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Westlake Legal Group > News and News Media (Page 72)

After Long Gap, Supreme Court Poised to Break Silence on Gun Rights

Westlake Legal Group merlin_151293738_52467552-c9f8-480d-a4c2-96f9db3e18fd-facebookJumbo After Long Gap, Supreme Court Poised to Break Silence on Gun Rights Thomas, Clarence Supreme Court (US) Suits and Litigation (Civil) Stevens, John Paul Second Amendment (US Constitution) Scalia, Antonin Kennedy, Anthony M Kavanaugh, Brett M gun control Gorsuch, Neil M firearms Decisions and Verdicts Constitution (US)

WASHINGTON — It has been almost 10 years since the Supreme Court last heard a Second Amendment case. On Monday, a transformed court will return to the subject and take stock of what has happened in the meantime.

The nation has had a spike in gun violence. And lower courts have issued more than 1,000 rulings seeking to apply the justices’ 2008 decision in District of Columbia v. Heller, which established an individual right to own guns but said almost nothing about the scope of that right.

The new case concerns a New York City ordinance. Fearing a loss in the Supreme Court, to say nothing of a broad ruling from the court’s conservative majority on what the Second Amendment protects, the city repealed the ordinance and now argues that the case is moot. But the court may be ready to end its decade of silence, elaborate on the meaning of the Second Amendment and, in the process, tell lower courts whether they have been faithful to the message of the Heller decision.

Proponents of gun rights and some conservative justices say lower courts have been engaged in lawless resistance to the protections afforded under the Second Amendment by sustaining unconstitutional gun-control laws.

“The lower courts have, generally speaking, been defying Heller,” said George Mocsary, a law professor at the University of Wyoming.

Gregory P. Magarian, a law professor at Washington University in St. Louis, looked at the same evidence and came to the opposite conclusion. “By and large, the lower courts have played this whole game very straight,” he said. “They have taken Heller seriously.”

The decision in the new case may clarify matters. Justices Clarence Thomas and Neil M. Gorsuch have already set out their positions, saying that the Supreme Court has tacitly endorsed dishonest rulings in the lower courts by refusing to hear appeals from decisions sustaining gun-control laws.

It was, Justice Thomas wrote in a 2017 dissent joined by Justice Gorsuch, part of “a distressing trend: the treatment of the Second Amendment as a disfavored right.”

In another dissent last year, Justice Thomas returned to the theme.

“The right to keep and bear arms is apparently this court’s constitutional orphan,” he wrote. “And the lower courts seem to have gotten the message.”

Eight months later, Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh joined the court, replacing the more moderate Justice Anthony M. Kennedy. And just a few months after that, the court announced that it would hear the case to be argued Monday.

The Heller decision was both revolutionary and modest. It ruled, by a 5-to-4 vote, that the Constitution guarantees an individual right to own guns — in the home, for self-defense. At the same time, it indicated that many kinds of gun regulations are permissible.

Justice Kennedy was in the majority in Heller decision, but he insisted on an important limiting passage, according to a 2018 interview with Justice John Paul Stevens, who wrote the main dissent and died in July.

“Nothing in our opinion,” Justice Antonin Scalia wrote for the majority in the passage that was the price of Justice Kennedy’s fifth vote, “should be taken to cast doubt on longstanding prohibitions on the possession of firearms by felons and the mentally ill, or laws forbidding the carrying of firearms in sensitive places such as schools and government buildings, or laws imposing conditions and qualifications on the commercial sale of arms.”

The court’s only other Second Amendment case since then, McDonald v. Chicago in 2010, extended the Heller decision, which concerned federal gun laws, to state and local ones.

Recent scholarship tells a complicated story about how the Heller decision has been applied in the lower courts. A comprehensive study of Second Amendment rulings after the Heller decision through early 2016, published last year in the Duke Law Journal, found that the success rate for challengers was indeed low, at about 9 percent.

But the article concluded that “the low rate of success probably has more to do with the claims being asserted than with judicial hostility.” For instance, challenges by felons charged with possessing guns made up about a quarter of the cases and almost always failed, as the Heller decision itself seemed to require.

Other challenges, in criminal cases or brought by people without lawyers, were also seldom successful. But plaintiffs with lawyers in civil cases in federal appeals courts, the study found, had a success rate of 40 percent.

“Second Amendment challenges have overwhelmingly failed at a broad level,” said Joseph Blocher, a law professor at Duke, who conducted the study with Eric Ruben, a fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice. “Something like 90 percent of them failed. But when you dig down into the cases to see why they failed, it turns out that many of them were weak from the outset.”

“Courts are not reflexively rejecting Second Amendment claims,” Professor Blocher said. “There will be cases in which judges may not go far enough in protecting the right, but that’s not indicative of what critics have called ‘massive resistance’ or ‘nullification’ or ‘second-class rights treatment.’”

Still, said Brannon P. Denning, a law professor at Samford University in Birmingham, Ala., “there was a tendency to give Heller the narrowest possible reading.”

“Judges were saying that as long as there is not a complete prohibition of possession of a handgun for self-defense in the home,” Professor Denning said, “then pretty much on anything else we’re going to give the benefit of the doubt to the government.”

The New York City ordinance challenged in the new case allowed residents with so-called premises licenses to take their guns to one of seven shooting ranges in the city limits. But the ordinance barred them from taking their guns anywhere else, including second homes and shooting ranges outside the city, even when they were unloaded and locked in a container separate from ammunition.

Three city residents and the New York State Rifle and Pistol Association filed a lawsuit challenging the law but lost in Federal District Court in Manhattan and in the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. A unanimous three-judge panel of the Second Circuit ruled that the ordinance passed constitutional muster under the Heller decision.

After the Supreme Court agreed to hear the case, New York State Rifle and Pistol Association v. City of New York, No. 18-280, the city amended its ordinance to allow people with premises licenses to take their guns to their homes and businesses and to shooting ranges and competitions, whether in the city or not. For good measure, New York State enacted a similar law.

The challengers have gotten everything they sought, the city’s lawyers told the Supreme Court, making the case moot. In response, the challengers said the case is still live because they may be entitled to seek money from the city and could suffer negative consequences for what was unlawful conduct while the ordinance was in place. They urged the justices not to reward the city’s “extraordinary machinations designed to frustrate this court’s review.”

Timothy Zick, a professor at William and Mary Law School, said supporters of gun regulation had reason to hope the justices would rule that the case is moot.

“The fear is that the court will accept the premise that what we need here is the most robust form of protection we can offer to this fundamental right because it’s been orphaned and disrespected,” Professor Zick said. “That, and the fact that this law is not a very good one, makes it understandable that you might not want this case to be the one that the court decides.”

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China to suspend US Navy visits to Hong Kong over bill

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103124200001_6103126715001-vs China to suspend US Navy visits to Hong Kong over bill fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc Edmund DeMarche article a9de8bf3-9c3f-5d88-b4c3-3561c1875eae

China announced Monday that it will suspend U.S. Navy visits to Hong Kong in retaliation over President Trump’s decision to sign legislation that supported the city’s pro-democracy protesters who have taken to the streets since June.

CHINA EXPERT SAYS BEIJING’S THREATS ARE LAUGHABLE

Beijing took its first step to make good on its promise to employ “countermeasures” against the U.S. in light of the bills that it blasted as “hegemonic” in nature and ignorant of the facts on the ground.

The Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, which was sponsored by Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., requires that the U.S. conducts yearly reviews into Hong Kong’s autonomy from Beijing. If ever found unsatisfactory, the city’s special status for U.S. trading could be tossed.

“I signed these bills out of respect for President Xi, China, and the people of Hong Kong,” Trump said in a statement. “They are being enacted in the hope that Leaders and Representatives of China and Hong Kong will be able to amicably settle their differences leading to long term peace and prosperity for all.”

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China also announced on Monday that it sanctioned Human Rights Watch for its support of the violence in the city, ,Hua Chunying, a ministry spokesman, told Reuters.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103124200001_6103126715001-vs China to suspend US Navy visits to Hong Kong over bill fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc Edmund DeMarche article a9de8bf3-9c3f-5d88-b4c3-3561c1875eae   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103124200001_6103126715001-vs China to suspend US Navy visits to Hong Kong over bill fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc Edmund DeMarche article a9de8bf3-9c3f-5d88-b4c3-3561c1875eae

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With Brutal Crackdown, Iran Is Convulsed by Worst Unrest in 40 Years

Westlake Legal Group XXIRAN-PROTESTS-01-facebookJumbo With Brutal Crackdown, Iran Is Convulsed by Worst Unrest in 40 Years Rouhani, Hassan Khamenei, Ali Iran Embargoes and Sanctions Demonstrations, Protests and Riots

Iran is experiencing its deadliest political unrest since the Islamic Revolution 40 years ago, with at least 180 people killed — and possibly hundreds more — as angry protests have been smothered in a government crackdown of unbridled force.

It began two weeks ago with an abrupt increase of at least 50 percent in gasoline prices. Within 72 hours, outraged demonstrators in cities large and small were calling for an end to the Islamic Republic’s government and the downfall of its leaders.

In many places, security forces responded by opening fire on unarmed protesters, largely unemployed or low-income young men between the ages of 19 and 26, according to witness accounts and videos. In the southwest city of Mahshahr alone, witnesses and medical personnel said, Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps members surrounded, shot and killed 40 to 100 demonstrators — mostly unarmed young men — in a marsh where they had sought refuge.

“The recent use of lethal force against people throughout the country is unprecedented, even for the Islamic Republic and its record of violence,” said Omid Memarian, the deputy director at the Center for Human Rights in Iran, a New York-based group.

Altogether, from 180 to 450 people, and possibly more, were killed in four days of intense violence after the gasoline price increase was announced on Nov. 15, with at least 2,000 wounded and 7,000 detained, according to international rights organizations, opposition groups and local journalists.

The last enormous wave of protests in Iran — in 2009 after a contested election, which was also met with a deadly crackdown — left 72 people dead over a much longer period of about 10 months.

Only now, nearly two weeks after the protests were crushed — and largely obscured by an internet blackout in the country that was lifted recently — have details corroborating the scope of killings and destruction started to dribble out.

The latest outbursts not only revealed staggering levels of frustration with Iran’s leaders, but also underscored the serious economic and political challenges facing them, from the Trump administration’s onerous sanctions on the country to the growing resentment toward Iran by neighbors in an increasingly unstable Middle East.

The gas price increase, which was announced as most Iranians had gone to bed, came as Iran is struggling to fill a yawning budget gap. The Trump administration sanctions, mostly notably their tight restrictions on exports of Iran’s oil, are a big reason for the shortfall. The sanctions are meant to pressure Iran into renegotiating the 2015 nuclear agreement between Iran and major world powers, which President Trump abandoned, calling it too weak.

Most of the nationwide unrest seemed concentrated in neighborhoods and cities populated by low-income and working-class families, suggesting this was an uprising born in the historically loyal power base of Iran’s post-revolutionary hierarchy.

Many Iranians, stupefied and embittered, have directed their hostility directly at the supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who called the crackdown a justified response to a plot by Iran’s enemies at home and abroad.

The killings prompted a provocative warning from Mir Hussein Moussavi, an opposition leader and former presidential candidate whose 2009 election loss set off peaceful demonstrations that Ayatollah Khamenei also suppressed by force.

In a statement posted Saturday on an opposition website, Mr. Moussavi, who has been under house arrest since 2011 and seldom speaks publicly, blamed the supreme leader for the killings. He compared them to an infamous 1978 massacre by government forces that led to the downfall of Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi a year later, at the hands of the Islamic revolutionaries who now rule the country.

“The killers of the year 1978 were the representatives of a nonreligious regime and the agents and shooters of November 2019 are the representatives of a religious government,” he said. “Then the commander in chief was the shah and today, here, the supreme leader with absolute authority.”

The authorities have declined to specify casualties and arrests and have denounced unofficial figures on the national death toll as speculative. But the nation’s interior minister, Abdolreza Rahmani Fazli, has cited widespread unrest around the country.

On state media, he said that protests had erupted in 29 out of 31 provinces and 50 military bases had been attacked, which if true suggested a level of coordination absent in the earlier protests. Iran’s official media have reported that several members of the security forces were killed and injured during the clashes.

The property damage also included 731 banks, 140 public spaces, nine religious centers, 70 gasoline stations, 307 vehicles, 183 police cars, 1,076 motorcycles and 34 ambulances, the interior minister said.

The worst violence documented so far happened in the city of Mahshahr and its suburbs, with a population of 120,000 people in Iran’s southwest Khuzestan Province — a region with an ethnic Arab majority that has a long history of unrest and opposition to the central government. Mahshahr is adjacent to the nation’s largest industrial petrochemical complex and serves as a gateway to Bandar Imam, a major port.

The New York Times interviewed six residents of the city, including a protest leader who had witnessed the violence; a reporter based in the city who works for Iranian media, and had investigated the violence but was banned from reporting it; and a nurse at the hospital where casualties were treated.

They each provided similar accounts of how the Revolutionary Guards deployed a large force to Mahshahr on Monday, Nov. 18, to crush the protests. All spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of retribution by the Guards.

For three days, according to these residents, protesters had successfully gained control of most of Mahshahr and its suburbs, blocking the main road to the city and the adjacent industrial petrochemical complex. Iran’s interior minister confirmed that the protesters had gotten control over Mahshahr and its roads in a televised interview last week, but the Iranian government did not respond to specific questions in recent days about the mass killings in the city.

Local security forces and riot police officers had attempted to disperse the crowd and open the roads, but failed, residents said. Several clashes between protesters and security forces erupted between Saturday evening and Monday morning before the Guards were dispatched there.

When the Guards arrived near the entrance to a suburb, Shahrak Chamran, populated by low-income members of Iran’s ethnic Arab minority, they immediately shot without warning at dozens of men blocking the intersection, killing several on the spot, according to the residents interviewed by phone.

The residents said the other protesters scrambled to a nearby marsh, and that one of them, apparently armed with an AK-47, fired back. The Guards immediately encircled the men and responded with machine gun fire, killing as many as 100 people, the residents said.

The Guards piled the dead onto the back of a truck and departed, the residents said, and relatives of the wounded then transported them to Memko Hospital.

One of the residents, a 24-year-old unemployed college graduate in chemistry who had helped organize the protests blocking the roads, said he had been less than a mile away from the mass shooting and that his best friend, also 24, and a 32-year-old cousin were among the dead.

He said they both had been shot in the chest and their bodies were returned to the families five days later, only after they had signed paperwork promising not to hold funerals or memorial services and not to give interviews to media.

The young protest organizer said he, too, was shot in the ribs on Nov. 19, the day after the mass shooting, when the Guards stormed with tanks into his neighborhood, Shahrak Taleghani, among the poorest suburbs of Mahshahr.

He said a gun battle erupted for hours between the Guards and ethnic Arab residents, who traditionally keep guns for hunting at home. Iranian state media and witnesses reported that a senior Guards commander had been killed in a Mahshahr clash. Video on Twitter suggests tanks had been deployed there.

A 32-year-old nurse in Mahshahr reached by the phone said she had tended to the wounded at the hospital and that most had sustained gunshot wounds to the head and chest.

She described chaotic scenes at the hospital, with families rushing to bring in the casualties, including a 21-year-old who was to be married but could not be saved. “‘Give me back my son!,’” the nurse quoted his sobbing mother as saying. “‘It’s his wedding in two weeks!’”

The nurse said security forces stationed at the hospital arrested some of the wounded protesters after their conditions had stabilized. She said some relatives, fearing arrest themselves, dropped wounded loved ones at the hospital and fled, covering their faces.

On Nov. 25, a week after it happened, the city’s representative in Parliament, Mohamad Golmordai, vented outrage in a blunt moment of searing antigovernment criticism that was broadcast on Iranian state television and captured in photos and videos uploaded to the internet.

“What have you done that the undignified Shah did not do?” Mr. Golmordai screamed from the Parliament floor, as a scuffle broke out between him and other lawmakers, including one who grabbed him by the throat.

The local reporter in Mahshahr said the total number of people killed in three days of unrest in the area had reached 130, including those killed in the marsh.

In other cities such as Shiraz and Shahriar, dozens were reported killed in the unrest by security forces who fired on unarmed protesters, according to rights groups and videos posted by witnesses.

“This regime has pushed people toward violence,” said Yousef Alsarkhi, 29, a political activist from Khuzestan who migrated to the Netherlands four years ago. “The more they repress, the more aggressive and angry people get.”

Political analysts said the protests appeared to have delivered a severe blow to President Hassan Rouhani, a relative moderate in Iran’s political spectrum, all but guaranteeing that hard-liners would win upcoming parliamentary elections and the presidency in two years.

The tough response to the protests also appeared to signal a hardening rift between Iran’s leaders and sizable segments of the population of 83 million.

“The government’s response was uncompromising, brutal and rapid,” said Henry Rome, an Iran analyst at the Eurasia Group, a political risk consultancy in Washington. Still, he said, the protests also had “demonstrated that many Iranians are not afraid to take to the streets.”

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Single shoe found in search for missing 6-year-old girl swept away in Arizona creek

Westlake Legal Group fseprd526303 Single shoe found in search for missing 6-year-old girl swept away in Arizona creek Jack Durschlag fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/disasters/floods fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc article 6a15be03-c1e9-5aa5-8234-2361b212faca

A shoe, believed to belong to a missing 6-year-old girl who was the subject of a massive search, was recovered Sunday about 200 yards from where her family’s oversized military-style truck got stuck in a raging creek in Arizona, a published report said.

Nine family members, together for the Thanksgiving holiday, were caught up in a cascade of water caused by an intense runoff from a powerful storm Friday, The Associated Press reported. Four children and two adults were rescued by helicopter, but three children stayed in the truck, which was later swept away.

2 ARIZONA CHILDREN, BOTH 5, FOUND DEAD, ONE STILL MISSING AFTER VEHICLE SWEPT AWAY BY FLOODWATERS

The girl, identified as Willa Rawlings, has been missing since the incident occurred. Her 5-year-old brother and cousin were both found dead on Saturday.

“We want to bring her home safely to her family. She needs to come home today, and we’re going to do that today.” 

— Lt. Virgil Dodd of the Gila County Sheriff’s Office.

“There was a shoe in the area where there was some interest in that debris. At this time, we believe that it may belong to the little girl that we’re searching for,” he added.

More than 100 volunteers gathered near Tonto Basin, a small community northeast of Phoenix, early Sunday to help search for the missing girl, Willa Rawlings, the Republic reported.

ARIZONA TEEN, 17, BECOMES TRAPPED IN CHIMNEY AFTER TRYING TO GET IN LOCKED HOUSE: REPORT

Volunteers, working in small groups searched through the muddy brush, heading toward the creek looking for the girl, who was wearing jeans and a purple jacket, the Republic reported.

Willa’s parents, Daniel and Lacey Rawlings, both escaped from the truck. However, their son, Colby Rawlings, and niece, Austin Rawlings, were not in the vehicle when it was pulled from the creek the next day. Their bodies were found about 600 to 1,000 yards from the failed crossing, the report said.

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The creek crossing was marked as closed with barricades and signs, authorities said.

A National Weather Service meteorologist said the agency issued a flood warning for the region – including the Tonto Basin area – at 8:53 a.m. Friday when an estimated nearly to 2 inches of rain fell in the area, with some of the runoff coming from snow that fell on nearby peaks, the AP reported.

The region received up to 4 inches of rain about a week before the incident.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group fseprd526303 Single shoe found in search for missing 6-year-old girl swept away in Arizona creek Jack Durschlag fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/disasters/floods fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc article 6a15be03-c1e9-5aa5-8234-2361b212faca   Westlake Legal Group fseprd526303 Single shoe found in search for missing 6-year-old girl swept away in Arizona creek Jack Durschlag fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/disasters/floods fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc article 6a15be03-c1e9-5aa5-8234-2361b212faca

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Kansas considers ‘greener’ new way to bury its dead

Westlake Legal Group Soils Kansas considers ‘greener’ new way to bury its dead fox news fnc/politics fnc Edmund DeMarche article 6a6773f6-0d97-5522-9c92-285cc44ac953

Promessa, a Swedish company that wants to revolutionize how to reduce the ecological footprint in traditional burials, is focusing on Kansas to introduce its product in the U.S. because the state has what some consider relatively lax cremation laws, a report said.

The procedure, according to the Kansas City Star, is called promession. In standard cremation the body is broken down by fire. Promession consists of the freezing the body with liquid nitrogen and then “vibrating it into particles,” the report said.

SUPREME COURT TO TAKE UP FIRST GUNS-RIGHTS CASE IN DECADE

Susanne Wiigh-Mäsak, the biologist who founded the company, said in an interview that promession is cost-effective and eco-friendly.

“You are still in an organic form, which means you are not broken down, you are still food for the soil and if you spread it around you will be food for birds, or fish, or whatever,” she told Wired in 2013.

Rachel Caldwell, a representative from the company, told the Star that she thought Kansas wouldn’t have “hang-ups” and was surprised when the state’s attorney general, Derek Schmidt, released an opinion about the matter before Thanksgiving. He reportedly said that the decision should be made by the Kansas Board of Mortuary Arts. The paper said it reached out to the board, and did receive a comment.  Promessa did not immediately respond to an after-hours email from Fox News on the Star report.

The interest in “greener” ways to bury the dead has become a topic that other states in the country are considering. Washington last May became the first state to allow the composting of human bodies. Licensed facilities in the state will offer a “natural organic reduction.” The body is mixed with substances like wood chips into about two wheelbarrows’ worth of soil in a span of several weeks. Loved ones are allowed to keep the soil to spread, just as they might spread the ashes of someone who has been cremated — or even use it to plant vegetables or a tree.

Kansas was reportedly an appealing state for Promessa because it does not require a fire to be used in the cremation process.  The paper spoke to one state representative, Dave Benson, a Democrat, who said he may consider drafting a bill to allow promession.

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“If that’s what you want, hey, where’s the government’s interest in telling you not to?” Benson said.

Westlake Legal Group Soils Kansas considers ‘greener’ new way to bury its dead fox news fnc/politics fnc Edmund DeMarche article 6a6773f6-0d97-5522-9c92-285cc44ac953   Westlake Legal Group Soils Kansas considers ‘greener’ new way to bury its dead fox news fnc/politics fnc Edmund DeMarche article 6a6773f6-0d97-5522-9c92-285cc44ac953

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Ronan Farrow says relationship with Hillary Clinton cooled when he looked into Weinstein

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6097551841001_6097550736001-vs Ronan Farrow says relationship with Hillary Clinton cooled when he looked into Weinstein fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox news fnc/politics fnc Edmund DeMarche article 421690f2-00e0-547c-ad55-d91c0cd181c6

Ronan Farrow, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, said in an interview published Saturday his relationship with Hillary Clinton cooled when word began to spread he was looking into allegations against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein.

Farrow told the Financial Times in 2011 he was selected by Clinton, then the secretary of state, to work as a special adviser on global youth issues. He said they worked together for years but noticed a change in their relationship when word got out he was looking into Weinstein – one of her top fundraisers.

Farrow did not elaborate on how Clinton found out about his interest in Weinstein or how exactly the relationship cooled. After-hours emails from Fox News to representatives for Clinton and Farrow were not immediately returned. The paper said a Clinton spokesman did not comment for its article.

Farrow told the paper, “It’s remarkable how quickly even people with a long relationship with you will turn if you if you threaten the centers of power or sources of funding around them. Ultimately, there are a lot of people out there who operate in that way. They’re beholden to powerful interests, you become radioactive very quickly.”

Farrow and The New York Times won Pulitzers in 2018 for stories outlining sexual misconduct allegations against Weinstein. The producer, 67, has pleaded not guilty to charges he raped a woman in a Manhattan hotel room in 2013 and performed a forcible sex act on a different woman in 2006. He is free on $1 million bail and maintains that any sexual activity was consensual.

Clinton, for her part, took days after the New York Times broke the Weinstein story to issue a statement. CNN reported that she said she was “shocked and appalled” by the revelations.

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“The behavior described by women coming forward cannot be tolerated. Their courage and the support of others is critical in helping to stop this kind of behavior,” the statement read.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6097551841001_6097550736001-vs Ronan Farrow says relationship with Hillary Clinton cooled when he looked into Weinstein fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox news fnc/politics fnc Edmund DeMarche article 421690f2-00e0-547c-ad55-d91c0cd181c6   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6097551841001_6097550736001-vs Ronan Farrow says relationship with Hillary Clinton cooled when he looked into Weinstein fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox news fnc/politics fnc Edmund DeMarche article 421690f2-00e0-547c-ad55-d91c0cd181c6

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Burkina Faso church attack, 14 shot dead, leader says

Westlake Legal Group 15163098_web1_190116-BPD-M-Burkina-Faso Burkina Faso church attack, 14 shot dead, leader says fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 8befc53d-5b4f-58e0-be65-024a2cb9afa6

The president of the West African nation of Burkina Faso has confirmed that 14 people were killed in an attack on a Protestant church in the country’s east.

Going on Twitter, President Roch Marc Christian Kabore said Sunday that he condemned “the barbaric attack” in the town of Hantoukoura. He said several people also were wounded.

Kabore offered his “deepest condolences to the bereaved families and wish a speedy recovery to the wounded.”

Islamic extremists have been active in Burkina Faso since 2015. Jihadists have attacked police stations and churches across the country’s north but also recently have struck in the east.

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In October, gunmen generally believed to be Islamic extremists attacked a convoy carrying employees of a mining company in that region, killing at least 37 people.

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Shelley Morrison, Veteran Actress And ‘Will & Grace’ Fan Favorite, Dies At 83

Westlake Legal Group 5de49ad32500005723d2ecac Shelley Morrison, Veteran Actress And ‘Will & Grace’ Fan Favorite, Dies At 83

Veteran character actress and “Will & Grace” fan favorite Shelley Morrison, whose career spanned over 50 years, died Sunday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, her publicist Lori DeWaal confirmed to the Associated Press. Morrison, who DeWaal said died from heart failure after a short illness, was 83. 

Morrison was best known for playing Rosario Salazar, the sharp-tongued Salvadoran maid in “Will & Grace,” who often exchanged verbal barbs and acerbic witticisms with Megan Mullally’s character, the brash socialite Karen Walker.

Morrison revealed recently that Rosario had been “one of my all-time favorite characters.”  

“She reminds me a lot of my own mother, who loved animals and children, but she would not suffer fools,” Morrison said, per AP. “It is very significant to me that we were able to show an older, Hispanic woman who is bright and smart and can hold her own.” 

Morrison’s husband of 64 years, Walter Dominguez, echoed this sentiment in a statement to People magazine. His wife’s “greatest pride as an actress was in playing the indomitable Rosario in a comedy series that furthered the cause of social equity and fairness for LGBTQ people,” he said, adding that Morrison had “believed that the best way to change hearts and minds was through comedy.”

According to her IMDb profile, Morrison appeared in more than 150 TV series over the course of her career, including “The Flying Nun,” “Murder, She Wrote” and “The Partridge Family.” She more recently voiced a character, Mrs. Portillo, on the Disney animated TV series “Handy Manny.”

Morrison also starred in films alongside some of Hollywood’s biggest stars, including “How to Save a Marriage and Ruin Your Life” with Dean Martin, “Mackenna’s Gold” with Gregory Peck and “Troop Beverly Hills” with Shelley Long. 

Morrison was born Rachel Mitrani to a Jewish-Spanish family in the Bronx in New York City in 1936, AP reported. She battled a variety of health problems, IMDb said, and was a survivor of breast and lung cancer. 

In social media tributes, Morrison’s “Will & Grace” costars Eric McCormack, Debra Messing and Sean Hayes mourned the death of their “dear Rosie.”

“Shelley was a beautiful soul & a wonderful actor. Her work as Rosario, season after season, was as nuanced and real as it was hysterical,” McCormack wrote.

Mullally also tweeted her grief at the news of Morrison’s passing.

“thank you for your friendship & partnership, shell,” she wrote. 

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Bus plunges onto frozen river in Siberia, killing 19

Westlake Legal Group buscrash-cropped-1229am Bus plunges onto frozen river in Siberia, killing 19 fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fnc/world fnc bd020998-bcd5-58ca-8b37-c1ff1aa82983 Associated Press article

Russian emergency officials say 19 people were killed when their bus plunged off a bridge onto a frozen river in eastern Siberia.

Another 22 people were injured in the Sunday accident, Russian news agencies cited the Emergencies Ministry as saying.

Initial investigation indicates that a front wheel on the bus failed as it was crossing a bridge over the Kuenga River about 4,900 kilometers (3,100 miles) east of Moscow.

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The coach-style bus landed upside down on the ice, collapsing the passenger compartment.

Westlake Legal Group buscrash-cropped-1229am Bus plunges onto frozen river in Siberia, killing 19 fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fnc/world fnc bd020998-bcd5-58ca-8b37-c1ff1aa82983 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group buscrash-cropped-1229am Bus plunges onto frozen river in Siberia, killing 19 fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fnc/world fnc bd020998-bcd5-58ca-8b37-c1ff1aa82983 Associated Press article

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Woman seeking bigger seat on plane faked medical emergency: cops

Westlake Legal Group AmericanEagleRobertAlexanderGettyImages Woman seeking bigger seat on plane faked medical emergency: cops Tamar Lapin New York Post fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/travel fnc/travel fnc article a37eb2e0-161b-5cac-9a25-ad74f5d4bdbb

This takes in-flight drama to new heights.

A Florida woman faked a medical emergency in order to get a larger seat on an American Airlines flight, authorities said.

But the pilot, apparently not realizing the emergency was bogus, turned the plane around.

KLM PASSENGERS SPEND 11 HOURS IN THE AIR GOING NOWHERE THANKS TO VOLCANIC ERUPTION AND HORSES

The woman, who wasn’t publicly identified, was taken into custody when Miami-bound flight American Eagle 3508 landed back in Pensacola around 6:30 a.m. Friday, police said.

“The pilot declared an emergency… once they got on the ground, she made it clear that she was faking the medical condition to get a bigger seat,” Pensacola Police Department spokesman Mike Wood told NBC 6.

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Once the plane was back on the ground, the woman continued with the theatrics, refusing to get off the aircraft, cops said.

The pilot, law enforcement and medical personnel eventually succeeded in getting her off the plane.

The woman was taken into custody under the Sunshine State’s Baker Act, which allows authorities to hold a person who could be a threat to themselves or others.

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Westlake Legal Group AmericanEagleRobertAlexanderGettyImages Woman seeking bigger seat on plane faked medical emergency: cops Tamar Lapin New York Post fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/travel fnc/travel fnc article a37eb2e0-161b-5cac-9a25-ad74f5d4bdbb   Westlake Legal Group AmericanEagleRobertAlexanderGettyImages Woman seeking bigger seat on plane faked medical emergency: cops Tamar Lapin New York Post fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/travel fnc/travel fnc article a37eb2e0-161b-5cac-9a25-ad74f5d4bdbb

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