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Westlake Legal Group > News and News Media (Page 8)

Man attacks dollar store manager with pizza bagels, then runs into Wendy’s and slaps worker

A seemingly intoxicated man went on a mini-rampage that included attacking a man with a box of pizza bagels and ended with him slapping a woman in a Wendy’s in Arkansas.

Roger Bridendolph is facing multiple charges after he allegedly had an altercation with dollar store employees in Springdale, Ark., and then ran into a nearby Wendy’s, where he slapped an employee.

Westlake Legal Group Roger-Bridendolph-mugshot Man attacks dollar store manager with pizza bagels, then runs into Wendy's and slaps worker Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/food/snack-foods fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 06a1c66f-79b0-52e1-baa4-4aced9f8eeb0

Roger Bridendolph is accused of assaulting a man with a box of pizza bagels and then slapping a woman in a Wendy’s. (Washington County Detention Center)

Bridendolph got into an argument with a cashier before attempting to steal the box of Bagel Bites, 5 News Online reports. When a manager got involved, Bridendolph reportedly pushed his way out the store; the manager followed him outside and Bridendolph allegedly struck him in the head with the box of pizza bagels.

POPULAR SUSHI ‘CRUNCH’ IS BLAMED FOR MULTIPLE KITCHEN FIRES, CAN ‘SPONTANEOUSLY COMBUST,’ INVESTIGATORS SAY

The man then walked over to a nearby Wendy’s and slapped a woman inside the restaurant.

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According to witnesses, police struggled to detain Bridendolph when they arrived. It’s unclear what exactly sparked the various assaults.

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Bridendolph is facing charges of felony robbery, and misdemeanor second-degree assault, disorderly conduct, and resisting arrest, according to the Washington County website. He’s also being held at the Washington County Detention Center and his bail was set at $3,500. The website also lists that he is homeless.

Westlake Legal Group Roger-Bridendolph-mugshot Man attacks dollar store manager with pizza bagels, then runs into Wendy's and slaps worker Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/food/snack-foods fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 06a1c66f-79b0-52e1-baa4-4aced9f8eeb0   Westlake Legal Group Roger-Bridendolph-mugshot Man attacks dollar store manager with pizza bagels, then runs into Wendy's and slaps worker Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/food/snack-foods fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article 06a1c66f-79b0-52e1-baa4-4aced9f8eeb0

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Defense Secretary nominee Esper grilled over contractor ties in heated confirmation hearing

Westlake Legal Group esper Defense Secretary nominee Esper grilled over contractor ties in heated confirmation hearing Ronn Blitzer Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/politics/senate fox news fnc/politics fnc b863c4f0-3b83-5389-aa6c-8e09fa7a2bf4 article

Mark Esper, who took over the role of Acting Secretary of Defense after former Acting Secretary Patrick Shanahan stepped down in June, faced tense moments in front of the Senate Armed Services Committee Tuesday during his confirmation process for the permanent Secretary job.

Esper, a former Army veteran who served 10 years on active duty and 11 years in the National Guard and Army Reserve, was grilled by multiple senators over his history as a lobbyist for Raytheon, a defense contractor he left in 2017 before becoming Secretary of the Army. Esper insisted there is nothing to worry about.

BOLTON TOUTS NATO ALLIES’ $100B MILITARY SPENDING SPREE AFTER TRUMP PUSH: ‘UNEQUALED TRIUMPH’

“It’s my commitment to the nation’s security, it’s my commitment to the men and women in uniform that drives me,” Esper said when asked about Raytheon by Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark. “Not anything else.”

After he became Acting Defense Secretary, Esper said in a memo that he would limit his involvement in any matters related to Raytheon, and that his staff would “screen all matters” and consult with the Standards of Conduct Office where appropriate.

During the hearing, he stated that he will employ a “robust screening process” and “remain in constant contact with our ethics personnel.” When asked by Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., if he would recuse himself from matters involving Raytheon, Esper asserted that he is ”fully committed to living up to my ethics commitments.”

That was not enough for 2020 Democratic candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., who claimed that because Esper qualified his recusal instead of committing to recuse himself from any and all matters related to his former employer, it was “a conflict of interest given that Raytheon does billions of dollars worth of business every year with the Defense Department.”

Esper responded by saying that ethics officials at the Pentagon recommended that he not recuse for all matters.

Warren then pointed to an exception to ethics obligations that she said Esper referred to in a memo, which would allow for a waiver that would permit him to get involved in matters that directly affect Raytheon’s financial interest if no other official can do the job.

“This smacks of corruption, plain and simple,” Warren said.

But in a letter to Esper from the Department of Defense’s Office of the General Counsel obtained by Fox News, Director Scott Thompson refuted Warren’s accusations, “At no time while serving as the Secretary of the Army or the Acting Secretary of Defense did you request, seek, or receive a waiver or authorization related to your Ethics Agreement and ethics obligations.”

Esper, who earlier in the hearing said he does not have any financial stake in Raytheon other than the deferred compensation, took issue with Warren’s implication that he is incapable of ethically performing the duties of the job.

“At the age of 18 I went to West Point and I swore an oath to defend this Constitution and I embraced the motto called Duty and Honor and Country and I’ve lived my life in accordance with those values ever since then,” Esper said. “I went to war for this country, I served overseas for this country, I’ve stepped down from jobs that paid me well more than what I was working anywhere else. And each time it was to serve the public good and to serve the young men and women of our armed services.”

According to the Fox News Research Dept. and Open Secrets.org, Warren received $31,919 in campaign donations from the defense industry for her 2020 campaign.  Raytheon gave her nearly $9,000 in 2018.  The company is headquartered in her home state.

Other issues that came up during the hearing included how the United States should deal with Iran.

Esper pointed to the need to focus on Iran and lingering threats from groups like al Qaeda, while building American military capabilities. At the same time, he made clear that “we do not want war with Iran.”

Regarding Russian efforts to interfere with American elections, Esper said the U.S. is in a better position than in the past, but there is still work to be done.

“We’ve been doing more but way short of what is necessary,” he said, adding “we need to be on guard and vigilant.”

In terms of new military technology, Esper said artificial intelligence is of the utmost importance.

“I think artificial intelligence will likely change the character of warfare, and I believe whoever masters it first will dominate on the battlefield for many, many, many years,” he said.

“We have to get there first. We have to.”

The testimony came as tech investor Peter Thiel called out Google for working with China, and not the U.S., on a massive artificial intelligence project. Thiel said the relationship could be “treasonous,” and President Trump said Tuesday morning that his administration would look into it.

TRUMP SUGGESTS GOOGLE COULD BE INVESTIGATED FOR ‘TREASON’

If confirmed, Esper would be the first permanent Defense Secretary since James Mattis stepped down at the end of 2018. Shanahan, who filled the role on an interim basis afterwards, had been considered for the permanent job, but reportedly withdrew due to a 2010 domestic incident that he did not want to be brought up during the confirmation process.

For the duration of Esper’s confirmation process, Navy Secretary Richard Spencer has assumed the role of Acting Defense Secretary, since federal law forbids people under consideration for a permanent secretary position to serve as acting secretary.

Committee Chairman Jim Inhofe, R-Okla., said that a final confirmation vote for Esper could take place as soon as later this week, but no later than next Tuesday.

Westlake Legal Group esper Defense Secretary nominee Esper grilled over contractor ties in heated confirmation hearing Ronn Blitzer Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/politics/senate fox news fnc/politics fnc b863c4f0-3b83-5389-aa6c-8e09fa7a2bf4 article   Westlake Legal Group esper Defense Secretary nominee Esper grilled over contractor ties in heated confirmation hearing Ronn Blitzer Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/politics/senate fox news fnc/politics fnc b863c4f0-3b83-5389-aa6c-8e09fa7a2bf4 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Barack Obama’s Life-Size Statue Featuring Sasha Unveiled In South Dakota

Westlake Legal Group 5d2df23f3b00004b00dac90a Barack Obama’s Life-Size Statue Featuring Sasha Unveiled In South Dakota

A bronze statue portraying former President Barack Obama has been erected in South Dakota’s “City of Presidents” with a notable addition: his 18-year-old daughter, Sasha Obama.

The statue, which was unveiled at the Elks Theatre in Rapid City on Saturday, depicts the former president waving one hand while holding hands with his younger daughter, who is also waving her other hand. The design was inspired by a photo of the former president with Sasha Obama at his first inauguration, the Rapid City Journal reported

Barack Obama joins other past U.S. presidents who were memorialized in the downtown area as part of the City of Presidents project that was launched in 2000 under the Rapid City Historic District Tour. The project aims to “honor the legacy of the American presidency” with sculptures positioned along the city’s streets and sidewalks, its website states. 

Painter and sculptor James Van Nuys, who created the Barack Obama statue, told the Journal he was happy the board chose the design with Barack Obama and Sasha Obama. Dallerie Davis, the project’s co-founder, said the group previously considered depicting Barack Obama waving by himself, before deciding on the final design.

“One of us said, ‘This is boring. This is not going to have the wow factor,’” Davis told CNN. “A man waving is not a showstopper.”

All of the sculptures are privately funded, the project’s website states. The Barack Obama sculpture has been designated to sit at the corner of Saint Joseph and 4th Streets in Rapid City, according to the project’s website. 

Van Nuys told the crowd at the unveiling ceremony at on Saturday that he felt a connection to the inauguration image of Barack Obama and Sasha Obama as a father himself, according to a live taping by the South Dakota Public Broadcasting radio station. 

He shared that his daughter was his best friend when she was growing up, so seeing Barack Obama as a “dad with his daughter” held a special meaning for him. 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Johnny Clegg, A Uniting Voice Against Apartheid, Dies At 66

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-874487806-cc5214d38c0f7e671aae84ecab6c72bfe4e83cb0-s1100-c15 Johnny Clegg, A Uniting Voice Against Apartheid, Dies At 66

South African musician Johnny Clegg, right, with his longtime bandmate Sipho Mchunu, performing in New York City in 1996. Clegg died Tuesday at age 66. Jack Vartoogian/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Jack Vartoogian/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Johnny Clegg, A Uniting Voice Against Apartheid, Dies At 66

South African musician Johnny Clegg, right, with his longtime bandmate Sipho Mchunu, performing in New York City in 1996. Clegg died Tuesday at age 66.

Jack Vartoogian/Getty Images

One of the most celebrated voices in modern South African music has died. Singer, dancer and activist Johnny Clegg, who co-founded two groundbreaking, racially mixed bands during the apartheid era, died Tuesday in Johannesburg at age 66. He had battled pancreatic cancer since 2015.

His death was announced by his manager and family spokesperson, Roddy Quin.

Clegg wrote his 1987 song “Asimbonanga” for Nelson Mandela. It became an anthem for South Africa’s freedom fighters.

Johnny Clegg was born in England, but he became one of South Africa’s most creative and outspoken cultural figures. He moved around a lot, as a white child born to an English man and a female jazz singer from Zimbabwe (then known as Southern Rhodesia). His parents split up while he was still a baby; Clegg’s mother took him to Zimbabwe before she married again, this time to a South African crime reporter, when he was 7. The family moved north to Zambia for a couple of years, and then settled in Johannesburg.

He discovered South Africa’s music when he was a young teenager in Johannesburg. He had been studying classical guitar, but chafed under its strictness and formality. When he started hearing Zulu-style guitar, he was enchanted — and liberated.

“I stumbled on Zulu street guitar music being performed by Zulu migrant workers, traditional tribesmen from the rural areas,” he told NPR in a 2017 interview. “They had taken a Western instrument that had been developed over six, seven hundred years, and reconceptualized the tuning. They changed the strings around, they developed new styles of picking, they only use the first five frets of the guitar — they developed a totally unique genre of guitar music, indigenous to South Africa. I found it quite emancipating.”

He soon found a local, black teacher — who took him into neighborhoods where whites weren’t supposed to go. He went to the migrant workers’ hostels: difficult, dangerous places where a thousand or two young men at a time struggled to survive. But on the weekends, they kicked back, entertaining each other with Zulu songs and dances.

Because Clegg was so young, he was accepted in their communities, and in those neighborhoods, he discovered his other great passion: Zulu dance, which he described as a kind of “warrior theater” with its martial-style movements of high kicks, ground stamps and pretend blows.

“The body was coded and wired — hard-wired — to carry messages about masculinity which were pretty powerful for a young, 16-year-old adolescent boy,” he observed. “They knew something about being a man, which they could communicate physically in the way that they danced and carried themselves. And I wanted to be able to do the same thing. I fell in love with it. Basically, I wanted to become a Zulu warrior. And in a very deep sense, it offered me an African identity.”

And even though he was white, he was welcomed into their ranks, despite the dangers to both him and his mentors. He was arrested multiple times for breaking the segregation laws.

“I got into trouble with the authorities, I was arrested for trespassing and for breaking the Group Areas Act,” he told NPR. “The police said, ‘You’re too young to charge. We’re taking you back to your parents.'”

He persuaded his mother to let him go back. And it was through his dance team that he met one of his longest musical collaborators: Sipho Mchunu. As a duo, they played traditional maskanda guitar music for about six or seven years.

“We couldn’t play in public,” Clegg remembered, “so we played in private venues, schools, churches, university private halls. We played a lot of embassies. We played a lot of consulates.”

Over time, they started thinking bigger; Clegg wanted to try to meld Zulu music with rock and with Celtic folk.

“I was exposed to Celtic folk music early on,” he told NPR. “I never knew my dad, and music was one way which I can connect with that country. I liked Irish, Scottish and English folk music. I had a lot of tapes and recordings of them. And my stepfather was a great fan of pipe music. On Sundays, he would play an LP of the Edinburgh Police Pipe Band.”

Clegg was sure that he heard connetions between the rural music of South Africa’s Natal province (now known as KwaZulu-Natal) — the music that he was learning from his black friends and teachers — and the sounds of Britain. So Clegg and Mchunu founded a fusion band called Juluka — “Sweat” in Zulu.

At the time, Johnny was a professor of anthropology at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg; Sipho was working as a gardener. They dreamed of getting a record deal even though they knew they couldn’t get airplay, or perform publicly in South Africa.

It was a hard sell to labels. South African radio was strictly segregated, and record companies refused to believe that an album sung partly in Zulu and partly in English would find an audience in any case. Clegg told NPR that their songs’ primary subject material wasn’t setting off any sparks with record producers, either.

“You know, ‘Who really cares about cattle? You’re singing about cattle. You know we’re in Johannesburg, dude, get your subject matter right!’ Clegg recalled. “But I was shaped by cattle culture, because all the songs I learned were about cattle, and I was interested. I was saying, ‘There’s a hidden world. And I’d like to put it on the table.'”

They got a record deal with producer Hilton Rosenthal, who released Juluka’s debut album, Universal Men, on his own label, Rhythm Safari, in 1979. And the band managed to find an audience both at home and abroad. One of its songs, “Scatterlings of Africa,” became a chart hit in the U.K.

[embedded content]

YouTube

The band toured internationally for several years, and went. But eventually, Mchunu decided he’d had enough. He wanted to go home — not just to Johannesburg, but home to his native region of Zululand, in the KwaZulu-Natal province, to raise cattle.

“It was really hard for Sipho,” Clegg told NPR. “He was a traditional tribesman. To be in New York City, he couldn’t speak English that well — there were times when I think he felt he was on Mars. And after some grueling tours, he said to me, ‘I gave myself 15 years to make it or break it in Joburg, and then go home.’ So he resigned, and Juluka came to an end —and I was still full of the fire of music and dance.”

So Clegg founded a new group called Savuka — which means “We Have Risen” in Zulu. Savuka had ardent love songs, like the swooning “Dela,” but many of the band’s tunes, like “One (Hu)Man, One Vote” and “Warsaw 1943 (I Never Betrayed the Revolution),” were explicitly political.

“Savuka was launched basically in the state of emergency in South Africa, in 1986,” Clegg observed. “You could not ignore what was going on. The entire Savuka project was based in the South African experience and the fight for a better quality of life and freedom for all.”

Long after Nelson Mandela was freed from prison and had become president of South Africa, he danced onstage with Savuka to that song that Clegg had written for him.

[embedded content]

YouTube

Clegg went on to a solo career. But in 2017, he announced he’d been fighting cancer. And he made one last international tour that he called his “Final Journey.”

The following year, dozens of musician friends and admirers — including Dave Matthews, Vusi Mahlasela, Peter Gabriel, and Mike Rutherford of Genesis — put together a charity single to honor Clegg. It’s benefitted primary school education in South Africa.

[embedded content]

YouTube

Clegg never shied away from being described as a crossover artist. Instead, he embraced the concept.

“I love it,” he said. “I love the hybridization of culture, language, music, dance, choreography. If we look at the history of art, generally speaking, it is through the interaction of different communities, cultures, worldviews, ideas and concepts that invigorates styles and genres and gives them life and gives people a different angle on stuff that was really, just, you know, being passed down blindly from generation to generation.”

Johnny Clegg didn’t do anything blindly. Instead, he held a mirror up to his nation — and urged South Africa to redefine itself.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Johnny Clegg, A Uniting Voice Against Apartheid, Dies At 66

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-874487806-cc5214d38c0f7e671aae84ecab6c72bfe4e83cb0-s1100-c15 Johnny Clegg, A Uniting Voice Against Apartheid, Dies At 66

South African musician Johnny Clegg, right, with his longtime bandmate Sipho Mchunu, performing in New York City in 1996. Clegg died Tuesday at age 66. Jack Vartoogian/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Jack Vartoogian/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Johnny Clegg, A Uniting Voice Against Apartheid, Dies At 66

South African musician Johnny Clegg, right, with his longtime bandmate Sipho Mchunu, performing in New York City in 1996. Clegg died Tuesday at age 66.

Jack Vartoogian/Getty Images

One of the most celebrated voices in modern South African music has died. Singer, dancer and activist Johnny Clegg, who co-founded two groundbreaking, racially mixed bands during the apartheid era, died Tuesday in Johannesburg at age 66. He had battled pancreatic cancer since 2015.

His death was announced by his manager and family spokesperson, Roddy Quin.

Clegg wrote his 1987 song “Asimbonanga” for Nelson Mandela. It became an anthem for South Africa’s freedom fighters.

Johnny Clegg was born in England, but he became one of South Africa’s most creative and outspoken cultural figures. He moved around a lot, as a white child born to an English man and a female jazz singer from Zimbabwe (then known as Southern Rhodesia). His parents split up while he was still a baby; Clegg’s mother took him to Zimbabwe before she married again, this time to a South African crime reporter, when he was 7. The family moved north to Zambia for a couple of years, and then settled in Johannesburg.

He discovered South Africa’s music when he was a young teenager in Johannesburg. He had been studying classical guitar, but chafed under its strictness and formality. When he started hearing Zulu-style guitar, he was enchanted — and liberated.

“I stumbled on Zulu street guitar music being performed by Zulu migrant workers, traditional tribesmen from the rural areas,” he told NPR in a 2017 interview. “They had taken a Western instrument that had been developed over six, seven hundred years, and reconceptualized the tuning. They changed the strings around, they developed new styles of picking, they only use the first five frets of the guitar — they developed a totally unique genre of guitar music, indigenous to South Africa. I found it quite emancipating.”

He soon found a local, black teacher — who took him into neighborhoods where whites weren’t supposed to go. He went to the migrant workers’ hostels: difficult, dangerous places where a thousand or two young men at a time struggled to survive. But on the weekends, they kicked back, entertaining each other with Zulu songs and dances.

Because Clegg was so young, he was accepted in their communities, and in those neighborhoods, he discovered his other great passion: Zulu dance, which he described as a kind of “warrior theater” with its martial-style movements of high kicks, ground stamps and pretend blows.

“The body was coded and wired — hard-wired — to carry messages about masculinity which were pretty powerful for a young, 16-year-old adolescent boy,” he observed. “They knew something about being a man, which they could communicate physically in the way that they danced and carried themselves. And I wanted to be able to do the same thing. I fell in love with it. Basically, I wanted to become a Zulu warrior. And in a very deep sense, it offered me an African identity.”

And even though he was white, he was welcomed into their ranks, despite the dangers to both him and his mentors. He was arrested multiple times for breaking the segregation laws.

“I got into trouble with the authorities, I was arrested for trespassing and for breaking the Group Areas Act,” he told NPR. “The police said, ‘You’re too young to charge. We’re taking you back to your parents.'”

He persuaded his mother to let him go back. And it was through his dance team that he met one of his longest musical collaborators: Sipho Mchunu. As a duo, they played traditional maskanda guitar music for about six or seven years.

“We couldn’t play in public,” Clegg remembered, “so we played in private venues, schools, churches, university private halls. We played a lot of embassies. We played a lot of consulates.”

Over time, they started thinking bigger; Clegg wanted to try to meld Zulu music with rock and with Celtic folk.

“I was exposed to Celtic folk music early on,” he told NPR. “I never knew my dad, and music was one way which I can connect with that country. I liked Irish, Scottish and English folk music. I had a lot of tapes and recordings of them. And my stepfather was a great fan of pipe music. On Sundays, he would play an LP of the Edinburgh Police Pipe Band.”

Clegg was sure that he heard connetions between the rural music of South Africa’s Natal province (now known as KwaZulu-Natal) — the music that he was learning from his black friends and teachers — and the sounds of Britain. So Clegg and Mchunu founded a fusion band called Juluka — “Sweat” in Zulu.

At the time, Johnny was a professor of anthropology at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg; Sipho was working as a gardener. They dreamed of getting a record deal even though they knew they couldn’t get airplay, or perform publicly in South Africa.

It was a hard sell to labels. South African radio was strictly segregated, and record companies refused to believe that an album sung partly in Zulu and partly in English would find an audience in any case. Clegg told NPR that their songs’ primary subject material wasn’t setting off any sparks with record producers, either.

“You know, ‘Who really cares about cattle? You’re singing about cattle. You know we’re in Johannesburg, dude, get your subject matter right!’ Clegg recalled. “But I was shaped by cattle culture, because all the songs I learned were about cattle, and I was interested. I was saying, ‘There’s a hidden world. And I’d like to put it on the table.'”

They got a record deal with producer Hilton Rosenthal, who released Juluka’s debut album, Universal Men, on his own label, Rhythm Safari, in 1979. And the band managed to find an audience both at home and abroad. One of its songs, “Scatterlings of Africa,” became a chart hit in the U.K.

[embedded content]

YouTube

The band toured internationally for several years, and went. But eventually, Mchunu decided he’d had enough. He wanted to go home — not just to Johannesburg, but home to his native region of Zululand, in the KwaZulu-Natal province, to raise cattle.

“It was really hard for Sipho,” Clegg told NPR. “He was a traditional tribesman. To be in New York City, he couldn’t speak English that well — there were times when I think he felt he was on Mars. And after some grueling tours, he said to me, ‘I gave myself 15 years to make it or break it in Joburg, and then go home.’ So he resigned, and Juluka came to an end —and I was still full of the fire of music and dance.”

So Clegg founded a new group called Savuka — which means “We Have Risen” in Zulu. Savuka had ardent love songs, like the swooning “Dela,” but many of the band’s tunes, like “One (Hu)Man, One Vote” and “Warsaw 1943 (I Never Betrayed the Revolution),” were explicitly political.

“Savuka was launched basically in the state of emergency in South Africa, in 1986,” Clegg observed. “You could not ignore what was going on. The entire Savuka project was based in the South African experience and the fight for a better quality of life and freedom for all.”

Long after Nelson Mandela was freed from prison and had become president of South Africa, he danced onstage with Savuka to that song that Clegg had written for him.

[embedded content]

YouTube

Clegg went on to a solo career. But in 2017, he announced he’d been fighting cancer. And he made one last international tour that he called his “Final Journey.”

The following year, dozens of musician friends and admirers — including Dave Matthews, Vusi Mahlasela, Peter Gabriel, and Mike Rutherford of Genesis — put together a charity single to honor Clegg. It’s benefitted primary school education in South Africa.

[embedded content]

YouTube

Clegg never shied away from being described as a crossover artist. Instead, he embraced the concept.

“I love it,” he said. “I love the hybridization of culture, language, music, dance, choreography. If we look at the history of art, generally speaking, it is through the interaction of different communities, cultures, worldviews, ideas and concepts that invigorates styles and genres and gives them life and gives people a different angle on stuff that was really, just, you know, being passed down blindly from generation to generation.”

Johnny Clegg didn’t do anything blindly. Instead, he held a mirror up to his nation — and urged South Africa to redefine itself.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Bernie Sanders says he’d ‘absolutely’ try to break up Facebook, Google, Amazon

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., said Tuesday that he would “absolutely” look to break up Big Tech giants like Facebook, Amazon and Google on antitrust grounds.

Speaking at a Washington Post event, Sanders specifically singled out Facebook as having “incredible power over the economy, over the political life of this country in a very dangerous sense.”

He also stated that Amazon is “moving very rapidly to be a monopoly.”

Sanders’ comments come at a perilous time for Silicon Valley, which is facing increased scrutiny from lawmakers on Capitol Hill and the prospect of being broken up or subjected to stringent new regulations.

BABY NAMED AFTER GOOGLE GETS SWAG FROM TECH GIANT

Westlake Legal Group DOTCOM_1280X720_BIG_TECH_ON_THE_HOT_SEAT Bernie Sanders says he'd 'absolutely' try to break up Facebook, Google, Amazon fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/tech/companies/amazon fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 0f898962-518b-5efd-8190-fcd87d919df8

In recent weeks, Facebook’s cryptocurrency Libra came under fire from lawmakers, the Federal Reserve and the Trump administration, while Republicans accused Google of being biased. The FTC has reportedly come to a settlement with Facebook, the details of which have not been made public, that includes a $5 billion fine.

RUBIK’S CUBE SOLVED BY DEEP LEARNING ALGORITHM IN FRACTION OF A SECOND

“And it’s not just Amazon,” Sanders said, according to Politico. “I think we need vigorous antitrust legislation in this country because you are seeing – you name the area, whether it’s pharmaceuticals, whether it is Wall Street, whether it is high tech – fewer and fewer gigantic corporations owning those sectors.” He would appoint an attorney general “who would break up these huge corporations,” he added.

Westlake Legal Group Bernie-Sanders-thumb Bernie Sanders says he'd 'absolutely' try to break up Facebook, Google, Amazon fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/tech/companies/amazon fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 0f898962-518b-5efd-8190-fcd87d919df8

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., pauses while speaking during a forum on Friday, June 21, 2019, in Miami. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.,who is battling Sanders and almost two dozen other candidates for the Democratic 2020 presidential nomination, called for the breakup of Amazon, Google and Facebook back in March.

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Westlake Legal Group DOTCOM_1280X720_BIG_TECH_ON_THE_HOT_SEAT Bernie Sanders says he'd 'absolutely' try to break up Facebook, Google, Amazon fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/tech/companies/amazon fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 0f898962-518b-5efd-8190-fcd87d919df8   Westlake Legal Group DOTCOM_1280X720_BIG_TECH_ON_THE_HOT_SEAT Bernie Sanders says he'd 'absolutely' try to break up Facebook, Google, Amazon fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/tech/companies/amazon fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 0f898962-518b-5efd-8190-fcd87d919df8

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Naomi Campbell reveals intense routine for airplane travel

This supermodel’s got a super-unusual travel routine.

Poser extraordinaire Naomi Campbell just revealed her airport routine in a YouTube video — and it’s as one-of-a-kind as she is.

After grabbing a fashion mag and, controversially, a bag of mini Twix bars at duty free (“You know what? I’m getting it … I’m getting it and I don’t care!”), Campbell proceeds to board a plane to Doha, Qatar.

As soon as she finds her seat, it’s showtime: Campbell breaks out a pair of disposable gloves (!) and gets to work, combatting the general grossness of airplanes and all the weird stuff air travel does to our bodies.

VIDEO OF AIRLINE PASSENGER USING FEET TO OPERATE IN-FLIGHT SCREEN HORRIFIES TWITTER: ‘I WOULD OPEN A SIDE DOOR AND JUMP OUT’

In the video, Campbell first wipes down “anything that you could possibly touch,” and she means it: the tray, the TV, the remote, the headrest … even the back of the seat in front of her.

“I do not care what people think of me,” she says, bluntly. “It’s my health and it makes me feel better.”

(Actually, the strategy seems well-received by the woman standing behind her, who asks, “Can you do my seat next?” with a giggle.)

Westlake Legal Group ff9f3e90-naomi-campbell-AP Naomi Campbell reveals intense routine for airplane travel New York Post Johannah Masters fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/lifestyle fnc/travel fnc article 7f11d25b-2c17-5205-85c6-582cc5f8193f

Naomi Campbell’s airport routine is apparently just as one-of-a-kind as she is. (AP)

But Campbell’s not done. Post-wipedown, she pulls out a pink, fabric cover for her seat. She has them in a bunch of colors and switches them out based on her mood. On land, she has them hand-washed at her hotel.

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Finally sheathed from the insult of the plane seat, Campbell moves onto her beauty routine.

Basically, it entails a whole lot of hydration: she has an entire plastic bag filled with beauty gear that she calls a “hydration pack,” and she’s also been chugging water throughout the video). Also: “masks, masks, masks.”

Westlake Legal Group airplane-seats Naomi Campbell reveals intense routine for airplane travel New York Post Johannah Masters fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/lifestyle fnc/travel fnc article 7f11d25b-2c17-5205-85c6-582cc5f8193f

In the video, Naomi Campbell first wipes down “anything that you could possibly touch,” and she means it: the tray, the TV, the remote, the headrest … even the back of the seat in front of her. (iStock)

She means the beauty kind — but she also means the literal kind. Yep, the final step Campbell takes is putting on an actual face mask that she wears the entire flight.

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“No matter what plane you take, private or commercial, as the plane descends, people start coughing and sneezing,” Campbell says. “The coughing and sneezing makes me … I just can’t.”

This story originally appeared in the New York Post.

Westlake Legal Group ff9f3e90-naomi-campbell-AP Naomi Campbell reveals intense routine for airplane travel New York Post Johannah Masters fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/lifestyle fnc/travel fnc article 7f11d25b-2c17-5205-85c6-582cc5f8193f   Westlake Legal Group ff9f3e90-naomi-campbell-AP Naomi Campbell reveals intense routine for airplane travel New York Post Johannah Masters fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/lifestyle fnc/travel fnc article 7f11d25b-2c17-5205-85c6-582cc5f8193f

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Judge bars Roger Stone from social media, says ex-Trump adviser violated gag order

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6005389699001_6005377411001-vs Judge bars Roger Stone from social media, says ex-Trump adviser violated gag order fox-news/person/roger-stone fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article Alex Pappas 8c1dbd03-c625-55ef-9580-b70b44c47caf

A federal judge on Tuesday barred former Trump adviser Roger Stone – facing charges of tampering, obstruction and false statements in a case brought by Special Counsel Robert Mueller – from posting anything on social media after determining Stone violated her gag order not to discuss the case.

U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson, in federal court in Washington, ordered Stone to stay off Twitter, Facebook and other social media platforms, saying he did not abide by her previous order to not comment on the case. She did not order Stone to jail.

“I said you can’t talk about it at all,” Jackson told Stone in court.

JUDGE ORDERS ROGER STONE TO COURT OVER INFLAMMATORY INSTAGRAM POST

Prosecutors argued Stone had violated the judge’s gag order with Instagram posts that disparaged the Mueller investigation and the broader election interference probe.

Defense lawyers have said nothing Stone posted on social media ran afoul of the judge’s order or would prevent an unbiased jury from hearing the case.

Jackson imposed the order in February after Stone posted a photo of the judge with what appeared to be the crosshairs of a gun.

Stone, the colorful former longtime political adviser to Trump, was indicted in January.

The indictment does not charge Stone with conspiring with WikiLeaks, the anti-secrecy website that published emails of Democrats during the 2016 campaign, or with the Russian officers Mueller says hacked them. Instead, it accuses him of lying about his interactions related to WikiLeaks’ release during probes by Congress and Mueller’s team.

Stone has contested the charges.

“I will plead not guilty to these charges,” Stone said at the time. “I will defeat them in court. This is a politically-motivated investigation.”

Fox News’ Anne Marie Riha and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6005389699001_6005377411001-vs Judge bars Roger Stone from social media, says ex-Trump adviser violated gag order fox-news/person/roger-stone fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article Alex Pappas 8c1dbd03-c625-55ef-9580-b70b44c47caf   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6005389699001_6005377411001-vs Judge bars Roger Stone from social media, says ex-Trump adviser violated gag order fox-news/person/roger-stone fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/politics fnc article Alex Pappas 8c1dbd03-c625-55ef-9580-b70b44c47caf

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House voting on resolution to condemn Trump's racist 'go back' tweet directed at 'squad'

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close House voting on resolution to condemn Trump's racist 'go back' tweet directed at 'squad'

Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib and Ayanna Pressley held a press conference in response to the President Trump’s tweets. USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – The House will vote Tuesday on a resolution condemning President Donald Trump’s racist remarks in which he told four outspoken congresswomen to “go back” to where they came from.

The resolution specifically calls Trump’s comments about the squad — Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.; Ilhan Omar, D-Minn.; Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass.; and Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich. — “racist” and says the attacks have “legitimized fear and hatred of new Americans and people of color.” 

The vote, scheduled this afternoon, will put Republicans on the record as to whether they denounce the president’s comments or will stick beside him. It will also set up a heated debate on the House floor, where Democrats are expected to pressure conservatives to back the resolution. 

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Long-standing House rules, however, prohibit any personal attacks on the president and Republicans repeatedly called out Democrats as they took the floor to speak out about the president’s rhetoric. 

Rep. Jim McGovern, D-Mass., and chairman of the House Rules Committee, attacked the president’s comments as something that “used to be reserved for the darkest corners of the internet.” 

“This is proudly using Twitter as a megaphone to attack fellow Americans,” he said. “These are American citizens being turned into some kind of scary ‘other,’ not because of their party, but because of their background, their race and their opinions.” 

He added: “I implore my colleagues to think twice before you follow the president off a cliff.”

Rep. Rob Woodall, R-Ga., took issue with McGovern’s comments, saying they clearly violated rules and were “diminishing” the institution of the House of Representatives. 

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told members of her caucus Tuesday morning she wasn’t worried about House rules on calling out the president’s comments, describing the four congresswomen as their “sisters” and saying Trump’s “words were racist,” according to an aide in the room. 

“The fact is, as offended as we are, and we are offended by what he said about our sisters. He says that about people every day and they feel as hurt as we do about somebody in our family having this offense against them,” Pelosi said, according to the source. 

More on resolution: House resolution will condemn Trump’s ‘disgusting’ attacks on AOC, Tlaib, Omar and Pressley

Everything we know: Trump triples down on his controversial tweets about ‘The Squad.’ 

Trump should ‘aim higher’: Lindsey Graham and other Republicans respond to Trump’s ‘go back’ tweets

She added that she hoped Republicans would join them in condemning the comments by voting in a bipartisan fashion for the resolution. 

“If they can’t support condemning the words of the President, well that’s a message in and of itself,” Pelosi said. 

It doesn’t appear Republican leaders are ready to denounce the president’s tweet. In a news conference on Tuesday morning, House GOP leaders refused to condemn the president and alleged the outcry is over politics. 

“Let’s not be false about what is happening here today,” said GOP minority leader Kevin McCarthy. “This is all about politics and beliefs of ideologies.”

Along with the resolution, Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., introduced a measure that would censure Trump for his racist comments. Democrats aren’t expected to take up the measure for a vote, instead hoping the resolution on Tuesday would garner bipartisan support. 

Trump wrote on Sunday that it was “so interesting to see ‘Progressive’ Democrat Congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe” now telling the U.S. how to run its government. He did not mention Ocasio-Cortez, Omar, Pressley or Tlaib by name. 

“Why don’t they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came,” Trump wrote on Twitter. “Then come back and show us how it is done.”

All four are American citizens. The four progressive freshmen lawmakers are some of the president’s most vocal critics in the House and have become known as the “squad” — sticking together even when they seem to go against the rest of their party on key votes and issues. 

The president’s tweets appeared to help unite House Democrats after weeks of infighting that exploded into the public last month over sending emergency money to border agencies running migrant detention centers.

The feud garnered headlines after Pelosi criticized members of the “squad,” telling the New York Times that the four congresswomen “have their public whatever and their Twitter world” but do not “have any following.” 

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close House voting on resolution to condemn Trump's racist 'go back' tweet directed at 'squad'

Four congresswomen reacted to President Donald Trump seemingly suggesting they “go back” to the countries they “originally came from”. USA TODAY

Ocasio-Cortez questioned why Pelosi would single out the new women of color in the caucus, telling the Washington Post it was “outright disrespectful.” 

The back-and-forth digs ended this weekend after Trump’s attacks. Instead, Democrats united against the president and denounced his comments.

More: ‘The Squad’: These are the four congresswomen Trump told to ‘go back’ to other countries

The resolution not only condemns Trump’s comments. It also highlights immigration as a centerpiece of American history and culture, quoting presidents throughout history and comparing them to the policies of the Trump administration, which has been heavily scrutinized due in part to the worsening conditions in migrant detention centers at the southern U.S. border. 

“The commitment to immigration and asylum has been not a partisan cause but a powerful national value that has infused the work of many Presidents,” the resolution reads. “American patriotism is defined not by race or ethnicity but by devotion to the Constitutional ideals of equality, liberty, inclusion, and democracy and by service to our communities and struggle for the common good.”

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Emmy snubs: George Clooney, Julia Roberts, Emma Stone left out of nominations

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The 71st Emmy Award nominations included big names in TV like “Game of Thrones” and “Stranger Things,” but it did not include these five names. USA TODAY

A-listers including Amy Adams (“Sharp Objects”), Mahershala Ali (“True Detective”) and Michelle Williams (“Fosse/Verdon”) all landed Primetime Emmy nominations Tuesday, but plenty of other high-profile actors and shows were left off the list. 

Among the most notable snubs: 

Julia Roberts

The Oscar winner made a splash with Amazon’s mind-bender “Homecoming,” in which she played a social worker at an experimental facility for returning soldiers. Although Roberts’ TV debut was hailed as one of her finest performances in years, that wasn’t enough to win over Emmy voters, who passed her over for best actress in a drama series. 

George Clooney

The “ER” megastar made his much-anticipated return to TV with war satire “Catch-22,” co-starring in and directing two of the miniseries’ six episodes. But the Hulu show earned zero nominations, while rival Netflix’s limited series “When They See Us” rightfully cleaned up across the board.

Emma Stone

Another Oscar winner out of the running for Emmy gold? Stone, who was the highlight of Cary Fukunaga’s ambitious Netflix drama “Maniac,” in which she co-starred with Jonah Hill as participants in a mysterious trial for a pharmaceutical drug. The show’s genre-hopping dream sequences allowed for both actors to inhabit multiple roles – easy catnip for Emmy voters – but both actors were shut out of the limited series categories.

‘Black-ish’

The ABC sitcom has been up for best comedy series the past three years, but was overlooked in Tuesday’s nominations, while critical darlings “Fleabag,” “Russian Doll” and “Schitt’s Creek” all earned their first nods in the category. Tracee Ellis Ross, a three-time actress nominee for “Black-ish,” was also snubbed, leaving Anthony Anderson with the show’s lone major nomination for best comedy actor. 

Aidy Bryant

Justice for Aidy! The longtime “Saturday Night Live” standout earned her first nomination for supporting actress in a comedy series last year, but failed to land repeat recognition in the category. (Perennial favorite Kate McKinnon was the sole “SNL” cast member to score a nod, though five hosts won nods in the guest-acting categories.) Even more egregious: Bryant’s delightful and moving Hulu comedy “Shrill,” which was praised for its revolutionary portrayal of a fat woman, was also snubbed across all categories. 

‘GLOW’

The Netflix dramedy, set in the competitive world of women’s wrestling in the 1980s, was a knockout with Emmy voters in its first season, winning two awards and nabbing eight total nominations, including one for best comedy series. But the show managed just one major nod this round, for Betty Gilpin in best supporting actress. 

‘The Kominsky Method’

It wasn’t all bad news for Netflix, whose 117 nominations, up from 112 last year, ranked second behind HBO. Sophomore crime thriller “Ozark” managed nine, including best drama series, a category that also recognized the streaming giant’s “Bodyguard.” Still, the shutout from best comedy series for “Kominsky” must’ve been a surprise. The Chuck Lorre series, about an acting coach and his best friend, appeared to be generally well-liked with Emmy voters, who nominated Michael Douglas and Alan Arkin for best actor and supporting actor, respectively. Netflix’s twisty “Dead to Me” was similarly missing from best comedy series, but still found love for Christina Applegate as best actress.

The Emmys will be presented Sept. 22 on Fox.  

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