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Westlake Legal Group > News and News Media (Page 62)

Handcuffed suspect stole police cruiser, authorities say

Westlake Legal Group handcuffs-istock Handcuffed suspect stole police cruiser, authorities say fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 783d4f50-56b4-5f1d-947c-2151832c3220

Police in Pennsylvania had their hands full Saturday with a suspect who had to be arrested twice, according to reports.

Officers initially arrested Monica Nicole Christian, 31, after responding to reports of squatters in a neighborhood in Rochester Township, near Pittsburgh.

Police say Christian became violent with them during the arrest, WTAE-TV reported.

GEORGIA MAN GETS 7 YEARS FOR KILLING PARTYGOER WITH SLAP TO THROAT

But once inside a police cruiser, the handcuffed Christian managed to climb through the cage separating the front and back seats – and then drive off in the police cruiser while the officer was gathering some items outside the vehicle, the Times of Rochester reported.

At some point the suspect slipped off the handcuffs, parked the vehicle and fled on foot, the report said.

But tips from neighbors helped police locate the suspect, according to WPXI-TV.

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“Without their assistance, we would have had a hard time trying to track her down,” Sgt. Dawn Shane of the Rochester Police department told WTAE.

Christian was later seen on local television, sticking her tongue out at a news crew as she was escorted by law enforcement officers.

Authorities say the suspect was wanted in Texas for robbery.

Westlake Legal Group handcuffs-istock Handcuffed suspect stole police cruiser, authorities say fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 783d4f50-56b4-5f1d-947c-2151832c3220   Westlake Legal Group handcuffs-istock Handcuffed suspect stole police cruiser, authorities say fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 783d4f50-56b4-5f1d-947c-2151832c3220

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83-year-old flower girl steals show at granddaughter’s wedding: ‘Grandma executed it perfectly’

Stand aside, all other flower girls – this grandmother just stole the show.

When bride Brenna Kleman was planning to marry Brock Kendall in Wichita, Kan., in April, she knew she needed her 83-year-old grandmother to be involved.

BRIDE WALKS DOWN AISLE AND DANCES WITH SON WHO HAS ‘LIFE-LIMITING’ HEART DEFECT

“I was taking care of a very sick elderly woman who told me the story how she was a flower girl for her grandchild,” the bride, a registered nurse, told HuffPost. “She was my inspiration to bring my own grandmother into my wedding day.”

Westlake Legal Group grandmother-flower-girl-4-Thomas-Felts-Photography 83-year-old flower girl steals show at granddaughter’s wedding: 'Grandma executed it perfectly' fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article Alexandra Deabler 21de92af-7cfb-5815-9b0f-fea9c808a553

When bride Brenna Kleman was planning to marry Brock Kendall in Wichita, Kan., in April, she knew she needed her 83-year-old grandmother to be involved. (Thomas Felts Photography)

However, Kleman likely didn’t expect her grandmother, who has a flair for drama, to go viral for her brilliant job as a flower girl.

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The photos, taken by Thomas Felts Photography, show the octogenarian throwing flower petals way up into the air at the end of the aisle, smiling widely as the bride looks on in the background.

“Grandpa was so proud of her,” the bride said to HuffPost. “He told the photographer, ‘That’s my flower girl.’ The photographer did such a great job in directing the shot and grandma executed it perfectly. Every time she threw more petals in the air, our family cheered louder.”

Westlake Legal Group grandmother-flower-girl-3-Thomas-Felts-Photography 83-year-old flower girl steals show at granddaughter’s wedding: 'Grandma executed it perfectly' fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article Alexandra Deabler 21de92af-7cfb-5815-9b0f-fea9c808a553

Kleman likely didn’t expect her grandmother, which an obvious flair for drama, would go viral for her brilliant job as a flower girl. (Thomas Felts Photography)

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The photos originally went viral after the bride’s cousin posted them on social media. And on the photographer’s Facebook, fans of the photoshoot were quick to share their praises.

“This one is so fun!!” one person commented.

“Love it!” another wrote.

Westlake Legal Group grandmother-flower-girl-3-Thomas-Felts-Photography 83-year-old flower girl steals show at granddaughter’s wedding: 'Grandma executed it perfectly' fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article Alexandra Deabler 21de92af-7cfb-5815-9b0f-fea9c808a553   Westlake Legal Group grandmother-flower-girl-3-Thomas-Felts-Photography 83-year-old flower girl steals show at granddaughter’s wedding: 'Grandma executed it perfectly' fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article Alexandra Deabler 21de92af-7cfb-5815-9b0f-fea9c808a553

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Soldier who lost ear in accident gets another after doctors ‘grow’ it on her arm

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6058468325001_6058473981001-vs Soldier who lost ear in accident gets another after doctors 'grow' it on her arm Manny Alvarez fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/health/medical-mysteries-marvels fox news fnc/health fnc article 4f785b04-1f75-51f5-b359-40c2c684acd8

Pvt. Shamika Burrage lost her entire left ear during a car accident on her way to visit family in Texas, says a report from the U.S. Army. The soldier needed counseling to deal with her emotions after the accident, including dealing with discontentment about the way she looked.

At the urging of her counselor, Burrage looked into plastic surgery for the missing ear. That’s when she found surgeons at William Beaumont Army Medical Center (WBAMC) who had a radical idea.

ALABAMA BOY WITH ONE-OF-A-KIND GENETIC DISORDER DEFIES ODDS AT AGE 6: HE’S A ‘MIRACLE’

The medical team wanted to use cartilage from Burrage’s ribs to form a new, non-artificial ear. The ear would then need to “grow” under the skin of the soldier’s arm before transplanting could take place.

According to Lt. Col. Owen Johnson III, chief, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, he saw that Burrage had “her whole life ahead of her.” Young soldiers like her deserve the best option they can get, Johnson stated in the U.S. Army report.

Burrage had lost the use of her ear when her tire blew out while traveling with her cousin. Burrage then hit the brakes before the vehicle skidded and rolled several times.

The soldier suffered head and spinal injuries along with losing her left ear because of the accident. However, her cousin, who was eight months pregnant at the time, only incurred minor injuries.

FACE TRANSPLANT HELPS SUICIDE SURVIVOR GET LIFE BACK

The bizarre idea of growing a new ear came after several months of recovery and medical attention. Johnson said the new ear would even have blood vessels and nerves in it. The soldier would be able to hear and feel it once attached.

At first, Burrage didn’t want to do reconstructive surgery. But after a while, she reminded herself that surgery could be “a good thing.” According to the report, Burrage didn’t lose any hearing in her ear but needed surgery to open the canal back up.

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Surgeons from WBAMC successfully transplanted their homegrown ear in 2018, leaving Burrage “optimistic and excited” about the final result.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6058468325001_6058473981001-vs Soldier who lost ear in accident gets another after doctors 'grow' it on her arm Manny Alvarez fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/health/medical-mysteries-marvels fox news fnc/health fnc article 4f785b04-1f75-51f5-b359-40c2c684acd8   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6058468325001_6058473981001-vs Soldier who lost ear in accident gets another after doctors 'grow' it on her arm Manny Alvarez fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/health/medical-mysteries-marvels fox news fnc/health fnc article 4f785b04-1f75-51f5-b359-40c2c684acd8

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Paul Batura: A Space Age playground taught me anything was possible in America

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5754772243001_5754730216001-vs Paul Batura: A Space Age playground taught me anything was possible in America Paul Batura fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/opinion fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox news fnc/opinion fnc d5a4cf1d-28c1-598b-9eb8-749eca137a05 article

Whether you grew up in a city, the suburbs or a small, rural town, every American adult has memories of a childhood playground — that magical, happy place where you spent carefree hours during the early season of your life.

If I close my eyes, I can see the sweeping, leafy expanse of Baldwin Park on Long Island’s south shore. It was built in the 1960s, a byproduct of the baby boom and post-World War II suburban living. Well-funded and meticulously maintained, it was one of our town’s golden jewels.

By comparison to today’s gentrified, safety-conscious parks that feature soft rubber mats, plastic equipment and no structure more than a few feet off the ground, the play structures of my childhood were lawsuits-in-waiting.

APOLLO 11: NASA AND THE ‘LOST’ MOON LANDING TAPES

There was lots of hard metal bolted onto asphalt and concrete along with sharp, shiny aluminum slides that seemed to heat well above 100 degrees in the hot summer sun. We even had tall pyramids made of brick that we would scale and leap from with wild abandon.

But the pièce de résistance of Baldwin Park had to be the rocket slide, a towering structure located beyond the swings and dizzying whirl that inevitably left a pile of kids in its wake.

To a kid like me, that rocket slide was a thousand feet tall, an imposing four-floor contraption that rose high up into the sky like the Apollo 11 spacecraft that years earlier had taken men to the moon.

I wasn’t yet born when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin first set foot on the lunar surface, a defining moment that occurred 50 years ago this coming week. But my parents and siblings never stopped talking about that warm summer night and how they watched in awe and wonder as the walk on the moon it unfolded in grainy black and white television images.

By the time I came along in 1972, there had been four more crewed lunar landings and the awesomeness had become somewhat normalized. But not to me, especially each time I stepped inside that playground rocket and began the long climb to the top.

Symbols are often dismissed for their shallowness, but the presence of that towering space-inspired slide subtly but assuredly reminded me that I lived in a country and at a time when anything was possible.

It wasn’t the only one. Oceanside Pool had its own water version, a two-story red, white and blue rocket slide that sent riders splashing down into the lap lanes.

American culture was space-crazy in the late 1960s and 70s. Fashion, architecture and even children’s television programs reflected both the pride and the realization of American potential.

“The Jetsons” animated television show was silly – but you couldn’t watch as a kid and wonder if there was some truth in the zaniness, a foretaste of the future, complete with flying cars and meals at the push of a button.

As we washed dishes each Sunday night after supper, we’d listen to the weekly sermon of Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, the long-time minister of New York City’s Marble Collegiate Church and the author of the classic best-seller, “The Power of Positive Thinking.”

I loved his preaching, because he always spoke with such enthusiasm about the future. He also raved about human potential and the importance of reaching for things just beyond your grasp.

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“Shoot for the moon,” the late minister once said. “Even if you miss, you’ll land among the stars.”

That was good advice 50 years ago – and it remains wise counsel today no matter who you are or where you want to go.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY PAUL BATURA

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5754772243001_5754730216001-vs Paul Batura: A Space Age playground taught me anything was possible in America Paul Batura fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/opinion fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox news fnc/opinion fnc d5a4cf1d-28c1-598b-9eb8-749eca137a05 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5754772243001_5754730216001-vs Paul Batura: A Space Age playground taught me anything was possible in America Paul Batura fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/opinion fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox news fnc/opinion fnc d5a4cf1d-28c1-598b-9eb8-749eca137a05 article

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Justice Dept. probing whether J&J lied to public about talcum powder’s cancer risk: report

A federal grand jury in Washington is looking into what Johnson & Johnson officials knew about the cancer risks in the company’s Baby Powder-brand talcum powder and other products, according to a report.

The New Jersey-based company is the subject of a U.S. Department of Justice criminal investigation as well as a regulatory probe amid allegations from thousands of cancer patients that J&J products played a role in their illnesses, Bloomberg reported last week.

The company is facing more than 14,000 lawsuits alleging that J&J talc products caused people’s ovarian cancer or mesothelioma, a condition linked to asbestos, the report said.

ASBESTOS FOUND IN CLAIRE’S MAKEUP PRODUCTS, FDA WARNS

Meanwhile, a J&J spokeswoman told Bloomberg that the company was “fully cooperating” with the Justice investigation. She also denied that the company’s Baby Powder contains asbestos or causes cancer, and said the company’s position is “supported by decades of independent clinical evidence.”

Westlake Legal Group 2016-02-24T173004Z_1_LYNXNPEC1N159_3_USA-BUSINESS Justice Dept. probing whether J&J lied to public about talcum powder’s cancer risk: report fox-news/newsedge/business fox-news/health/cancer fox-news/health fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 11730269-1cf4-5074-9ef8-d1c8c1e8b040

Bottles of Johnson & Johnson baby powder line a drugstore shelf in New York. (Reuters)

But in recent years nearly a dozen juries have concluded that J&J knew some of its Baby Powder and Shower-to-Shower products contained asbestos and did not make the information available to consumers, the report said. Such cases have cost J&J more than $5 billion in payouts to plaintiffs, the report said.

J&J has since sold the Shower-to-Shower brand to another company that has an agreement with J&J protecting it from any asbestos lawsuits linked to the brand, according to Bloomberg.

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In March, a jury in California awarded $29 million to a woman who claimed J&J products caused her terminal cancer.

Last December, J&J shares suffered their worst loss in 16 years after Reuters reported the company knew for decades about asbestos content in its products. The company forcefully denied the veracity of the Reuters report.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 2016-02-24T173004Z_1_LYNXNPEC1N159_3_USA-BUSINESS Justice Dept. probing whether J&J lied to public about talcum powder’s cancer risk: report fox-news/newsedge/business fox-news/health/cancer fox-news/health fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 11730269-1cf4-5074-9ef8-d1c8c1e8b040   Westlake Legal Group 2016-02-24T173004Z_1_LYNXNPEC1N159_3_USA-BUSINESS Justice Dept. probing whether J&J lied to public about talcum powder’s cancer risk: report fox-news/newsedge/business fox-news/health/cancer fox-news/health fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 11730269-1cf4-5074-9ef8-d1c8c1e8b040

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Beatles Fans Go Bonkers As Paul And Ringo Reunite On L.A. Stage

Westlake Legal Group 5d2ade3b2400008c1793570a Beatles Fans Go Bonkers As Paul And Ringo Reunite On L.A. Stage

Los Angeles Beatles fans thought they died and went to heaven Saturday night when Ringo Starr joined Paul McCartney on stage to perform “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” — and “Helter Skelter.”

The audience at Paul’s massive Dodger Stadium concert screamed when he announced during the encore a “surprise for everyone” — the “one and only Ringo Starr!” The Beatles drummer walked on stage, embraced his old band mate, and Paul kissed him on the top of the head, according to The Blast. “Peace and love, everybody!” Ringo shouted. “All right, brother,” said McCartney. “I love you, man.”

McCartney clutched his bass and Starr settled in behind the drums, and they let loose … on an appropriately psychedelic stage. Ringo stuck around to play “Helter Skelter” — and everyone enjoyed the show.

Ringo tossed his sticks into the audience when he finished, and pretended to reach for Paul’s bass to chuck that in, too. “It’s been a thrill for me,” he said. “And I love you, man.” Paul told his old pal (again): “I love you, man. Peace and love, Ringo.”

“I don’t think I’ll see something more iconic in my entire life,” tweeted one lucky fan in the audience. Another gushed on Twitter: “I LOVE MY LIFE.”

Ringo just turned 79 July 7. Paul wished a happy birthday on Instagram to the “best drummer in the world.”

It was the last night of McCartney’s solo American tour that started in May in New Orleans. “Farewell to you guys,” Paul said at the end, Variety reported. “Farewell to America. Only one thing left to be said: We’ll see you next time.”

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Jim DeMint: ObamaCare is a mess – but many Dems favor more radical ideas that would make things worse

Westlake Legal Group debate Jim DeMint: ObamaCare is a mess – but many Dems favor more radical ideas that would make things worse Jim DeMint fox-news/us/economy fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/opinion fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 67385eda-4d51-55ac-aa70-19ebcfe94233

It was only a few years ago that President Barack Obama and congressional Democrats rammed into law a trillion-dollar mish-mash of government spending, taxes and regulations called the Affordable Care Act – more commonly known as ObamaCare.

The rollout was a mess – Obama’s team couldn’t even design a functioning website.

And it’s only been downhill from there.

ALFREDO ORTIZ: HOUSE DEMS FOCUS ON SINGLE-PAYER HEALTH CARE – HERE’S WHAT YOU WON’T HEAR

Millions of Americans lost health insurance plans they liked. Millions more were priced out of the government-controlled exchanges, and so couldn’t afford the promised “affordable” care at all.

And most of the people ObamaCare supposedly helped found themselves not with good insurance, but stuck in a Medicaid program so dysfunctional that most doctors don’t even accept it anymore.

But if you think this mess might humble Democrats‘ confidence in big government and themselves, think again.

Today leading liberals are no longer content with politicians and bureaucrats controlling most of the American health care system – they want Washington to take it all. The total federal takeover of the U.S. medical industry was once the fever dream of socialist extremists like Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.

But today, so-called “single-payer” health insurance – including the elimination of all private health insurance – is the mainstream position of the Democratic Party. It is going to be their platform in the 2020 presidential campaign, and their plan as soon as they win back power.

Like most progressive slogans, so-called “single-payer” health care sounds nice. But, as health care expert Chris Jacobs lays out in his new book, The Case Against Single Payer, the reality is worse than the talking points.

Make no mistake: “single-payer” health care means politicians and bureaucrats – not patients or their families, not doctors or nurses or other providers – call the shots. During the debates about ObamaCare, Democrats promised their plan was a compromise that would split the difference between market-driven and government-controlled health care.

Under single-payer health care, there is no difference to split. It means government pays the doctors and hospital beds, pays for the tests, pays for the medicine, pays for everything – that means government, not you or your doctor, will be calling the shots.

Since there is no upper limit on health care services people might want, politicians in charge of single-payer systems have to choose whether to bankrupt their countries, or ration care. They start by raising taxes, but it’s never enough. They always end up rationing care. What does that mean?

It means refusing certain medicines, surgeries, procedures, and services to patients the government deems unworthy of the expense.

Under single-payer health care, you’ll pay more not just for less health care, but to be refused care that you need and could otherwise afford. You don’t have to be an expert to know who this rationing will hurt the most – the very young, the very old, and individuals with disabilities.

Every Democratic version of single-payer health care would include taxpayer-funded abortion-on-demand. Indeed, they will go a step further and require pro-life doctors to perform abortions and other procedures that violate their religious beliefs.

But single-payer health care would not only be morally bankrupt; it would be plain-old bankrupt too!

America already faces a $22 trillion national debt. Former Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Michael Mullen has called the debt our biggest national security risk.

Single-payer health care is projected to cost a minimum of $32 trillion all by itself, just in the first 10 years of implementation. Such fiscal recklessness would not just swamp the federal budget; it could drown our entire economy.

The left has an almost theological belief in the capacity of government to solve everyone’s problems. But the history of socialized medicine – in Canada, Great Britain, and elsewhere – is that it causes more problems than it solves.

Democrats are right that American health care is too expensive and bureaucratic, warps our economy, and riddles the federal budget with waste and cronyism. But their proposed solution would only double-down on these dysfunctions.

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Real health care reform requires getting politicians and bureaucrats out of the way. They have done enough harm as it is. It’s time to get health care power out of Washington.

Politicians can’t solve our health care problems. They should hand control of the system back to the patients, families, and health care providers who can.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY JIM DEMINT

Westlake Legal Group debate Jim DeMint: ObamaCare is a mess – but many Dems favor more radical ideas that would make things worse Jim DeMint fox-news/us/economy fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/opinion fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 67385eda-4d51-55ac-aa70-19ebcfe94233   Westlake Legal Group debate Jim DeMint: ObamaCare is a mess – but many Dems favor more radical ideas that would make things worse Jim DeMint fox-news/us/economy fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/opinion fox-news/health fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 67385eda-4d51-55ac-aa70-19ebcfe94233

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Blackout gives New York’s governor opportunity to blast New York City’s absentee mayor

One consequence of New York City’s Saturday night blackout: It shined a bright spotlight on the tensions between two prominent Democrats, the city’s mayor and the state’s governor.

As more than 70,000 customers — plus countless tourists and other visitors — dealt with the loss of electricity attributed to a transformer fire, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo blasted New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, who was in Iowa campaigning for president when the massive blackout hit Manhattan.

“I can count the number of times I leave the state basically on my fingers,” Cuomo told CNN, responding to a question about the importance of the mayor being in New York during an emergency.

MANHATTAN TRANSFORMER FIRE KNOCKS OUT POWER TO THOUSANDS IN MIDTOWN, UPPER WEST SIDE

“Mayors are important. And situations like this come up, you know. And you have to be on-site,” he said. “I think it’s important to be in a place where you can always respond. But look, everybody makes their own political judgment and I’m not going to second-guess anyone either. I do my job the way I think I should do my job and I leave it to others to do the same.”

“Mayors are important. And situations like this come up, you know. And you have to be on-site.”

— New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo

Westlake Legal Group b2578e2a-de-blasio-cuomo-split-720 Blackout gives New York's governor opportunity to blast New York City's absentee mayor fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/person/andrew-cuomo fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson article af40990a-004e-590a-abd6-daa9c47c0336

Although both are Democrats, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, left and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo have had a strained relationship. 

De Blasio was at a campaign stop in Waterloo, Iowa, when an equipment failure at a transformer substation shut off power for tens of thousands of people in his city.

The mayor first told CNN he was mulling whether to return to New York, but later decided he would, according to the Washington Examiner. He plans to fly back to the city Sunday morning, a spokesperson said.

Late Saturday, the mayor issued several Twitter messages, indicating he was monitoring the situation back home.

NEW YORK DEMS CUOMO, DE BLASIO STILL SEEM AT ODDS

“With the power back on, I’ve directed City agencies to investigate this evening’s blackout,” he wrote. “They’ll work with ConEd to get to the bottom of what happened tonight and prevent another widespread outage like this.”

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Meanwhile, the governor was in New York City, speaking to reporters just before midnight. He confirmed that power had been restored to all affected customers.

“This could have been much worse,” Cuomo added, commending emergency responders. “When things are at their worst New Yorkers are at their best.”

The governor said he would be working with utility company Con Edison to make sure a blackout of Saturday’s magnitude doesn’t happen again.

Westlake Legal Group de-blasio-cuomo-split-720 Blackout gives New York's governor opportunity to blast New York City's absentee mayor fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/person/andrew-cuomo fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson article af40990a-004e-590a-abd6-daa9c47c0336   Westlake Legal Group de-blasio-cuomo-split-720 Blackout gives New York's governor opportunity to blast New York City's absentee mayor fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/person/andrew-cuomo fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson article af40990a-004e-590a-abd6-daa9c47c0336

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With ICE Raids Looming, Immigrants Worry: ‘Every Time Someone Knocks, You Get Scared’

All week, Veronica had distracted herself from a constant barrage of news about a series of coordinated immigration raids that the Trump administration planned to begin this weekend in cities across the country.

She worked late every night, preparing for a weeklong family vacation to Florida to visit Disney World and go fishing. She booked a three-bedroom apartment for herself and 13 family members. She packed her 4-year-old daughter’s Mickey Mouse backpack and “Frozen”-themed suitcase with clothes, stuffed animals and a blanket to sleep with.

But then, the woman who cleans Veronica’s home, who is undocumented, showed her cellphone videos of immigration arrests happening in Miami. The woman warned that Freddie, Veronica’s husband and partner of 15 years, who is undocumented and has a standing deportation order, could be swept up. Other family members and friends started to call, saying the same.

Hours before the family was scheduled to pile into cars for the long drive to Florida from their home in Prince George’s County, Maryland, Veronica, who asked to be identified only by her first name, called her immigration lawyer for advice. The lawyer told her to cancel.

“It’s a disaster because my daughter was happy that we were taking this trip. She’s only 4 years old but she knows a lot things,” Veronica said. “Now we don’t know how we are going to explain to her that we’re not going to be able to go on vacation anymore.”

President Trump’s promises on Friday that the administration would execute a series of immigration arrests nationwide added to fears that have been growing among immigrant communities for more than a month, as the raids have been debated, scheduled and then rescheduled.

The operation will target some 2,000 undocumented immigrants who crossed the border recently, in groups of family units. That is a departure from what is typical for Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents, who tend to focus on deporting adults who entered the country alone. But word of the operation seems to have struck fear across undocumented communities, including among people who have been living here for years.

Immigration agents were spotted on Friday in Immokalee, Fla., about 40 miles east of Naples, though it was not clear whether their work was connected to the larger operation. Norelia Sanchez, an immigrant family support worker with the Redlands Christian Migrant Association in Immokalee, said locals had called her at 6 a.m., when ICE agents were seen parked outside of a local Hispanic restaurant.

Ms. Sanchez said residents had reported seeing the agents “knocking door by door.” Her organization was still trying to confirm on Saturday reports that a mother had been detained when she had met one of her children at a bus stop.

Some parents called the center’s offices and apologized for not sending their children into summer day care and education programs; they would not be leaving the house because of ICE’s presence, they told Ms. Sanchez and her colleagues.

“The ones who did, you could actually see mothers with children, holding their hands, holding their cellphones, and they were literally running to the school,” Ms. Sanchez said.

The Campo Rojo area, where many migrants live, appeared deserted on Friday, Ms. Sanchez said. “It was just plain silent. It was completely a ghost town.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157875297_3a893e80-6dc0-4f50-8b22-9f24679b8480-articleLarge With ICE Raids Looming, Immigrants Worry: ‘Every Time Someone Knocks, You Get Scared’ United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Immigration Detention Immigration and Emigration Immigration and Customs Enforcement (US) Illegal Immigration Deportation

Demonstrators held photos of children who have died in detention during a rally Friday outside of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Chicago.CreditBrittany Greeson for The New York Times

The raids were planned out of Mr. Trump’s frustration over the steady stream of migrant parents and children who began crossing the border in record numbers last October, with numbers increasing almost every month since. Though border crossings dropped slightly in June, the administration says that the situation is still a “humanitarian crisis.”

Caving to pressure from Democratic lawmakers and immigrant advocates who had labeled the raid operation as inhumane and unnecessary, Mr. Trump delayed the raids in June, saying that he would give Democratic lawmakers time to adjust existing immigration laws to tighten up the asylum process. In the absence of legislative change, plans for the raids re-emerged this week, spiking fear once again.

Now, a number of undocumented immigrants — particularly those in the dozen or so cities that are rumored to be a focus of the event — are making plans to evade arrest. Some have fled their homes, choosing to get as far as possible from the addresses that the government has on file for them. Others are hunkering down with reserves of food, planning to shut themselves inside until the operation ends.

They are helped by the fact that ICE agents cannot forcibly enter the homes of their targets under the law. But if past tactics are any measure, agents are likely to come to the operation armed with ruses to coax people outside. They will likely have new strategies that might help to counteract the preparations that undocumented immigrants have been making with the help of their lawyers.

Anticipating that they will not manage to block all of the arrests through preventive strategies, immigration lawyers and advocates across the country have been working swiftly to distribute contingency plans for those who are captured.

Shannon Camacho, a coordinator of the Los Angeles Raids Rapid Response Network for immigrants, said the organization is urging undocumented parents with children who are United States citizens or legal permanent residents to sign caregiver affidavits, so that if the parents are deported, the children will not be left without legal guardians.

“When people are arrested, their children can’t be picked up from school, or if they’re caring for the elderly, no one will be around to give them their medicine. We tell them to have designated people in their friends or family networks to respond,” said Ms. Camacho.

Mony Ruiz-Velasco, the director of PASO-West Suburban Action Project, a community group in Melrose Park, Ill., said her staff and volunteers were advising families to memorize at least one phone number so that they can call for help if they are detained.

Win, the largest nonprofit provider of shelters for families with children in New York, notified families with undocumented members to be cautious and to leave over the weekend, if necessary, a person familiar with the instructions confirmed. The nonprofit operates 11 shelters, and houses about 10 percent of the nearly 12,000 families in the city currently living in shelters.

A 17-year-old girl, who lives in one of the shelters and who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said a shelter employee used coded language to warn her family to go into hiding and to return on Monday. “They said, ‘Your room is going to be very hot this weekend. Come back Monday when things cool off,’” she said.

Meanwhile, immigrants’ rights lawyers were preparing to file court motions to reopen the immigration cases of people who are arrested in the operation before they can be deported. Doing so will require that the lawyers get access to the detention centers where the migrants will be held, and it is unclear whether federal officials will make such access available, lawyers said.

“We have a library at this point of different kinds of motions that we can file,” said Judy London, directing attorney of Public Counsel’s Immigrants’ Rights Project in Los Angeles. She added: “The access issue is what we are most concerned about.”

Ms. London’s organization is party to a lawsuit filed this week in New York to prevent the operation. In the lawsuit, the lawyers, represented by the American Civil Liberties Union, claim that many of the migrants who are being targeted failed to appear in immigration court — a common reason for a deportation order — because the Trump administration did not inform them of their court dates.

Across the country, news of the operation sparked fear, even among immigrants who were unlikely to be affected — such as those who had never had an encounter with federal authorities, and were therefore unknown to the government, according to lawyers who were making preparations on Friday.

In Atlanta, Anna Ruiz, a legal intern with the social justice organization Project South, handed out information about the rights of people who may be targeted by ICE.CreditMelissa Golden for The New York Times

That afternoon, Atlanta immigration lawyer Charles Kuck took audience questions from inside the Univision 34 studio for a Facebook Live interview. Some in the audience said they had work permits or pending green card applications, or had been granted permission by authorities to voluntarily leave the United States but had not yet reached the deadline before which they must do so. They asked if they should be worried. In each case, his answer was no.

“There are people worrying who shouldn’t be worrying,” Mr. Kuck said in a phone interview afterward.

After a brief stop at a Chick-fil-A, Mr. Kuck planned to meet with more clients, conduct a second Facebook Live interview, and attend a “Lights for Liberty” rally at Plaza Fiesta, a sprawling strip mall along Buford Highway, a corridor that is home to many Atlanta-area immigrants. As he continued to arm immigrants with information about their legal rights, he hoped to tame the panic that had spread throughout the region’s Latino communities.

“ICE isn’t driving up and down Buford Highway,” Mr. Kuck said. “They’re going to do targeted raids. I’d be shocked if Atlanta took more than a couple hundred people.”

Democratic lawmakers also rallied around immigrants, promising to protect their rights to due process and prevent as many arrests as possible. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot said on Friday that the city would increase funding for legal protections for immigrant families, and reiterated that she had banned ICE from accessing Chicago Police Department databases related to federal immigration enforcement activities.

Harry Osterman, a city alderman whose far-north-side district includes many Latinos, emailed constituents on Friday evening with hotline numbers and information on what to do if they see ICE activity.

Gov. Gavin Newsom of California posted a video on Facebook informing immigrants of their rights. And Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young of Baltimore released a statement encouraging anyone who was arrested to avail themselves of the city’s public immigration defense fund.

The only immigrants who appear to be shielded from any deportation raids, for now, are those living in New Orleans — which is experiencing heavy flooding this week and is bracing for more, brought on by tropical storm Barry. Following the agency’s usual practice during extreme weather, ICE leadership sent a staff-wide email this week saying that agents would not conduct enforcement operations there during the storm.

Some undocumented immigrants have chosen to continue their routines as much as possible, in some cases a way to cope with the stress. When rumors first swirled about the latest round of immigration raids, said Geovani, 24, he didn’t panic about his family’s well-being. In a way, this weekend would be like any other for the undocumented family from Mexico, now living in Atlanta: home-cooked meals, hours lost on Facebook, down time shared among his parents and children.

Silvia Padilla has been living illegally in Los Angeles for 14 years. Her husband is also undocumented. She stressed multiple times that her family had never taken any government assistance. Her youngest child, Joshua, 1, is an American citizen.

News of the raids, Ms. Padilla said, is alarming. But it is a fear she has lived with for a long time. If ICE agents show up at their home, the entire family knows not to open the door.

This weekend, she still intends to take her children to the park and let them walk to the mall, and she plans to go to a doctor’s appointment with her husband.

“We’re going to go about our lives the same as we do. We have a lot of things to do. We’re leaving it up to God,” she said.

Veronica, the woman from Maryland who canceled her trip to Florida, is more uneasy. “Every time someone knocks, you get scared of who’s going to be behind the door,” she said. “Especially when you’re not expecting anyone.”

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The 1977 Blackout in New York City Happened Exactly 42 Years Ago

On Saturday at 6:47 p.m., parts of Midtown Manhattan and the West Side went dark.

Pedestrians used their cellphones as flashlights to cross the streets, Broadway shows were disrupted and commuters scrambled to find alternative ways home after subway stations were shuttered.

A little more than three hours later, Con Edison announced that power was being restored.

On a steamy July night in 1977, exactly 42 years ago, the same thing happened: New York City plunged into darkness, but this time the city was left without power for 25 hours.

It became a defining event, as looting and arson spread through the streets, resulting in 3,800 arrests and millions of dollars worth of damage.

There were also some familiar scenes. Take a look.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 13blackout-1977-02-articleLarge The 1977 Blackout in New York City Happened Exactly 42 Years Ago Power Failures and Blackouts New York City Manhattan (NYC)

CreditBrian Alpert/Keystone, via Getty Images

Refrigerators without power caused food to spoil. But that didn’t stop restaurants and bars from keeping their doors open and their liquor pouring.

Power Restored to Manhattan’s West Side After Major Blackout

July 13, 2019

Blackout Darkens Broadway, but Songs Brighten Sidewalk Scenes

July 13, 2019

CreditAllan Tannenbaum/Getty Images

Some people eating in restaurants made their way onto the streets — when the power went out, so did the air conditioning. On Saturday, many people finished their meals by the lights of their cellphones, an option not available in 1977.

CreditAssociated Press

The city’s skyline became a silhouette, as iconic buildings like the Empire State Building blended in with the night sky.

CreditChester Higgins Jr./The New York Times

Despite the looting, some New Yorkers took to the streets to help direct traffic. The same scene played out on Saturday evening when over 200 traffic lights went out, according to the city’s Department of Transportation.

CreditSteve Oualline/Associated Press

The 1977 blackout also caused widespread transportation disruption, including at Grand Central Station. Saturday’s blackout caused problems along the entire subway system, according to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

CreditAssociated Press

And yet, some went about their evenings, which for some lucky people in Rockefeller Center meant a stop at an ice cream truck.

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