) and parental empowerment (access is a gift, not a right).

Dr. Salter: Gaining some shared experience on a new service helps you identify risks, builds trust and provides an opportunity for nonconfrontational conversations. You can find out more about different platforms by going to trusted sources such as Common Sense Media and the eSafety commissioner website in Australia, which provide useful summaries of new apps and their safety features.

Dr. Salter: You can start by talking about our rights and responsibilities online. You can emphasize that, online, we have an obligation to treat people well, and a right to be treated well by others.

You can brainstorm with your child the kinds of situations where they might feel unsafe, and the strategies they can use to stay safe. Set reasonable rules, but keep the conversation open so they feel comfortable coming to you if something happens that concerns them.

We’ve had situations where children have stayed silent on really major sextortion cases for months because they were already in trouble online and didn’t want to be in trouble for breaking the rules, too. Groomers and abusers rely on silence.

Dr. Salter: Red flags that an online “friend” can’t be trusted: They tell the child to keep the relationship secret; they ask for a lot of personal information; they promise favors and gifts; they contact the child through multiple platforms and services; they initiate intimate discussions about the child’s appearance; and they insist on meeting face to face.

The first thing is for children to raise concerns with adults they trust. They should know never to send a nude image on the internet and remember they don’t have to do anything they don’t want to do. Their most common mistake is not listening to themselves when they feel uncomfortable.

Dr. Cooper: We try to avoid making children feel they are wholly responsible for their safety because if they fail, they develop significant guilt and self-blame. That being said, the most important warning signs are too much time online and angry reactions when parents put in a cease-and-desist order. Others are contact with a “voice” they do not recognize, and contact with someone requesting inappropriate behavior, including duping their parents.

Dr. Salter: While exploring a platform or app with your children, find out how to report and block users who make them feel unsafe. Encourage them to use this option if they receive unwanted or uncomfortable contact. If the user persists, contact your local police.

Dr. Salter: The first step is to remain nonjudgmental and reassure your children that they are not in trouble. Groomers rely on children feeling too ashamed to tell, so it’s important to be supportive.

The most common mistake parents make is embarrassment — being unable to create a space in their relationship with their children where it’s O.K. to discuss their emerging interest in sex. It’s really hard to talk to children about their sexuality.

Dr. Cooper: The industry is not about the business of promoting safety. I have yet to see a new cellphone purchase accompanied with a “How to keep your children safe with this device” pamphlet. We should empower children and show them how to report to trusted authorities.

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Florida Shooting Updates: Officials Are Investigating Gunman’s Motive

Video

transcript

‘You Just Don’t Expect This,’ Sheriff Says of Pensacola Shooting

A gunman killed three people at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida before he was fatally shot by officers. It was the second shooting this week at a Navy base.

“Walking through the crime scene was like being on the set of a movie. And as the mayor eloquently put, you just don’t expect this to happen at home. This doesn’t happen in Escambia County, it doesn’t happen in Pensacola. It doesn’t happen to our friends and neighbors who are members of the United States Navy. But it did. And it has. And so for now, we’re here to pick up the pieces.” “This is a tragic day for the city of Pensacola. NAS (Naval Air Station) is incredibly an important part of our community — for 200 years this has been a part of the city of Pensacola — and we’re a military town. Our hearts and prayers are connected to all those that serve us every day, and certainly the expectation that this would happen here at home was unexpected.”

Westlake Legal Group 06pensacola-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Florida Shooting Updates: Officials Are Investigating Gunman’s Motive United States Navy United States Defense and Military Forces PENSACOLA, Fla. Military Bases and Installations mass shootings

A gunman killed three people at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida before he was fatally shot by officers. It was the second shooting this week at a Navy base.CreditCredit…WEAR-TV, via Associated Press

Here’s what you need to know:

The F.B.I. was investigating but did not confirm a report that the Saudi trainee had watched videos of mass shootings at a dinner party sometime this week, according to a senior American official who was briefed on the investigation but not authorized to speak publicly.

The gunman, who killed three people and injured eight others, did not have any apparent ties to international terrorist groups and appeared to have radicalized on his own, according to the official.

The gunman, identified as Second Lt. Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, was killed by a sheriff’s deputy who responded to the attack. Lieutenant Alshamrani was training to become a pilot and initially entered the United States in 2018, according to the official. But at some point Lieutenant Alshamrani returned to Saudi Arabia and then re-entered the United States in February 2019, the official said.

The lieutenant reported for his training program at the naval air station about three days before the shooting, the official said.

It was unclear what Lieutenant Alshamrani was doing in the United States between February and when he reported for training, but he was apparently living in the Pensacola area for much of that period, the official said.

Six other Saudi nationals were detained for questioning near the scene of the shooting, which took place over two floors in a classroom on the base. Three of the Saudis who were detained had been seen filming the entire incident, according to another person briefed on the investigation.

It was not known whether the six Saudis detained were students in the classroom building, and there was no immediate indication that those filming the incident were connected to the gunman, the person said.

On Facebook, family members identified Joshua Kaleb Watson as one of the victims. Adam Watson wrote in a post that his youngest brother “saved countless lives today with his own.”

“After being shot multiple times he made it outside and told the first response team where the shooter was and those details were invaluable,” he wrote. “He died a hero and we are beyond proud but there is a hole in our hearts that can never be filled.”

Mr. Watson’s father, Benjamin Watson, told The Pensacola News Journal that his 23-year-old son was shot five times. A rifle team captain, he had reported to the base two weeks earlier for flight training, his father told the newspaper.

The authorities have not officially released the victims’ names. Eight people were injured in the attack. Sheriff Morgan said two of the eight were deputies responding to the scene.

One was shot in the arm and one in the knee, but both are expected to recover and one was released from the hospital on Saturday, a spokeswoman for the Sheriff’s Office said.

Captain Kinsella said the victims were “part of the Navy family.”

“They’re part of us, and our heart goes out to those of you who may be affected by this tragedy,” he said.

Investigators were trying to determine what motivated the gunman.

Senator Rick Scott, Republican of Florida, and Representative Matt Gaetz, a Republican whose district includes Pensacola, both described the shooting as an act of terrorism. But federal law enforcement officials said it was too early to establish the gunman’s motive.

The SITE Intelligence Group, which monitors jihadist activity, cited a Twitter account with a name matching the gunman that had posted a “will” calling the United States a “nation of evil” and criticizing its support for Israel.

SITE said the account had also quoted Osama bin Laden, the former Qaeda leader, and was critical of United States foreign policy.

“I’m not against you for just being American,” the posts said. “I don’t hate you because your freedoms, I hate you because every day you supporting, funding and committing crimes not only against Muslims but also humanity.”

The account could not be independently verified, and law enforcement officials did not confirm that it was connected to the gunman.

The lieutenant was a trainee with the Saudi Air Force. Saudi pilots have trained at the Pensacola base since 1995.

The gunman used a locally purchased Glock 45 9-millimeter handgun with an extended magazine and had four to six other magazines in his possession, according to one of the people briefed on the investigation.

At a vigil for the victims on Saturday, Mayor Grover C. Robinson IV of Pensacola said that as far as he knew, the Pensacola Police had never had any interactions with the gunman.

Capt. Timothy F. Kinsella Jr., the base’s commanding officer, said that about 200 international students were training at the base. They come from countries like Italy and Norway, in addition to Saudi Arabia, and are trained to fly helicopters or F-15s, according to a Navy pilot familiar with the program. Americans and Saudis go through initial training together before embarking on separate programs.

Mr. Robinson said the Naval Air Station had deep roots in northwest Florida, with a military history that went beyond its status as a state. It was a key fort for the Spanish, he said, and for “as long as we’ve been flying planes, 100 years, they have been flying planes out of that base.”

Mr. Scott and Mr. Gaetz blamed the shooting, in part, on what they called insufficient federal standards for the vetting of foreign military trainees. The senator said he wanted a “full review” of military programs that train foreign nationals in the United States.

“Whether this individual was motivated by radical Islam or was simply mentally unstable, this was an act of terrorism,” Mr. Scott said in a statement on Friday. “There is no reason we should be providing state-of-the-art military training to people who wish us harm.”

Mr. Robinson acknowledged that the incident raised serious questions about vetting, but said he would leave issues of national security to the federal authorities. “We depend on allies,” he said. “This is the first time this has happened and NAS has been doing this for decades. We train a number of people to help fight against these adversaries.”

King Salman of Saudi Arabia called President Trump to offer his condolences and to condemn the actions of the gunman, who he said did not represent the Saudi people, according to Mr. Trump.

“The King said that the Saudi people are greatly angered by the barbaric actions of the shooter,” Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter.

The shooting happened early on Friday morning across two floors of a classroom building at the Naval Air Station in Pensacola, where foreign military trainees have studied for decades.

Law enforcement officials said they began receiving emergency calls at about 6:50 a.m., and the base was put on lockdown. It was the second shooting at a Navy base this week.

“Walking through the crime scene was like being on the set of a movie,” Sheriff Morgan said on Friday.

Adam Goldman and Liam Stack contributed reporting.

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California waitress gets $1,000 tip after restaurant was closed for a week

A California waitress received a generous gift when a customer tipped her $1,000 after the restaurant she worked at had to close for a week.

Sarah Klein missed out on a week’s worth of pay when her job at The Mainstream Bar and Grille in Poway was put on hold wehn a boil water order shut the business down for six days.

When the restaurant reopened, Klein mentioned to one of her regulars how the water outage affected her family. With Christmas around the corner, losing a paycheck made a world of difference.

RESTAURANT PATRON LEAVES OHIO WAITRESS $1,000 TIP AFTER ‘WONDERFUL’ DINNER: ‘SHE WAS LITERALLY SHAKING’

Westlake Legal Group Sarah-Klein-Poway California waitress gets $1,000 tip after restaurant was closed for a week Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/lifestyle/parenting/family fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc eb4bfb2d-0ac8-5a8a-8bb3-dcc1bc6cd945 article

Sarah Klein missed out on a week’s worth of pay when her job at The Mainstream Bar and Grille in Poway was compromised over a boil water order that shut down the business for six days. (Photo: KABC)

“You do really want to budget,” Klein told KABC. “You really want to figure out what you want to do for the holiday or how you are going to spend your money. So that was scary.”

Surprisingly, the customer returned to give Klein what he called a “donation.”

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Westlake Legal Group Sarah-Klein-Envelope California waitress gets $1,000 tip after restaurant was closed for a week Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/lifestyle/parenting/family fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc eb4bfb2d-0ac8-5a8a-8bb3-dcc1bc6cd945 article

The envelope, which had “Merry Christmas!” written on it, contained 10 $100 bills, which the customer said could be used toward whatever Klein needed. (Photo: KABC)

“He came back with an envelope and $1,000 cash was inside for me,” she said.

The envelope, which had “Merry Christmas!” written on it, contained 10 $100 bills, which the customer said could be used toward whatever Klein needed.

“Poway is like a family,” said the restaurant’s general manager, Brian Harvey. “And they come together in times of need, and it’s definitely one of those times.”

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When asked what she planned on spending the money on, Klein said she would use it to make the holiday more special for her family.

“You know, just spend it on my son’s birthday is this month, and the holidays,” she said. “So now there is so much more we can do. So I’m just really proud to be in Poway.”

Westlake Legal Group Sarah-Klein-Surprise California waitress gets $1,000 tip after restaurant was closed for a week Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/lifestyle/parenting/family fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc eb4bfb2d-0ac8-5a8a-8bb3-dcc1bc6cd945 article   Westlake Legal Group Sarah-Klein-Surprise California waitress gets $1,000 tip after restaurant was closed for a week Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/lifestyle/parenting/family fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc eb4bfb2d-0ac8-5a8a-8bb3-dcc1bc6cd945 article

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Nashville cops arrest third teen after several juveniles break out of detention center, one still on the loose

Westlake Legal Group marsh Nashville cops arrest third teen after several juveniles break out of detention center, one still on the loose Paulina Dedaj fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc e9ba8464-99be-5585-8232-92de90cf6150 article

Police in Nashville have captured a teen accused of murder after he and four others escaped a juvenile detention center last month.

Morris Marsh, 17, was arrested Friday following a vehicle pursuit led by the Juvenile Crime Task Force that ended in the 300 block of Harding Place, Metro Nashville Police said. He is accused of murder in the April 8 death of a 19-year-old man.

NASHVILLE COPS HUNT TEEN MURDER SUSPECTS, TWO OTHERS ON THE RUN AFTER JAILBREAK

Marsh’s arrest marks the third of four teens who were wanted after escaping from the Juvenile Detention Center in downtown Nashville on Nov. 30.

On Tuesday, Juvenile Crime Task Force and Gang Unit detectives apprehended 16-year-old Decorrius Wright and 15-year-old Calvin Howse outside a condo complex in Madison, just northeast of Nashville.

Police are still on the hunt for Brandon Caruthers, 17, who is on trial for an armed robbery case from August 2018.

The four teens were said to be on a work detail when their supervisor left them to address a fight at another location inside the facility, the Metro Nashville Police Department said in a press release.

The suspects, who were described as “dangerous,” were said to have been gone for at least 35 minutes before being reported to the police. They got into an elevator that was left open and “used staff protocols to ride to the ground floor where they went through a series of doors and exited to the outside,” police said. Three employees were reportedly fired from the detention center for breaking protocol that led to the escape.

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Several of the escapees’ family members have been charged following their capture.

Howse’s sister, Jasmine, surrendered herself to police Friday on “outstanding warrants charging her with being an accessory after the fact of her brother’s escape and facilitation of escape,” Metro Nashville Police Department said in a press release.

Three other people, including his mother and cousin, were arrested on similar charges. Marsh’s mother and brother were also charged with being accessories.

Fox News’ Nicole Darrah contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group marsh Nashville cops arrest third teen after several juveniles break out of detention center, one still on the loose Paulina Dedaj fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc e9ba8464-99be-5585-8232-92de90cf6150 article   Westlake Legal Group marsh Nashville cops arrest third teen after several juveniles break out of detention center, one still on the loose Paulina Dedaj fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc e9ba8464-99be-5585-8232-92de90cf6150 article

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Andy Puzder: Big jobs numbers — What will it take for liberals to admit an economic boom?

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113796427001_6113803509001-vs Andy Puzder: Big jobs numbers — What will it take for liberals to admit an economic boom? fox-news/us/economy/jobs fox-news/us/economy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Andy Puzder 7b3ed7a6-d0aa-545a-bb1d-504ee4f7753d

Under President Trump, we’ve seen the labor markets reach incredible heights. The good news for American workers is that the growth in jobs and wages isn’t coming to an end any time soon.

Although I have to admit that I never tire of the “beat expectations” admissions that seem to come out after every new economic report, you have to wonder what it will take for liberals to finally acknowledge an economic boom that’s improving the lives of all Americans.

The November jobs report should be more than enough to dispel the pessimism that anti-Trump “experts” constantly sow through the media. The American economy added 266,000 new jobs in November, sending the unemployment rate to a 50-year low of 3.5 percent.

US JOB GROWTH ROARS BACK IN NOVEMBER, WITH 266,000 ADDED

The results blew past expectations. Economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal predicted the economy would add 188,000 jobs last month, leaving the unemployment rate at 3.6 percent. MarketWatch came up with a slightly lower figure, forecasting just 180,000 new jobs.

Those discrepancies were pretty big, but they weren’t nearly as misleading as the ADP report, a closely-watched indicator of private-sector employment that comes out just days before the official jobs report.

Rarely an accurate barometer of job growth, ADP indicated that employment only increased by 67,000 jobs in November, falling short by a whopping 199,000 jobs — which is an especially big deal for a whole lot of families right before the holidays.

The Department of Labor also upwardly revised the September and October payroll numbers adding 41,000 more jobs and bringing the three-month average up to a robust 203,000 new jobs per month.

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Wages are also continuing to grow at a healthy pace, because the jobs boom of the past three years has kept consistent upward pressure on worker compensation as employers compete for employees. That’s one thing the economic forecasters got right. Year over year wage growth was 3.1 percent in November, and October was revised upwards to 3.2 percent. Notably, the gains are greatest among rank-and-file workers (3.7 percent).

All of the partisan talking points have been proven wrong, as the ongoing predictions of an impending recession are becoming more and more preposterous. The economy is strong, American citizens are prospering, and there are no signs of a slowdown. On the contrary, President Trump’s economic policies have put the economy on a solid new foundation that emphasizes creating a genuine opportunity for employment and advancement to all Americans.

It’s important to take the naysayers in context. Most critics of the Trump economy just aren’t capable of looking at our economic performance objectively, because their interpretation of the data is clouded by their hatred of President Trump. They know that the strong and growing working-class economy is one of the president’s greatest assets for his reelection campaign, and they’re committing the classic pundit’s faux pas of mistaking their political fantasies for reality.

What these diehard opponents can’t or won’t admit is that President Trump has unleashed the productive power of the American worker by slashing excessive regulations, cutting taxes for middle-income taxpayers, and putting the interests of American citizens at the center of our trade policy.

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Perhaps the most impressive thing about the outstanding November jobs report is that the economy would be even stronger if not for Democratic obstruction in Congress.

As I recently noted, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif, is blocking a vote on the United States-Mexico-Canada (USMCA) trade agreement in order to prevent President Trump from adding another accomplishment to his record. Many members of her own party would eagerly vote for the deal, which would create nearly 200,000 new jobs — many of them in the manufacturing and agriculture sectors — and add tens of billions of dollars to our gross domestic product.

America’s economic engine is purring, yet the Democrats keep insisting that we need to take it to their shady mechanics who invariably lie about the incredible costs of their proposed “repairs.” With the latest jobs report to comfort us, ordinary Americans can just sit back and enjoy the ride, because it won’t be over for quite some time.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113796427001_6113803509001-vs Andy Puzder: Big jobs numbers — What will it take for liberals to admit an economic boom? fox-news/us/economy/jobs fox-news/us/economy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Andy Puzder 7b3ed7a6-d0aa-545a-bb1d-504ee4f7753d   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6113796427001_6113803509001-vs Andy Puzder: Big jobs numbers — What will it take for liberals to admit an economic boom? fox-news/us/economy/jobs fox-news/us/economy fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Andy Puzder 7b3ed7a6-d0aa-545a-bb1d-504ee4f7753d

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