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Westlake Legal Group > News and News Media (Page 42)

Ohio State’s Chase Young wins Nagurski Award

Ohio State defensive end Chase Young won the Bronko Nagurski Award given to the nation’s top college defensive player on Monday night.

Young was the nation’s most dominant player on defense this season, recording 16 1/2 sacks and forcing six fumbles in 10 games for the Buckeyes. His best game came against then-No. 13 Wisconsin when he had four sacks and two forced fumbles in a 38-7 victory.

The 6-foot-6, 265-pound Young joins a list of former Nagurski Award winners that includes Aaron Donald, Warren Sapp, Luke Kuechly, Terrell Suggs and Champ Bailey.

“It’s such an honor to come in here and see all of the great players that have won this award, and have a chance to put my name in that category with some of the all-time great college football players,” Young said. “It’s definitely amazing.”

Young received the award Monday night at a banquet sponsored annually by the Charlotte Touchdown Club.

Ohio State coach Ryan Day was on hand for the announcement as the event’s keynote speaker.

He praised Young for putting up “ridiculous” statistics this season, and helping his team to an undefeated season so far. Second-ranked Ohio State plays No. 3 Clemson in the Fiesta Bowl on Dec. 28, with the winner advancing to the College Football Playoff National Championship game.

“I knew that he was certainly capable of a season like this,” Day said. “You see him in practice every day, and you see guys make a big jump from year two to year three in college. And he made a big jump just in total production. And, he didn’t play in a whole bunch of games in terms of the second half and he missed a couple of games. When he was on the field, his production was just off the charts.”

Young dedicated the award to his grandfather, Carl Robinson, who passed away when he was in middle school.

“If he was to see everything I have done this season, he would probably have a heart attack,” Young said. “He would be ecstatic and probably be at a loss for words. We were always close. He would teach me how to make stuff and how to fix stuff and show me off to some of his old school friends. We used to do everything together, almost like a second dad.”

Young is also up for the Heisman Trophy, an award that normally goes to offensive players.

He said his goal this season was to prove that he plays hard every play.

“I’m going to make mistakes, but if you are going 100 miles per hour you might make up for those mistakes,” Young said.

Young said his future NFL team will get a player who is willing and eager to learn.

“I’m going to be a dude who works hard, is not going say too much and just go about his business,” Young said.

Day said Young has a chance to go down as one of the all-time greats, like many of the former Nagurski Award winners.

“Yeah, he’s definitely the most dominant defensive player in the country,” Day said. “When you have that type production in a limited amount of snaps, I just think that it is unbelievable.”

Auburn defensive tackle Derrick Brown, Georgia safety J.R. Reed, Clemson linebacker Isaiah Simmons and Minnesota defensive back Antoine Winfield Jr. were the other finalists for the award.

Westlake Legal Group Chase-Young2 Ohio State's Chase Young wins Nagurski Award fox-news/sports/ncaa/ohio-state-buckeyes fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 3e2de854-3a87-5f9b-a8e3-2bc88c9ed9b5   Westlake Legal Group Chase-Young2 Ohio State's Chase Young wins Nagurski Award fox-news/sports/ncaa/ohio-state-buckeyes fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 3e2de854-3a87-5f9b-a8e3-2bc88c9ed9b5

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House Democrats Unveil 2 Articles Of Impeachment Against Trump

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1187544881-1-_wide-82fbbe7b61ab917f7a621e47c717c0f91f815266-s1100-c15 House Democrats Unveil 2 Articles Of Impeachment Against Trump

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the chairs of investigative committees announces the articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  House Democrats Unveil 2 Articles Of Impeachment Against Trump

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the chairs of investigative committees announces the articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday.

Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Updated at 10:02 a.m. ET

House Democrats unveiled two articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday morning, charging him with abuse of power in the Ukraine affair and obstruction of Congress.

The announcement followed 77 days after the House launched a formal inquiry into Trump’s freezing of assistance to Ukraine and request to investigate his political rival. It marked only the fourth time in U.S. history that articles of impeachment have been introduced against a president.

Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., said Trump “consistently puts himself above the country” and the president’s actions in the Ukraine affair left the House with no choice but to resort to the remedy prescribed in the Constitution for the most egregious wrongdoing by a president.

“We must be clear: No one — not even the president — is above the law,” he said.

Watch Nadler’s remarks.

After it completes work on the articles, the Judiciary Committee is expected to send them to the full House for a vote on whether to impeach the president. Democrats control the majority.

If the chamber votes to impeach Trump, that would trigger a trial in the Senate — which is controlled by Trump’s allies. Republicans in the upper chamber are expected to acquit Trump and permit him to keep his office.

The president wrote on Twitter that he rejected the premise of Democrats’ case — he did not “pressure” his Ukrainian counterpart, Trump argued.

Trump’s campaign said separately on Tuesday that impeachment represented a craven attempt by Democrats to sabotage the election because House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her members are worried none of their presidential candidates can defeat Trump in the election next year.

Dems: We can’t wait

In announcing the articles, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Trump’s actions have imperiled the integrity of the 2020 election and Trump’s continued tenure in the White House continues to do so.

In view of Congress’ need to ensure the election can run fairly and the legislature’s need to preserve its status as a co-equal branch of government, the House must impeach Trump, Schiff said.

He rejected the idea that Congress should wait for Election Day itself to let voters decide whether to reelect or remove Trump.

“‘Why don’t you let him cheat in one more election?'” Schiff asked rhetorically. “That is what that argument amounts to.”

In announcing the articles Tuesday, Democratic leaders emphasized they were not taking the matter lightly. Pelosi and her lieutenants did not take questions from reporters.

Articles of impeachment were previously introduced against Presidents Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton. Johnson and Clinton were impeached but acquitted by the Senate. Nixon resigned before he was impeached by the House.

Watch the full 13-minute presser.

The Ukraine affair

The drafting of articles of impeachment followed lengthy testimony before the House Intelligence Committee — first behind closed doors, then in public — from current and former government officials.

In its 300-page report released last week, the committee argued that Trump abused his office and pressured Ukraine to open investigations against former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter for Trump’s own political benefit.

In a House Judiciary Committee hearing Monday, lawyers for House Democrats presented evidence they say shows the president has abused his power, obstructed Congress and should be removed from office.

“President Trump’s persistent and continuing effort to coerce a foreign country to help him cheat to win an election is a clear and present danger to our free and fair elections and to our national security,” committee lawyer Daniel Goldman said.

Meanwhile, House Republicans have dismissed the inquiry as purely partisan and criticized its process.

“At the end of the day, all this is about is a clock and a calendar,” said Rep. Doug Collins, the lead Republican on the panel, “and they can’t get over the fact that Donald J. Trump is president of the United States, and they don’t think they have a candidate who can beat him.”

The White House has rejected offers from Democrats to participate in the inquiry, blocked some officials from testifying and refused to turn over documents.

The dispute over testimony from key administration figures — including Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo — is the basis for Democrats’ allegation that Trump has obstructed Congress and violated the Constitution’s requirement that the legislature provide a check and balance on the executive.

But White House lawyer Pat Cipollone has called the inquiry “completely baseless” and unfair and not a process the administration is bound to respect.

Claudia Grisales contributed to this report.

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NHL Commissioner: We will not tolerate abusive behavior

Westlake Legal Group NHL-Gary-Bettman NHL Commissioner: We will not tolerate abusive behavior fox-news/sports/nhl fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 4067ac7f-0d71-56e9-bdfb-8873dfb80de6

Commissioner Gary Bettman said Monday the NHL will work swiftly to make changes to better deal with personnel conduct issues in the wake of incidents that surfaced in recent weeks.

Speaking at the end of the first day of the Board of Governors meeting at the Inn at Spanish Bay resort in Pebble Beach, Bettman told reporters that NHL personnel will be required to attend mandatory counseling regarding racism and anti-bullying. Bettman also talked about the formation of a hotline for people to call to report any such incidents.

“Inclusion and diversity are not simply buzz words. They are foundational principles of the NHL,” Bettman said. “Our message is unequivocal: We will not tolerate abusive behavior of any kind.”

Bettman’s comments were his first publicly since former NHL player Akim Aliu alleged that former Calgary Flames coach Bill Peters previously directed racial slurs toward him while in the minor leagues a decade ago. Peters, who has also been accused of physical abuse while coaching Carolina, resigned following the accusations by Aliu.

While Bettman said that the NHL is conducting its own review of the Peters-Aliu situation, the commissioner made it clear that there will be zero tolerance from the league moving forward.

To that end, Bettman and deputy commissioner Bill Daly told the Board of Governors about a multi-point plan designed to curb any further issues while allowing coaches to still do their job.

“Professionalism and respect have been important to this league but it is now a particularly important time to discuss it because everyone is entitled to a respectful workplace,” Bettman said.

Included in the proposed plan:

● Teams will be required to immediately report any incidents of inappropriate behavior by club personnel that has been brought to their attention. Failure to do so will result in “severe discipline,” according to Bettman.

● Swift and severe punishment for those involved in any future or past incidents that are brought to the NHL’s attention.

● A mandatory annual counseling program that all NHL coaches, assistant coaches, minor league coaches, general managers and assistant general managers must attend. The program, which will be created by professionals in the field outside of the NHL, will focus on consciousness-raising, education and training on diversity and inclusion. The players association and coaches association will be consulted in the formation of the program as well.

● The formation of a disciplinary counsel that will be run under the direction of NHL executive vice-president Kim Davis.

Bettman also spoke about the possibility of creating a hotline for people to call to report incidents of abuse, racism or other things that might fall into a ‘grey area’ as Bettman referred to it.

“We understand the critical importance that no one is retaliated against for raising a concern or participating in an investigation. I guarantee we will take all reports seriously and follow up,” Bettman said.

Aliu accused Peters of using racial slurs while the two were with the Rockford IceHogs of the American Hockey League from 2008-10.

Bettman said he spoke with the Board of Governors regarding the code of conduct plan and received full support.

“As one of the preeminent professional sports leagues in the world and as the preeminent hockey league in the world, we recognize and embrace our role in setting an example,” Bettman said. “We now are obviously aware of conduct that was and is unacceptable. Whether it happened 10 years ago or last week, the answer must be the same: It is unacceptable.”

The NHL is continuing to investigate the Aliu allegations as well as those made by former Carolina players that Peters physically abused them while coaching the Hurricanes. Aliu on Monday said he was encouraged Bettman is willing to embrace changes.

“Now the hard work begins of focusing on specifics and implementing policy that will make this part more diverse, safer and accountable,” Aliu said in a statement on Twitter. “We have to ensure that future generations of hockey players do not face the barriers and racism that I have throughout my career.”

Ron Francis, general manager for the Seattle expansion team, held the same job with Carolina during the alleged physical abuse and has said that he told former owner Peter Karmanos about the allegations. Karmanos, in a subsequent interview, claimed he was unaware of any incidents regarding Peters.

“There seems to be some confusion between statements by Peter Karmanos and Ron Francis, which I still need to sort out,” Bettman said. “However I am fairly clear that none of this has anything to do with Carolina under (current owner) Tom Dundon who was among the first to call me when Peters’ conduct came to light.”

Bettman said that he believes most NHL coaches conduct themselves appropriately but believes it’s critical to have a program in place to prevent issues from getting out of hand.

“Not everyone will approve of every coach’s methods,” Bettman said. “However there are lines that cannot be crossed. Clearly, physical abuse and racial and homophobic language cross the line.”

Bettman said that he and Daly were updated on the situation regarding current Chicago Blackhawks assistant coach Marc Crawford. Crawford has been accused of physical abuse by former player Sean Avery during the 2006-07 season when both were with the Los Angeles Kings. Bettman said the league is deferring to the club’s investigation on the matter.

The NHL expects to put their plans in motion as quickly as possible.

“We want to have a program that is meaningful and effective and is done in the right way,” Bettman said.

Westlake Legal Group NHL-Gary-Bettman NHL Commissioner: We will not tolerate abusive behavior fox-news/sports/nhl fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 4067ac7f-0d71-56e9-bdfb-8873dfb80de6   Westlake Legal Group NHL-Gary-Bettman NHL Commissioner: We will not tolerate abusive behavior fox-news/sports/nhl fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 4067ac7f-0d71-56e9-bdfb-8873dfb80de6

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Big Tech’s Critics, Flush With Cash, Try to Build a Movement

Westlake Legal Group 10Antitrust-illo-facebookJumbo Big Tech’s Critics, Flush With Cash, Try to Build a Movement Wu, Timothy Open Markets Institute Omidyar, Pierre M Income Inequality Hughes, Chris (1983- ) Hewlett, William and Flora, Foundation ford foundation Economic Security Project Athena (Coalition) Antitrust Laws and Competition Issues

WASHINGTON — Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders have discussed breaking up the biggest tech companies during their presidential campaigns. Federal and state regulators are investigating whether the companies have violated antitrust law.

But the activists and scholars who first raised concerns about the market power of companies like Facebook and Amazon don’t plan to stop there. They want to sell their thinking to the public, and they’re amassing wealthy backers to help them do it.

Major nonprofits, including the Ford and Hewlett Foundations, have together pledged millions of dollars toward taking on the power of the country’s corporate giants. Other supporters include groups run by George Soros, the billionaire financier, and Pierre Omidyar, an eBay founder.

The foundations regularly fund critical looks at capitalism. The Ford Foundation, for example, supports many organizations that study and fight inequality. The Hewlett Foundation, whose lineage goes back to a founder of Hewlett-Packard, has put a slice of its nearly $10 billion endowment toward organizations re-examining the free market economic policies that dominate Washington.

But the financial support is reaching new heights, and it could help the activists keep pressure on Silicon Valley by building the sort of political might that has powered liberal policy victories on issues like civil rights and net neutrality. Activists recently announced a coalition to take on Amazon, for example, that includes organizers around the country.

One of the groups receiving foundation money is led by Chris Hughes, a Facebook co-founder who now publicly argues for breaking up the social media giant. His group, the Economic Security Project, is pooling some of the money and then distributing it to projects focused on antitrust and concentration concerns. Mr. Hughes, wealthy from his time at Facebook, has contributed some of the money himself.

The Economic Security Project plans to give antitrust activists $10 million over the next 18 months. On Tuesday, the organization will announce how it plans to spend the first $3 million, putting the money toward grass-roots organizers, researchers at several Washington think tanks and a group that recruits artists to make graphics that “expose how our economy really works.”

The coming years will test whether the efforts of the advocates can harness the skepticism about large corporations and the wealthy that is animating the Democratic presidential primary race. Ultimately, these advocates hope to address corporate concentration in numerous businesses, including drugs and farm products, and combat rising economic inequality.

They have their work cut out for them. Tech companies spend tens of millions of dollars on lobbying every year. And antitrust issues hinge on dense questions of law and economics that don’t fit on a bumper stickers.

“It’s not just about trends and corporate accountability,” said Maria Torres-Springer, the vice president for United States programs at the Ford Foundation, which has a $12 billion endowment. “It’s about creating and sustaining a movement that rebuilds political and economic power for everyday Americans.”

A leading beneficiary of the money is the Open Markets Institute, a research group whose focus on antitrust issues has been pivotal in making corporate concentration a matter of public debate. It expects to bring in more than $3 million in 2020, according to an internal document from the first half of this year. In 2016, before the group split off from a bigger organization, New America, its revenue topped out at just over $900,000.

This year, the Knight Foundation, which focuses on journalism, awarded Open Markets $2 million to study the impact that concentration among technology platforms has on the media. In September, the Ford Foundation gave it $200,000 to examine how tech monopolies affect workers. A public campaign it has led to break up Facebook will expand to include Google next year, according to Sarah Miller, the organization’s deputy director.

Mr. Hughes’s Economic Security Project is contributing to that campaign. It is also paying for Open Markets to conduct public opinion polling.

“Our view is you need an ecosystem,” Mr. Hughes said. “You need a community of people who generally share the same values but who, among themselves, may even have different approaches to the issues.”

Another progressive group, Jobs With Justice, plans to hold sessions next year explaining to people the antitrust case against tech companies in simple terms. In the draft script of the training, the session’s leader seizes on a simple metaphor, asking attendees to consider two lemonade stands.

The first stand belongs to someone whose family owns the local grocery store, so it gets its lemons free. The family’s neighbors, who opened a competing stand, aren’t so lucky. Over time, the first stand is able to slash its prices to undercut the second stand.

The session leader asks for a volunteer to play the person running the stand that can’t use a family connection to get free fruit. The volunteer has to decide whether to engage in a price war with the more powerful competitor while an organizer charts the volunteer’s dire financial situation on butcher paper.

Each situation ends with the volunteer’s lemonade stand closing and a revelation: Amazon, the session leader will tell participants, has used this tactic against its competitors.

“What we wanted to do was create some field materials, some training materials, just to even explain what a monopoly meant for people,” said Erica Smiley, Jobs With Justice’s executive director. “Outside of people maybe playing the board game, it’s kind of an old idea that maybe they learned in their fourth grade civics class but haven’t necessarily re-upped on.”

Ms. Smiley’s group is one participant in Athena, the new coalition organizing opposition to Amazon over antitrust, privacy and other concerns. The coalition says it wants to raise $15 million in its first three years.

Athena will receive money from Mr. Hughes’s fund, along with other groups trying to rally the grass roots to the cause.

The civil rights group Color of Change plans to use its funding from the project to pay for new hires to lead public campaigns around antitrust issues, while the Action Center on Race and the Economy will run “corporate campaigns designed to influence the public narrative on corporate concentration and win real victories for communities of color around the country.”

Other projects, like the artists’ group, are focused on finding new ways to explore the antitrust issue. Mr. Hughes’s group paid for a New York event in November — held by a project called the Museum of Capitalism — where people could play versions of the board game Monopoly that are meant to call out inequities in the economy.

Mr. Hughes will also finance some groups doing academic research on corporate concentration and intends to support more researchers in the future.

“If you’re going to see real change, you need a community of scholars who are in dialogue with one another,” he said.

Money is already flowing to campuses. In November, the Knight Foundation allocated $3.5 million to researchers to examine questions about digital platforms, including competition issues.

The foundation, along with Mr. Omidyar’s philanthropic network, has also provided the money to introduce an antitrust-focused initiative at Yale’s business school. In an interview, Sam Gill, a Knight executive, said the foundation had not yet taken a position on whether there should be an antimonopoly movement but felt it was important to finance inquiries into the questions posed by major tech companies.

In recent years, more potential solutions to corporate concentration have emerged. While some believe in aggressive approaches like breaking up companies, others prefer new regulations or other measures.

At a conference at the University of Utah this fall, Dan Crane, a conservative law professor, challenged a group of participants including Tim Wu, a legal scholar and New York Times contributing opinion writer who is a leading voice calling for more aggressive antitrust enforcement. Mr. Crane pushed them to be more specific about the changes they would like to see in how antitrust laws are interpreted and enforced.

Over box lunches, the group wrote a statement, later published by Mr. Wu, listing legal precedents the group hopes will be overturned and policies it hopes will be enacted.

“Those who believe in a strong revival of antitrust, and a return to its antimonopoly roots, have a duty to specify what, exactly, they mean, in concrete, legal detail,” the statement said.

Mr. Wu said that, among other purposes, the statement could be a test for judicial nominees. It’s a focus reminiscent of the playbook that helped build the conservative legal movement — which in turn shaped the antitrust laws Mr. Wu and his compatriots criticize today.

“Over a 30-year period, they won almost every one of those battles,” Mr. Wu said. “They just sort of said, ‘Here’s what it should be,’ and it happened.”

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WATCH LIVE: House Democrats Expected To Unveil Articles Of Impeachment Tuesday

Westlake Legal Group ap_19343427281984-1-_wide-c43a1caf33852ea970ebe737a727f72d4cf5f720-s1100-c15 WATCH LIVE: House Democrats Expected To Unveil Articles Of Impeachment Tuesday

Mist rolls over the U.S. Capitol dome early Monday before a House Judiciary Committee hearing. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Westlake Legal Group  WATCH LIVE: House Democrats Expected To Unveil Articles Of Impeachment Tuesday

Mist rolls over the U.S. Capitol dome early Monday before a House Judiciary Committee hearing.

Patrick Semansky/AP

House Democrats will unveil articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday morning, 77 days after they launched a formal inquiry into his withholding of aid to Ukraine and request to investigate a political rival.

Leaders of the House investigating committees are expected to announce the articles at 9 a.m. ET, according to two Democratic aides.

Watch the press conference live here.

It is unclear exactly what — 0r how many — articles of impeachment Democrats will bring. In a House Judiciary hearing last week, lawmakers heard arguments for and against a number of potential articles: abuse of power and bribery, obstruction of Congress and obstruction of justice.

After it finalizes the articles, the Judiciary Committee is expected to send them to the full House for a vote on whether to impeach the president.

“The president leaves us no choice but to act because he is trying to corrupt, once again, the election for his own benefit,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said last week, announcing that Democrats were moving forward with impeachment against President Trump.

The move to draft articles of impeachment comes after the House Intelligence Committee heard lengthy testimony — first closed-door, then in public — from current and former officials. In its 300-page report released last week, the committee argued that Trump abused his office and pressured Ukraine to open investigations against former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter for Trump’s own political benefit.

In a House Judiciary Committee hearing Monday, lawyers for House Democrats presented evidence they say shows the president has abused his power, obstructed Congress and should be removed from office.

“President Trump’s persistent and continuing effort to coerce a foreign country to help him cheat to win an election is a clear and present danger to our free and fair elections and to our national security,” committee lawyer Daniel Goldman said.

Meanwhile, House Republicans have sharply dismissed the inquiry as political and criticized its process. “At the end of the day, all this is about is a clock and a calendar,” said Rep. Doug Collins, the lead Republican on the panel, “and they can’t get over the fact that Donald J. Trump is president of the United States, and they don’t think they have a candidate who can beat him.”

The White House has rejected offers from Democrats to participate in the inquiry, blocked officials from testifying and refused to turn over documents. White House lawyer Pat Cipollone has called the inquiry “completely baseless” and unfair.

Claudia Grisales contributed to this report.

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Amid Bernie Sanders’s ‘Resurgence,’ a Progressive Coalition Endorses Him

Westlake Legal Group 10sanders-progressives-facebookJumbo Amid Bernie Sanders’s ‘Resurgence,’ a Progressive Coalition Endorses Him Sanders, Bernard Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Center for Popular Democracy

The Center for Popular Democracy Action, a coalition of more than 40 progressive community groups totaling about 600,000 members, will on Tuesday endorse Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont for the Democratic presidential nomination, signaling that Mr. Sanders’s political standing among the party’s left wing has rebounded — or even risen — in the months since he suffered a heart attack.

At the time of his hospitalization, in early October, Mr. Sanders was under intense political pressure. Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts had surged past him in polling and positioned herself as the progressive standard-bearer in the race, buoyed by an endorsement from the Working Families Party, a key progressive group that had endorsed Mr. Sanders in the 2016 race.

Now, their political fortunes have shifted. Mr. Sanders has risen in the polls, while Ms. Warren has plateaued, stymied by a barrage of political attacks that have forced her to make a rare shift in messaging. Leaders for C.P.D. Action, which includes liberal groups focusing on immigration, health care, housing and other issues, said Mr. Sanders had seen a jolt of popularity within the organization in the past two months, surpassing Ms. Warren. This is the first time the group, founded in 2012, has endorsed in the presidential race.

Jennifer Epps-Addison, the group’s co-executive director, called it a “resurgence.”

“What Bernie Sanders has built — it is not arguable,” Ms. Epps-Addison said. “It’s an exciting and different energy than we’ve seen in the Democratic base.”

Mr. Sanders also nabbed the endorsement of the National Nurses United, the country’s biggest nurses’ union, in November.

The fight to become the party’s progressive front-runner is having significant effects on the battle for the Democratic nomination. Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. continues to lead in polling with the support of nonwhite and working-class voters, while groups like C.P.D. Action and the Working Families Party are seeking to entice these demographics into their progressive coalition. If they are successful, it may upend the primary.

But without a clear candidate atop the progressive coalition, and Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren still battling for pole position among their ideological base just two months before the Iowa caucus, some worry that the left will miss a critical window to overtake Mr. Biden and define the Democratic Party’s future.

“I’m a little worried about the split,” said Gustavo Torres, president of CASA in Action, a Latino and immigrant organization that is an affiliate of C.P.D.

Maurice Mitchell, the national director of the Working Families Party, acknowledged that the race remains fluid, and the electoral picture on the party’s left, like the presidential race at large, can shift at a moment’s notice.

“Warren and Sanders are both giants of the progressive movement,” Mr. Mitchell said in a statement. “We’re with Warren, but I applaud anyone putting their organizing muscle behind either of them. It’s the only way we’re going to win against the corporate Democrats and beat Donald Trump.”

For C.P.D. Action, the endorsement means it will now marshal its affiliates — more than 600,000 members across the country — to organize voters in support of Mr. Sanders in the primary. Leaders said there will be a particular focus on reaching racial minorities and a grass-roots strategy to bring new voters into the process.

Mr. Sanders, Ms. Warren and the former cabinet secretary Julián Castro were finalists for the group’s endorsements. C.P.D. Action did not release raw vote totals from its affiliates, but the Vermont senator secured a commanding 75 percent of the vote on the second ballot against Ms. Warren, said a person familiar with the process.

The group’s endorsement comes after Mr. Sanders also secured the backing of three of the most prominent and progressive members of the House: Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ilhan Omar of Minnesota.

Ms. Ocasio-Cortez campaigned for Mr. Sanders in eastern Iowa last month.

“When people try to accuse us of going too far left — we’re not pushing the party left,” Ms. Ocasio-Cortez said during a rally in Coralville. “We are bringing the party home.”

The split among progressive groups shows that while Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren are often seen as interchangeable left-wingers by the party’s moderates, leading progressives see tangible differences.

Ms. Warren has had more success among college-educated white liberals and prominent liberal activists who backed Hillary Clinton in the last presidential cycle. Mr. Sanders is often preferred by the party’s more ardent activists, who are not scared off by his willingness to buck Democratic traditions.

In their own words, Ms. Warren has defined herself as a capitalist working within the Democratic Party. Mr. Sanders has identified as a Democratic Socialist, and is an independent who has not registered with the Democratic Party during his decades in Congress.

However, leaders from C.P.D. Action said it’s that history of outside advocacy that helped sway their support to Mr. Sanders over rivals such as Ms. Warren and Mr. Castro. They clarified that both still have significant good will among the collection of members, even as their members endorse Mr. Sanders.

“His supporters have found each other collectively, and they’ve found a voice in the movement orientation of Bernie Sanders,” Ms. Epps-Addison said. “That’s the energy we need to defeat Donald Trump.”

Mr. Torres said considering the importance of next year’s election, he wants to support someone who can match the outsider persona of Mr. Trump. In that view, he sees Mr. Sanders’s self-identified socialist label as not an electoral liability but a strength.

“How we see it, Senator Sanders very clearly distinguished himself from President Trump on politics and style and behavior,” he said. And while they approve of Ms. Warren, he believes that in order to win in 2020, “we need the biggest distinction possible.”

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Big Tech Is Under Attack, and Investors Couldn’t Care Less

Westlake Legal Group 00techmarket1-facebookJumbo Big Tech Is Under Attack, and Investors Couldn’t Care Less United States Politics and Government Stocks and Bonds Standard&Poor's 500-Stock Index Microsoft Corp Facebook Inc E-Commerce Computers and the Internet Company Reports Apple Inc Amazon.com Inc

It was December 2018, and the towering giants of tech were looking wobbly.

Apple’s shares were tumbling, and it hadn’t yet delivered the bad news about a sales slowdown in China for the iPhone, a device that had helped make it the modern era’s first trillion-dollar company. Facebook could not escape the shadow of the dueling electoral scandals of Cambridge Analytica and Russian disinformation. And Amazon’s stock was sagging as the president of the United States regularly attacked the company.

Just as it appeared that the big tech companies’ endless upward march had finally come to an end, they led a remarkable rally.

This year, the S&P 500 tech sector is up roughly 40 percent, handily outpacing the 25 percent gain for the benchmark index over all, which is itself the third-best annual return of the past two decades.

Apple stock is up 69 percent, and it set a high-water mark last week. Google’s parent company, Alphabet, is up 28.5 percent, and set its own record on Monday. Microsoft shares have soared 49 percent in 2019, and Amazon is up 16.5 percent.

And Facebook — whose chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, has spent much of the past two years telling lawmakers why his company can be trusted on issues as varied as personal data and cryptocurrency — is up nearly 54 percent.

Tech has surged in part thanks to the tide of rate cuts unleashed by the Federal Reserve, which has lifted all boats. The gains also reflect the relief investors are feeling that the trade war’s worst outcomes haven’t come to pass.

The trade-sensitive chip maker AMD more than doubled on such a swing in sentiment, making it the best-performing stock in the S&P 500 so far this year. Lam Research, which produces semiconductor manufacturing equipment, is up more than 90 percent, the second-best showing.

But the giants of technology — companies like Apple, Alphabet, Amazon, Facebook and Microsoft — are the stocks that have made the market’s year. Their bulk gives them outsize sway over indexes like the S&P 500, which are weighted by market capitalization. In other words, price moves of bigger companies move the index the most.

The rise in value of these five companies alone accounted for more than 20 percent of the total returns of the S&P 500 this year, through the end of November.

“It’s been a great year for mega-cap tech for sure,” said Richard Bodzy, a portfolio manager at Putnam Investments whose top two holdings are Microsoft and Apple.

Few would have predicted such robust results a year ago.

Between October 2018 and January, Apple’s share price crashed roughly 40 percent. The stock plummeted nearly 10 percent in a single day — Jan. 3 — after the company cut its outlook for sales for the first time in over a decade, citing slowing iPhone sales in China.

Facebook’s stock dropped 43 percent from its 2018 peak to the market’s trough last December, as it faced months of scrutiny related to the use of its platform by Russians seeking to influence the 2016 American presidential campaign as well as the collection of users’ data by the political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica. The tumble included a 19 percent nose dive — the company’s worst day ever — on July 26, after executives said future profits would be hurt as it ramped up spending on security.

Amazon shares lost roughly 34 percent of their value between September 2018 and Christmas. President Trump has assailed the company and its chief executive, Jeff Bezos, who owns The Washington Post. Mr. Trump publicly accused Amazon of avoiding taxes and called The Post, which has aggressively covered the Trump administration, a lobbyist for the company. On Monday, Amazon said Mr. Trump had pressured the Pentagon to cut it out of a multibillion-dollar cloud computing contract.

With a slump of roughly 19 percent, Microsoft stood out for its relative resilience. Some investors dumped their shares late last year as the company’s juggernaut web services division experienced a temporary deceleration in sales growth.

But, just when things looked bleakest, stocks began to rise.

In January, the Federal Reserve swiveled away from its 2018 policy of raising rates, toward its eventual decision to chop them three times in 2019. The Fed’s efforts buoyed shares broadly, helping to set off the best start for the S&P 500 since the late 1980s.

The Fed chose to cut rates, in part, because of rising threats to economic growth. Those concerns also drove investors to buy shares in mega-cap tech companies.

“They are more economically resilient,” said Jeb Breece, principal at Spears Abacus, an independent money management firm in Manhattan. “A dollar of tech earnings seems like more of a sure bet than a dollar of Midwestern steel earnings.”

And earnings among the tech giants have held up better than some had feared. After ugly results in the first and second quarters, Facebook’s third quarter topped expectations for profit and revenue.

Apple’s results have also been better than expected recently, and Microsoft in particular has notched supercharged results. Its Azure cloud computing business has helped push the company’s profit growth rate up to almost 30 percent for the last three quarters.

That has driven Apple and Microsoft — which also happen to be the largest companies in the United States, by market cap — to their best performances in a decade.

The recent climbs have left these tech giants with some of the largest market values on earth. Apple and Microsoft both have a market value of over $1 trillion. Alphabet is worth more than $900 billion.

The sheer scale of these companies is part of what makes their rise this year so remarkable. While huge share price surges are common in the market for smaller capitalization companies, these are giants.

The law of large numbers means it is far more difficult to generate large percentage increases in value. A unique confluence of factors allowed these companies to break that law this year. But observers say it’s unlikely they will regularly clock such large gains.

“How does Microsoft double again? You’re adding a trillion dollars,” Mr. Breece said. “You’re just getting to huge numbers.”

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Today on Fox News: Dec. 10, 2019

STAY TUNED

On Fox News: 

Fox & Friends, 6 a.m. ET: Special guests include: Walter Blanks Jr., communications associate at American Federation for Children; Judge Andrew Napolitano, Fox News senior judicial analyst.

On Fox Business:

Mornings with Maria,  6 a.m. ET: Wilbur Ross, U.S. Secretary of Commerce; Robert Nardelli, former chairman and CEO of Chrysler; Robert Ray, former federal prosecutor.

On Fox News Radio:

The Fox News Rundown podcast: What’s Buried in the DOJ Watchdog Report on Russian Probe Launch – The much anticipated Justice Department inspector general report concerning FBI surveillance in the Russia investigation has been released. While the report uncovered a number of errors in the application process made by the FBI, it concluded that investigators found no political bias surrounding the launch of the probe. Fox News Digital politics reporter Brooke Singman and former DOJ prosecutor James Trusty weigh in on the findings of the report.

Also on the Rundown: The recent shooting at a naval base in Pensacola, Fla. has put the spotlight on the International Military Education and Training (IMET) program. The shooter, a 21-year-old Saudi Air Force pilot, was participating in the program before he shot and killed three people. There are now growing concerns about the program and allowing foreign nationals on our military bases. FOX News military analyst Col. David Hunt discusses the purpose of IMET and how this shooting could impact its future.

Plus, commentary by Deroy Murdock, contributing editor with National Review and Fox News contributor.

Want the Fox News Rundown sent straight to your mobile device? Subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher.

The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: Special guests include: U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton. R-Ark.; Allen West, former Florida congressman; and more.

Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News: Dec. 10, 2019 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 14d54ca6-8675-50c5-9dcc-d9defa52c124   Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News: Dec. 10, 2019 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 14d54ca6-8675-50c5-9dcc-d9defa52c124

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House Democrats Expected To Unveil Articles Of Impeachment Tuesday

Westlake Legal Group ap_19343427281984-1-_wide-c43a1caf33852ea970ebe737a727f72d4cf5f720-s1100-c15 House Democrats Expected To Unveil Articles Of Impeachment Tuesday

Mist rolls over the U.S. Capitol dome early Monday before a House Judiciary Committee hearing. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Westlake Legal Group  House Democrats Expected To Unveil Articles Of Impeachment Tuesday

Mist rolls over the U.S. Capitol dome early Monday before a House Judiciary Committee hearing.

Patrick Semansky/AP

House Democrats will unveil articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday morning, 77 days after they launched a formal inquiry into his withholding of aid to Ukraine and request to investigate a political rival.

Leaders of the House investigating committees are expected to announce the articles at 9 a.m. ET, according to two Democratic aides.

Watch the press conference live here.

It is unclear exactly what — 0r how many — articles of impeachment Democrats will bring. In a House Judiciary hearing last week, lawmakers heard arguments for and against a number of potential articles: abuse of power and bribery, obstruction of Congress and obstruction of justice.

After it finalizes the articles, the Judiciary Committee is expected to send them to the full House for a vote on whether to impeach the president.

“The president leaves us no choice but to act because he is trying to corrupt, once again, the election for his own benefit,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said last week, announcing that Democrats were moving forward with impeachment against President Trump.

The move to draft articles of impeachment comes after the House Intelligence Committee heard lengthy testimony — first closed-door then in public — from current and former officials. In its 300-page report released last week, the committee argued that Trump abused his office and pressured Ukraine to open investigations against former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter for Trump’s own political benefit.

In a House Judiciary Committee hearing Monday, lawyers for House Democrats presented evidence they say shows the president has abused his power, obstructed Congress and should be removed from office.

“President Trump’s persistent and continuing effort to coerce a foreign country to help him cheat to win an election is a clear and present danger to our free and fair elections and to our national security,” committee lawyer Daniel Goldman said.

Meanwhile, House Republicans have sharply dismissed the inquiry as political and criticized its process. “At the end of the day, all this is about is a clock and a calendar,” said Rep. Doug Collins, the lead Republican on the panel, “and they can’t get over the fact that Donald J. Trump is president of the United States, and they don’t think they have a candidate who can beat him.”

The White House has rejected offers from Democrats to participate in the inquiry, blocked officials from testifying and refused to turn over documents. White House lawyer Pat Cipollone has called the inquiry “completely baseless” and unfair.

Claudia Grisales contributed to this report.

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Lawsuit Claims SAT And ACT Are Illegal In California Admissions

Westlake Legal Group summer-sat-final-revised_slide-13f4cc04f000d4e87089843af93c85ec8e5246e4-s1100-c15 Lawsuit Claims SAT And ACT Are Illegal In California Admissions
Ryan Johnson for NPR
Westlake Legal Group  Lawsuit Claims SAT And ACT Are Illegal In California Admissions

Ryan Johnson for NPR

Fatima Martinez knows there’s a lot riding on her SAT score.

“My future is at stake,” says the Los Angeles high school senior. “The score I will receive will determine which UC schools I get into.”

But that may not always be the case.

A lawsuit expected to be filed Tuesday is challenging the University of California system’s use of the SAT or ACT as a requirement for admission. A draft of the document obtained by NPR argues the tests — long used to measure aptitude for college — are deeply biased and provide no meaningful information about a student’s ability to succeed, and therefore their requirement is unconstitutional.

“The evidence that we’re basing the lawsuit on is not in dispute,” says attorney Mark Rosenbaum of the pro bono firm Public Counsel. “What the SAT and ACT are doing are exacerbating inequities in the public school system and keeping out deserving students every admissions cycle.”

Public Counsel is filing the suit in California Superior Court on behalf of students and a collection of advocacy groups.

The University of California system has long debated dropping the tests, and some university leaders have expressed their support. At an event in November, Carol Christ, the chancellor of UC Berkeley, said, “I’m very much in favor of doing away with the SAT or ACT as a requirement for application to the University of California.” UC Berkeley was quick to clarify that comment didn’t signal a policy change.

UC spokesperson Claire Doan couldn’t comment on the lawsuit because it hadn’t been filed yet. She says a special faculty task force is currently investigating the use of standardized testing in admissions, and the university system is “waiting for the assessment and recommendations from the … Task Force before determining whether any steps should be taken on this important issue.”

The university has been evaluating the requirement through a policy lens, but the lawsuit argues it’s a legal issue: “This policy illegally discriminates against applicants on the basis of race and wealth, and thereby denies them equal protection under the California Constitution.”

The University of California serves more than 250,000 students, and is one of the largest school systems in the country. About 50 years ago, the system adopted the SAT as a way to weed out applicants — a decision that helped elevate the test to a national standard.

But research has since shown that SAT scores are strongly linked to family income, and a student’s high school academic record, regardless of what school they attended, does a far better job of predicting college success.

The College Board, the organization behind the SAT, says grades and test scores function together, providing “more insight into a student’s potential to succeed than either measure alone.” Research conducted by the College Board maintains that SAT scores are predictive of success in college. The ACT says its test is not biased. In a statement, it tells NPR, “Blaming standardized tests for differences in educational quality and opportunities that exist will not improve educational outcomes.”

Nonetheless, more and more schools are turning to test-optional admissions policies. In 2019, nearly 50 schools dropped the standardized tests from admissions requirements, according to the National Center for Fair and Open Testing, an advocacy group that has long been critical of standardized testing. Those schools joined a pool of about 1,000 colleges across the country. One of those colleges, the University of Chicago, claims the decision to go test-optional — along with increased financial aid — has led to an increase of first-generation and low-income students on campus.

“If the University of California were to go ahead and drop the testing requirements, it would have profound and widespread effects in the college admissions arena,” says Bob Schaeffer, director of the National Center for Fair and Open Testing. “If University of California can go test-optional, pretty much any school could.”

Still, attorney Mark Rosenbaum acknowledges option testing won’t completely solve the problem.

“There probably is no playing field less level than the journey to go to college and higher education — and the SATs are a part of that,” Rosenbaum says. “But they’re not the whole story.”

He hopes the lawsuit will fuel a larger conversation around college admissions.

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