web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News and News Media (Page 32)

David Avella: Tom Steyer is Biden’s biggest threat

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6057347981001_6057347777001-vs David Avella: Tom Steyer is Biden’s biggest threat fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc e5cbaf93-1c9e-5a98-bec8-8b7561a1823b David Avella article

President Trump’s impeachment organizer Tom Steyer has joined the race to become the Democratic presidential nominee with a pledge to spend $100 million of his own billion-dollar fortune. While it will not put him any closer to defeating Donald Trump, it does likely close the door on former Vice President Joe Biden winning the nomination.

Steyer’s notoriety comes from donating the billions he has made investing in fossil fuels, private prisons and subprime lending companies into progressive activism for impeaching President Trump and reckless environmental policies.

TOM STEYER HITS BACK AT ‘INSIDER’ DEMOCRATIC RIVALS AFTER SANDERS, WARREN SWIPES

He will be pushing the same radical, job-killing climate change ideas that those defining the progressive agenda such as New York Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senators Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren have been screaming for. The difference is Steyer’s pledge to spend $100 million means he will be a loud voice that voters will hear and see.

Steyer’s spending doesn’t guarantee voters will get behind his candidacy, but it does mean Biden will have to fend off attacks on his pragmatism or risk losing ground to Harris, Warren or Sanders.

He also ensures the eventual Democratic nominee will have to put economic socialism and environmental recklessness at the forefront of his or her message.

To date, Biden’s weakening support has been as much a matter of his own missteps as specific attacks by other candidates. His opponents have already increased attention to his record on race, his age, and not being connected to today’s Democratic Party – not to mention his propensity for being overly touchy.

Still, the negative quotient has been diffuse, making it hard to distinguish noise from actual sound. All that changes when Steyer puts his money on the table. The sheer amount he spends on a given message will force the discussion in that direction.

This will happen very quickly.  Steyer is already on television with advertising totaling $1.5 million in the first four contests — Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada. The impact of Steyer’s candidacy is one more nail in the coffin that will become the Biden for President campaign.

Also, while Biden is seemingly content to mechanically run his campaign as he has in his previous two bids for the presidency, Steyer will be relying on modern technology to get the job done. Two early states, Iowa and Nevada, are allowing votes to be cast for their caucuses using a mobile phone. It will hardly be a shocker when Steyer’s forces go to university campuses to engage and activate students on the spot to vote for their man.

These activists are determined to have their voices heard. And the Steyer candidacy will have the infrastructure to make it happen. The more progressive and single-issue environmental voters participate in early contests, the larger a turnout there will be for Steyer, Harris, Sanders and Warren.

The more Steyer talks about carbon-free sources of energy, the more Biden will be forced to admit to Pennsylvania coal miners that he is ready to sell them out.

The more ground Biden cedes to progressive, single-issue environmental causes, the harder it will be for him to, with any credibility, claim to be a champion for blue collar manufacturing workers.

Biden has now endorsed the Green New Deal but that does not mean he will receive a pass from the greener factions of the Democrat Party.

The self-funding Steyer also widens a vulnerability for Biden that is already being exploited by Warren – and that is his coziness with lobbyists and wealthy donors.

Just like Donald Trump in 2016, Steyer will be able to make the case that he doesn’t need special interest money because he is spending his own – and then point to Biden as part of the swamp.

The knock on Steyer is whether he’s the answer to the biggest question being asked by Democrats: “Who can beat President Trump?”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The GOP is ready to spend in the billions to win President Trump a second term.  Not even Steyer has the money it would need to overtake a well-funded incumbent party.

If Steyer actually comes through on his pledge to spend $100 million to push impeachment and progressive causes that Biden won’t support, then he is in the perfect position to spoil the race for Biden – and tip the race to Harris, Sanders or Warren.

Did someone say Steyer for Vice President?

CLICK HERE FOR MORE FROM DAVID AVELLA

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6057347981001_6057347777001-vs David Avella: Tom Steyer is Biden’s biggest threat fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc e5cbaf93-1c9e-5a98-bec8-8b7561a1823b David Avella article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6057347981001_6057347777001-vs David Avella: Tom Steyer is Biden’s biggest threat fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tom-steyer fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc e5cbaf93-1c9e-5a98-bec8-8b7561a1823b David Avella article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Today on Fox News, July 15, 2019

STAY TUNED

On Fox News: 

Fox & Friends, 6 a.m. ET: Guests include: U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.; U.S. Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo.; Scott Walker, former Wisconsin governor.

Fox News @ Night, 11 p.m. ET: Art Acevedo, chief of the Houston Police Department.

On Fox Business:

Mornings with Maria, 6 a.m, ET: Guests include: Ken Cuccinelli, acting director of Citizenship and Immigration Services.

Varney & Co., 9 a.m. ET: Larry Kudlow, director of the National Economic Council.

Lou Dobbs Tonight, 7 p.m. ET: Morgan Wright, cybersecurity expert.

On Fox News Radio:

The Fox News Rundown podcast:Should President Trump Be Troubled By Latest Polls?” – President Trump still lags behind Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, and Elizabeth Warren in head-to-head polls that were released over the weekend.  Brad Blakeman, former deputy assistant to President George W. Bush and Richard Fowler, Fox News contributor and senior fellow at New Leaders Council discuss where the 2020 candidates should be focusing their attention. Tuesday is the 20th anniversary of the death of John F Kennedy Jr.  Steve Gillon, his friend and a historian, joins the podcast to reflect on JFK Jr’s life and discuss his new book, “America’s Reluctant Prince: The Life of John F Kennedy Jr.” Plus, commentary by Judge Andrew Napolitano, Fox News senior judicial analyst.

Want the Fox News Rundown sent straight to your mobile device? Subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher.

The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.; Michael Goodwin, New York Post columnist; Karl Rove, Fox News contributor and former White House deputy chief of staff under President George W. Bush; Bret Baier, anchor of “Special Report.”

Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News, July 15, 2019 fox-news/entertainment/media fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 23726622-ddbe-59dc-8817-d2074d09fd5c   Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News, July 15, 2019 fox-news/entertainment/media fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 23726622-ddbe-59dc-8817-d2074d09fd5c

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Amazon Prime Day Brings Sales, and Risks, for Retailers

Westlake Legal Group merlin_155850153_d3743ee7-d15e-4cc5-b714-1ed724c2afe9-facebookJumbo Amazon Prime Day Brings Sales, and Risks, for Retailers Shopping and Retail E-Commerce Amazon.com Inc

Amazon had already revolutionized the way people read books, watch TV and shop online. And now it has succeeded in transforming the retail calendar.

Monday is the start of Amazon’s annual Prime Day sale, when subscribers to the company’s Prime service get major discounts on everything from flat-screen TVs to Ben & Jerry’s ice cream. Now in its fifth year, the sale has grown so large that the term Amazon Prime Day no longer quite captures it. This year’s Prime sale stretches across two days, and Amazon is not the only company involved. A record 250 retailers are offering their own sales to compete with Prime Day.

Analysts call this confluence of summertime promotions “Black Friday in July.” In 2018, retailers in the United States recorded $447 billion in July sales, $4 billion more than their total that December.

But the emergence of a second major shopping season — four months before Thanksgiving — may come at a cost for the hundreds of retailers scrambling to keep up with Amazon.

“There are all these retailers that are jumping on the bandwagon,” said John Nash, the chief marketing and strategy officer at RedPoint Global, a data management firm that works with retail companies. “Retailers need to turn their marketing dollars into profitable revenue growth, and it is yet to be proven that these events are profitable.”

Mr. Nash said stores should focus on creating long-term relationships with customers, rather than chasing temporary sales spikes.

“If retailers continue to prioritize episodic events over ongoing customer engagements throughout the year,” he said, “consumers will be conditioned to buy this way — only when there is a major sale.”

One risk that retailers should consider as they plan mid-July sales is cannibalization, said Guy Yehiav, the chief executive of Profitect, an analytics provider for the retail industry. Shoppers who buy heavily discounted items in July may be less inclined to return to the same stores later in the summer.

“By offering steep discounts on products now, retailers remove the incentive for their customers to visit during the traditional back-to-school season, when they can offer the same items at a planned margin,” Mr. Yehiav said. “This costs retailers both margins and foot traffic.”

Still, despite that risk, a number of retail chains — including J. C. Penney and Staples — have put back-to-school items like backpacks and notebooks at the center of their July sales campaigns. Kristin McGrath, a shopping expert at BlackFriday.com, said those deals would not necessarily cut into future sales, since many shoppers remain interested in back-to-school products throughout August.

“The pessimistic look is that Prime Day is really hurting brick-and-mortar retail,” Ms. McGrath said. “But in a lot of ways, it’s really inspiring them to innovate.”

Amazon was not the first company to offer a major July sale. As early as 2012, Best Buy and Walmart used “Black Friday in July” to advertise summer deals. These days, however, hundreds of chains offer July deals, and most of the sales are the same week as Prime Day. Target’s sale covers the same two days, and Walmart has promised bargain prices from Sunday to Wednesday.

“While you will see some retailers offer deals right after Prime Day, for the most part they’ve really got to come in and ride the Prime Day wave,” Ms. McGrath said. “Because interest is going to drop when Prime Day ends.”

But while the growth of Prime Day illustrates Amazon’s power in the marketplace, the July sale season also offers retailers a chance to demonstrate what sets them apart from the e-commerce giant.

“They do have this physical footprint that they really should leverage,” Mr. Nash of RedPoint Global said. “They can meet with consumers in person, let them physically touch products. That’s an advantage.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Peter Thiel says FBI, CIA should investigate if Chinese intelligence infiltrated Google: report

Billionaire tech investor Peter Thiel on Sunday called for the FBI and CIA to investigate whether Chinese intelligence had infiltrated Google, according to a report.

Thiel, who supported Trump in 2016 and Facebook board member, made the comments during a speech at the National Conservatism Conference in Washington. He said the FBI and CIA needed to ask Google three questions to determine if the tech giant had been compromised by Chinese intelligence, Axios reported.

Westlake Legal Group AP19192676211762 Peter Thiel says FBI, CIA should investigate if Chinese intelligence infiltrated Google: report fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox news fnc/tech fnc Bradford Betz article 14f8bbe9-734c-538e-bc90-a6a214c787fc

FILE: A Google Home Hub is displayed in New York.  (AP)

“Number one: How many foreign intelligence agencies have infiltrated your Manhattan Project for AI (artificial intelligence)?” Thiel reportedly asked. “Number two: Does Google’s senior management consider itself to have been thoroughly infiltrated by Chinese intelligence?”

Thiel then slammed Google for its decision to work with the Chinese military while refusing to renew a contract with the U.S. Department of Defense.

“Number three: Is it because they consider themselves to be so thoroughly infiltrated that they have engaged in the seemingly treasonous decision to work with the Chinese military and not with the US military,” Thiel said.

OK GOOGLE, ARE YOU LISTENING? TECH GIANT’S SMART SPEAKERS EAVESDROP ON PRIVATE CONVERSATIONS, INVESTIGATION FINDS

Google has faced criticism over its work on a censored search engine – “Project Dragonfly” – that would allow it to return to China after leaving in 2010 over human rights concerns. The company dropped the project after members of the company’s privacy team raised complaints.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Other reports said that Google decided not to renew its contract for Project Maven – a controversial military program that uses artificial intelligence to improve drone targeting – which expired earlier this year.

Google did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Fox News’ Louis Casiano contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19192676211762 Peter Thiel says FBI, CIA should investigate if Chinese intelligence infiltrated Google: report fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox news fnc/tech fnc Bradford Betz article 14f8bbe9-734c-538e-bc90-a6a214c787fc   Westlake Legal Group AP19192676211762 Peter Thiel says FBI, CIA should investigate if Chinese intelligence infiltrated Google: report fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox news fnc/tech fnc Bradford Betz article 14f8bbe9-734c-538e-bc90-a6a214c787fc

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Peter Thiel says FBI, CIA should investigate if Chinese intelligence infiltrated Google: report

Billionaire tech investor Peter Thiel on Sunday called for the FBI and CIA to investigate whether Chinese intelligence had infiltrated Google, according to a report.

Thiel, who supported Trump in 2016 and Facebook board member, made the comments during a speech at the National Conservatism Conference in Washington. He said the FBI and CIA needed to ask Google three questions to determine if the tech giant had been compromised by Chinese intelligence, Axios reported.

Westlake Legal Group AP19192676211762 Peter Thiel says FBI, CIA should investigate if Chinese intelligence infiltrated Google: report fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox news fnc/tech fnc Bradford Betz article 14f8bbe9-734c-538e-bc90-a6a214c787fc

FILE: A Google Home Hub is displayed in New York.  (AP)

“Number one: How many foreign intelligence agencies have infiltrated your Manhattan Project for AI (artificial intelligence)?” Thiel reportedly asked. “Number two: Does Google’s senior management consider itself to have been thoroughly infiltrated by Chinese intelligence?”

Thiel then slammed Google for its decision to work with the Chinese military while refusing to renew a contract with the U.S. Department of Defense.

“Number three: Is it because they consider themselves to be so thoroughly infiltrated that they have engaged in the seemingly treasonous decision to work with the Chinese military and not with the US military,” Thiel said.

OK GOOGLE, ARE YOU LISTENING? TECH GIANT’S SMART SPEAKERS EAVESDROP ON PRIVATE CONVERSATIONS, INVESTIGATION FINDS

Google has faced criticism over its work on a censored search engine – “Project Dragonfly” – that would allow it to return to China after leaving in 2010 over human rights concerns. The company dropped the project after members of the company’s privacy team raised complaints.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Other reports said that Google decided not to renew its contract for Project Maven – a controversial military program that uses artificial intelligence to improve drone targeting – which expired earlier this year.

Google did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Fox News’ Louis Casiano contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19192676211762 Peter Thiel says FBI, CIA should investigate if Chinese intelligence infiltrated Google: report fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox news fnc/tech fnc Bradford Betz article 14f8bbe9-734c-538e-bc90-a6a214c787fc   Westlake Legal Group AP19192676211762 Peter Thiel says FBI, CIA should investigate if Chinese intelligence infiltrated Google: report fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox news fnc/tech fnc Bradford Betz article 14f8bbe9-734c-538e-bc90-a6a214c787fc

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

How Joe Biden Became the Democrats’ Anti-Busing Crusader

NEWPORT, Del. — In July 1974, with a federal court in Delaware on the verge of ordering busing to integrate Wilmington’s overwhelmingly black public schools, Joseph R. Biden Jr. arrived at a school auditorium in this predominantly white suburb to find himself the target of a political ambush.

Just two years after narrowly winning a Senate seat at the age of 29, Mr. Biden had recently cast two votes to protect the practice of busing to achieve desegregation — despite his own very public unease with it. He thought he had come to Newport simply to address a local civics organization. But when he got there, more than 200 people, organized by a largely white parent group that opposed busing, jeered and heckled Mr. Biden, demanding that he more vocally join their cause.

“If you think I’m in trouble with you people,” he said then, seeking to assure the crowd that he was on their side, “you ought to hear what my liberal friends are telling me.”

The meeting marked a turning point for the young senator, who counted himself a liberal Democrat and an ardent defender of civil rights. Not long after that verbal drubbing, Mr. Biden plunged headfirst into one of the most politically fraught and racially divisive topics in America. He emerged as the Democratic Party’s leading anti-busing crusader — a position that put him in league with Southern segregationists, at odds with liberal Republicans and helped change the dynamic of the Senate, turning even some leaders in his own party against busing as a desegregation tool.

“No issue has consumed more of my time and energies,” Mr. Biden declared with a flourish as he opened a Senate hearing in 1981, adding, “We want to stop court-ordered busing.”

Now, more than four decades later, that vocal advocacy clouds the early stages of Mr. Biden’s 2020 presidential run. In the two weeks since Senator Kamala Harris of California, a rival for the nomination, invoked her own story of being bused to school to forcefully challenge Mr. Biden during the first Democratic presidential debates — and on the heels of criticism of his work with segregationists on crime legislation — Mr. Biden’s standing has dropped among the Democratic electorate, and his status as the race’s early front-runner is freshly threatened as his polling lead among black voters softens.

[Here’s a timeline of Mr. Biden’s history with busing.]

Mr. Biden declined to be interviewed for this article. On Friday, however, his campaign told Politico that Mr. Biden now backs an effort by Democrats in Congress to repeal 1970s-era restrictions on voluntary busing. That is the type of desegregation method Ms. Harris experienced as a child, and Mr. Biden’s position is not a shift: He has never opposed voluntary busing.

During the course of his 36-year Senate career, school desegregation, more than any other issue with the possible exception of crime, crystallized the political and civil rights crosscurrents swirling around Mr. Biden. He arrived in Washington in 1973, having come of age amid the racial ferment of the late 1960s, with deep ties to Wilmington’s black community — relationships rooted in his advocacy for housing integration and other forms of urban aid in a state still grappling with the legacy of Jim Crow.

Mr. Biden has said that his record on school desegregation has been misrepresented, and he maintains that he supported busing as a remedy for the intentionally discriminatory policies that kept white and black students in separate schools in the South — a position his campaign spokesman, Andrew Bates, reaffirmed on Sunday in a statement to The Times. But a review of hundreds of pages of congressional records, as well as interviews with education experts and Biden contemporaries in Wilmington and Washington, suggests that his opposition to busing was far more sweeping than he has led voters to believe.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157119810_2a89cdbd-571d-48f8-8dc6-1d96303fd985-articleLarge How Joe Biden Became the Democrats’ Anti-Busing Crusader Wilmington (Del) Segregation and Desegregation Presidential Election of 2020 Education (K-12) Blacks Biden, Joseph R Jr

Mr. Biden, center left, and Senator Kamala Harris of California, center right, clashed over his history with busing during the first Democratic presidential debates last month.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

“I don’t know whether he’s just reconstructed this history in his own mind, but he’s factually untruthful, that’s for sure,” said Gary Orfield, a California professor who has written extensively about school desegregation, including in Wilmington, and who testified before Mr. Biden in 1981. He said that for politicians like Mr. Biden, the busing question was “a real test of conscience and courage. I think he failed.”

Mr. Biden also, more than any other Northern Democrat, adopted the language of conservatives on the issue, using terms like “forced busing” when his fellow liberals would emphasize desegregation, not transportation. Civil rights advocates note that students had, of course, been riding buses to school for decades; opponents of court-ordered busing never raised a ruckus when black children were forced to ride buses miles away from their homes to attend “colored-only” schools.

“I oppose busing,” Mr. Biden said in a lengthy television interview entered into the Congressional Record in 1975. “It’s an asinine concept, the utility of which has never been proven to me.”

From 1975 until 1982, Mr. Biden — often in partnership with his fellow Delawarean, Senator William Roth, a Republican — promoted nearly a dozen pieces of legislation aimed at placing strict limits on the authority of federal agencies and the courts to mandate busing to achieve racial integration in schools. At a time when busing controversies were provoking racial unrest in cities like Boston, Mr. Biden argued that housing integration — which would take much longer to implement than a busing plan — was a far better way to desegregate public schools.

“The new integration plans being offered are really just quota-systems to assure a certain number of blacks, Chicanos, or whatever in each school,” Mr. Biden told the television interviewer.

“That, to me, is the most racist concept you can come up with,” he added. “What it says is, in order for your child with curly black hair, brown eyes, and dark skin to be able to learn anything, he needs to sit next to my blond-haired, blue-eyed son. That’s racist! Who the hell do we think we are, that the only way a black man or woman can learn is if they rub shoulders with my white child?”

The Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education upended the American educational landscape, reversing decades of the “separate but equal” doctrine with its finding that racially segregated schools were unconstitutional. Mr. Biden was 11 years old and had just moved with his family to Delaware from Scranton, Pa., when the unanimous ruling came down in May 1954.

The case had an immediate impact throughout the country. But it was particularly resonant in Delaware, a state that, while not in the Confederate South, had laws on its books that required its public school pupils to attend segregated schools. A desegregation suit filed in Delaware had been one of five cases the Supreme Court merged in hearing Brown.

The young Mr. Biden was well aware of the effect segregation was having in Wilmington’s black communities. Though he attended Archmere Academy, a private Catholic school in nearby Claymont, his family lived in racially diverse Wilmington, which helped him foster relationships with black residents that were unusually intimate for the time.

“I remember the stories they’d tell about how they were treated by whites day in and day out,” Mr. Biden said in his 2007 autobiography, “Promises to Keep.” “Every day, it seemed to me that black people got subtle and not-so-subtle reminders they didn’t quite belong in America. It was a dozen small cuts a day.”

After the Brown decision, Louis Redding, a black lawyer who had handled the Delaware suit, set out to test the state’s commitment to desegregation. He recruited a group of 11 black students to try to enroll in an all-white high school in Milford, a city south of Wilmington, one of the more conservative areas of the state.

Louis Redding, left, and Thurgood Marshall, center, at the Supreme Court in 1953 for the Brown v. Board of Education case.CreditGeorge Tames/The New York Times

Orlando Camp was one of the so-called “Milford 11.” Mr. Camp, who until then had been bused to an all-black school even farther from his home, said he still remembered the racist vitriol from the all-white crowds in Milford.

“The first day was fine,” Mr. Camp said. “The second day was a little more emotional, because parents were being notified that there were colored kids there for the first time. Then there were phone calls. That’s when all hell broke loose.”

The group lasted 28 days before being forced out.

The episode made clear to Mr. Redding and his allies that, even with the Supreme Court decision on their side, the battle for school integration in Delaware had only begun. The Supreme Court had charged school districts to desegregate with “all deliberate speed,” but the vague terminology allowed districts around the country to slow-walk change.

Still, Delaware appeared to be taking steps forward. In 1967, a segregated high school created for black students in southern Delaware shut its doors.

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968, and Wilmington’s racial complexion, and racial politics, began to shift. Riots erupted; stores were looted, windows smashed with bricks. The state’s Republican governor sent the National Guard to the city for nine months in the aftermath, imposing curfews on the city’s residents.

Wilmington’s demographics had already begun to change in the late 1950s and 1960s, but the riots and their aftermath accelerated the exodus of white families to the suburbs. In the years after the chaotic summer of 1968, Wilmington became a majority-black city, a rarity in a state that is two-thirds white.

“The riots chased people out of the city,” said James M. Baker, an African-American civil rights activist who would go on to become mayor of Wilmington. “You just had one bad event after the other.”

If school districts around the country were slow to desegregate after the 1954 Brown ruling, the landmark 1971 Supreme Court case of Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education hurried things up. The court held that the use of busing as a “remedial technique” was allowable to achieve integration.

However, the justices drew a distinction between Southern-style “de jure” segregation, which resulted from discriminatory policies intended to separate blacks and whites, and “de facto” segregation in the North, which was rooted in neighborhood housing patterns. The ruling only applied, they said, to states that had a history of “de jure” intentional segregation. Delaware was among them.

Not long after the Swann decision, Mr. Redding, the American Civil Liberties Union, and a slew of black and white plaintiffs seized on the new moment in Delaware to reopen a previous desegregation case and argue for a more radical proposal: racial integration through dispersing students throughout the metropolitan district, meaning the city and suburbs.

The case would wind its way through the courts for the next seven years. From the outset, the strategy would divide Wilmington’s black leaders.

Supporters of the lawsuit in Wilmington argued that the schools would never be equal unless they achieved full racial integration, and that busing was the only means to achieve it. Detractors said that, while integration was important, it could be achieved through other, more palatable means, such as public housing in suburbs.

What’s more, black communities had won political power on the Wilmington School Board, and its teachers were well paid. Some community leaders worried about the prospect of reigniting the ugliness they had seen in communities like Milford.

By this time, Mr. Biden had been elected to the New Castle County Council, with expanding public housing in the suburbs a central platform of his campaign. If that advocacy was met with pushback from white residents, Delaware’s black leaders embraced the young politician.

“Joe has always been right in the community with us. I mean, in the black community,” said Maurice Pritchett, a black Wilmington education leader who remembered when a 19-year-old Mr. Biden was the only white lifeguard at a public pool in an African-American neighborhood. “He was always right there. And we accepted him.”

Richard “Mouse” Smith, the longtime president of the Wilmington N.A.A.C.P., has known Mr. Biden since the 1960s, when both were young men interested in politics.

“Joe didn’t choose” the black community, Mr. Smith said. “We chose him.”

The anti-busing fervor sweeping American cities erupted into violence in the fall of 1974, when buses carried black children into white neighborhoods in Boston for the first time. Crowds jeered, throwing bricks and rocks at the buses as terrified students huddled inside. Black children were greeted at school with racial epithets.

A school bus carried black students to a white neighborhood in Boston in 1974. The children were greeted at school with racial epithets.CreditAssociated Press

In Washington, busing debates were roiling the Capitol, where Senator Edward Gurney, a conservative Republican from Florida and staunch supporter of President Richard M. Nixon, had made an unsuccessful push to attach an amendment to an education spending bill that would have effectively done away with court-ordered busing.

Two days before the 20th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education, the debate over the so-called “Gurney amendment” came to the Senate floor. Senator Edward Brooke, a liberal Republican from Massachusetts and the first black senator since Reconstruction, who would go on to become Mr. Biden’s foe in a string of busing debates, warned that the measure would take local school systems “back to the age of Jim Crow.”

It was defeated, 47-46. Mr. Biden — who viewed the amendment as overly broad and unconstitutional — sided with Mr. Brooke, casting the deciding vote. Today, he cites the Gurney vote in defending his record on school desegregation, insisting that he backs busing to eliminate intentional “de jure” segregation, but not “de facto” segregation.

“I’ve always been in favor of using federal authority to overcome state-initiated segregation,” Mr. Biden said recently.

But Professor Orfield, who has done extensive research on the Wilmington school district in his role as co-director of the Civil Rights Project at the University of California, Los Angeles, says the de jure-de facto distinction is a canard, because courts did not have authority to order busing unless they found proof of intentional segregation.

Mr. Biden’s Gurney vote did not go over well with the angry crowd that had gathered in the school auditorium to confront him on that July night in 1974, and by the end of that year it seemed the senator’s anti-busing views were hardening.

In a December 1974 speech on the Senate floor, Mr. Biden said he had become “more and more disenchanted with busing as a remedy,” whether or not segregation was intentional. The following year, in the television interview, he said he had “gotten to the point where I think our only recourse to eliminate busing may be a constitutional amendment.”

Senator Strom Thurmond, the segregationist from South Carolina, was circulating such a proposal. But Mr. Biden opposed Mr. Thurmond’s plan. And, convinced he could achieve his goals legislatively, he never proposed a constitutional amendment of his own.

Back in Delaware, Mr. Redding’s desegregation case was inching its way through the United States District Court. In March 1975, a three-judge panel ruled in a split 2-1 decision that Wilmington’s largely black school district would have to merge with 10 suburban districts with much higher white populations. Eventually, those 11 districts would be sliced up like a pie to accommodate a desegregation plan that employed busing.

Mr. Biden agreed with the dissenting judge and thought the court ruling went overboard. Then he did something that stunned his colleagues: He joined up with Jesse Helms, the segregationist senator from North Carolina, to offer his own anti-busing amendment to that year’s education spending bill.

Under the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, the federal Department of Health, Education and Welfare had a powerful tool to fight school segregation: It could withhold funding from districts that refused to integrate — and integration effectively meant busing. Mr. Helms wanted to strip the agency of that power.

As Mr. Biden rose on the Senate floor in September 1975 to embrace that approach, Mr. Helms wryly welcomed him “to the ranks of the enlightened.” Mr. Biden objected to the education department mandating desegregation absent a court order, and warned of white flight to the suburbs and even racial unrest.

Senator Jesse Helms of North Carolina, a segregationist, teamed up with Mr. Biden on an anti-busing amendmentCreditWally McNamee/Corbis, via Getty Images

“You have to open up avenues for blacks without closing avenues for whites,” Mr. Biden said in the 1975 television interview, adding, “You put more money into the black schools for remedial reading programs, you upgrade facilities, you upgrade opportunities, you open up housing patterns.”

Unless such steps were taken, he said, “we are going to end up with the races at war.”

“This is the real problem with busing,” Mr. Biden went on. “You take people who aren’t racist, people who are good citizens, who believe in equal education and opportunity, and you stunt their children’s intellectual growth by busing them to an inferior school, and you’re going to fill them with hatred.

“And what about the black student from Wilmington’s east side? You send him to Alexis I. DuPont, bus him through Centerville every day, then send him back to the ghetto. How can he be encouraged to love his white brothers?”

Mr. Helms’s amendment, which would have also barred the education department from collecting data about the race of students or teachers, failed. But a slightly narrower measure written by Mr. Biden, which prevented schools from using federal dollars to assign teachers or students by race, passed, 50-43.

The vote was a turning point in the Senate; Mr. Biden’s advocacy made it safe for other Democrats to oppose busing. Thus did Democrats like Senator Mike Mansfield, the majority leader, join the old bull segregationists — Mr. Helms, Mr. Thurmond, Senator James Eastland of Mississippi — in backing the Biden amendment.

Mr. Brooke — whose pro-busing stance generated intense backlash in his home state of Massachusetts — was furious. He called it “the greatest setback to civil rights since 1964.”

In 1976, Mr. Biden turned his attention to the next front: the courts.

In the Senate, he introduced legislation to bar the Justice Department from pursuing desegregation cases that might result in court-ordered busing, alarming lawyers in its Civil Rights Division.

“He was no friend of the work we were doing, I’ll put it that way,” said one of those lawyers, Ted Shaw, who handled school desegregation cases at the department and is now a professor of law at the University of North Carolina.

Ted Shaw, a former lawyer in the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department, said Mr. Biden was “no friend of the work we were doing.”CreditÁngel Franco/The New York Times

Mr. Biden prodded Solicitor General Robert H. Bork — whose nomination to the Supreme Court he would later doom when he was chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee — to file a brief with the Supreme Court, asking it to use the Wilmington case as a test case to determine whether federal judges were issuing too many busing orders.

With his 1978 re-election campaign looming, and polls showing busing was deeply unpopular, Mr. Biden waged an all-out assault, backing a series of bills aimed at limiting the power of federal judges to issue busing orders. One measure would have stripped federal courts of their jurisdiction over desegregation entirely — an approach that would have pushed school desegregation cases into the hands of state judges, who were highly unlikely to issue busing orders.

Mr. Shaw, who later served as president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund Inc., called it a “court-stripping bill.” He said that, while he would not rule out voting for Mr. Biden in the presidential race, “I also don’t think he gets a pass.”

None of those measures became law, and though Mr. Biden continued to press his anti-busing agenda into the early 1980s, the Wilmington district eventually integrated after a final federal court ruling in 1978, and the furor subsided.

Three years later, at a Senate hearing on busing, William Taylor, a civil rights lawyer who had been advising the Wilmington School Board on integration, spoke to Mr. Biden’s trepidations about busing, though the senator was not there to hear him.

“I am sorry Senator Biden is not here, but I would say specifically as someone who has been involved in Wilmington that despite all the dire predictions that were made before that plan was implemented, it has gone very well,” Mr. Taylor said. “It has gone peacefully. There have been achievement gains in the school.”

“I would say Wilmington is one of the success stories,” Mr. Taylor continued. “I would love to discuss with Senator Biden the evidence on which he believes desegregation has not been a success in Wilmington, if that is, indeed, what he believes.”

Busing in Wilmington ended in 1995 when, after 17 years of federally mandated integration measures, the state education board successfully argued to be released from oversight. The State Legislature has since passed a law stating every child should attend the school closest to their home, which was seen as the death blow for the final vestiges of the state’s busing era.

Mr. Biden in 1987, after announcing his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination.CreditCynthia Johnson/The LIFE Images Collection, via Getty Images

Schools in Wilmington have become more racially segregated since that time; a study by Professor Orfield’s group at U.C.L.A. on school segregation in Delaware between 1989 and 2010 found that “significant and rising portions of the state’s black students enroll in segregated schools that are very isolated by both race and socioeconomic status.”

One Wilmington school is now named after Mr. Redding, the civil rights lawyer who handled the city’s desegregation cases. But some black leaders in Wilmington look back at busing as a failed experiment.

“Desegregation was a necessary thing,” said Mr. Baker, the former mayor. “But the way they did it? Horrible.

Mr. Smith, the longtime supporter of Mr. Biden, said the busing efforts for desegregation took away structures that protected black communities.

“We lost from busing,” he said. “We lost our control. We had the Wilmington school board. The black teachers lost.”

The Biden spokesman, Mr. Bates, said that if elected, Mr. Biden would reinstate Obama-era policies “designed to increase the diversity of our schools.” Mr. Biden has long maintained that the white flight he had warned about came to pass, noting the many white families who fled to Pennsylvania for that state’s public schools, or — like Mr. Biden himself — enrolled their children in private schools. In his 2007 memoir, he described court-ordered busing as “a liberal train wreck.”

Aides say he has not changed his mind.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

New Mexico construction worker saves baby, toddler from burning building

A New Mexico construction worker is being hailed a hero for saving a two-month-old girl and a young boy from a burning building Friday, according to a report.

Construction workers had been installing a roof on a building in northeast Albuquerque when a fire broke out at an adjacent apartment building, KOAT-TV reported.

Westlake Legal Group fire New Mexico construction worker saves baby, toddler from burning building fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/new-mexico fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox news fnc/us fnc c7e9f334-ce13-53a4-b6d4-2907abba6648 Bradford Betz article

A construction worker helped save a two-month-old girl and a young boy after a fire broke out on Friday, according to a report.  (Albuquerque Fire Rescue)

Mason Fierro, one of the workers, told the station he saw a man screaming for help from the second-story with his baby and toddler.

“We saw him hanging out of the window with his baby, his two-month-old baby,” Fierro said.

Construction workers brought their ladders over while Fierro told the man to drop the baby girl into his arms.

“He dropped her. I caught her. Then they bring another little boy, two or three-years-old, then we caught him as well,” Fierro added.

OHIO POLICE OFFICER RESCUE CHILD FROM BURNING HOME IN DRAMATIC VIDEO

Fierro credited the rest of the construction workers with helping to save the children’s parents.

“We had each other’s back, and it was just an all-in thing,” Fierro said.

Fierro and the crew made sure the children’s parents were okay before going door-to-door to alert people until firefighters arrived.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Albuquerque Fire Rescue said three people were sent to the hospital for minor smoke inhalation. No other injuries were reported. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Westlake Legal Group fire New Mexico construction worker saves baby, toddler from burning building fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/new-mexico fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox news fnc/us fnc c7e9f334-ce13-53a4-b6d4-2907abba6648 Bradford Betz article   Westlake Legal Group fire New Mexico construction worker saves baby, toddler from burning building fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/new-mexico fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox news fnc/us fnc c7e9f334-ce13-53a4-b6d4-2907abba6648 Bradford Betz article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

4 kids pack SUV with fishing rods, drive 600 miles before being picked off by police: report

CANBERRA, Australia– Four children aged 10 to 14 packed fishing rods in a parent’s SUV, left a farewell note then drove more than 600 miles down the Australian east coast before they were stopped by police the next day, an officer said on Monday.

When the children were stopped by police near Grafton in New South Wales state at 10:40 p.m. Sunday, they locked the doors and refused to get out, Acting Police Inspector Darren Williams said.

A police officer used a baton to break a window of the Nissan Patrol, that had been reported stolen, Williams said.

MAN REELS IN FISH WITH A MASSIVE SNAKE ATTACHED TO IT

Police were not sure which child or children drove or why they left Rockhampton in Queensland state on Saturday. The children are a 14-year-old boy, two 13-year-old boys and a 10-year-old girl.

Williams said they possibly shared the driving.

“It’s a long way, in excess of 600 miles from Rockhampton down to Grafton. I couldn’t imagine one person actually driving all that way in two days,” Williams told reporters.

The children are suspected of failing to pay for gasoline at gas stations in two towns, Williams said.

They were also chased by police in the New South Wales town of Glen Innes, where a 13-year-old was suspected to be driving, Williams said.

“There was a short pursuit up there with the Highway Patrol and due to the age of the driver and the road conditions, that was terminated by the Highway Patrol officers … and the general duties police that were involved,” he said.

The 14-year-old lived in Grafton, which might have been the children’s destination, Williams said.

Police have yet to interview the children because they cannot be questioned without a parent or guardian being present. Williams said they will be charged, but did not list the alleged offenses.

Williams did not know if the children were related or how they knew each other.

He did not know what the children had written in the note that was left in Rockhampton.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Schools are closed in New South Wales for the midyear vacation, while the school vacation ended in Queensland on Monday.

Drivers must be at least 17 years old in Queensland to apply for a license.

Westlake Legal Group ff 4 kids pack SUV with fishing rods, drive 600 miles before being picked off by police: report fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 289af1f3-61fb-5efc-a00d-561c79418cf3   Westlake Legal Group ff 4 kids pack SUV with fishing rods, drive 600 miles before being picked off by police: report fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 289af1f3-61fb-5efc-a00d-561c79418cf3

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Florida dad who raped 1-year-old daughter, posted videos on dark web, gets 70 years: report

A former paramedic from Florida was sentenced to 70 years in prison for recording a series of heinous videos of himself raping his 1-year-old daughter and posting them to the dark web.

James Lockhart, 31, made the sickening four-video series of the sexual abuse between March 2016 and February 2018 and uploaded the clips on dark web forums using the screen names “StrangeWood” and “HardWood,” according to court records.

Westlake Legal Group e6a58b9a-florida Florida dad who raped 1-year-old daughter, posted videos on dark web, gets 70 years: report Tamar Lapin New York Post fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc article 5e4bd5c8-402d-5990-a079-174dc709ed1d

James Lockhart has pleaded to charges of producing, distributing, and possessing child pornography. (DOJ)

Lockhart, who worked at Paramedics Logistics Florida from 2012 to October 2018, pled guilty to charges of producing, distributing and possessing child pornography in March. He was sentenced on Thursday, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Florida announced.

In addition to what he posted online, investigators found more videos and photos showing the baby being sexually abused in Lockhart’s possession, authorities said.

Lockhart’s wife and the mother of his two children, a boy and a girl, identified the baby in the video as their daughter. She also ID’ed the man’s hand in the video as her husband’s, according to Newsweek.

The sick Bradenton, Fla., man also bragged about sexually abusing another 1-year-old child, authorities said.

LOUISIANA MAN ARRESTED AFTER WIFE ALLEGEDLY CATCHES HIM RAPING 9-YEAR-OLD GIRL: REPORT

He was arrested Oct. 5, 2018 after Homeland Security agents searched his home and found the sick images on his computer, The Miami Herald reported.

On his devices, investigators also found a collection of child pornography that included 4,000 images and 43 videos.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“HSI’s national and international partnerships have helped ensure that this predator will never again harm a child.”

To continued reading on The New York Post, click here.

Westlake Legal Group e6a58b9a-florida Florida dad who raped 1-year-old daughter, posted videos on dark web, gets 70 years: report Tamar Lapin New York Post fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc article 5e4bd5c8-402d-5990-a079-174dc709ed1d   Westlake Legal Group e6a58b9a-florida Florida dad who raped 1-year-old daughter, posted videos on dark web, gets 70 years: report Tamar Lapin New York Post fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc article 5e4bd5c8-402d-5990-a079-174dc709ed1d

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

SEE IT: Russia launches major new telescope into space after delays

A Russian Proton-M rocket successfully delivered a cutting-edge space telescope into orbit Saturday after days of launch delays, Russia’s space agency said.

Roscosmos said the telescope, named Spektr-RG, was delivered into a parking orbit before a final burn Saturday that kicked the spacecraft out of Earth’s orbit and on to its final destination: the L2 Lagrange point.

Westlake Legal Group 2f322f9f-AP19194685925443 SEE IT: Russia launches major new telescope into space after delays MATTHEW BODNER fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/air-and-space fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 4e99f8c7-3d5c-58a3-95cf-fcf3d3936d00

A Russian Proton-M rocket takes off from the launch pad at Russia’s space facility in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. (Roscosmos Space Agency Press Service photo via AP)

Lagrange points are unique positions in the solar system where objects can maintain their position relative to the sun and the planets that orbit it. Located 0.93 million miles from Earth, L2 is particularly ideal for telescopes such as Spektr-RG.

If all goes well, the telescope will arrive at its designated position in three months, becoming the first Russian spacecraft to operate beyond Earth’s orbit since the Soviet era. The telescope aims to conduct a complete x-ray survey of the sky by 2025, the first space telescope to do so.

The Russian accomplishment comes as the U.S. space agency NASA celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969.

Russian space science missions have suffered greatly since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. Budget cuts have forced the Russian space program to shift toward more commercial efforts.

INDIA ABORTS MOON MISSION LAUNCH, CITING TECHNICAL GLITCH

A Russian Mars probe, called Mars 96, failed to leave Earth’s orbit in 1996. A later attempt to send a probe to Mars, called Fobos-Grunt, suffered a similar fate in 2011.

Work on Spektr-RG telescope began in the 1980s but was scrapped in the 1990s. Spektr-RG was revived in 2005 and redesigned to be smaller, simpler and cheaper.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In its modern form, the project is a close collaboration between Russian and German scientists, who both installed telescope equipment aboard the Russian spacecraft.

Westlake Legal Group AP19194685925443 SEE IT: Russia launches major new telescope into space after delays MATTHEW BODNER fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/air-and-space fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 4e99f8c7-3d5c-58a3-95cf-fcf3d3936d00   Westlake Legal Group AP19194685925443 SEE IT: Russia launches major new telescope into space after delays MATTHEW BODNER fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/science/air-and-space fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 4e99f8c7-3d5c-58a3-95cf-fcf3d3936d00

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com