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Andy Puzder: Desperate Dems pursue impeachment inquiry based on flimsiest of justifications

Westlake Legal Group 13f2d382-trump-pelosi Andy Puzder: Desperate Dems pursue impeachment inquiry based on flimsiest of justifications fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Andy Puzder 7ab9c695-31c1-5105-a5b2-890af5504e18

It has always seemed strange to me that Democrats so readily accepted the Steele dossier’s allegations against President Trump. Perhaps this was because my personal reaction on reading the dossier was mild amusement at how very poorly it was written and how absurd the patently “salacious and unverified” allegations sounded.

In the end, what sounded like bogus claims turned out to be bogus claims.

You would think Democrats and their media allies would have learned a lesson from this nonexistent “Russia collusion” debacle. But Democrats have once again unquestioningly accepted hearsay allegations from a politically biased source in the whistleblower complaint.

GOP SEN. KEVIN CRAMER SAYS ATTACKS ON TRUMP WILL NEVER CEASE: ‘HATERS ARE GOING TO HATE’

Perhaps strangest of all in this strangest of political times, Democrats initiated an impeachment inquiry based on these allegations before even seeing either the complaint itself or a transcript of the call to which it referred.

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Though I rarely agree with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., on policy, I don’t think she’s stupid. So I was puzzled by her willingness to pursue this extremely risky step without anything approaching evidence of serious wrongdoing.

I thought perhaps a combination of the pending election, the weak slate of potential Democratic presidential nominees, plus President Trump’s increasingly obvious economic success, had created political desperation so intense that Pelosi’s only choice was to take an extreme political risk.

At this point, I asked myself, what else have they got? Elizabeth Warren? A Hillary Clinton rematch? Seriously? 

But then it occurred to me that this could all make sense. People tend to believe that others will do what they themselves would do if faced with similar choices. No one wants to believe other people would make choices morally superior to their own.

This certainly explains the rush to accept the Steele dossier’s absurd claims. According to The New York Times: “Fusion GPS was hired on behalf of Mrs. Clinton’s campaign and the D.N.C. by their law firm, Perkins Coie, to compile research about Mr. Trump, his businesses and associates – including possible connections with Russia. It was at that point that Fusion GPS hired Mr. Steele, who has deep sourcing in Russia, to gather information.”

Whether you call this opposition research (meaning Democrats did it) or collusion (meaning Republicans did it), it’s certainly easy to see why Democrats incorrectly believed nominee Trump would look to Russia for information that could influence the election. It was the very conduct in which the Democrats had engaged.

How about the whistleblower’s complaint? Well, again according to The New York Times, former Vice President Joe Biden “threatened to withhold $1 billion in United States loan guarantees if Ukraine’s leaders did not dismiss the country’s top prosecutor, who had been accused of turning a blind eye to corruption.” Not coincidentally, the prosecutor “was soon voted out by the Ukrainian Parliament.”

So did anyone associated with Biden benefit from his actions? Well, Mr. Biden’s son Hunter “had a stake in the outcome” as he was “paid as much as $50,000 per month” for being “on the board of an energy company owned by a Ukrainian oligarch who had been in the sights of the fired prosecutor general.”

Whether you call this fighting corruption (meaning a Democrat did it) or an abuse of power (meaning a Republican did it), it’s once again easy to see why Democrats would so easily believe that President Trump threatened to withhold foreign aid to obtain a personal benefit. It’s exactly what Democrats did under similar circumstances.

Less than one day after Pelosi announced her impeachment inquiry, President Trump discredited the whistleblower’s allegations by releasing a rough transcript of his call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

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The rough transcript shows that Trump did not condition foreign aid on any action by Zelensky. Zelensky has since confirmed that he didn’t feel any such pressure from Trump.

The transcript also shows that Zelensky, not Trump, brought up Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani visiting Ukraine to investigate corruption. And despite incredibly biased media coverage to the contrary, the only “favor” Trump requested in the call concerned investigating foreign interference in our 2016 election – a subject that used to be of great interest to Democrats.

In reality, if someone suggested withholding aid to pressure a foreign power into besmirching a political opponent, President Trump would be the first person in the room to say “No way” – or likely something far more graphic and inappropriate to repeat here.

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But much like the false “Russiagate” debacle, because of their willingness to believe President Trump would act as they would in similar circumstances, the Democrats (and their media allies) now find themselves prematurely committed to an impeachment inquiry based on the flimsiest of justifications.

I fully expect their hollow abuse of power claims to continue. They have no choice at this point. They will continue to stir up a lot of dust and when the dust settles, once again, there will be nothing there.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY ANDY PUZDER

Westlake Legal Group 13f2d382-trump-pelosi Andy Puzder: Desperate Dems pursue impeachment inquiry based on flimsiest of justifications fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Andy Puzder 7ab9c695-31c1-5105-a5b2-890af5504e18   Westlake Legal Group 13f2d382-trump-pelosi Andy Puzder: Desperate Dems pursue impeachment inquiry based on flimsiest of justifications fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article Andy Puzder 7ab9c695-31c1-5105-a5b2-890af5504e18

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Adam Schiff Says Whistleblower May Not Testify, Safety ‘Primary Interest’

Westlake Legal Group 5da40c802100002a0dacd7f4 Adam Schiff Says Whistleblower May Not Testify, Safety ‘Primary Interest’

Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said Sunday it may not be necessary to have the whistleblower who first filed a complaint about President Donald Trump’s call with Ukraine testify before Congress, saying there were still major concerns about the person’s safety.

Schiff, speaking to CBS News’ “Face the Nation,” told host Margaret Brennan that while his committee was initially interested in speaking with the whistleblower, who is still anonymous, he felt like lawmakers had now confirmed many of the details in from the call between Trump and Ukrainian leader Volodymyr Zelensky that set off the House’s ongoing impeachment inquiry.

“Given that we already have the call record, we don’t need the whistleblower who wasn’t on the call to tell us what took place during the call,” Schiff said during the interview Sunday. “We have the best evidence of that.” 

In the complaint, which was filed after Trump’s July 25 phone call with Zelensky, the whistleblower said they became concerned after hearing from multiple White House aides that Trump repeatedly pressured his counterpart to investigate a main political rival, former Vice President Joe Biden, and his son, Hunter Biden. The call took place shortly after the president ordered nearly $400 million in military aid that had been appropriated for Ukraine be put on hold.

The White House released a reconstruction of the call last month which showed clear instance of Trump asking for the investigation, and critics have said the demand reflected a clear quid pro quo in exchange for a political favor.

Trump has rejected those calls, however, and labeled the impeachment effort a “coup” and another “witch hunt” to overturn the 2016 election. He has demanded to know the identity of his accuser, fueling worries that the person’s identity could be leaked and their safety put in danger. 

“I think initially, before the president started threatening the whistleblower, threatening others calling them traitors and spies and suggestion that you know, we used to give them the death penalty to traitors and spies, maybe we should think about that again… Yes we were interested in having the whistleblower come forward,” Schiff said Sunday. “Our primary interest right now is making sure that that person is protected.”

The chairman leads one of three House panels spearheading the impeachment inquiry, and Democrats have already sent out a flurry of subpoenas and requests for documents related to the Ukraine call. While the White House has been stonewalling many of those efforts, some former officials have already spoken to lawmakers, including the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine.

“We want to make sure that we uncover the full details about the conditionality of either the military aid of that meeting with Ukraine’s president,” Schiff said Sunday. “It may not be necessary to take steps that might reveal the whistleblower’s identity to do that.”

He continued: “And we’re going to make sure we protect that whistleblower.”

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Syria Live Updates: Assad’s Army Moves into Border Town

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_162683814_d79699bc-2413-4b97-a0bf-2f200a8161b0-articleLarge Syria Live Updates: Assad’s Army Moves into Border Town United States Defense and Military Forces Turkey Syrian Democratic Forces Syria Russia Kurds Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) Defense and Military Forces Assad, Bashar al-

Syrian government troops entered the strategic town of Tel Tamer on Monday.CreditDelil Souleiman/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

The Syrian Army invaded the town of Tel Tamer in northeastern Syria, state media reported on Monday, soon after the government of President Bashar al-Assad forged an alliance with the Kurdish forces that control the region.

Tel Tamer, a strategic crossroads that connects northeastern Syria with the country’s northern hub, Aleppo, is just 20 miles from Ras al Ain, the center of the Turkish assault.

Tel Tamer was once home to hundreds of Christians before ISIS overran the territory and claimed it as part of its self-declared caliphate in 2015. Kurdish-led fighters repelled the Islamist extremists and had held the town with the backing of American troops until President Trump abruptly withdrew them from the region last week.

Syrian state television showed about half a dozen Syrian soldiers milling around a pickup truck mounted with a machine gun. They were greeted by a small crowd of local residents, some of whom carried portraits of Mr. Assad.

It has been only a week since President Trump pulled back American forces in Syria and effectively gave Turkey the green light to cross the border and pursue its own military agenda. Alliances are shifting, ISIS is reinvigorated and the lives of thousands of civilians are endangered.

Embittered at their abandonment by their American allies, Kurdish leaders adroitly moved to secure a new partner: The government of Bashar al-Assad, an avowed foe of the United States.

Late Sunday, the Syrian Democratic Forces, or S.D.F., said they had struck a deal with the Assad government that would allow government forces to enter the Kurdish-controlled northeast of Syria for the first time in years. The commander of the S.D.F. wrote an article for Foreign Policy that explained the reasoning behind the deal.

The commander, Mazloum Abdi, said in the absence of American help against the Turkish invasion, he had no option but to seek help from the Syrian Army and their Russian allies, even though “we do not trust their promises.”

“We know that we would have to make painful compromises with Moscow and Bashar al-Assad if we go down the road of working with them,” he added. “But if we have to choose between compromises and the genocide of our people, we will surely choose life for our people.”

Trump administration officials once argued that keeping Mr. Assad’s forces out of the territory was crucial to stemming Iranian and Russian influence in Syria. But with American troops on the way out, Washington has lost its leverage.

“The worst thing in military logic and comrades in the trench is betrayal,” said one official allied with the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces.

Some American military members who had worked closely with the Kurdish militia were also appalled.

“They trusted us and we broke that trust,” said one Army officer who has worked alongside the Kurds in northern Syria. “It’s a stain on the American conscience.”

Advisers to the Turkish president said Monday morning that the Turkish Army would press on with its incursion, despite the deal brokered between Kurdish forces and the Syrian government on Sunday.

The official Turkish explanation for the offensive was to clear the area of the Kurdish-led militia that has close ties with a terrorist group that is banned in Turkey.

At the start of the invasion, Turkish officials said they respected Syrian sovereignty.

But on Monday, Yasin Aktay, an adviser to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey, said on Twitter that “the fact that Syrian Army has made a deal” with the Kurdish militia “will not stop Turkey’s antiterror operation.”

A second presidential adviser, Ibrahim Kalin, later tweeted that “Turkey will not stop until we reach our goals.” Turkish officials have previously promised to create a buffer zone along the length of its border with Syria, roughly 20 miles deep.

The United States had no greater ally in driving out the Islamic State militants who claimed vast swathes of Syria in the quest for a modern-day caliphate than the coalition of fighters known as the Syrian Democratic Forces, or S.D.F.

Inch by inch, the Kurdish-led militia, working with its American military partners, drove ISIS militants out of their strongholds.

But another United States ally viewed the militia much less fondly: Turkey. Its leaders looked across their southern border and saw not an ally but a threat to its territorial integrity, given the militia’s ties to Kurdish separatists in Turkey.

With Turkish-led forces now threatening the Kurds, the S.D.F. has turned its attention away from the Islamic State, including those militants captured during the war and held in detention camps. Already, some ISIS members said to have escaped, along with hundreds of their family members. A planned transfer of five dozen “high value” detainees to the United States from Syria never happened.

Between escaped ISIS members and the Islamist sleeper cells believed to have been left behind when the militants were defeated in Syria, there is concern that the world has not seen the last of the extremist group.

Where Turkish forces struck Kurdish-held areas

Westlake Legal Group syria-zoom-map-600 Syria Live Updates: Assad’s Army Moves into Border Town United States Defense and Military Forces Turkey Syrian Democratic Forces Syria Russia Kurds Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) Defense and Military Forces Assad, Bashar al-

Ras al Ain

Turkey’s proposed

buffer zone

KURDISH

Control

ISIS members’ families escape from detention.

Government

Control

Turkish army AND

syrian opposition

KURDISH

Control

Other

opposition

Government

Control

Deir al-Zour

Albu Kamal

Westlake Legal Group syria-zoom-map-335 Syria Live Updates: Assad’s Army Moves into Border Town United States Defense and Military Forces Turkey Syrian Democratic Forces Syria Russia Kurds Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) Defense and Military Forces Assad, Bashar al-

Ras al Ain

Turkey’s proposed

buffer zone

ISIS members’ families escape from detention.

Turkish army

AND syrian

opposition

KURDISH

Control

Other

opposition

Government

Control

Westlake Legal Group syria-zoom-map-300 Syria Live Updates: Assad’s Army Moves into Border Town United States Defense and Military Forces Turkey Syrian Democratic Forces Syria Russia Kurds Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) Defense and Military Forces Assad, Bashar al-

Ras al Ain

Turkey’s proposed

buffer zone

ISIS members’ families escape from detention.

Turkish army AND

syrian opposition

KURDISH

Control

Other

opposition

Government

Control

Sources: Times reporting; Control areas via Conflict Monitor by IHS Markit | By Sarah Almukhtar, Allison McCann and Anjali Singhvi

Reporting was contributed by Carlotta Gall, Ben Hubbard, Charlie Savage, Eric Schmitt, Patrick Kingsley, Hwaida Saad, Eric Nagourney and Russell Goldman.

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Kurds announce deal with Assad after US withdrawal; Trump taunts Hunter Biden

Good morning and welcome to Fox News First. Here’s what you need to know as you start your Monday …

Russia brokers deal between Kurds and Damascus to stem Turkish offensive: report; Trump seeing ‘consensus’ in new sanctions on Turkey
Nearly a week after the U.S. announced its decision to pull out troops from northern Syria to make way for a Turkish incursion, Kurdish forces in the country have reportedly agreed to a new deal with Damascus in a desperate bid to face off against Ankara’s offensive. The New York Times reported that the deal– which was announced Sunday evening– would enable President Bashar al-Assad’s forces to attempt to regain a foothold in the country’s northeast. The Washington Post reported that the deal was reached after three days of negotiations between the Kurdish forces, Russian envoys and Damascus. Click here for more on our top story.

The latest development comes as at least nine people, including five civilians, were killed Sunday in Turkish airstrikes on a convoy in the Syrian border town of Ras al-Ayn, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights and Syrian Kurdish officials. In an interview on Fox News Sunday, Secretary of Defense Mark Esper defended Trump’s decision to withdraw U.S. forces and said the U.S. is urging Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan to cease the aggression.

Esper said that roughly 1,000 troops will be withdrawing from the north of the country. A U.S. official told Fox News that forces will not be leaving the country altogether, but will be moving southward. Meanwhile, in a series of tweets, Trump himself denounced getting involved in “endless wars” and talked up wide support in Washington in imposing news sanctions against Turkey.

‘Where’s Hunter?’ Trump asks, as Biden’s son promises not to work with foreign companies if father wins presidency in 2020
President Trump targeted Hunter Biden Sunday morning, implying that the son of former Vice President Joe Biden has disappeared — hours after Hunter Biden’s attorney announced his client is stepping down from the board of a Chinese company and vowed that he will not work with foreign companies if his father becomes president. “Where’s Hunter? He has totally disappeared!” Trump tweeted. Trump and his own attorney, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, have accused Hunter Biden of improperly benefiting from business dealings in China and Ukraine while Joe Biden was vice president.

Westlake Legal Group Caravan101419 Kurds announce deal with Assad after US withdrawal; Trump taunts Hunter Biden fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article a2a5a652-03d6-5495-bfc6-86a20a46ac42

Mexico halts caravan of 2,000 migrants bound for US
A caravan of roughly 2,000 migrants bound for the United States was halted by Mexican authorities over the weekend only a few hours into their journey, according to officials. The caravan, which consisted of migrants from Africa, the Caribbean, and Central America, left before dawn Saturday from Tapachula, a town in southern Mexico near the Guatemalan border, Reuters reported. About 24 miles into their journey, federal police and national guardsmen blocked their path. The abrupt halt of the caravan stood in stark contrast to last year when waves of U.S.-bound caravans – including one of at least 7,000 people – drew widespread media coverage while immigration officials on both sides of the border struggled to stem the flow.

China’s trade with US shrinks again in September
The trade war between the U.S. and China continues to take a toll on the Chinese economy and threatens to tip the global economy into recession. China’s trade with the United States fell by double digits again in September. Exports to the United States, China’s biggest foreign market, fell 17.8 percent to $36.5 billion, a deterioration from August’s 16 percent decline, customs data showed Monday. Imports of American goods sank 20.6 percent from the year before to $10.6 billion, a slight improvement over August’s 22 percent decline.

Westlake Legal Group Sgt.-Mark-Allen Kurds announce deal with Assad after US withdrawal; Trump taunts Hunter Biden fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article a2a5a652-03d6-5495-bfc6-86a20a46ac42

Master Sgt. Mark Allen dies 10 years after being shot while searching for Army deserter Bergdahl
Retired Army Master Sgt. Mark Allen died on Saturday, 10 years after he was shot while looking for a missing soldier Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl in Afghanistan back in 2009. He was 46. Allen was unable to walk or speak since being shot in the head by a sniper in July 2009 during his attempted search for Bergdahl, who walked off his base in Afghanistan and was imprisoned by the Taliban for five years.

Bergdahl later pleaded guilty to desertion, misbehavior and endangering the lives of fellow soldiers, including Allen and was reduced in rank from sergeant to private and fined $1,000 per month over a ten-month period.
 
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#TheFlashback: CLICK HERE to find out what happened on “This Day in History.”
 
SOME PARTING WORDS

In a special “Swamp Watch” on “The Next Revolution,” Steve Hilton points out that Joe and Hunter Biden continue to dodge an investigation of the family business dealings in Ukraine while Trump faces a formal impeachment inquiry.
 
Not signed up yet for Fox News First? Click here to find out what you’re missing.

Click here to find out what’s on Fox News and Fox News Radio today!

Fox News First is compiled by Fox News’ Bryan Robinson. Thank you for joining us! Enjoy your day! We’ll see you in your inbox first thing on Tuesday morning.

Westlake Legal Group TurkeyKurds101419 Kurds announce deal with Assad after US withdrawal; Trump taunts Hunter Biden fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article a2a5a652-03d6-5495-bfc6-86a20a46ac42   Westlake Legal Group TurkeyKurds101419 Kurds announce deal with Assad after US withdrawal; Trump taunts Hunter Biden fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article a2a5a652-03d6-5495-bfc6-86a20a46ac42

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Cracker Barrel-loving family celebrates son’s first birthday at restaurant chain

The beloved country store has a new fan – and he may be the youngest yet.

Little Michael Magnotta made his Cracker Barrel debut last month in New Jersey as an early celebration for his first birthday. The tot, who turned 1 on Oct. 3, ventured out to the popular chain on Sept. 29 with his family to mark the exciting occasion.

Westlake Legal Group 578A3394 Cracker Barrel-loving family celebrates son’s first birthday at restaurant chain fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article Alexandra Deabler a75d2ba8-9ad0-5df2-b2f1-3e08b2f0faba

Little Michael Magnotta made his Cracker Barrel debut last month in New Jersey as an early celebration for his first birthday (Michael Magnotta / Cracker Barrel)

CRACKER BARREL SHARES ORIGINAL MENU, LITTLE-KNOWN FACTS FOR 50TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

However, his appetite for the restaurant chain was inevitable.

Michael Magnotta, father of the newest country store lover, fell in love with Cracker Barrel in April 1998 when his grandparents took him for the first time to a location in Georgia.

Westlake Legal Group 578A3490 Cracker Barrel-loving family celebrates son’s first birthday at restaurant chain fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article Alexandra Deabler a75d2ba8-9ad0-5df2-b2f1-3e08b2f0faba

Cracker Barrel has been such a large part of Michael and Nicole Magnotta’s life that they wanted to introduce their son to it at a young age. They hope the family tradition will continue. (Michael Magnotta / Cracker Barrel)

Since then, for the past 20 years, Michael has been visiting Cracker Barrels across the country. When he married his wife, Nicole, the love for the chain continued – the pair incorporated the restaurant into their wedding day by having Cracker Barrel cornbread on each table, and having a peg game with pegs matching their wedding colors.

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Currently, his count is up to 100 – which he celebrated by driving from New Jersey with his wife to Lebanon, Tenn., home of the first Cracker Barrel.

Westlake Legal Group 578A3454 Cracker Barrel-loving family celebrates son’s first birthday at restaurant chain fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article Alexandra Deabler a75d2ba8-9ad0-5df2-b2f1-3e08b2f0faba

Little Michael seemed to enjoy the experience as he was photographed in the iconic rocking chairs. He even got his own special “Rising Star” apron to wear to mark the occasion. (Michael Magnotta / Cracker Barrel)

Once the pair hit the impressive 100-store mark, the Magnottas decided to postpone visiting any more new Cracker Barrels until their son was born to start the next batch of 100 visits off right and ensure their family tradition was being passed down from the beginning, a press release shared.

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Little Michael seemed to enjoy the experience as he was photographed in the iconic rocking chairs. He even got his own special “Rising Star” apron to wear to mark the occasion.

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Though this family is definitely dedicated to carrying on the Cracker Barrel tradition, they still have a long way to go before they can catch up to Ray and Wilma Yoder – the 80-year-old couple from Indiana who has visited all 645 Cracker Barrel locations in America.

Westlake Legal Group 578A3394 Cracker Barrel-loving family celebrates son’s first birthday at restaurant chain fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article Alexandra Deabler a75d2ba8-9ad0-5df2-b2f1-3e08b2f0faba   Westlake Legal Group 578A3394 Cracker Barrel-loving family celebrates son’s first birthday at restaurant chain fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article Alexandra Deabler a75d2ba8-9ad0-5df2-b2f1-3e08b2f0faba

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Billionaires could face up to 97.5 percent tax rates under Sanders’ plan: economists

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6091908623001_6091914091001-vs Billionaires could face up to 97.5 percent tax rates under Sanders’ plan: economists fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc d93f0dc5-85ec-527c-b425-e8a57af8c347 article

Two economists at the University of California, Berkeley claim that billionaires could face a 97.5 percent average effective tax rate under Sen. Bernie Sanders’ plan, which would easily thump other Democrats running for president in 2020.

Emmanuel Saez, one of the professors, told Bloomberg that “with the wealth tax, you get directly at the stock instead of hitting the flow of income, making it a  much more powerful de-concentration tool than income taxes.” The report pointed out that Sanders has said that the number of billionaires in the U.S. would be cut in half within 15 years under the plan.

The plan unveiled by Sanders seeks a 1 percent levy on households worth more than $32 million and proposes tax rates that would increase for wealthier people, up to 8 percent for fortunes in excess of $10 billion.

Sanders vowed to go further than Sen. Elizabeth Warren and generate more than $4 trillion over the next decade, substantially reducing billionaires’ fortunes. Billionaires would face a 62 percent average effective tax rate under Warren.

Sanders’ plan goes further because it starts on fortunes worth less, kicking in at $32 million. Warren also proposes increasing the wealth tax up to 3 percent on any net worth of more than $1 billion, while Sanders’ tax rates don’t top out until 8 percent for the richest households.

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The Massachusetts senator has topped Sanders in recent polls of Democrats in Iowa and New Hampshire that show her running about even with the longtime front-runner, former Vice President Joe Biden, in those states.

Fox News’ Edmund DeMarche and the Associated Press contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6091908623001_6091914091001-vs Billionaires could face up to 97.5 percent tax rates under Sanders’ plan: economists fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc d93f0dc5-85ec-527c-b425-e8a57af8c347 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6091908623001_6091914091001-vs Billionaires could face up to 97.5 percent tax rates under Sanders’ plan: economists fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc d93f0dc5-85ec-527c-b425-e8a57af8c347 article

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Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples’ Day?

Westlake Legal Group ap_162847727820941-f86b69770efba5c1c684905efe98a131aa1764dd-s1100-c15 Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

People look on at a celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day in 2016 at Seattle’s City Hall. Seattle began observing Indigenous Peoples’ Day two years earlier to promote the well-being and growth of Seattle’s Indigenous community. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

People look on at a celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day in 2016 at Seattle’s City Hall. Seattle began observing Indigenous Peoples’ Day two years earlier to promote the well-being and growth of Seattle’s Indigenous community.

Elaine Thompson/AP

On Monday in the nation’s capital, there is no Columbus Day. The D.C. Council voted to replace it with Indigenous Peoples’ Day in a temporary move that it hopes to make permanent. Several other places across the United States have also made the switch in a growing movement to end the celebration of the Italian explorer in favor of honoring Indigenous communities and their resiliency in the face of violence by European explorers like Christopher Columbus.

Baley Champagne is responsible for that change in her home state of Louisiana. The tribal citizen of the United Houma Nation petitioned the governor, John Bel Edwards, to change the day. He did, along with several other states this year.

“It’s become a trend,” Champagne said. “It’s about celebrating people instead of thinking about somebody who actually caused genocide on a population or tried to cause the genocide of an entire population. By bringing Indigenous Peoples’ Day, we’re bringing awareness that we’re not going to allow someone like that to be glorified into a hero, because of the hurt that he caused to Indigenous people of America.”

And so in Houma, La., people from across the state will gather to honor and celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day for the first time.

She wants it to be “a celebration and to bring acknowledgment to the Native population,” Champagne said. “You know, because we have many friends of all different races in this area and Houma is named after the Houma people, the Houma Choctaw. So to bring this, I think it’s long overdue. It’s a big celebration. And we’re just so excited to have this finally.”

There’s no comprehensive list of places that have switched, but at least 10 states now celebrate some version of Indigenous Peoples’ Day on the second Monday in October, like Hawaii’s Discoverers’ Day or South Dakota’s Native Americans’ Day. Many college campuses have dumped Columbus Day for Indigenous Peoples’ Day as have more than 100 cities, towns and counties across the country.

For Native Americans, Columbus Day has long been hurtful. It conjures the violent history of 500 years of colonial oppression at the hands of European explorers and those who settled here — a history whose ramifications and wounds still run deep today.

“Today we understand that while [Columbus] was an explorer and is credited with being one of the first Europeans to arrive in the Americas, we now know a great deal about the history and the way that he and his people behaved when they came to this continent,” said Shannon Speed, a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation and director of the UCLA American Indian Studies Center. “Which included pillaging, raping and generally setting in motion a genocide of the people who were already here. That’s not something we want to celebrate. That’s not something anyone wants to celebrate.”

The shift isn’t happening without some pushback. For many Italian Americans, Columbus Day is their day to celebrate Italian heritage and the contributions of Italian Americans to the United States. It was adopted at a time when Italians were vilified and faced religious and ethnic discrimination. The first commemoration came in 1892, a year after a mass lynching of 11 Italian Americans by a mob in New Orleans. Italian Americans latched onto the day as a way to mainstream and humanize themselves in the face of rampant discrimination. It became a national holiday in 1934 to honor a man who, ironically, never set foot in the United States. Columbus anchored in the Bahamas.

For many Italian Americans, Columbus Day isn’t just about the man but about what the day represents: a people searching for safety and acceptance in their new home.

Westlake Legal Group ap_19116550679343-5ddee6727229dd3613bbe7b1f9255573c9201c46-s1100-c15 Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

For many Italian Americans, Columbus Day is about celebrating Italian heritage and the contributions of Italian Americans to the United States. Above, the Christopher Columbus statue at Manhattan’s Columbus Circle in New York. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Bebeto Matthews/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

For many Italian Americans, Columbus Day is about celebrating Italian heritage and the contributions of Italian Americans to the United States. Above, the Christopher Columbus statue at Manhattan’s Columbus Circle in New York.

Bebeto Matthews/AP

In 2017, after someone vandalized the Christopher Columbus statue in New York City’s Central Park, the then-president and chief operating officer of the National Italian American Foundation, John M. Viola, wrote in a New York Times editorial, “The ‘tearing down of history’ does not change that history. In the wake of the cultural conflict that has ripped us apart over these months, I wonder if we as a country can’t find better ways to utilize our history to eradicate racism instead of inciting it. Can’t the monuments and holidays born of our past be reimagined to represent new values for our future?”

He went on to write, “We believe Christopher Columbus represents the values of discovery and risk that are at the heart of the American dream, and that it is our job as the community most closely associated with his legacy to be at the forefront of a sensitive and engaging path forward, toward a solution that considers all sides.”

Speed says she recognizes the importance of celebrating the history and contributions of Italian Americans, but there has to be another way to honor them.

“There are a lot of Italian Americans who very much support the shift to Indigenous Peoples’ Day because they don’t want to feel themselves associated with a man who is known to have committed terrible crimes against humanity,” she said. “Italian Americans were greatly discriminated against in this country, and it’s incredibly important to have a day to celebrate that heritage. It just shouldn’t be around the figure of Columbus.”

Celebrating Columbus, she said, not only whitewashes a violent history but also discounts the further trauma that honoring him inflicts on Indigenous people.

Westlake Legal Group ap_16285049452613-f5d362e52d4044f03dc16cb837d6c3c8b76cbb54-s1100-c15 Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

Rally participants listen to an address by Frank Bear Killer of the Oglala Lakota tribe outside the state Capitol in Lincoln, Neb., in 2016 to mark Lincoln’s first Indigenous Peoples’ Day. At least 10 states now celebrate some version of Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Nati Harnik/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

Rally participants listen to an address by Frank Bear Killer of the Oglala Lakota tribe outside the state Capitol in Lincoln, Neb., in 2016 to mark Lincoln’s first Indigenous Peoples’ Day. At least 10 states now celebrate some version of Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Nati Harnik/AP

“Indigenous children are going to school and being forced to hear about and celebrate the person who set in motion the genocide of their people,” Speed said. “That’s incredibly painful. It creates an ongoing harm. And so we can’t have a national holiday that creates an ongoing harm for a significant portion of our citizens.”

For Native Americans, that pain is the first thing they feel when they hear “Columbus Day,” Speed said. But when a group of Berkeley, Calif., residents asked the city to change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day in 1992, then-Mayor Loni Hancock said it was the first time she’d really understood the negative impact of this holiday on Indigenous people.

“We had to think about what is this holiday about and who discovered America and how really profoundly disrespectful it was to say that a European explorer who never actually set foot on the continent did that,” Hancock said. “Discounting the Indigenous people who had lived here for centuries with very sophisticated cultures and pretty much in harmony with the earth.”

Indigenous peoples first proposed the day during a 1977 United Nations conference on discrimination against them. But it wasn’t until 1989 that South Dakota became the first state to switch Columbus Day to Native Americans’ Day, celebrating it for the first time in 1990. And then Berkeley became the first U.S. city to switch to Indigenous Peoples’ Day. The Pew Research Center says Columbus Day is the most inconsistently observed national holiday in the United States.

“Certainly the hundreds and thousands of Italian immigrants who came over in steerage class on the boats at the turn of the 19th century endured a lot of hardships to get here,” Hancock said. “But the discovery of America is something where you want to get your history right. And I think that to fully understand and take responsibility for who we are as a people in this land made it very important to be clear about who was here first and reflect on what happened in our history after that, in terms of the displacement and oftentimes genocide of those people. How that might have reflected a general discounting of the history and the humanity of nonwhite people of many kinds in this country and to take responsibility for our history.”

National Desk intern Megan Manata contributed to this report.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Missing From Elizabeth Warren’s 2020 Surge: Democratic Endorsements

Westlake Legal Group merlin_162565353_6e8d439e-7b57-4b89-9ce4-ae7ba3196a22-facebookJumbo Missing From Elizabeth Warren’s 2020 Surge: Democratic Endorsements Warren, Elizabeth Presidential Election of 2020 Politics and Government Massachusetts Haaland, Deb Endorsements Democratic Party

WASHINGTON — Senator Elizabeth Warren has built her following in part by taking pictures with thousands of voters deep into evening after campaign events, but her dinner audience here one night last month was far smaller. And Ms. Warren’s guests were more interested in hearing, and politely challenging, her campaign pitch than eagerly capturing the moment for posterity on their iPhones.

Addressing a few dozen members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus at a Chinese restaurant a few blocks from the Capitol, she laid out her case for why she could unify Democrats, emphasized that she was not hostile to properly run businesses and made a soft sell to the lawmakers to support her presidential bid.

“She said, ‘Nobody could do this alone, I will need your help,’” recalled Representative Chellie Pingree of Maine, who attended the gathering and said Ms. Warren “was great.”

But just under a month since the family-style meal, the Massachusetts senator has the same small number of endorsements from congressional colleagues beyond her home state as she did beforehand: three.

Ms. Warren is expected to reveal additional support from Democratic officials this week in conjunction with Tuesday’s CNN/New York Times debate and the release of her smashing third-quarter financial disclosure. Yet her growing crowd sizes, soaring fund-raising and surge to the top of a number of national and early-state polls only shine a brighter light on one of the most revealing elements of this primary: the widening gap between the preferences of many Democratic voters and the lawmakers who represent them.

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Ms. Warren is now a clear front-runner in the race for her party’s nomination, yet just under four months before the leadoff Iowa caucuses she lacks the support of a single governor, big-city mayor or fellow senator outside Massachusetts.

She does have the backing of the Working Families Party, an influential liberal group, and yet she also has fewer total endorsements from state legislators in Iowa and New Hampshire than Senator Cory Booker, who registers in the lower single-digits of surveys and last month had to beseech donors to give him enough money to sustain his stagnant campaign.

The apparent lag between Democratic activists and Democratic elected officials, which comes nearly four years after President Trump’s stunning outsider’s capture of the Republican nomination and Senator Bernie Sanders’ surprisingly potent candidacy in the Democratic primaries, has done little to slow Ms. Warren’s momentum.

Yet the reluctance of Democratic lawmakers to embrace Ms. Warren’s campaign this deep into the year, after she has plainly emerged as a leading candidate, illustrates both the lingering reservations party elites have about her general election prospects and her unique positioning in this race.

“Racing to the left is not really speaking to the needs of people in the heartland,” said Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, who expressed alarm about scrapping private health insurance, urged the candidates to focus on “pocketbook issues” and, when asked if Ms. Warren could reclaim the Midwestern states Mr. Trump captured in 2016, paused before saying: “I’m not sure.”

Ms. Warren is politically neither fish nor fowl.

She is not an anti-establishment insurgent in the style of Mr. Sanders, who were he in the position Ms. Warren is now would almost certainly have inspired a Stop Bernie campaign funded by a petrified donor class. But with her refusal to raise money among rich contributors, her unabashed populism and her pre-Senate roots in academia, she is hardly a Clinton-style creature of the Democratic political class.

As a result, many party officials are neither rushing to oppose her nor racing to her side, instead staying on the sidelines and doing what politicians often do when they are uncertain of what choice to make: buying time.

“It’s easier to wait, you keep your relationships good,” said Representative Deb Haaland of New Mexico, one of the few lawmakers who is supporting Ms. Warren, noting that some of her colleagues are loath to offend their friends in the race by choosing a candidate.

Reinforcing this instinct toward caution is the fluid nature of a primary still large enough to feature 12 candidates on the debate stage this week as well as the high stakes of next year’s general election.

“You had two candidates last time,” said longtime Representative Rosa DeLauro of Connecticut, referring to the Sanders-versus-Hillary Clinton race. “People want to see this unfold.”

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Thanks to his decades-long relationships and the perception in some quarters that he would be a strong candidate against Mr. Trump, Joseph R. Biden Jr. has picked up the most support from Democratic lawmakers of any of the presidential hopefuls. But his uneven performance as a candidate this year and Mr. Trump’s daily barrage of attacks on him, have left some party officials wondering just how safe a pick he is in 2020.

“People are concerned about Joe, but they ask: Is Elizabeth electable?” said former Senator Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, explaining the dilemma. “So a lot of people are just keeping their powder dry because they have not decided who can best run against Trump.”

Defeating a president who may be the first incumbent to seek re-election after being impeached should be the party’s overriding focus, said Gov. J.B. Pritzker of Illinois.

“I genuinely feel our republic is in danger,” Mr. Pritzker said.

A longtime donor who often immersed himself in primaries before he entered politics, Mr. Pritzker said he was staying out of this race for the time being in part because he was still stung by 2016, when some of Mr. Sanders supporters protested what they saw as his mistreatment by Mrs. Clinton and her establishment-aligned supporters.

“When he didn’t win people folded their arms and stayed home or they voted for Jill Stein or Gary Johnson,” said Mr. Pritzker, alluding to two of the third-party candidates whose votes helped cost Mrs. Clinton the election.

He’s not the only Democrat who has the echo of the Sanders-Clinton race still throbbing in their ears nor the only one determined to avoid alienating any of the supporters of this cycle’s candidates.

“Many believed the primary was rigged in favor of Hillary Clinton,” Representative Darren Soto of Florida said. “There is a feeling among many of us that we need to have a broad and diverse field, plenty of debates and let the primary voters decide on their own.”

What few lawmakers will say, at least publicly, is that wading into the race can also come with a cost: they run the risk of angering the eventual nominee if they support a losing candidate and they also invite complaints from their own constituents or donors, who may have a different preference.

What’s more, they also have to be mindful of their own political branding and how they align themselves.

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“Politicians are different from voters,” said Donna Brazile, the longtime Democratic strategist and former party chair. “They have to say, ‘How does this fit with my agenda, my district?’” In Ms. Warren’s case, even one of her biggest boosters, Ms. Haaland, conceded it was easier for her to step out early because of the progressive nature of her district.

“Some folks they’re just like, ‘I better stay out of it for a while because of my district,’” she said of her House colleagues.

And it’s not just lawmakers who are taking a wait-and-see approach. Powerful liberal interest groups, including much of organized labor, are also hanging back, which only prompts the politicians to believe it’s safer to remain mum.

“That would make a difference if they came out,” Representative Dina Titus of Nevada said of unions. “They’re all being coy, too.”

Ms. Titus said she planned to get behind a candidate later this year, but her state, the third to vote in next year’s primary, illustrates just how many party elites were remaining neutral: Nevada’s governor, two senators, three Democratic House members and longtime boss, former Senator Harry Reid, have all refrained from endorsing a candidate.

Representative Jamie Raskin of Maryland said that he had also been “drawn in different directions in this race,” noting that he wanted to make a decision that’s both “passionate and strategic.”

But after having lunch in Washington last month with Ms. Warren and her husband, Bruce Mann, Mr. Raskin said he planned on endorsing the senator.

“If all she had to her name was senator from Massachusetts she would not be an ideal candidate,” he said, before citing Ms. Warren’s record as a consumer advocate and critic of Washington self-dealing. “As a candidate of public integrity and honesty in government, she has a very powerful story to tell at a time of boundless Republican corruption and lawlessness.” What’s more, Mr. Raskin said, “She made a very eloquent and personal pitch to me.”

As for Ms. Pingree, she said she was “watching the wisdom, the perspective of the public” and was eager “to see who people get excited about.”

She will also have a chance to gauge the views of her colleagues. When Congress comes back from its recess this week, Ms. Pingree said she and the other House Democrats who live in her Washington high rise planned on having a debate watch party in the building’s common room.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples’ Day?

Westlake Legal Group ap_162847727820941-f86b69770efba5c1c684905efe98a131aa1764dd-s1100-c15 Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

People look on at a celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day in 2016 at Seattle’s City Hall. Seattle began observing Indigenous Peoples’ Day two years earlier to promote the well-being and growth of Seattle’s Indigenous community. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Elaine Thompson/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

People look on at a celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day in 2016 at Seattle’s City Hall. Seattle began observing Indigenous Peoples’ Day two years earlier to promote the well-being and growth of Seattle’s Indigenous community.

Elaine Thompson/AP

On Monday in the nation’s capital, there is no Columbus Day. The D.C. Council voted to replace it with Indigenous Peoples’ Day in a temporary move that it hopes to make permanent. Several other places across the United States have also made the switch in a growing movement to end the celebration of the Italian explorer in favor of honoring Indigenous communities and their resiliency in the face of violence by European explorers like Christopher Columbus.

Baley Champagne is responsible for that change in her home state of Louisiana. The tribal citizen of the United Houma Nation petitioned the governor, John Bel Edwards, to change the day. He did, along with several other states this year.

“It’s become a trend,” Champagne said. “It’s about celebrating people instead of thinking about somebody who actually caused genocide on a population or tried to cause the genocide of an entire population. By bringing Indigenous Peoples’ Day, we’re bringing awareness that we’re not going to allow someone like that to be glorified into a hero, because of the hurt that he caused to Indigenous people of America.”

And so in Houma, La., people from across the state will gather to honor and celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day for the first time.

She wants it to be “a celebration and to bring acknowledgment to the Native population,” Champagne said. “You know, because we have many friends of all different races in this area and Houma is named after the Houma people, the Houma Choctaw. So to bring this, I think it’s long overdue. It’s a big celebration. And we’re just so excited to have this finally.”

There’s no comprehensive list of places that have switched, but at least 10 states now celebrate some version of Indigenous Peoples’ Day on the second Monday in October, like Hawaii’s Discoverers’ Day or South Dakota’s Native Americans’ Day. Many college campuses have dumped Columbus Day for Indigenous Peoples’ Day as have more than 100 cities, towns and counties across the country.

For Native Americans, Columbus Day has long been hurtful. It conjures the violent history of 500 years of colonial oppression at the hands of European explorers and those who settled here — a history whose ramifications and wounds still run deep today.

“Today we understand that while [Columbus] was an explorer and is credited with being one of the first Europeans to arrive in the Americas, we now know a great deal about the history and the way that he and his people behaved when they came to this continent,” said Shannon Speed, a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation and director of the UCLA American Indian Studies Center. “Which included pillaging, raping and generally setting in motion a genocide of the people who were already here. That’s not something we want to celebrate. That’s not something anyone wants to celebrate.”

The shift isn’t happening without some pushback. For many Italian Americans, Columbus Day is their day to celebrate Italian heritage and the contributions of Italian Americans to the United States. It was adopted at a time when Italians were vilified and faced religious and ethnic discrimination. The first commemoration came in 1892, a year after a mass lynching of 11 Italian Americans by a mob in New Orleans. Italian Americans latched onto the day as a way to mainstream and humanize themselves in the face of rampant discrimination. It became a national holiday in 1934 to honor a man who, ironically, never set foot in the United States. Columbus anchored in the Bahamas.

For many Italian Americans, Columbus Day isn’t just about the man but about what the day represents: a people searching for safety and acceptance in their new home.

Westlake Legal Group ap_19116550679343-5ddee6727229dd3613bbe7b1f9255573c9201c46-s1100-c15 Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

For many Italian Americans, Columbus Day is about celebrating Italian heritage and the contributions of Italian Americans to the United States. Above, the Christopher Columbus statue at Manhattan’s Columbus Circle in New York. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Bebeto Matthews/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

For many Italian Americans, Columbus Day is about celebrating Italian heritage and the contributions of Italian Americans to the United States. Above, the Christopher Columbus statue at Manhattan’s Columbus Circle in New York.

Bebeto Matthews/AP

In 2017, after someone vandalized the Christopher Columbus statue in New York City’s Central Park, the then-president and chief operating officer of the National Italian American Foundation, John M. Viola, wrote in a New York Times editorial, “The ‘tearing down of history’ does not change that history. In the wake of the cultural conflict that has ripped us apart over these months, I wonder if we as a country can’t find better ways to utilize our history to eradicate racism instead of inciting it. Can’t the monuments and holidays born of our past be reimagined to represent new values for our future?”

He went on to write, “We believe Christopher Columbus represents the values of discovery and risk that are at the heart of the American dream, and that it is our job as the community most closely associated with his legacy to be at the forefront of a sensitive and engaging path forward, toward a solution that considers all sides.”

Speed says she recognizes the importance of celebrating the history and contributions of Italian Americans, but there has to be another way to honor them.

“There are a lot of Italian Americans who very much support the shift to Indigenous Peoples’ Day because they don’t want to feel themselves associated with a man who is known to have committed terrible crimes against humanity,” she said. “Italian Americans were greatly discriminated against in this country, and it’s incredibly important to have a day to celebrate that heritage. It just shouldn’t be around the figure of Columbus.”

Celebrating Columbus, she said, not only whitewashes a violent history but also discounts the further trauma that honoring him inflicts on Indigenous people.

Westlake Legal Group ap_16285049452613-f5d362e52d4044f03dc16cb837d6c3c8b76cbb54-s1100-c15 Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

Rally participants listen to an address by Frank Bear Killer of the Oglala Lakota tribe outside the state Capitol in Lincoln, Neb., in 2016 to mark Lincoln’s first Indigenous Peoples’ Day. At least 10 states now celebrate some version of Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Nati Harnik/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

Rally participants listen to an address by Frank Bear Killer of the Oglala Lakota tribe outside the state Capitol in Lincoln, Neb., in 2016 to mark Lincoln’s first Indigenous Peoples’ Day. At least 10 states now celebrate some version of Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Nati Harnik/AP

“Indigenous children are going to school and being forced to hear about and celebrate the person who set in motion the genocide of their people,” Speed said. “That’s incredibly painful. It creates an ongoing harm. And so we can’t have a national holiday that creates an ongoing harm for a significant portion of our citizens.”

For Native Americans, that pain is the first thing they feel when they hear “Columbus Day,” Speed said. But when a group of Berkeley, Calif., residents asked the city to change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day in 1992, then-Mayor Loni Hancock said it was the first time she’d really understood the negative impact of this holiday on Indigenous people.

“We had to think about what is this holiday about and who discovered America and how really profoundly disrespectful it was to say that a European explorer who never actually set foot on the continent did that,” Hancock said. “Discounting the Indigenous people who had lived here for centuries with very sophisticated cultures and pretty much in harmony with the earth.”

Indigenous peoples first proposed the day during a 1977 United Nations conference on discrimination against them. But it wasn’t until 1989 that South Dakota became the first state to switch Columbus Day to Native Americans’ Day, celebrating it for the first time in 1990. And then Berkeley became the first U.S. city to switch to Indigenous Peoples’ Day. The Pew Research Center says Columbus Day is the most inconsistently observed national holiday in the United States.

“Certainly the hundreds and thousands of Italian immigrants who came over in steerage class on the boats at the turn of the 19th century endured a lot of hardships to get here,” Hancock said. “But the discovery of America is something where you want to get your history right. And I think that to fully understand and take responsibility for who we are as a people in this land made it very important to be clear about who was here first and reflect on what happened in our history after that, in terms of the displacement and oftentimes genocide of those people. How that might have reflected a general discounting of the history and the humanity of nonwhite people of many kinds in this country and to take responsibility for our history.”

National Desk intern Megan Manata contributed to this report.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Virginia voter registration deadline quickly approaching

Westlake Legal Group 18021767_G Virginia voter registration deadline quickly approaching

Tuesday is the last day Virginians can register to vote or update an existing registration. Eligible citizens can register online . Applications are also available at public facilities, including public libraries and Department of Motor Vehicle offices, in addition to local registration offices.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com