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Westlake Legal Group > News and News Media (Page 4)

6 Takeaways From The 4th Democratic Presidential Primary Debate

The fourth Democratic debate was a long one, about three hours, and ended after 11 p.m. ET.

You might not have made it through the whole thing, but there were some potentially consequential moments.

Here are six takeaways:

1. The scrutiny came for Warren, and her vulnerabilities were exposed some

Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts was under fire Tuesday night from several opponents, and when that happens to a candidate, you know they’re a front-runner.

Last week Warren caught up to former Vice President Joe Biden in an average of the national polls, and on Tuesday night she found herself hemmed in, particularly by South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar.

Buttigieg attacked Warren for promoting Medicare for All, while not having a detailed plan or saying how she would pay for it.

“Look, this is why people here in the Midwest are so frustrated with Washington in general and Capitol Hill in particular,” Buttigieg told Warren. “Your signature, Senator, is to have a plan for everything except this.”

“I think as Democrats we are going to succeed when we dream big and fight hard, not when we dream small and quit before we get started,” Warren said.

But while a similar line from Warren at an earlier debate got thunderous applause, it didn’t land the same way this time, and Klobuchar was ready with a response, going after Warren for, in her view, dismissing others’ plans because they weren’t hers.

“You know, I think simply because you have different ideas doesn’t mean you’re [not] fighting for regular people,” Klobuchar said.

The criticisms strike at Warren’s core vulnerability – that she’s less electable than others in the race because, one, her policies are too liberal and, two, the former Harvard professor is dismissive and elitist.

2. The Biden versus Warren Rorschach Test

An exchange later in the debate certainly caught the attention of social media – but it was one that was in the eye (and ear) of the beholder.

Warren was touting her role at the inception of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau during the Obama administration when former Vice President Joe Biden objected.

“I agreed with the great job she did and I went on the floor and got you votes,” Biden contended, his voice starting to rise. “I got votes for that bill. I convinced people to vote for it so let’s get those things straight, too.”

Warren paused and responded, “I am deeply grateful to President Obama who fought so hard to make sure that agency was passed into law and I am deeply grateful to every single person who fought for it and who helped pass it into law.”

Westlake Legal Group petegettyimages-1176120014-2-1_custom-4ebf9708b4b6eaa77467c3294c2345c035584426-s1100-c15 6 Takeaways From The 4th Democratic Presidential Primary Debate

Democratic presidential hopeful Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., left, and entrepreneur Andrew Yang, center, listen as former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke speaks during the fourth Democratic primary debate. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  6 Takeaways From The 4th Democratic Presidential Primary Debate

Democratic presidential hopeful Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., left, and entrepreneur Andrew Yang, center, listen as former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke speaks during the fourth Democratic primary debate.

Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Not exactly thanking Biden. The reaction to this moment was swift and fierce. (Just see the replies in this tweet.) Some saw Biden as yelling, “mansplaining” and trying to take credit for something Warren did. Some saw Warren, though, as ungracious, petty and ungrateful.

It’s not clear what Biden’s role was exactly in whipping votes for the CFPB. Ryan Grim at The Intercept noted that he covered the agency’s creation and while a top Biden adviser was involved, Biden was not.

It should be noted that Biden and Warren have a history on economics and especially bankruptcy law. Biden, a former senator from Delaware, home of many of the nation’s credit-card companies, has been accused of protecting them, and Biden and Warren clashed when she testified on Capitol Hill about bankruptcy law in 2005.

3. Buttigieg may be back in the game

The small-town mayor, who has become a darling of the donor class, controlled multiple exchanges and had a very strong night. In addition to taking on Warren on health care, he also went after former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke on his proposal to take away privately-owned guns and Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard on her support of President Trump pulling U.S. troops out of Syria.

In exchange after exchange, Buttigieg appeared to be trying to rein in Democrats from getting too far afield with policies that don’t poll very well. For example, Medicare for All as an option to private health insurance, which Buttigieg supports, polls far better than Medicare for All as a replacement.

An NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll from July found that 70% of Americans thought Medicare for All as an option was a good idea, while just 41% approved completely replacing private insurance.

Only three candidates — Warren, Biden and Sanders — have been polling in double-digits nationally for most of this campaign. Those three encapsulate the progressive (Warren, Sanders) versus moderate/incremental wings (Biden) of the party.

But Buttigieg positioned himself a little differently, saying that there was a “false choice” being presented. He said he disagreed with Biden that Trump is an “aberration,” arguing the president is a symptom of what he sees as the challenge of a changing country.

Buttigieg also criticized Warren for what he called “infinite partisan combat.”

“Yes, we have to fight,” he said. “Absolutely we have to fight for the big changes at hand. But it’s going to take more than fighting. … Think about what the president can do to unify a new American majority for some of the boldest things that we’ve attempted in my lifetime.”

Can he sell his third way? He’s at least positioned himself for the pragmatic lane if Biden falters, and he could pull from Warren’s support given their overlap with college-educated white voters.

4. Questions about Hunter Biden were over and done with surprisingly quickly

The candidates — and, frankly, the moderators — didn’t seem to want to go very deep on Biden’s son, Hunter, and his business ties. It’s somewhat surprising there wasn’t more follow up given just how much this has been talked about in recent weeks since Democrats opened their impeachment inquiry into Trump after the president’s phone call with Ukraine’s president.

In that call, Trump asked Ukraine’s president to investigate the Bidens, after withholding military aid to the country.

Westlake Legal Group bernie-gettyimages-1176120141_custom-d2d804da320f79ecd06f8828cfcf93a69da82e77-s1100-c15 6 Takeaways From The 4th Democratic Presidential Primary Debate

Democratic presidential hopefuls California Sen. Kamala Harris and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders during the fourth Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  6 Takeaways From The 4th Democratic Presidential Primary Debate

Democratic presidential hopefuls California Sen. Kamala Harris and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders during the fourth Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season.

Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

“Look, my son did nothing wrong,” Biden said. “I did nothing wrong. I carried out the policy of the United States government in rooting out corruption in Ukraine. And that’s what we should be focusing on.”

Asked in a follow up if he’d made a mistake letting his son serve on a board of a Ukrainian gas company while he was handling Ukraine policy in the Obama administration, Biden said, “I never discussed a single thing with my son on anything having to do with Ukraine.”

And that was essentially the end of the conversation. None of the other candidates wanted to touch it.

5. The previously taboo issue of age was broached

It’s been a thing since the start of the Democratic primary campaign and, honestly, before — given the age of the Democratic Capitol Hill leadership and the relative youth of the Democratic activist base.

The top three Democratic candidates — Warren, Biden and Sanders — are all septuagenarians. Sanders is 78, Biden 76 and Warren 70. In the run up to the debate Sanders had a heart attack that took him off the campaign trail, and that became a reason for the moderators to ask about age.

Westlake Legal Group klob-gettyimages-1181318358_custom-623915ec292413d5a80fa2bac3b3dbbf4e38d100-s1100-c15 6 Takeaways From The 4th Democratic Presidential Primary Debate

Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar speaks as former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julián Castro looks on during the debate. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  6 Takeaways From The 4th Democratic Presidential Primary Debate

Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar speaks as former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julián Castro looks on during the debate.

Win McNamee/Getty Images

“I’m healthy. And feeling great,” said Sanders, who looked healthy and rested, and who, by the way, polls best of the candidates with young voters. Sanders then used the moment to plug an upcoming rally in Queens, N.Y. where he will officially receive the endorsement of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.).

Biden was asked about being 80 and handling the duties of president. “Look,” Biden said, “one of the reasons I am running is because of my age and my experience. With it comes wisdom.”

But it’s a real issue of who’s next for the Democratic Party. For no matter how many candidates are running, the bench is seen as pretty thin for national candidates of the next generation.

6. Health care was again dominant, while immigration, climate change and race didn’t even come up

Once again, Democrats showed the biggest fissure in the party is on health policy. It has dominated Democratic debates for a decade, and it continuously rates as the top issue for Democrats.

An earlier debate was criticized for not addressing women’s health and reproductive rights. But Tuesday night the candidates discussed it. And foreign policy received arguably the most serious treatment so far of the Democratic debates.

But other policy areas of interest to the party were left off the table. Namely immigration, climate change and race. It’s not like the candidates don’t discuss these topics (there was a multi-hour climate change candidate forum on CNN last month), but it was notable that those subjects were left out Tuesday night.

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Dan Gainor: Elizabeth Warren draws most attention from media and candidates in Democratic debate

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6094784589001_6094789741001-vs Dan Gainor: Elizabeth Warren draws most attention from media and candidates in Democratic debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc Dan Gainor b669685b-3bce-5cbc-bbeb-fe872dc8ec0b article

While there was no clear winner in the debate featuring 12 Democratic presidential candidates Tuesday night, it was clear that Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts was seen by the moderators and her fellow candidates as the one to beat.

That point was evident with time allotted to each candidate. Warren had the most with nearly 23 minutes to answer questions – or about equal to what the bottom three candidates mustered, according to The New York Times.

There were some advantages to that. John Harwood of CNBC proclaimed “this debate crowning Warren the new 2020 front-runner.”

CNN, NYT SLAMMED FOR AVOIDING CHINA DURING PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE: ‘THIS IS LITERALLY A JOKE,’ ‘SHAMEFUL’

But former CBS News anchor Dan Rather said that “the stage is more crowded than a Times Square subway stop.” And almost everyone on that stage was targeting Warren.

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It didn’t go well for the senator from Massachusetts. The regular attacks often turned her into a whiny scold.

As CNN anchor John King later explained: “The candidates on the stage clearly thought it was in their best interest to go after Warren.”

Former CNN commentator Roland Martin said it even better, noting: “How do we know @ewarren is leading? She has a bullseye on her tonight.”

The Washington Post sold the debate with a headline sounding like it watched a far-more entertaining contest: “Warren faces first sustained attack in raucous debate.” At least it was right about the attacking.

The New York Times was more accurate in tone about the tedious three-hour marathon: “Warren Draws Fire From All Sides, Reflecting a Shift in Fortunes in Race.”

CNN host Van Jones reflected on the attacks, calling Warren: “Mortal. Mortal. Somebody grabbed the cape and pulled on it.” Jones explained that the “moderates” struck back, “tired of the woke-enomics.”

PBS White House Correspondent Yamiche Alcindor said it was a “BIG MOMENT” when the “Elizabeth Warren attacks begin.” As she described it: “Warren gives a tough stare” after “Mayor Pete Buttigieg says to Warren: Your signature is to have a plan for everything except health care.”

Even far-left Hollywood director Michael Moore wasn’t entirely happy with Warren’s prescriptions for change. He said: “Senator Warren (whom I love) just said she believes in ‘accountable capitalism’. There is no such thing. The only thing capitalism is accountable to is weath [sic] and more wealth for the wealthy. It’s only mission is to economically enslave the citizenry so the rich can get richer.”

But there was more to the debate than just attacks on Warren. There were also attacks on President Trump. Of course. CNN, which has done as much as any outlet in America to promote impeachment, began the entire debate with 12 questions on the subject – one easy one for each candidate.

The result was laughably predictable – all the candidates showed that they hate Trump. The Post’s phrasing was a “unified condemnation of Trump.” Like no one saw that coming.

NBC News Correspondent Mike Memoli called the beginning of the debate “a moment of history,” adding that “1 participant may vote on articles of impeachment. 5 participants would sit as jurors in an impeachment trial.”

This is sure to please the major media that not only hate Trump but have financial interests in the impeachment. Axios reported that news outlets are “building pop-up newsletters, podcasts, and sections solely to cover the day-to-day developments of the impeachment process.” Those include Vox Media, CNN and The New York Times.

Sen. Kamala Harris of California scored one of the night’s few applause lines and news outlets went with her extreme narrative backing abortion, after she said: “And it is not an exaggeration to say women will die, poor women, women of color will die, because these Republican legislatures in these various states who are out of touch with America are telling women what to do with our bodies.”

The debate was also predictably left-wing. Van Jones asked Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota a scary post-debate question for Democrats: “And I wonder, are you afraid that the party is going in a direction that is just going to get us killed here in the middle of the country?” Klobuchar responded about the party can “come together,” but it’s the kind of comment that will set the left and media worrying.

Add it to the amazingly quiet crowd. The Root’s Politics Editor Jason Johnson called it “the quietest audience I’ve ever seen in a debate.” Trump would have called that “low energy.” He’d have been right.

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Even liberals weren’t always happy with all the candidates, especially the newest entrant into the race. Vox Senior Correspondent Zack Beauchamp made fun of the billionaire who just joined the campaign, but who always seems to wear the same tie. “While Tom Steyer wasted an unconscionable amount of money getting on stage and did absolutely nothing to justify his presence here, his tie is pretty good.”

Bustle Deputy News Editor Catherine Thompson took her own shot at his debating style: “Tom Steyer is gesticulating and speaking like he’s a ventriloquist’s dummy carved out of wood.”

But CNN had Steyer’s back. It initially listed him as a “former hedge fund manager.” That wasn’t nice enough to a guy who buys so much TV advertising. So it somehow got changed to “Businessman.”

Because CNN is neutral. And not in it for the money.

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And Washington Post Opinion Writer Elizabeth Bruenig was equally critical of former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke after a few candidates were asked about their age. “i mean look. yes, as you get older, your brain gets worse. but that’s just a general trend. look at beto. he’s very young and his brain is very bad.”

There was one especially unusual highlight of the debate. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii bashed the “mainstream media” like she was running in the Republican primary. She explained that The “New York Times and CNN have also smeared veterans like myself for calling for an end to this regime change war.” Those news organizations were the two hosts of the debate.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6094784589001_6094789741001-vs Dan Gainor: Elizabeth Warren draws most attention from media and candidates in Democratic debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc Dan Gainor b669685b-3bce-5cbc-bbeb-fe872dc8ec0b article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6094784589001_6094789741001-vs Dan Gainor: Elizabeth Warren draws most attention from media and candidates in Democratic debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc Dan Gainor b669685b-3bce-5cbc-bbeb-fe872dc8ec0b article

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Gregg Jarrett: Latest Pelosi-Schiff impeachment ‘witch hunt’ is venomous affront to constitutional principles

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095142247001_6095140934001-vs Gregg Jarrett: Latest Pelosi-Schiff impeachment ‘witch hunt’ is venomous affront to constitutional principles Gregg Jarrett fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9cb3d0f8-18de-55e8-bdac-6b35f477bccc

The quixotic quest to impeach President Trump is not only anathema to the fundamental principles of due process, but constitutes a full-frontal assault on the procedural protections inherent in the “due process” clause of the Constitution.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her chosen marionette, Rep. Adam Schiff, are operating in the shadows of secrecy. Their authority does not derive from the House of Representatives itself upon a full majority vote.  Instead, they have commandeered impeachment power by anointing themselves as the sole determinants.

They alone have chosen a “star chamber” approach to removing the president. The remaining members of the House are left in the dark without access to facts, documents and testimony. So, too, are President Trump and American voters who placed him in office.  What is the purpose of an electoral choice by the many if it can be reversed by the furtive maneuvers of the few?  Or two?

JOE BIDEN DEFENDS SON HUNTER’S UKRAINE WORK: ‘MY SON DID NOTHING WRONG. I DID NOTHING WRONG’ 

In any democracy, the principles of transparency and accountability demand that the actions and decisions of elected officials be open to public scrutiny. Citizens have a right to know what their government is doing. This is even more essential when Congress seeks to impeach a president. Secrecy corrupts the process and delegitimizes governance. The common good is undermined, as order gives way to chaos.

There is nothing more chaotic (and mysterious) than the current impeachment inquiry. Evidence of this is undeniably compelling. No one knows what’s going on behind closed doors. The select few who are present or have access to information have been threatened with eviction or an ethics investigation should they disclose to anyone what is happening.

Witnesses have been threatened with obstruction of justice if they refuse to appear in these secret proceedings.  Some have reportedly been told that legal counsel is not allowed.  As Democrats selectively leak damaging information, Republicans are prohibited from rebutting it.  The minority party is also deprived of subpoena power and forbidden from calling witnesses of its own.  This is an abuse of the process and an egregious deprivation of rights.

Much of this is compounded by the persistent confusion over what constitutes an official inquiry and which committee is really in charge. At first, it was Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler who claimed he was presiding over a “formal impeachment proceeding.”  Now, it seems that Schiff is doing the same. Has command been passed? Or are these now dueling inquiries?

No one seems to know, least of all Pelosi who feels no compulsion to inform the American people — who are understandably bewildered. Like a ship adrift, who’s the captain here?

In an effort to rationalize the abiding secrecy, Schiff suggested that his hearings are “analogous to a grand jury proceeding done out of public view.”  This is disingenuous, at best. A grand jury is a neutral body. Schiff and his fellow Democrats who control the Intelligence Committee are the antithesis of neutral.

It now appears that Schiff played a pivotal role in orchestrating the initial whistleblower complaint that led to the impeachment hysteria and then lied about it. Suddenly, he doesn’t want this anonymous informant to testify since that would surely implicate Schiff own partisan machinations and deceptions. It might expose the “witch hunt.”

The latest Pelosi-Schiff “witch hunt” has abandoned all pretense of fairness.  It is a venomous attempt to undo the 2016 presidential election and drive Trump from office by employing unconstitutional means. 

All of this could have been avoided if Pelosi had called for a full vote of House members to initiate an official impeachment inquiry and identified the controlling committee. If nothing more, it would have established basic rules of conduct and ensured some measure of fairness.  Instead, she acted unilaterally and without any real authority beyond her gavel. Mistakenly embracing a monarchy, Pelosi has become the self-appointed Queen.

As Queens and Kings are wont to do, the business of ruling is conducted by fiat. In turn, “due process” rights of the ruled are erased as if they never existed. But they do exist in a democracy and are enshrined in our own Constitution which is being trampled on with impunity.

White House Counsel Pat Cipollone pointed this out to Pelosi and Schiff in his October 8 letter on behalf of President Trump. He correctly cited decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court in Watkins v. United States (1957) and Quinn v. United States (1955) in which the Justices ruled that the Bill of Rights and “due process” guarantees apply to congressional investigations. They have also been recognized as a requirement in impeachment proceedings. For support, Cipollone quoted the very words of Nadler who stated, “the power of impeachment… demands a rigorous level of due process.” Indeed, it does.

Yet, the present impeachment inquiry, however misguided or unfounded, bears no resemblance to the procedural guarantees of “due process” found in the Fifth Amendment and enunciated more specifically in Supreme Court decisions throughout the years. Past presidential impeachment inquiries were all authorized by a vote of the House and the protections of “due process” were, in each instance, scrupulously followed. 

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The latest Pelosi-Schiff “witch hunt” has abandoned all pretense of fairness. It is a venomous attempt to undo the 2016 presidential election and drive Trump from office by employing unconstitutional means.

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Could the Supreme Court intervene based on “due process” violations? It is possible, but not likely. President Trump could file what’s called a “Petition For Writ Of Mandamus” asking the high court to direct Speaker Pelosi to hold an impeachment inquiry vote before the entire House.  However, such a legal move is a considerable long shot. While mandamus petitions are intended to correct defects of justice, they often involve departments or agencies, not the legislature. Historically, the Supreme Court has been loath to involve itself in legislative-executive battles unless or until it is absolutely necessary. 

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President Trump should continue to resist this misbegotten impeachment inquiry. If, for example, Schiff is foolish enough to seek enforcement of a subpoena in federal court, issues of “due process” could then be presented. 

Federal judges, including the justices on the high court, care deeply about precedent. They also respect and uphold basic rights guaranteed in our Constitution. Pelosi and Schiff couldn’t care less.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095142247001_6095140934001-vs Gregg Jarrett: Latest Pelosi-Schiff impeachment ‘witch hunt’ is venomous affront to constitutional principles Gregg Jarrett fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9cb3d0f8-18de-55e8-bdac-6b35f477bccc   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095142247001_6095140934001-vs Gregg Jarrett: Latest Pelosi-Schiff impeachment ‘witch hunt’ is venomous affront to constitutional principles Gregg Jarrett fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9cb3d0f8-18de-55e8-bdac-6b35f477bccc

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GOP’s Dan Crenshaw fires back after called ‘racist’ by Democrat who compared Trump to Usama bin Laden

Westlake Legal Group crenshaw GOP’s Dan Crenshaw fires back after called ‘racist’ by Democrat who compared Trump to Usama bin Laden fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox news fnc/politics fnc fbd4e999-71a5-5b08-a0b3-16909f6a590c Dom Calicchio article

Rep. Dan Crenshaw, the freshman Republican congressman from Texas, and a former Navy SEAL who was wounded in combat, defended himself Tuesday after a video showed an Illinois Democrat calling him “a racist.”

The Democrat, Rep. Sean Casten, an Irish-born lawmaker whose district covers suburbs west of Chicago, told an audience earlier this month that Crenshaw was “a racist” because the Texan proposed an amendment in Congress to prevent illegal immigrants from voting.

“The last amendment on the floor that day … came from Dan Crenshaw, the new Republican, the Navy SEAL with the eyepatch,” Casten said, according to the Washington Free Beacon. “He came up with an amendment to say, ‘We’re going to add a rider on this bill that says that illegals can’t vote.’ And I sat there and I said, ‘You know what? You’re not allowed to vote if you’re not a citizen.’ … Why are you doing that? The reason you’re doing that is because you are a racist. Because you are trying to appeal to people who will vote for you if you stand up and oppose brown people.”

Crenshaw responded Tuesday on Twitter, after video from Casten’s Oct. 5 remarks surfaced.

“When you can’t articulate a coherent argument, you resort to calling your political opponents racist,” Crenshaw wrote. “Can’t say I’m surprised. Just another day in Washington with the Democrat Party.”

Later, a Crenshaw spokeswoman added, in a statement to the Free Beacon: “If Rep. Casten is so deeply offended that our laws prohibit non-citizens from voting in federal elections, then he should be honest with his constituents and let them know how little he values the power of their vote.”

In a party-line vote, the Democrat-controlled House defeated Crenshaw’s proposal, the outlet reported.

Casten previously made headlines in June when he came out in support of the impeachment effort against President Trump.

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The Democrat also drew criticism last year when he said Trump and 9/11 mastermind Usama bin Laden “have a tremendous amount in common.”

Crenshaw, during a September appearance on Fox & Friends, accused Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders of deliberately tweeting about veterans issues in order to “make people angry.”

Westlake Legal Group crenshaw GOP’s Dan Crenshaw fires back after called ‘racist’ by Democrat who compared Trump to Usama bin Laden fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox news fnc/politics fnc fbd4e999-71a5-5b08-a0b3-16909f6a590c Dom Calicchio article   Westlake Legal Group crenshaw GOP’s Dan Crenshaw fires back after called ‘racist’ by Democrat who compared Trump to Usama bin Laden fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox news fnc/politics fnc fbd4e999-71a5-5b08-a0b3-16909f6a590c Dom Calicchio article

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‘Tarzan’ actor Ron Ely’s home was site of woman’s murder, authorities say; suspect arrested

Santa Barbara County sheriff’s deputies arrested a suspect Tuesday in connection with the murder of a woman at a Southern California home owned by 1960s “Tarzan” actor Ron Ely, according to reports.

The unidentified suspect was on the loose for a short time before being caught, KABC-TV of Los Angeles reported.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-479611285 'Tarzan' actor Ron Ely's home was site of woman's murder, authorities say; suspect arrested fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc f552ba0c-e7fc-5f78-ad96-70107a3baba4 Brie Stimson article

American actor Ron Ely plays the title role in an episode of the US TV series ‘Tarzan’, circa 1967. (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES POLICE RESPOND TO FIGHT DURING ‘JOKER’ SCREENING

Ely, 81, is best known for playing Tarzan in the 1966-68 TV series of the same name. He also had recurring roles in shows like “The Love Boat” and “Fantasy Island.”

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It’s unclear if Ely was in the house at the time of the slaying, but officials said a man was there, KABC reported.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-479611285 'Tarzan' actor Ron Ely's home was site of woman's murder, authorities say; suspect arrested fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc f552ba0c-e7fc-5f78-ad96-70107a3baba4 Brie Stimson article   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-479611285 'Tarzan' actor Ron Ely's home was site of woman's murder, authorities say; suspect arrested fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc f552ba0c-e7fc-5f78-ad96-70107a3baba4 Brie Stimson article

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Huawei Reports Stronger Sales Growth

Westlake Legal Group 16huawei-facebookJumbo Huawei Reports Stronger Sales Growth Telephones and Telecommunications Huawei Technologies Co Ltd China

BEIJING — Huawei said on Wednesday that its sales had risen by 27 percent in the latest quarter, a faster pace of growth that suggests the Chinese technology giant has been successfully weathering the Trump administration’s efforts to stymie its business around the world.

The United States added the smartphone and telecom gear maker to an export blacklist in May, causing the company’s revenue growth to slow to 13 percent for the second quarter of this year. But on Wednesday, Huawei said growth had recovered to 27 percent in the third quarter compared with a year earlier, even though the blacklist means the company is still restricted from buying parts and technology from American suppliers.

Huawei is the world’s leading producer of the equipment in cellphone networks. American officials have long been concerned that the company’s products could be used in intelligence-gathering by the Chinese government, an accusation that Huawei has repeatedly denied.

The company said Wednesday that it had so far signed 60 contracts with telecom carriers around the world to provide equipment for networks using the next generation of wireless technology, or 5G.

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2020 Election: 5 things we learned from the Democratic debate in Ohio

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The biggest debate of the election cycle was chippy.

With 12 candidates vying for voters attention at Tuesday’s debate in Westerville, Ohio, the White House contenders threw sharper jabs at each other and competed to outdo each other in their expressions of outrage over President Donald Trump.

Sen. Bernie Sanders returned to the debate stage two weeks after suffering a heart attack and resumed his call for a “political revolution.” Billionaire activist Tom Steyer made his debate stage debut, but struggled to get much speaking time.

Here are some of the other big takeaways from Tuesday night’s debate in suburban Columbus.

1: Biden addressed, but didn’t quite blunt, Trump’s smears on son’s Ukraine business

Former Vice President Joe Biden didn’t take any incoming fire from his Democratic rivals over Hunter Biden’s overseas business dealings, but he fell short of putting the issue to rest.

Debate blog: Elizabeth Warren takes rivals’ shots, Joe Biden pivots on Ukraine and other top Democrat debate moments

Ahead of Tuesday night’s debate, Biden vowed that he would not allow a family member or administration officials to be involved with foreign businesses should he be elected president. Hunter Biden acknowledged in a television interview that aired Tuesday that he probably wouldn’t have been picked to serve on Ukraine energy company Burisma Holdings board if his last name wasn’t Biden, but insisted he did nothing improper.

But asked directly by CNN co-moderator Anderson Cooper why it was OK for his son to serve on a foreign board when he was previously vice president but not if he wins the presidency, Biden didn’t directly answer.

“Look, my son did nothing wrong,” Biden replied. “I did nothing wrong. I carried out the policy of the United States government in rooting out corruption in Ukraine. And that’s what we should be focusing on.” 

With each passing day, House Democrats receive more incriminating testimony in their ongoing impeachment inquiry of President Trump over his pushing Ukraine president Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate Hunter Biden’s business dealings in the Eastern European nation.

Trump, while damaged by the scandal, has managed to make Hunter Biden’s position serving on Burisma an ever-present issue in the campaign that shows no sign of disappearing. Biden has complained that the media has paid too much attention to his son’s business dealings, despite no evidence of impropriety.

The younger Biden did not have any past experience or technical background that would make him specially qualified to serve on the energy company’s board.

More: Hunter Biden will resign from board of Chinese firm, says he won’t serve on foreign boards if Joe Biden elected president

In his Good Morning America interview, Hunter Biden pointed to his past service on the board of Amtrak — a position his father appointed him to — as experience that helped qualify him for a job that reportedly paid $50,000 per month.

After Hunter Biden’s interview aired Tuesday morning, Trump took to Twitter to gloat, “Now Sleepy Joe has real problems! Reminds me of Crooked Hillary and her 33 deleted emails, not recoverable.”

The Bidens still have work to do to clear the murky waters Trump has created.

2: Surging Elizabeth Warren gets to feel sting of being a front-runner

Is it safe to declare Elizabeth Warren the co-frontrunner with Biden?

From the moment he entered the race in April, Biden — a well-known commodity with the imprimatur of his association with former President Obama — was the frontrunner in polls.

Recent polling suggests that has changed. Warren has come out on top in eight of the past 15 national polls, including a national survey by Quinnipiac University that showed her three percentage points ahead of Biden. It was the third Quinnipiac poll in a row where she’s led Biden.

But with her exalted status, the punches from her Democratic rivals are starting to get harder.

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg hit hard early in the debate, hammering Warren for refusing to directly answer a question about whether Medicare for All would lead to a middle-class tax hike.

“Well, we heard it tonight, a yes or no question that didn’t get a yes or no answer,” Buttigieg said. “Look, this is why people here in the Midwest are so frustrated with Washington in general and Capitol Hill in particular. Your signature, Senator, is to have a plan for everything. Except this.”

Warren retorted that overall costs will go up for the wealthy and for big corporations but down for middle class families.

“I will not sign a bill into law that does not lower costs for middle class families.” Warren said.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar also knocked Warren for how she’s gone about pushing her call for wealth tax, a plan that calls for a 2% hike on income for families making more than $50 million annually. Warren has said she would use the wealth tax to help fund tuition-free college, pay for universal childcare, and other programs.

“I want to give a reality check here to Elizabeth, because no one on this stage wants protect billionaires — not even the billionaire wants to protect billionaires,” said Klobuchar, referring to the billionaire candidate Steyer. “Your idea is not the only idea.”

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke said he thought Warren’s message is often too divisive.

“I think it’s part of the solution but I think we need to be focused on lifting people up and sometimes I think Senator Warren is focused on being punitive or pitting one side of the country against the other,” O’Rourke said.

Warren replied that she was “shocked at the notion that anyone thinks I’m punitive.”

“Look, I don’t have a beef with billionaires,” she said. “My problem is you made a fortune in America, you had a great idea, you got out there and worked for it, good for you. But you built that fortune in America. I guarantee you built it in part using workers all of us helped pay to educate. You built it in part getting your goods to markets on roads and bridges all of us helped pay for. You built it at least in part protected by police and firefighters all of us help pay the salaries for.”  

3: Candidates are united in blasting Trump on Syria, but less robust in explaining how to undo the damage

The crowded field was unanimous as they ripped Trump’s abrupt decision to withdraw U.S. troops from northern Syria, turning the area into a powder keg where Russian forces are now looking to fill the security vacuum created by Trump.

“It’s been the most shameful thing any president has done in modern history in terms of foreign policy,” Biden said.

Buttigieg, who was deployed to Afghanistan as a Navy Reserve officer, said Trump betrayed Kurdish allies by acceding to Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdoganand allowing him to clear northern Syria of American-allied Syrian Democratic Forces who assisted U.S. troops in battling the terror group ISIS. 

“What we were doing in Syria was keeping our word,” Buttigieg said. “Part of what makes it possible for the United States to get people to put their lives on the line to back us up is the idea that we will back them up, too. When I was deployed, not just the Afghan national army forces but the janitors put their lives on the line just by working with U.S. forces. I would have a hard time today looking an Afghan civilian or soldier in the eye after what just happened over there.”

The Democratic hopefuls were eloquent in their anger at Trump as they accused him of pushing the region to tumult. But they didn’t offer much detail on how they would undo the damage.

Biden may have come the closest in offering a substantive answer to the question, saying he would work to safely return U.S. troops to northern Syria and look to put pressure on Erdogan and Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad.

“What I would do is I would be making it real clear to Assad that, in fact, where he’s going to have a problem — because Turkey is the real problem here,” Biden said. “And I would be having a real lockdown conversation with Erdogan and letting him know that he’s going to pay a heavy price for what he has done now. “

4: The Biden vs. Warren rivalry got feisty  

Soon after Biden entered the race in April, Warren took a swipe at him for his advocacy as a senator for the 2005 Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act, legislation that tightened rules on who could qualify for bankruptcy protection and benefited credit card companies.

“At a time when the biggest financial institutions in this country were trying to put the squeeze on millions of hardworking families who were in bankruptcy because of medical problems, job losses, divorce or death in the family, there was nobody standing up for them,” Warren said. “I got in that fight because they just didn’t have anyone. And Joe Biden was on the side of the credit card companies.” 

Since then, the jousting between the moderate Biden and more liberal Warren had been otherwise anodyne.

That changed at Tuesday’s debate.

Biden and Warren had a sharp exchange over who played what role in setting up the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in 2010 following the national banking crisis two years earlier. Warren was the mastermind of the CFPB and helped the Obama administration stand it up.

Biden claimed that Warren wasn’t crediting him with the role he played in getting the agency off the ground.

“I went on the floor and got you votes,” Biden told Warren. “I got you votes.”

Warren didn’t acknowledge Biden’s remarks but thanked President Barack Obama.

“I am deeply grateful to President Obama for fighting so hard,” Warren said.

“You did a hell of job,” Biden offered.

“Thank you,” Warren said.

5: Septuagenarians make the case age is just a number.

Sanders returned to the campaign trail with Tuesday’s debate, an appearance that came just two weeks after he suffered a heart attack while campaigning in Las Vegas.

The moment was a big one for Sanders, 78, who as the oldest candidate in the field has frequently had to address the issue of whether his age will be an impediment should he be elected as president.

More: 4 decades separate 2020’s presidential candidates. Here’s what that looks like.

He told co-moderator Erin Burnett that he was “feeling great,” and teased he would demonstrate his plan to continue his vigorous campaign with a big rally in New York City this weekend that would include a special guest. While the debate was still underway, news broke that Sanders had won the endorsement of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who last year became the youngest woman elected to Congress and is a leading voice in the progressive movement.

But it wasn’t just Sanders who was asked to reassure voters that their age won’t be a problem.

Burnett noted in a question to Biden that former President Jimmy Carter said last month that he couldn’t have handled the duties of the presidency at age 80. Biden would turn 80 during his term should he win the White House.

“Look, one of the reasons I’m running is because of my age and my experience,” Biden said. “With it comes wisdom. We need someone to take office this time around who on day one can stand on the world stage, command the respect of world leaders, from (Russia’s President Vladimir) Putin to our allies, and know exactly what has to be done to get this country back on track.”

Warren, who would be 71 on Inauguration Day, batted away concerns about her age.

“Well, I say, I will out-work, out-organize, and outlast anyone, and that includes Donald Trump, Mike Pence, or whoever the Republicans get stuck with,” she said.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, 38, who is the second youngest candidate in the Democratic field, came to her septuagenarian rivals defense.

“I was going to say it’s not fair to ask these three about their health and their fitness to serve as president but not every other one of us,” Gabbard said. “But here’s the real question I believe you should be asking is:  Who is fit to serve as our commander-in-chief?  This is the most important responsibility that the president has.”

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David Bossie: 7 Democratic debate takeaways after watching candidates caught up in Trump Derangement Syndrome

Westlake Legal Group DemDozenDebate101519 David Bossie: 7 Democratic debate takeaways after watching candidates caught up in Trump Derangement Syndrome fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Bossie article 5d58f8af-98ea-5bf2-aafc-063ea68be35c

A dozen Democratic presidential candidates continued their race to become the left’s most favored socialist when they debated Tuesday night. Once again, the debate stage showcased a lackluster group of extremist politicians pandering to their far-left base of support with harmful policy proposals that are way outside the mainstream.

The three septuagenarian candidates currently making up the top tier of the Democratic field include a confused and corrupt former Vice President Joe Biden some 20 years past his prime; unelectable socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who recently suffered a heart attack; and hopelessly out-of-touch former Harvard professor and current Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, who wants to throw 180 million Americans off their private health insurance plans, including union workers.

Stuck with a field marred with enormous electability questions, no one is paying closer attention to the weakest field of presidential candidates in recent memory than 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

WARREN COMES UNDER ATTACK FROM ALL SIDES AT DEM DEBATE, AS BIDEN DEFENDS SON’S BUSINESS PRACTICES

These two nationally recognized liberals are likely thinking the same thing as everyone else: none of the 12 mediocre candidates on the stage in Ohio Tuesday night has what it takes to defeat President Trump in November 2020.

More from Opinion

After watching the three-hour snooze fest, here are some of the takeaways that Clinton and Bloomberg may be thinking about as they consider jumping into the presidential race.

The Democratic candidates are desperately lurching farther and farther to the left.  This strategy of embracing extremism is clearly designed to capture the hearts and minds of the Democratic primary electorate by repackaging the tired Big Government policies of the past. Capitalism and liberty have become dirty words with this crowd. Look no further than new reports Tuesday night that Green New Deal author and socialist Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York – along with radical Reps. Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ilhan Omar of Minnesota – plan to endorse Sanders for president. Throughout history, socialism has failed at every turn and will fail once again as the Democrat’s party platform in the 2020 general election.

Joe Biden’s son Hunter and his shady foreign business dealings were glossed over and badly mischaracterized. This should have been the big issue of the night. Serious allegations against the Bidens are being whitewashed by a biased mainstream media that has gone headfirst into the dishonesty tank during the Trump administration.

The impeachment witch hunt led the discussion because the Democratic Party has no positive agenda. All the candidates reminded viewers about the partisan nature of the baseless impeachment inquiry against President Trump by rushing to judgment before getting the facts. It’s become clear that impeachment is being pushed because desperate Democrats can’t defeat Trump at the ballot box in less than 13 months.

Democrats are offering the American people big tax increases, job-killing over-regulation, and lawless open borders. These failed and harmful ideas aren’t polling well with voters. But the far-left Democrats are so committed to Big Government that they ignore the fact that their plans would wreck the vibrant Trump economy and punish American families and businesses.

“Medicare-for-all,” championed by Sanders, is so extreme that even some of the Democratic presidential candidates oppose it. Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., pointed out that the disastrous proposal would result in a “multitrillion-dollar hole” in the federal budget. Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota called the irresponsible plan a “pipedream.” They’re both right.

The debate will not change the trajectory of the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. Nothing happened to suggest someone had a breakout moment and will show real upward movement in the polls. The top tier will remain Warren, Biden and Sanders.

Despite the best efforts of Democrats, President Trump’s amazing accomplishments to improve the lives of the American people simply cannot be explained away. The national unemployment rate of 3.5 percent is at a 50-year low and the unemployment rates for women, African-Americans, Hispanic-Americans and Asian-Americans are at historic lows. Over 6 million jobs have been created on President Trump’s watch – including 500,000 manufacturing jobs – and a record number of Americans are currently employed. To paraphrase former President Bill Clinton, elections are about the strong economy – and continued prosperity.

In a debate that featured barely a spark – much less fireworks – there’s ample reason for Democratic power brokers around the country to be concerned about where the current overcrowded field is headed. So they might be looking for other options before the Iowa caucuses kick off voting for the presidential candidates in February.

Here’s the reality:

Job creators, entrepreneurs and investors alike know that President Trump at his core thinks like a pro-growth businessman, and that gives them confidence to make decisions that expand their businesses.

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On trade, President Trump’s vision and leadership have changed opinions on how we approach China, Mexico, Canada, and the European Union. The president knows there is a difference between free trade and fair trade when it comes to prioritizing American workers.

In Tuesday night’s debate in the critical Rust Belt state of Ohio – as the Democrats highlighted their failed vision of tax increases, overregulation, and giving away the store to China – the contrast with the positive Trump record couldn’t be starker.

Well-known liberal egotists Clinton and Bloomberg certainly think a lot of themselves and despite their baggage could probably fare better against President Trump than the current slate of boring Democrat wannabes.

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And if the Democrats really want to recreate the 2008 Obama coalition, there’s another candidate who could immediately become the party’s frontrunner due to nostalgia alone. Her name is Michelle Obama. But the problem with nostalgia is that we tend to remember what we liked and forget what we didn’t like.

The clear reality emerging at the end of the long debate was that these are desperate times for a Democratic Party suffering from Trump Derangement Syndrome.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY DAVID BOSSIE

Westlake Legal Group DemDozenDebate101519 David Bossie: 7 Democratic debate takeaways after watching candidates caught up in Trump Derangement Syndrome fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Bossie article 5d58f8af-98ea-5bf2-aafc-063ea68be35c   Westlake Legal Group DemDozenDebate101519 David Bossie: 7 Democratic debate takeaways after watching candidates caught up in Trump Derangement Syndrome fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc David Bossie article 5d58f8af-98ea-5bf2-aafc-063ea68be35c

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Los Angeles police respond to fight during ‘Joker’ screening

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Authorities in Los Angeles on Tuesday responded to a fight that broke out inside a movie theater during a screening of Todd Phillip’s “Joker,” a report said.

The fight broke out at AMC Burbank at about 8:54 p.m. local time, the Hollywood Reporter reported. The magazine reported that the fight included four individuals. One man appeared to suffer a head injury and there was an unconfirmed report that a glass bottle was used during the melee.

The movie itself has been criticized as excessively violent.

CHRISTEN LIMBAUGH BLOOM: ‘JOKER’ VIOLENCE ISN’T WHAT SCARED ME, THIS DID

Five family members of people killed or injured in the Aurora shooting recently sent a letter to Warner Bros. CEO Ann Sarnoff. In it, they voiced concerns about sympathetic portrayals of villains and asked the studio to help end gun violence.

Police are investigating the fight as an assault with a deadly weapon, THR reported.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6090045931001_6090044916001-vs Los Angeles police respond to fight during ‘Joker’ screening fox-news/us/crime fox-news/entertainment/movies fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 184e8f52-8519-51d1-9f18-45473215ea65   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6090045931001_6090044916001-vs Los Angeles police respond to fight during ‘Joker’ screening fox-news/us/crime fox-news/entertainment/movies fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 184e8f52-8519-51d1-9f18-45473215ea65

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‘This is for you’: Washington Nationals fans ready for more as team wins National League title

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'This is for you': Washington Nationals fans ready for more as team wins National League title

SportsPulse: The Nationals are going to their first ever World Series and in the process had one of most historic turnarounds we’ve ever seen in baseball. USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — Ted Lerner was talking to all Washington Nationals fans when he told them “This is for you” from a makeshift stage behind second base in the moments after the nonagenarian’s team won their first pennant

The 43,976 in front of him, though, had just witnessed history — and roared back with approval of what they’d seen Tuesday. A seven-run first inning made Game 4 a laugher early that turned into a tightrope, but the Nationals prevailed over the St. Louis Cardinals 7-4.  

“Often bumpy roads lead to beautiful places,” Nationals manager Dave Martinez told a still-packed stadium, undeterred by the threat of a closing Metro system. “And this is a beautiful place.”

Fans disembarked trains more than four hours before first pitch. Some went to bars, some milled about the neighborhood. The first fan in line at the center field gate was Rick Tameris, sporting a Santa hat and white beard.

“This is for the playoffs,” Tameris told USA TODAY Sports. “Matter of fact, wore it back in 2012, when we played St. Louis (in the NLDS) and lost.” 

So why’d he think it was going to work this time? 

“Just the luck of the draw,” he said.  

Tameris admitted he had questioned whether Martinez was the man for the job when Washington started the season 19-31. 

“His motto is one game at a time,” Tameris said. “And that’s what they’ve done since the All-Star break.”

Unlike Game 4 of the NLDS, when the possibility of being eliminated by the Los Angeles Dodgers kept fans at a distance, the place was packed to the gills when Patrick Corbin delivered his first offering at 8:06 p.m.

Eleven minutes later, they were rattling off the first chants of the night as Trea Turner scored the game’s first run on Anthony Rendon’s sacrifice fly.

Teams often feed off the energy from the crowd. For this Nationals team, it can feel like it works the other way around, Nationals fan Travis Eagleson said.

“If the players get excited, we get excited,” he said. “If that’s what they’re about, that’s what we’re about.” 

Eagleson was in attendance with friend Brad Calandre, and both were wearing shark costumes, inspired by reserve outfielder Gerardo Parra’s “Baby Shark” walk-up song that’s been embraced en masse this season.

“Our fans stay in it, just like the players fight back,” Calandre said, invoking the team’s postseason mantra “Stay In the Fight.” 

When Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina took his time rounding the bases on his solo homer in the fourth, boos turned to cheers when whoever caught the ball in the left-center field seas threw it back.

The crowd pleaded with Daniel Hudson to escape a bases loaded jam in the eighth, and when he did, they didn’t sit back down until they left the ballpark. 

Fans in D.C. celebrated a Capitals championship in 2018, and the Washington Mystics captured the WNBA title over the weekend.

Will the winning continue in the nation’s capital?

“You’ve got the Caps who have won. You’ve got the Mystics,” Tameris said. “Now, let’s have baseball and see the Nats come up with a World Series win.”

Denise Vee, 23, has worked as an usher at the stadium for four years and has become a diehard Nationals fan in the process. 

That much was evident when fans began piling out of her section, 134, right behind the first base dugout. Vee screamed at the top of her lungs for at least 10 minutes straight and high-fived every individual as they exited. She takes pride is among the most lively in Nationals Park. 

“Amp them up when they’re going down the steps, make sure they’re prepared for the rest of the evening,” she said.

“My voice is demolished for tomorrow,” Vee said. “We’re all a family now. The chemistry is amped up. We’re gonna make it all the way through.” 

Brad Brenneman and his 18-year-old daughter, Lauren, had driven from Lovettsville, Virginia, for Tuesday’s game. 

“I can’t believe it,” Brenneman told her. “But persistence is everything.” 

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