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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 100)

Cathay Pacific, Icon of Hong Kong’s Rise, Now Reflects China’s Grip

HONG KONG — Two months of boiling antigovernment protests have divided Hong Kong’s people. Now, the unrest has pitted one of the territory’s best-known international brands against some of its own employees.

The Chinese government has forced Cathay Pacific Airways, a longtime emblem of Hong Kong’s proud status as a global capital, to bar staffers who support or participate in the territory’s protests from doing any work involving flights to mainland China. As part of the same demands, issued on Friday, it ordered that the airline begin submitting information about all crew members flying to — or above — the mainland to the Chinese authorities for prior approval.

Cathay said separately on Saturday that it had removed from flying duties a pilot who was charged with rioting in Hong Kong, and that it had fired two airport ground staff for misconduct. Earlier in the week, the airline said it would investigate accusations that its employees had leaked travel information for a Hong Kong police soccer team.

The orders from mainland air safety officials represent an escalation into Hong Kong’s business affairs, illustrating the power Beijing wields over international companies that build their fortunes on access to China. Some in the semiautonomous territory fear that China’s political encroachment also represents an economic threat, not only to Cathay, but also to all multinational companies in Hong Kong.

“If you’re a boss, you’re thinking, ‘Oh my God!’” said Carol Ng of the Hong Kong Cabin Crew Federation, a union that represents airline workers. “‘I just want to do business here. Now they’re screening my staff.’”

This kind of fear could do real damage to Hong Kong’s economy, Ms. Ng said, “much more than the protests or rallies themselves.”

Cathay representatives did not respond on Sunday when asked how exactly the company planned to enforce the new orders from Beijing. China’s aviation regulator was not available for comment.

The airline’s largest shareholder is Swire Pacific, a Hong Kong-based conglomerate with British roots. Its second largest owner is Air China, the state-run carrier.

Cathay’s predicament underlines the economic pressures coming to bear on Hong Kong. Forecasters predict that the long-running protests on top of the trade war between the United States and China will weigh on the territory’s growth. Tourist visits have declined, and the Hong Kong stock market has been falling for the past several weeks.

Several Cathay employees interviewed by The New York Times over the weekend said that the company had not asked workers about their involvement in or attitudes toward the demonstrations, something that it would presumably need to do to stop them from working on flights to mainland China.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_159050085_ae2978e9-8895-4b26-b853-27f43b44af08-articleLarge Cathay Pacific, Icon of Hong Kong’s Rise, Now Reflects China’s Grip Swire Pacific Limited Politics and Government Hong Kong Hogg, Rupert Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Communist Party of China China Cathay Pacific Airways Airlines and Airplanes

Protesters at Hong Kong International Airport on Friday.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

Still, the employees described an atmosphere of rising fear and anger in response to China’s demands, and of unease about how Cathay would carry them out.

“We are all so furious now,” said Sally Chu, a 28-year-old Cathay flight attendant. “We wonder how they can check on our activities and ban us, too.”

The airline, one of Asia’s largest international carriers, has already blamed Hong Kong’s recent turmoil for a drop in bookings. The controversy now threatens to test the company’s commitments to its employees against its own bottom line, which depends significantly on its ability to fly through mainland Chinese airspace.

The pilot whom Cathay removed from service, Liu Chung-yin, was released on bail after his arrest late last month. But the Chinese state news media noted that he had been allowed to continue flying, and warned that Cathay would “pay a painful price” for “tacitly encouraging antigovernment strikes.” Mr. Liu could not be reached for comment.

Other Cathay employees’ political activities attracted attention in mainland China after large numbers of the airline’s workers called in sick to take part in a recent general strike, which led to scores of flight cancellations.

Announcing the pilot’s suspension on Saturday, Cathay went out of its way to say that “we express no view whatsoever on the subject matter of any proceedings to which he may be subject.”

In a message to employees that day, Cathay’s chief executive, Rupert Hogg, said the airline planned to comply with the Chinese regulator’s new requirements. “Our primary focus must remain on delivering a safe, comfortable customer experience for everyone who chooses to fly with us,” Mr. Hogg wrote.

Just days earlier, the airline’s leaders had said employees’ political views were not their concern.

“We certainly wouldn’t dream of telling them what they have to think about something,” Cathay’s chairman, John Slosar, said at a news conference. “They’re all adults. They’re all service professionals. We respect them greatly.”

It is also unclear whether meeting the Chinese authorities’ demands will be enough to spare Cathay the wrath of Beijing’s propaganda machine. In a social media commentary on Sunday evening, the People’s Daily, the Communist Party’s mouthpiece, said that the airline’s actions had hardly resolved its “crisis.”

“Ground the flights that must be grounded, punish those who must be punished, rectify what must be rectified,” the commentary said. “In the face of such warnings, how can you joke around!”

Some Cathay workers said it might be for the best if they did not fly to the mainland after all, lest they risk being arrested or having their phones and other personal belongings searched.

“The airline must speak up and ensure the rights and personal safety of employees,” said another Cathay flight attendant, Karrie Chan, 24. “Otherwise I would feel unsafe even when at work.”

Travelers at the Hong Kong airport this month when a general strike grounded almost 200 flights, most of them with Cathay Pacific.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

Cathay rose to pre-eminence by connecting Asia’s emerging economies to London, Los Angeles, New York and other centers of wealth in the developed world. Hong Kong prospered by connecting China to the global companies that wanted to do business there.

Today, though, more of those companies operate in mainland China directly, with less need for Hong Kong as a bridge.

And Cathay is now just one of many carriers linking East and West. China’s state-backed airlines can fly international passengers directly to and from the mainland’s megacities. The flag carriers of the Persian Gulf nations offer their own convenient routes to Asia for travelers from Europe and North America.

Cathay Pacific’s history is tied up with its home city’s emergence as a global hub in ways that date back to the company’s founding, in 1946.

The airline’s founders, Roy Farrell and Sydney de Kantzow, were pilots who had flown missions across the Himalayas to supply Nationalist forces in China during World War II.

After the war ended, Mr. Farrell, a Texan, bought a surplus transport plane with the dream of flying goods to China from Australia, according to “Beyond Lion Rock,” a history of Cathay by the journalist Gavin Young.

The Roy Farrell Export-Import Company’s inaugural voyage from Sydney carried “three and a half tons of clothes — for the tattered of China,” The Sydney Morning Herald reported.

Hong Kong at the time was in near ruin. Its harbor was cluttered with the wrecks of warships from the Japanese occupation, and air services were almost nonexistent. But as the British colony grew rich over the following decades, so did Cathay, transforming from a swashbuckling shoestring operation into a carrier of regional, then international, renown.

That the airline was British-controlled and flown largely by British and Australian pilots did not prevent it from becoming a source of pride for many people in Hong Kong — a respected global name associated with punctuality and good service.

The industry’s changing landscape began taking a toll on Cathay’s finances several years ago, and in 2017 the airline laid off hundreds of workers. It has since returned to profitability, although its image took another hit last year when it acknowledged that the personal data and travel histories of as many as 9.4 million people had been compromised in a computer breach.

Recently, Cathay bought Hong Kong Express, a low-cost airline, to help it better compete against budget upstarts in the region.

Cathay employees said over the weekend that they still trusted the company to treat its crew members fairly, and that concerns for their own jobs and safety were still outweighed by their desire to voice their convictions.

“The heavy-handed tactics of mainland China only make me feel that I must speak out so that they know how much we value freedom and democracy,” said Ms. Chu, the flight attendant. “Otherwise, they will only get worse.”

Raymond Zhong reported from Hong Kong, and Tiffany May from San Francisco.

Follow Raymond Zhong and Tiffany May on Twitter: @zhonggg and @nytmay.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Justin Haskins: In 2020, socialism could flip Minnesota — and the election — to Trump

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6070765998001_6070765354001-vs Justin Haskins: In 2020, socialism could flip Minnesota -- and the election -- to Trump Justin Haskins fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9363d62a-5e7f-5c1d-a68d-f7b13c5c9422

Almost no one expected Donald Trump to win the 2016 presidential election, but his campaign’s strategy to focus on disaffected Midwest voters long abandoned by the Democratic Party leadership paid off in a big way. A majority of voters in Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and, perhaps most surprisingly, Wisconsin, all pulled the lever in favor of Trump.

To win a second term, Trump is going to need a similar level of success in the Midwest, and it looks as though Minnesota, which has long been thought of as an iron-clad Democratic stronghold, could be a big part of his 2020 strategy — and for good reason.

Without Minnesota, the Democratic presidential candidate — regardless of who wins the primary race — would face a nearly insurmountable uphill battle. For example, even if the Democratic challenger were to flip Michigan and Pennsylvania to his or her side, it still wouldn’t be enough to win if Trump were to hold every other state he captured in 2020 and wins in Minnesota. Winning Minnesota would also mean that Trump could lose Florida and Arizona — two states he won in 2016 — and still end up with more than the required 270 electoral votes.

NEWT GINGRICH: TRUMP IS RIGHT ABOUT BALTIMORE — NEW SOLUTIONS NEEDED FOR OLD PROBLEMS

Of course, beating the Democratic challenger in Minnesota is easier said than done. No Republican presidential candidate has won in Minnesota since Richard Nixon in 1972.

But Trump is not a “normal” Republican. He only lost Minnesota by a little more than 40,000 votes in 2016. Mitt Romney lost by more than 200,000.

And that only tells part of the story.

Many Republicans concerned about Trump voted for Libertarian Gary Johnson, who received more than 112,000 votes, or conservative Trump critic Evan McMullin, who garnered more than 53,000 votes. It’s unlikely similar candidates will get the same level of support in 2020, which means Trump should have a better shot in Minnesota than he did in 2016.

Trump also dramatically outperformed other Republicans running for statewide offices in 2012, 2014 and 2018.

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There’s another great reason to believe Trump has a good shot of winning Minnesota: Democrats are increasingly moving away from the policies swing voters in the state have long valued in favor of radical progressivism and even socialism. Democrats have moved so far to the left during the current election cycle that it’s becoming difficult to tell the difference between their party’s platform and the platform of the Democratic Socialists of America.

Democrats no longer represent the party of John F. Kennedy or Bill Clinton. If Minnesota’s more moderate Democrats realize that, it could mean huge trouble for whomever the party’s left-wing base chooses to face off against Trump. And there’s a great reason to believe they will take notice thanks in part to freshman Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar.

Democrats no longer represent the party of John F. Kennedy or Bill Clinton. If Minnesota’s more moderate Democrats realize that, it could mean huge trouble for whomever the party’s left-wing base chooses to face off against Trump.

To say Omar has had an absolutely disastrous first term in office would be an understatement. Not only has she been plagued by questions about potential violations of campaign finance rules and immigration laws and remarks some have deemed to be anti-Semitic, she has also routinely advocated for some of the most radical, socialistic policies offered in decades — including “Medicare-for-All,” the “cancellation” of all student loan debt, and the craziest proposal of all: the Green New Deal.

The Green New Deal, the brainchild of fellow socialist radical New York Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, would destroy millions of jobs by completely eliminating the fossil-fuel industry — almost overnight — and forcing people to purchase much more expensive renewable energy. It would also impose other socialist schemes, including basic income programs, a federal jobs guarantee, single-payer health care, a slew of “social justice” programs, and a whole new system of publicly-owned banks.

MORE FROM OPINION

This radical socialist proposal might be a popular idea among elites in parts of the Northeast and on the West Coast, but it isn’t the sort of thing middle-of-the-road Democrats have historically backed in the heart of the Midwest.

Earlier in 2019, left-wing Democrats attempted to pass a 100 percent renewable energy mandate, which energy providers in the state would have been forced to comply with by 2050. The destruction of the fossil-fuel industry would be particularly disastrous for Minnesotans. The Center of the American Experiment estimates just a 50 percent renewable energy requirement would cost the state more than $80 billion and nearly 21,000 lost jobs.

Despite a massive campaign, the mandate failed on a bipartisan basis in the state’s Senate after Minnesotans, thanks in large part to the work of groups like the Center of the American Experiment, realized just how crushing the new law would be.

Such radical policies, mixed with Omar’s far-left views on immigration and her close relationship with socialists like Ocasio-Cortez, have led to a dramatic decline in her popularity nationally and among swing voters, the very people likely to decide the 2020 race in Minnesota and the rest of the Midwest.

A July Economist/YouGov poll found that only 25% of Americans said they have a favorable view of Omar, and an internal Democratic poll of likely swing voters — white voters with two years or less of college education — showed just 9 percent support for Omar. Yes, you read that correctly: 9%. This is particularly interesting because, like most states in the Midwest, Minnesota has more non-college-educated white swing voters than many other regions.

By the way, the same survey of likely swing voters also found support for socialism is just 18 percent, another good sign for Trump.

Omar won her far-left congressional district in 2018 by more than 50 percentage points, earning more than 78% of the vote, so it’s unlikely she’s in any danger of losing her seat in 2020. However, Minnesota-based media reports have suggested her antics have raised doubts among some voters in the state, although by just how much remains to be seen.

Democrats might point to preliminary 2020 polling that shows Trump’s approval rating among Minnesotans isn’t high as proof that he is likely to lose the state again, but it’s important to remember pollsters performed terribly in 2016 in the Midwest.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

For example, the two final surveys conducted in Minnesota prior to the 2016 election (according to Real Clear Politics) showed Trump losing by an average of 9 percentage points. He ended up losing by less than 2. Similarly, the final survey conducted in Wisconsin predicted Trump would lose by 8 percentage points. He won the state.

If Trump can paint the 2020 election as a choice between his economic achievements — Minnesota now has the 14th best unemployment rate in the nation — and the radical socialism of Ilhan Omar, it’s very possible Democrats could be in for another very rough election night.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY JUSTIN HASKINS

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6070765998001_6070765354001-vs Justin Haskins: In 2020, socialism could flip Minnesota -- and the election -- to Trump Justin Haskins fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9363d62a-5e7f-5c1d-a68d-f7b13c5c9422   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6070765998001_6070765354001-vs Justin Haskins: In 2020, socialism could flip Minnesota -- and the election -- to Trump Justin Haskins fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9363d62a-5e7f-5c1d-a68d-f7b13c5c9422

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Justin Haskins: In 2020, socialism could flip Minnesota — and the election — to Trump

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6070765998001_6070765354001-vs Justin Haskins: In 2020, socialism could flip Minnesota -- and the election -- to Trump Justin Haskins fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9363d62a-5e7f-5c1d-a68d-f7b13c5c9422

Almost no one expected Donald Trump to win the 2016 presidential election, but his campaign’s strategy to focus on disaffected Midwest voters long abandoned by the Democratic Party leadership paid off in a big way. A majority of voters in Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and, perhaps most surprisingly, Wisconsin, all pulled the lever in favor of Trump.

To win a second term, Trump is going to need a similar level of success in the Midwest, and it looks as though Minnesota, which has long been thought of as an iron-clad Democratic stronghold, could be a big part of his 2020 strategy — and for good reason.

Without Minnesota, the Democratic presidential candidate — regardless of who wins the primary race — would face a nearly insurmountable uphill battle. For example, even if the Democratic challenger were to flip Michigan and Pennsylvania to his or her side, it still wouldn’t be enough to win if Trump were to hold every other state he captured in 2020 and wins in Minnesota. Winning Minnesota would also mean that Trump could lose Florida and Arizona — two states he won in 2016 — and still end up with more than the required 270 electoral votes.

NEWT GINGRICH: TRUMP IS RIGHT ABOUT BALTIMORE — NEW SOLUTIONS NEEDED FOR OLD PROBLEMS

Of course, beating the Democratic challenger in Minnesota is easier said than done. No Republican presidential candidate has won in Minnesota since Richard Nixon in 1972.

But Trump is not a “normal” Republican. He only lost Minnesota by a little more than 40,000 votes in 2016. Mitt Romney lost by more than 200,000.

And that only tells part of the story.

Many Republicans concerned about Trump voted for Libertarian Gary Johnson, who received more than 112,000 votes, or conservative Trump critic Evan McMullin, who garnered more than 53,000 votes. It’s unlikely similar candidates will get the same level of support in 2020, which means Trump should have a better shot in Minnesota than he did in 2016.

Trump also dramatically outperformed other Republicans running for statewide offices in 2012, 2014 and 2018.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR OPINION NEWSLETTER

There’s another great reason to believe Trump has a good shot of winning Minnesota: Democrats are increasingly moving away from the policies swing voters in the state have long valued in favor of radical progressivism and even socialism. Democrats have moved so far to the left during the current election cycle that it’s becoming difficult to tell the difference between their party’s platform and the platform of the Democratic Socialists of America.

Democrats no longer represent the party of John F. Kennedy or Bill Clinton. If Minnesota’s more moderate Democrats realize that, it could mean huge trouble for whomever the party’s left-wing base chooses to face off against Trump. And there’s a great reason to believe they will take notice thanks in part to freshman Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar.

Democrats no longer represent the party of John F. Kennedy or Bill Clinton. If Minnesota’s more moderate Democrats realize that, it could mean huge trouble for whomever the party’s left-wing base chooses to face off against Trump.

To say Omar has had an absolutely disastrous first term in office would be an understatement. Not only has she been plagued by questions about potential violations of campaign finance rules and immigration laws and remarks some have deemed to be anti-Semitic, she has also routinely advocated for some of the most radical, socialistic policies offered in decades — including “Medicare-for-All,” the “cancellation” of all student loan debt, and the craziest proposal of all: the Green New Deal.

The Green New Deal, the brainchild of fellow socialist radical New York Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, would destroy millions of jobs by completely eliminating the fossil-fuel industry — almost overnight — and forcing people to purchase much more expensive renewable energy. It would also impose other socialist schemes, including basic income programs, a federal jobs guarantee, single-payer health care, a slew of “social justice” programs, and a whole new system of publicly-owned banks.

MORE FROM OPINION

This radical socialist proposal might be a popular idea among elites in parts of the Northeast and on the West Coast, but it isn’t the sort of thing middle-of-the-road Democrats have historically backed in the heart of the Midwest.

Earlier in 2019, left-wing Democrats attempted to pass a 100 percent renewable energy mandate, which energy providers in the state would have been forced to comply with by 2050. The destruction of the fossil-fuel industry would be particularly disastrous for Minnesotans. The Center of the American Experiment estimates just a 50 percent renewable energy requirement would cost the state more than $80 billion and nearly 21,000 lost jobs.

Despite a massive campaign, the mandate failed on a bipartisan basis in the state’s Senate after Minnesotans, thanks in large part to the work of groups like the Center of the American Experiment, realized just how crushing the new law would be.

Such radical policies, mixed with Omar’s far-left views on immigration and her close relationship with socialists like Ocasio-Cortez, have led to a dramatic decline in her popularity nationally and among swing voters, the very people likely to decide the 2020 race in Minnesota and the rest of the Midwest.

A July Economist/YouGov poll found that only 25% of Americans said they have a favorable view of Omar, and an internal Democratic poll of likely swing voters — white voters with two years or less of college education — showed just 9 percent support for Omar. Yes, you read that correctly: 9%. This is particularly interesting because, like most states in the Midwest, Minnesota has more non-college-educated white swing voters than many other regions.

By the way, the same survey of likely swing voters also found support for socialism is just 18 percent, another good sign for Trump.

Omar won her far-left congressional district in 2018 by more than 50 percentage points, earning more than 78% of the vote, so it’s unlikely she’s in any danger of losing her seat in 2020. However, Minnesota-based media reports have suggested her antics have raised doubts among some voters in the state, although by just how much remains to be seen.

Democrats might point to preliminary 2020 polling that shows Trump’s approval rating among Minnesotans isn’t high as proof that he is likely to lose the state again, but it’s important to remember pollsters performed terribly in 2016 in the Midwest.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

For example, the two final surveys conducted in Minnesota prior to the 2016 election (according to Real Clear Politics) showed Trump losing by an average of 9 percentage points. He ended up losing by less than 2. Similarly, the final survey conducted in Wisconsin predicted Trump would lose by 8 percentage points. He won the state.

If Trump can paint the 2020 election as a choice between his economic achievements — Minnesota now has the 14th best unemployment rate in the nation — and the radical socialism of Ilhan Omar, it’s very possible Democrats could be in for another very rough election night.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY JUSTIN HASKINS

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6070765998001_6070765354001-vs Justin Haskins: In 2020, socialism could flip Minnesota -- and the election -- to Trump Justin Haskins fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9363d62a-5e7f-5c1d-a68d-f7b13c5c9422   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6070765998001_6070765354001-vs Justin Haskins: In 2020, socialism could flip Minnesota -- and the election -- to Trump Justin Haskins fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 9363d62a-5e7f-5c1d-a68d-f7b13c5c9422

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘Flip or Flop’ star Tarek El Moussa says Heather Rae young has already met his kids

Westlake Legal Group heather-rae-young-tarek-el-moussa 'Flip or Flop' star Tarek El Moussa says Heather Rae young has already met his kids Jessica Sager fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox-news/entertainment/events/divorce fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a8b7b7a5-4cbf-5198-98d8-55a5f12ec08b

That was quick!

Flip or Flop” star Tarek El Moussa says his new girlfriend, Heather Rae Young, has already met his and ex-wife Christina Anstead’s kids.

“I just went through some pretty traumatic things in my life and honestly I was very happy being comfortable on my own and I didn’t realize what I was missing until I found what I was missing,” El Moussa, 37, told Entertainment Tonight of Young, 31. “She just makes me feel really good and happy. I was sad for a very long time; I was alone for a very long time, and I feel like she’s really brought me back to life, which is very, very fun to say.”

‘FLIP OR FLOP’ DIRECTOR RECALLS MOMENT WHEN TAREK EL MOUSSA AND CHRISTINA ANSTEAD CROSSED THE LINE IN ON-SET FIGHT

The HGTV star gushed, “She is just so adorable … we’re having a blast. I introduced her to my kids last night for the first time. My mom, my dad, my mom’s husband, my sister. So, we’re doing it! Very excited.”

El Moussa and Anstead, 36, share daughter Taylor, 8, and son Brayden, 3.

Anstead and El Moussa separated in May 2016 after a blowout fight in which cops allegedly seized guns from the family home amid fear that El Moussa was suicidal. They each denied the claims.

TAREK EL MOUSSA TALKS HIS TWO NEW HGTV SERIES AND CO-PARENTING: ‘WE’RE DIFFERENT PEOPLE WITH DIFFERENT LIVES’

Anstead married TV presenter Ant Anstead in a “winter wonderland” wedding last December. The couple announced in March that they are expecting their first child together.

El Moussa admitted that he hasn’t told his ex-wife the news yet, despite telling the press and all of his social media followers.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Actually, no, I haven’t talked to her about Heather yet,” he told ET. “So, that’s probably a talk I should probably have pretty soon. Like, probably today, considering I’m talking about her on TV now. She’ll probably find out I think? Yeah, I think I’ll give her a call.”

Westlake Legal Group heather-rae-young-tarek-el-moussa 'Flip or Flop' star Tarek El Moussa says Heather Rae young has already met his kids Jessica Sager fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox-news/entertainment/events/divorce fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a8b7b7a5-4cbf-5198-98d8-55a5f12ec08b   Westlake Legal Group heather-rae-young-tarek-el-moussa 'Flip or Flop' star Tarek El Moussa says Heather Rae young has already met his kids Jessica Sager fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox-news/entertainment/events/divorce fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a8b7b7a5-4cbf-5198-98d8-55a5f12ec08b

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Sanders says Trump is not to blame for El Paso shooting, but that his rhetoric ‘creates the climate for it’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6062723789001_6062721049001-vs Sanders says Trump is not to blame for El Paso shooting, but that his rhetoric 'creates the climate for it' fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc d476234c-23b3-5903-b2b4-3f8c27f502dc article Andrew O'Reilly

While 2020 Democratic presidential primary contender Bernie Sanders said that he does not believe President Trump wants “to see somebody get shot,” the Vermont lawmaker did say Sunday that Trump “creates the climate” for events like last weekend’s mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas.

“I think that what he has created in this country with his incredible rhetoric, his racist rhetoric, where he calls Mexicans rapists and criminals, where he almost condones in a rally when someone was attacking somebody,” Sanders said of Trump during an interview on CBS’ “Face the Nation.” “He creates a climate where we are seeing a significant increase in hate crimes in this country.”

Sanders added: “He is creating the kind of divisiveness in this nation that is the last thing that we should be doing…He creates the climate, but do I think that he wants to see somebody get shot? Absolutely not.”

MASS SHOOTINGS BRING TRUMP TO DAYTON, EL PASO AMID PROTESTS

Trump’s rhetoric and hardline stance towards illegal immigration has come under amplified attacks since last weekend’s shooting in El Paso, where 21-year-old Patrick Crusius killed 22 people and wounded dozens of others. Crusius said that he was targeting Mexicans and, in an online screed, reportedly wrote about a “Hispanic invasion of Texas.”

Crusius, however, noted in his manifesto that he held these racist views long before Trump launched his 2016 election campaign with a major focus of curbing illegal immigration and building a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico.

Speaking earlier on “Face the Nation,” House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., said that assigning the blame for these mass shootings on anyone besides the perpetrator was “a very slippery slope.”

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“The president’s no more responsible for that shooting as your next guest, Bernie Sanders, is for my shooting,” Scalise said.

Scalise was severely injured when a gunman opened fire on a group of Republican lawmakers at a baseball practice in Alexandria, Va., in June 2017. The gunman, James Hodgkinson, was a left-wing activist who had volunteered for Sanders’ 2016 presidential campaign.

Sanders’ condemned the shooter’s “despicable act” on the Senate floor that same morning.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6062723789001_6062721049001-vs Sanders says Trump is not to blame for El Paso shooting, but that his rhetoric 'creates the climate for it' fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc d476234c-23b3-5903-b2b4-3f8c27f502dc article Andrew O'Reilly   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6062723789001_6062721049001-vs Sanders says Trump is not to blame for El Paso shooting, but that his rhetoric 'creates the climate for it' fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc d476234c-23b3-5903-b2b4-3f8c27f502dc article Andrew O'Reilly

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Kellyanne Conway Defends Trump Spreading Epstein Conspiracy Theory On Twitter

Westlake Legal Group 5d5025552400004a4c937eaf Kellyanne Conway Defends Trump Spreading Epstein Conspiracy Theory On Twitter

Kellyanne Conway on Sunday downplayed President Donald Trump’s decision to retweet a conspiracy theory linking former President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to the apparent suicide of Jeffrey Epstein.

After stating on “Fox News Sunday” that she couldn’t discuss any ongoing investigations into the convicted sex offender’s death, the senior White House aide was asked why the president amplified such a baseless claim.

“I think the president just wants everything to be investigated,” Conway told Fox News’ Bill Hemmer. “There was some unsealed information implicating some people very high up.”

She continued: “I will say, Bill, that there’s always this rush to ‘we need transparency, we need accountability,’ when it involves fictional accusations like collusion with Russia to swing an election. This seems to be very concrete in that Jeffrey Epstein has done some very bad things over a number of years.”

Hemmer continued to press Conway about Trump’s retweet, stating it was “clear what he was trying to say.”

“I think the president just wants everything to be investigated,” Conway repeated. “But you do hear different people asking questions and they want to know who else was involved in Epstein’s crimes or even just, um, activities.”

Hours after Epstein was found dead in his New York City jail cell Saturday, Trump shared a tweet to his more than 63 million followers that included the hashtag #ClintonBodyCount and suggested the Clintons were behind it.

There is no evidence substantiating the “Clinton Body Count” conspiracy theory, which tries to link the family to a number of deaths. Snopes, the fact-checking news site, extensively debunked the false claims when they first surfaced.

A spokesman for the Clinton family tweeted that the conspiracy theory was “ridiculous” and “of course not true.”

Trump’s retweet prompted condemnation from Democrats and many journalists, who suggested it was dangerous and wildly inappropriate for the president to promote such a claim about his former political rivals.

Jake Tapper, host of CNN’s “State Of The Union,” tore into Trump for “using his amplified voice to spread conspiracy theories” once again.

“We begin this morning with a retweet from the president of the United States,” Tapper said Sunday. “Not a message about healing or uniting the country one week after two horrifying massacres, not about the victims of those tragedies.”

“Instead, President Trump, using his massive Twitter platform … to spread a deranged conspiracy theory,” he continued. “President Trump could use his megaphone for anything, but the president often uses it to amplify that which is the worst of us: personal attacks, bigotry and insane conspiracy theories.”

Later on the show, former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, a 2020 Democratic presidential hopeful, bashed Trump’s retweet as “another example of our president using this position of public trust to attack his political enemies with unfounded conspiracy theories.” 

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Epstein, a former high-profile hedge fund manager, reportedly killed himself at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan on Saturday. He was being held in the jail as he awaited trial on sex-trafficking charges.

His death has raised questions and concerns from Justice Department officials and lawmakers on both sides of the aisle. Attorney General William Barr announced Saturday that his department’s inspector general is opening an investigation into the matter.

Both Trump and Bill Clinton had relationships with Epstein, who was known to be well connected to powerful people. Court documents unsealed this week showed both men had flown on Epstein’s private jet in the past.

Clinton recently claimed he didn’t know anything about Epstein’s “terrible crimes” and hasn’t spoken to him in “well over a decade.” Trump, who appeared in photos and video with Epstein at various events, said last month that he had a “falling out” with Epstein and was “not a fan of his.”

Watch Conway’s full interview on “Fox News Sunday” below:

Watch the latest video at foxnews.com

Carla Herreria contributed reporting. 

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Before Jail Suicide, Epstein Was Left Alone and Not Closely Monitored

Jeffrey Epstein, the financier who hanged himself in a federal jail in Manhattan, was supposed to have been checked by guards every 30 minutes, but that procedure was not being followed the night before he was found, a law-enforcement official with knowledge of his detention said.

In addition, the jail had transferred his cellmate and allowed Mr. Epstein to be housed alone in a cell just two weeks after he had been taken off suicide watch, a decision that also violated the jail’s normal procedure, two officials said.

The disclosures about apparent failures in Mr. Epstein’s detention at the Metropolitan Correctional Center deepened questions about his suicide and are very likely to be the focus of inquiries by the Justice Department and the F.B.I.

Officials cautioned that their initial findings about his detention were preliminary and could change.

The federal Bureau of Prisons has already come under intense criticism for not keeping Mr. Epstein under a suicide watch after he had been found in his cell on July 23 with injuries that suggested that he had tried to kill himself.

A person with knowledge of the investigation said that when the decision was made to remove Mr. Epstein from suicide watch, the jail informed the Justice Department that Mr. Epstein would have a cellmate and that a guard “would look into his cell” every 30 minutes.

But that was apparently not done, the person said.

Senior law-enforcement officials, members of Congress and Mr. Epstein’s accusers have all demanded answers about why Mr. Epstein was not being more closely monitored.

Mr. Epstein’s suicide has also unleashed a torrent of unfounded conspiracy theories online, with people suggesting, without evidence, that Mr. Epstein was killed to keep him from incriminating others.

Over the years, Mr. Epstein’s social circle had included dozens of well-known politicians, business executives, scientists, academics and other notables, including President Trump, former President Bill Clinton, Prince Andrew of Britain and Leslie H. Wexner, the retail billionaire behind Victoria’s Secret and Bath & Body Works.

Mr. Epstein, 66, was awaiting trial on federal charges he sexually abused dozens of teenage girls when he was found dead in his cell at the Metropolitan Correctional Center at 6:30 a.m. on Saturday.

Jeffrey Epstein Dead in Suicide at Jail, Spurring Inquiries

Aug 10, 2019

Westlake Legal Group merlin_159066939_bca8398d-60f0-4007-a646-00ac94bbec75-threeByTwoSmallAt2X Before Jail Suicide, Epstein Was Left Alone and Not Closely Monitored Wexner, Leslie H Trump, Donald J Suicides and Suicide Attempts Sex Crimes Prisons and Prisoners Palm Beach (Fla) Metropolitan Correctional Center (Manhattan, NY) Manhattan (NYC) Justice Department Federal Bureau of Prisons Epstein, Jeffrey E (1953- ) Clinton, Bill Child Abuse and Neglect

That was a day after thousands of documents were released in a civil case that provided disturbing details about how he had lured scores of adolescent girls into prostitution, paying them to give him erotic massages at his mansions in Manhattan and Palm Beach, Fla.

The former money manager was found semiconscious three weeks ago in a shared cell with bruises on his neck after a judge denied him bail. He was placed on a 24-hour suicide watch and received daily psychiatric evaluations, the official said.

But six days later, prison officials determined he was no longer a threat to his own life and put him in a cell in a special housing unit with another inmate, one prison official familiar with the incident said.

It is standard practice at the Metropolitan Correctional Center to place people who have been on suicide watch with a cellmate, two people with knowledge of Mr. Epstein’s case said.

But Mr. Epstein’s cellmate was later moved out of the special housing unit, leaving him alone, the prison official said.

Bureau of Prison officials said it is standard procedure for guards in special housing units to check on inmates every half-hour.

It remained unclear why that procedure was not followed in Mr. Epstein’s case. Like many federal prisons and detention centers, the jail has been short staffed for some time, union leaders have said.

The two guards on duty in the special housing unit where Mr. Epstein was housed were both working overtime, the prison official with knowledge of the incident said. One of the corrections officers was working his fifth straight day of overtime, while the other officer had been forced to work overtime, the official said.

An investigation by The New York Times that published last year revealed that federal prisons across the country, including the Metropolitan Correctional Center, have been dealing with rising violence as staffing at the facilities has dwindled.

Questions about the safety of such prisons arose late last year when James (Whitey) Bulger, the notorious Boston gangster, was brutally murdered in a West Virginia prison shortly after being moved there.

[Read how staffing shortages have made federal prisons more dangerous.]

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Airline apologizes for reportedly leaving wheelchair-bound elderly woman at the wrong gate, charging her extra for replacement ticket

An airline is apologizing after reports surfaced that an 82-year-old woman confined to a wheelchair missed her flight after she was reportedly taken to the wrong gate and forced to pay for a new ticket.

Norwegian Airlines has reportedly processed a refund and has launched an investigation into the incident. The passenger, who reportedly also has eyesight problems, was flying from Orlando International Airport to London when the incident allegedly occurred.

Westlake Legal Group norwegian-airline Airline apologizes for reportedly leaving wheelchair-bound elderly woman at the wrong gate, charging her extra for replacement ticket Michael Hollan fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc e074306d-e4a4-577d-99a4-bb43a7256951 article

Norwegian Airlines apologized for charging Brian Moorhead’s mother for the additional ticket after she missed her initial flight. (iStock)

Brian Moorhead claims that he was forced to pay an additional $449 after his mother missed her flight in July, Fox 35 reports. According to him, he took her to the airport about three hours before her flight. He told the news outlet that he wasn’t allowed to wheel his mother to the gate and she was left in the care of a worker.

He says that his mother was mistakenly taken to Gate 96 instead of Gate 94 and nobody realized the mistake until too late.

UNITED AIRLINES PASSENGER ACCUSED OF HIDING VIDEO CAMERA IN PLANE’S FIRST-CLASS BATHROOM

Moorhead described this as a “genuine mistake” to Fox 35. He was less understanding about what came next, however.

After being forced to pay for a replacement ticket, Moorhead filed a complaint. According to him, “They kept saying she didn’t show up, she didn’t show up. I said, ‘I have a boarding pass. I’m sitting here looking at it and you have her case. You have her luggage checked in.’”

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Norwegian’s initial response was reportedly dated July 24. Moorhead claims he didn’t hear anything back from the airline until he took his story to local news outlets in early August. Less than a day after the story ran, Norwegian reportedly issued an apology and began processing a refund.

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In a statement to Fox 35, a spokesperson for Norwegian Airlines said, “There seems to have been miscommunication as to what happened to Ms. Moorhead, who should not have been left by herself. She should of course have been given proper attention and care until she boarded, which is when Norwegian air cabin crew would be responsible for her well-being until she arrived in London. Due to this miscommunication of events, Mr. Moorhead was unfortunately charged for a new ticket the following night, which should also not have happened, and Norwegian apologizes for this. A refund has been issued.”

Westlake Legal Group norwegian-airline Airline apologizes for reportedly leaving wheelchair-bound elderly woman at the wrong gate, charging her extra for replacement ticket Michael Hollan fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc e074306d-e4a4-577d-99a4-bb43a7256951 article   Westlake Legal Group norwegian-airline Airline apologizes for reportedly leaving wheelchair-bound elderly woman at the wrong gate, charging her extra for replacement ticket Michael Hollan fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc e074306d-e4a4-577d-99a4-bb43a7256951 article

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Little Mix singer Jade Thirlwall says she almost died from anorexia

Little Mix star Jade Thirlwall has relived the horrifying moment doctors warned her she would die if she did not start eating.

The 26-year-old, who has won millions of fans with the Brit-winning girl band, suffered from anorexia for five years before finding fame on “The X Factor.”

Thirlwall was treated in hospital aged 16 and says she was tormented by an “anorexia angel” on her shoulder.

LITTLE MIX SINGER JESY NELSON UNDER FIRE FOR SINGING R. KELLY SONG

The northern pop star went on to make a full recovery and was discharged just weeks before auditioning on “The X Factor” in 2011.

Now Thirlwall is determined to help youngsters battling eating disorders and recently visited patients at a hospital in Sheffield to tell them about her own experiences.

The emotional day was recorded for “BBC Sounds Life Hacks” podcast “I’ve Been There: Jade Thirlwall & Anorexia.”

Reflecting on her own battle with the mental health condition, Thirlwall told host Katie Thistleton: “Anorexia was my own dark secret and I guess I was sort of satisfied with that.

LITTLE MIX CRITICIZED FOR RISQUE OUTFITS AT ARIANA GRANDE’S MANCHESTER BENEFIT SHOW

Westlake Legal Group jade-thirlwall-getty Little Mix singer Jade Thirlwall says she almost died from anorexia The Sun fox-news/health/mental-health/eating-disorders fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/events/illness fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc article 1913a34e-dbf0-5bd4-9f26-a4f834871e3e

Jade Thirlwall of Little Mix revealed she nearly died after battling anorexia. She recovered with the aid of doctors before auditioning for “The X Factor” in 2011. (Getty)

“It was my own thing that I could do to myself and nobody knew about it.

“I obviously became very small and my ribs were sticking out. I was very gaunt and I used to wear a lot of baggy clothes to hide that.

“In my head, I felt so down and depressed about everything that was going on in my life, I really just wanted to sort of waste away.

ARIANA GRANDE SLAMS PIERS MORGAN OVER COMMENTS ABOUT LITTLE MIX’S PARTIAL NUDITY

“I got in a really horrible state. The turning point — and the reason why I first told my counselor — was when I got tired of hating myself so much.

“The second turning point for me was when I was at the hospital and the doctors told me that I would die if I kept doing it.

“To hear somebody say that to you is actually quite scary and I started to realize how damaging it was for my family.

“I’d become so selfish with how I felt about myself I forgot that I had family and friends who were also really hurting because of what I was doing.

“It sounds really weird, but I saw anorexia like an angel on my shoulder. Anorexia for me was control, and if I was controlling something then I was winning.

“It wasn’t until I had therapy about it that I realized anorexia was actually the devil on my shoulder. That it wasn’t my friend.

“I really struggled to understand that at first, because I was so isolated and didn’t talk to anyone.

TEEN’S BRAIN TUMORS ALLEGEDLY MISDIAGNOSED AS ANOREXIA

“I’d got so used to hearing that voice telling me, ‘Don’t eat that’ or ‘Don’t look in the mirror’, ‘You’re still ugly, you still have a long way to go’.

“It took a long time to realize that voice wasn’t good for me anymore.”

Thirlwall, who grew up with parents James and Norma and brother Karl in South Shields, Tyne and Wear, believes her anorexia began after her granddad died when she was 13.

The number of teenage girls diagnosed with anorexia has rapidly increased in recent years and 1.25 million people in Britain are currently living with an eating disorder.

Thirlwall listened to an interview with 14-year-old anorexia sufferers Marissa and Megan.

BARBIE-INSPIRED BLOGGER OVERCOMES ANOREXIA

Marissa has battled the condition for three years and only sought help after she came across a recovering anorexic’s Instagram post discussing how her periods had stopped.

Thirlwall tells podcast host Thistleton, 30: “It’s really scary when you haven’t spoken to anyone yet  and you know you’re hurting yourself but you don’t understand the seriousness of it.

“My period stopped as well and I thought, ‘Oh well, it’s just a side effect of doing what I’m doing’.

“I didn’t realize that I was gradually destroying my body, more and more.

ANOREXIC SISTERS HOSPITALIZED AFTER MODELING AGENCY TELLS THEM TO LOSE WEIGHT

“It sounds quite twisted but I was — not proud of myself — but I knew I was having the effect that I wanted on my body.

“I was destroying myself and that’s what I intended to do.

“But when you’re actually told by someone, especially a doctor, that you’re going to die if you keep doing what you’re doing — especially if someone says that in front of your mom, or someone that you really love — it is really a hard moment.”

Megan has struggled with anorexia for two years. She told Thistleton she would feel so guilty about eating that she punished herself by sleeping on the floor.

Thirlwall’s visit was arranged as a surprise for Little Mix fans Marissa and Megan, who squeal with delight when she walks into the room.

CELEBRITIES WHO BATTLED EATING DISORDERS

The pair quiz Thirlwall on her own struggles with anorexia, in particular her worst moment. She tells them: “Probably the first day I had to go to the hospital. I remember my mom and dad had a bit of a breakdown.”

Following regular therapy and visits to the hospital, Jade was discharged just weeks before auditioning for “The X Factor” in summer 2011, aged 18.

The judges put her together with Leigh-Anne PinnockJesy Nelson and Perrie Edwards to form girl band Little Mix and they went on to win the show.

Asked how she avoided a relapse, Thirlwall replies: “I knew I would ruin my dream of becoming a singer.”

VICTORIA’S SECRET MODEL SAYS SHE WAS FIRED FOR GAINING AN INCH

She adds: “Being famous still has a lot of downsides — like people constantly talk about the way I look if I put a little bit of weight on, and there are unflattering photos.

“Honestly, I still have times where I’ll feel a bit sad or down about something, but I now don’t associate that with eating anymore. I don’t punish myself in that way.”

After the visit, Marissa says: “It just shows you that there is life after the hospital and you can recover.”

And Megan, who has since been discharged, adds: “It doesn’t stop you from reaching your goals. Jade said she had a goal in her mind and she got it.”

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While 46 percent of anorexia sufferers make a full recovery, it remains the biggest killer of all mental health conditions. But Thirlwall’s story shows there is hope for youngsters out there battling it.

“Life Hacks – I’ve Been There: Jade Thirlwall & Anorexia,” produced by Amelia Ellis, is released Sunday on BBC Sounds. Listen here.

This article originally appeared in The Sun.

Westlake Legal Group jade-thirlwall-getty Little Mix singer Jade Thirlwall says she almost died from anorexia The Sun fox-news/health/mental-health/eating-disorders fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/events/illness fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc article 1913a34e-dbf0-5bd4-9f26-a4f834871e3e   Westlake Legal Group jade-thirlwall-getty Little Mix singer Jade Thirlwall says she almost died from anorexia The Sun fox-news/health/mental-health/eating-disorders fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/events/illness fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc article 1913a34e-dbf0-5bd4-9f26-a4f834871e3e

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Simone Biles makes history with balance beam dismount at US women’s gymnastics championship

Westlake Legal Group Simone-Biles-AP Simone Biles makes history with balance beam dismount at US women's gymnastics championship Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/sports/olympics fox-news/sports fox-news/person/simone-biles fox news fnc/sports fnc article 357b3d30-5403-5c3b-8192-ca2c00421f90

Simone Biles — the five-time Olympic medalist who’s described as the greatest gymnast of her generation — made history on Friday with a spectacular beam dismount at the U.S. Gymnastics Championships.

Competing in Kansas City, Mo., 22-year-old Biles became the first gymnast ever to attempt a double-twisting, double somersault dismount from the balance beam, according to Team USA.

Biles said she was “really happy with the beam dismount and how it’s come along, because if you had asked me after [U.S. Classic] if I was going to complete it, I would’ve said no.”

SIMONE BILES TO USA GYMNASTICS ON LARRY NASSAR: ‘YOU COULDN’T PROTECT US’

Before her beam landing, Biles was disappointed in her night — so much so she wanted to “throw it in the trash and start over.” During the landing of her floor routine, in which she also tried to make history, she fell and touched the floor with her hand.

“As soon as I fell on floor, I was like, ‘That’s it, I’m scratching the meet. I’m walking off the floor,'” Biles told USA Today.

But despite the fall, Biles finished in first place with a lead of 1.75 points, and had the highest scores among her competitors on balance beam, floor and vault.

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“I’m still really upset about floor. I did end on a good note, so that makes me happy — but I’m still disappointed about floor,” Biles told reporters. “I still get really frustrated because I know how good I am and how well I can do…so I just want to do the best routine for the audience and for myself out here.”

The second half of the women’s gymnastics competition is scheduled to take place at 8 p.m. ET Sunday.

Westlake Legal Group Simone-Biles-AP Simone Biles makes history with balance beam dismount at US women's gymnastics championship Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/sports/olympics fox-news/sports fox-news/person/simone-biles fox news fnc/sports fnc article 357b3d30-5403-5c3b-8192-ca2c00421f90   Westlake Legal Group Simone-Biles-AP Simone Biles makes history with balance beam dismount at US women's gymnastics championship Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/sports/olympics fox-news/sports fox-news/person/simone-biles fox news fnc/sports fnc article 357b3d30-5403-5c3b-8192-ca2c00421f90

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