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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 102)

Israel Said to Deny Entry to Omar and Tlaib After Trump’s Call to Block Them

Westlake Legal Group 15israel-congresswomen-facebookJumbo Israel Said to Deny Entry to Omar and Tlaib After Trump’s Call to Block Them West Bank visas United States International Relations tlaib, rashida Palestinians Omar, Ilhan Israel Boycotts

JERUSALEM — President Trump called on Thursday for Israel to bar the entry of two American congresswomen who had planned to visit the West Bank, taking an extraordinary step to influence an allied nation and punish his political opponents at home.

It was reported last week that Mr. Trump was pressing Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel to deny entrance to the two women, Representatives Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib, and Thursday morning he left little doubt. He said in a Twitter post while Israeli officials were still deliberating the matter that “it would show great weakness if Israel allowed Rep. Omar and Rep. Tlaib to visit.”

Israel is still weighing whether to deny entry to Ms. Omar and Ms. Tlaib, officials said on Thursday. Both women have been vocal in their support of the Palestinians and the boycott-Israel movement.

Mr. Trump’s decision to recommend that another country block entry to two United States citizens, let alone members of Congress, is one of the most pronounced violations of democratic norms that he has engaged in since taking office in January 2017.

It also placed him at odds with the Republican leadership in Congress.

“I feel very secure in this, that anyone who comes with open ears, open eyes and an open mind will walk away with an understanding, just as all these members here do, that this bond is unbreakable,” the House minority leader, Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, told reporters in Jerusalem on Sunday, while leading a delegation of 31 Republican lawmakers. “I think all should come.”

Speaking at a joint news conference with Mr. McCarthy, Representative Steny Hoyer, the House majority leader, who was heading a delegation to Israel of 41 Democratic representatives, agreed.

Many Israelis and Jewish leaders have also expressed discomfort with the idea that American officials could be denied entry because of their beliefs or criticism of Israel. Just last month, the Israeli ambassador to Washington, Ron Dermer, said that Israel would not deny entry to any United States representatives.

Ms. Omar, a Minnesota Democrat, and Ms. Tlaib, a Michigan Democrat, were scheduled to arrive on Sunday for a tour of the West Bank, partly under the auspices of an organization headed by a longtime Palestinian lawmaker, Hanan Ashrawi, that was expected to highlight Palestinian grievances over the Israeli occupation.

The women were planning to visit the West Bank cities of Hebron, Ramallah and Bethlehem, as well as Israeli-annexed East Jerusalem, including a visit to the Al Aqsa Mosque, a hotly contested and volatile holy site, according to Ms. Ashrawi. Most of the delegation was expected to depart on Aug. 22, but Ms. Tlaib had been planning to stay on to visit relatives in the West Bank.

No meetings had been planned with either Israeli or Palestinian officials, other than Ms. Ashrawi, who is also a member of the Palestine Liberation Organization’s executive committee. She said the organization she leads, Miftah, was co-sponsoring the visit.

The purpose of the visit, Ms. Ashrawi said, was to give the congresswomen a way “to engage with the Palestinian people directly and to see things on the ground.”

“What are they afraid of?” she said, referring to the Israeli government. “That they might find out things?”

Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar, both freshmen, are the first two Muslim women elected to Congress. Ms. Tlaib, who is of Palestinian descent, has spoken often of her grandmother, who lives on the West Bank, while Ms. Omar, a Somali refugee, is the first woman to wear a hijab on the House floor.

But while they were hailed as symbols of diversity when they arrived in Washington, they quickly became embroiled in controversy over their statements on Israel and on supporters of the Jewish state. Ms. Omar apologized after she said support for Israel was “all about the Benjamins, baby” — a reference to $100 bills.

In early March, the House voted to condemn all forms of hatred after Ms. Omar said pro-Israel activists were “pushing for allegiance to a foreign country,” a remark that critics in both parties said invoked the longstanding anti-Semitic trope of “dual loyalty.”

Those remarks have been deeply problematic for Democratic leaders, who are trying to demonstrate solidarity with Israel. And they have given Mr. Trump and his fellow Republicans an opening to fan the flames of racial division, in an effort to break the longstanding alliance between American Jews and the Democratic Party.

Ms. Omar and Ms. Tlaib’s public support for the boycott movement had already drawn criticism from the White House. In remarks last month that were widely condemned as racist, Mr. Trump said that four congresswomen of color — Ms. Omar and Ms. Tlaib, as well as Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts — should “go back” to the countries they came from. Since then, the chant of “send her back” has become a fixture at President Trump’s political rallies.

Axios reported recently that President Trump had told advisers that he thought Mr. Netanyahu should bar Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar under a law that denies entry to foreign nationals who publicly show support for a boycott.

Under the law, passed in 2017, Israel can bar entry to people considered prominent advocates of the boycott, divestment and sanctions movement, a loose network that, among other goals, aims to pressure Israel into ending the occupation of the West Bank. Pro-Israel advocates accuse the movement’s supporters of anti-Semitism.

Last month, the United States House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a bipartisan resolution condemning the boycott-Israel movement as one that “promotes principles of collective guilt, mass punishment and group isolation, which are destructive of prospects for progress towards peace.”

Mr. Netanyahu, for his part, is in the middle of a tight election campaign, and some analysts say he can ill afford to appear weak when dealing with high-profile critics of Israeli policies. At the same time, he is involved in a high-wire act of trying to balance Israel’s ties with the Democrats and his close embrace of, and support from, Mr. Trump.

“If they are prevented from entering, it will be the foolishness of the Netanyahu government,” said Alon Pinkas, a former Israeli consul general in New York, told Israel’s Army Radio on Thursday. “These are congresswomen of the majority party, which most American Jews vote for.”

One of the main points of contention over the planned itinerary appears to be the visit to the Aqsa Mosque in East Jerusalem. A sacred site revered by Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary and by Jews as Temple Mount, the location of their ancient temples, it is a frequent flash point in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Danny Ayalon, a former Israeli ambassador to the United States and a former deputy foreign minister, told Israel’s Kan Radio on Thursday that the congresswomen should be allowed to enter Israel “but with restrictions.”

“If they want to stage a provocation by entering the Temple Mount with Palestinian hosts, then that can be prevented,” he said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Stock Markets Take A Breather After Steep Drop

Westlake Legal Group ap_19227536565450-da7aff64299f4fa53605d4116157ce2865ba61d2-s1100-c15 Stock Markets Take A Breather After Steep Drop

Major U.S. stock indexes were nearly unchanged Thursday, a day after their steepest drops of the year. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Stock Markets Take A Breather After Steep Drop

Major U.S. stock indexes were nearly unchanged Thursday, a day after their steepest drops of the year.

Richard Drew/AP

Investors paused to catch their breath Thursday, one day after the stock market suffered its worst drop of the year. Market indexes were flat as investors digested mixed signals about prospects for the U.S. economy.

Consumer spending — a key pillar of the economy — remains strong. Retail sales jumped by 0.7% in July, according to the Commerce Department. After a slow start at the beginning of the year, retail sales have grown for the last five months — a sign that consumers are still feeling good about the economy, with low unemployment and rising wages.

Walmart, the world’s biggest retailer, also reported solid sales in the second quarter and raised its profit forecast for the rest of the year.

News from the manufacturing sector is less encouraging. Industrial production slumped in July, with factory output falling 0.4%. The U.S. manufacturing sector is more dependent on exports than the much larger services side of the economy. As a result, factories have suffered more fallout from rising trade tensions.

Disappointing news about manufacturing in China and a report that Germany’s economy shrank in the second quarter helped trigger a sharp selloff on Wall Street Wednesday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 both fell about 3%.

Investors were also spooked by news that the yield on 10-year Treasury notes dipped below the yield on 2-year notes — an unusual situation that historically has been a warning sign of a looming recession.

Some observers cautioned that this “inverted yield curve” could be a false alarm in this instance.

“I would really urge on this occasion it may be a less good signal” of a recession, former Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen told Fox Business. “I think the U.S. economy has enough strength to avoid that.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump approval rating drops following mass shootings in latest Fox News poll

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Trump approval rating drops following mass shootings in latest Fox News poll

Protestors turned up in both Dayton, Ohio and El Paso, Texas as President Donald Trump visited following two mass shootings that left 31 dead. USA TODAY

A Fox News poll released on Wednesday indicated that support for President Donald Trump among voters has declined, with an approval rating that dropped to 43% from 46% in July.

More respondents said Trump is “tearing the country apart” than did in previous years; 59% thought he is divisive while 31% said he is “drawing the country together.” 

The poll, conducted between August 11 and August 13, includes responses from more than 1,000 people who are currently registered to vote, on both sides of the aisle.

The current rating is heavily influenced by Democratic responses. Only 7% of Democrats in the survey approved of Trump’s performance as president compared 88% of Republicans.

More: Beto O’Rourke on Texas shooting: Trump ‘has no place’ in El Paso

Trump’s reaction to the recent mass shootings is an issue for survey respondents; 52% disapproved. Following the deaths of 22 victims in El Paso, Texas, and 9 in Dayton, Ohio, Trump has called for stronger background checks. Background check measures were supported by the vast majority of both Democrats and Republicans who were polled.

According to the poll, a proposal to ban assault rifles and semi-automatic weapons in the country would be favored by 86% of Democrats and 46% of Republicans. Democrats and Republicans also both showed strong favor toward police removing guns from individuals who pose a threat to themselves or others.

Other factors for gun violence pointed to by poll respondents were split across party lines. More Republicans believed bad parenting was partly to blame, while Democrats said white nationalism and anti-immigrant sentiment were factors.

Ten percent of respondents listed Trump’s rhetoric as a main cause for mass shootings occurring more frequently in the United States than in other countries, making it the third most common response after lack of gun laws and mental health-related issues.

More: Kamala Harris hits back at NRA after group criticizes her gun control proposals

Disapproval of the National Rifle Association has also been climbing, with a current unfavorability rating of 47%, up from 45% in March 2018.

Overall, the majority of respondents prefer to live in a country where people have the right to own guns when asked to choose between that and a ban, with an overwhelming support from Republicans at 84% and only 32% from Democrats.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/08/15/trump-rating-down-fox-news-poll-following-mass-shootings/2017726001/

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Israel Bars Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib From Entering Country Over BDS Support

Westlake Legal Group 5d55415b2200003100f60718 Israel Bars Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib From Entering Country Over BDS Support

Reps. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) and Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.), two of Israel’s sharpest critics in Congress, have been barred from entering the country ahead of their proposed visit to the occupied West Bank and East Jerusalem, an Israeli official said Thursday.

“The decision has been made [and] the decision is not to allow them to enter,” Israeli Deputy Foreign Minister Tzipi Hotovely told Israel’s Reshet Radio, Reuters reported.

Israel decided to ban the freshman lawmakers in response to their support for the pro-Palestinian Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement.

BDS seeks to put economic pressure on Israel to recognize the movement’s demands, which include equal rights for Arab-Palestinian citizens of Israel and the country’s withdrawal from the occupied territories.

Under Israeli law, supporters of the movement can be denied entry to the country. But Israel’s ambassador to the United States, Ron Dermer, said last month that Omar and Tlaib would be allowed to visit.

“Out of respect for the U.S. Congress and the great alliance between Israel and America, we would not deny entry to any member of Congress into Israel,” he said.

President Donald Trump tweeted Thursday that it would show “great weakness if Israel allowed Rep. Omar and Rep. Tlaib to visit.”

“Minnesota and Michigan will have a hard time putting them back in office,” he wrote. “They are a disgrace!”

Neither Omar nor Tlaib immediately responded a request for comment.

Last year, Omar and Tlaib became the first Muslim women elected to Congress. Tlaib, an American of Palestinian heritage, has family in the West Bank. If she made a special humanitarian request to visit her family, it would be considered “favorably,” a senior Israeli government official told The Washington Post.

The two congresswomen have been criticized roundly by Republicans, as well as some members of their own party, for speaking out against America’s relationship with Israel. Some Republicans, including Trump, have accused them of being anti-Semitic, though Omar and Tlaib have made clear they take issue with the Israeli government ― not with Jewish people.

Omar and Tlaib have not formally announced a date for their proposed trip. It could begin as early as this weekend, Reuters reported, citing sources familiar with the planned visit.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

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Minnesota man whose wife died after meth-fueled ‘death party’ is sentenced

The Minnesota man who held a meth-fueled “death party” with his dying wife — during which officials say she died of an overdose — was sentenced on Monday.

Duane Johnson, 59, was initially charged with third-degree murder in the death of Debra Johnson, 69. She was found dead in her home in Searles, a city roughly 100 miles southwest of Minneapolis, in January by first responders who arrived after Johnson called 911 to report her death.

NEW MEXICO MAN FORCE-FED CAT METH, BATTERED GIRLFRIEND, POLICE SAY

Westlake Legal Group Duane-Johnson-Brown-County-Sheriffs-Office Minnesota man whose wife died after meth-fueled 'death party' is sentenced Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e0a9736-9cd7-5663-88ac-fe8e9997175f

Duane Johnson, 59, was sentenced to three years in prison for criminal neglect after his wife died following a “death party” the two reportedly held earlier this year. (Brown County Sheriff’s Office)

Investigators found Debra wrapped in a sheet, according to WCCO. Deputies said Johnson claimed his wife begged him to take her out of a nursing home and let her die in their Minnesota home.

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Johnson, who reportedly told authorities he and his dying wife spent several days before her death doing drugs, later negotiated a plea deal that allowed him to plead guilty to criminal neglect.

He was sentenced to three years in prison, but is likely to serve 19 months behind bars before spending the remainder on supervised release, the news outlet reported.

Westlake Legal Group Duane-Johnson-Brown-County-Sheriffs-Office Minnesota man whose wife died after meth-fueled 'death party' is sentenced Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e0a9736-9cd7-5663-88ac-fe8e9997175f   Westlake Legal Group Duane-Johnson-Brown-County-Sheriffs-Office Minnesota man whose wife died after meth-fueled 'death party' is sentenced Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/us/crime/drugs fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e0a9736-9cd7-5663-88ac-fe8e9997175f

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'Nothing short of a miracle': Dramatic standoff with Philadelphia gunman ends with no loss of life

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'Nothing short of a miracle': Dramatic standoff with Philadelphia gunman ends with no loss of life

This is the second major police shooting this week. The first occurred at a California traffic stop. USA TODAY

PHILADELPHIA — Throughout a seven-hour gun battle that turned a Philadelphia neighborhood into a war-zone and left six officers injured, the goal was “preservation of life,” police commissioner Richard Ross said, explaining a day of intense gunfire and tear gas salvos before the gunman surrendered early Thursday.

At one point, with hundreds of officers pinned down by erratic gunfire, a SWAT team rescued two officers trapped upstairs with handcuffed prisoners in the north Philadelphia home. 

In the end, the police tactics worked as the shooter, with his hands up, was driven from his home after a tear gas barrage and all the injured officers were treated and released.

“It’s nothing short of a miracle that we don’t have multiple officers killed today,” Ross said.

Throughout the ordeal, he said, the goal was “preservation of life, irrespective of who it is.”

The gunman was identified as Maurice Hill, 36, a Philadelphia man with an extensive record of gun convictions and resisting arrest, the Philadelphia Inquirer and Associated Press reported.

The melee erupted as officers came to the house in a north Philadelphia neighborhood of brick and stone row homes to serve drug arrest warrants.

The standoff was especially unnerving as hundreds of officers, often pinned down by barrages of erratic gunfire from the house, had to operate in the densely populated area of narrow streets and tightly packed houses.

Seven-hour standoff: Gunman surrenders after ‘volatile’ standoff in Philadelphia; 6 officers shot

At one point, dozens of children had to be evacuated from a nearby day care center next door.

Temple University’s medical campuses nearby were placed on lockdown and trains and buses were ordered not to stop along neighborhood routes.

The chaotic confrontation even included an unusual move by Ross, the police commissioner, who got on the phone to negotiate directly with the shooter.

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“I wouldn’t have been able to live with myself,” he said explaining why, from his perch 200 yards away, he decided to get directly involved in the effort to end the stalemate.

The standoff near Temple University unfolded Wednesday afternoon with an attempt to serve arrest warrants that “went awry almost immediately,” Ross said.

Many officers “had to escape through windows and doors to get (away) from a barrage of bullets,” he said.

As gunfire erupted and officers scrambled to safety, two officers were trapped on the second floor – one officer guarding two handcuffed prisoners and the other holed up in a bathroom with a third prisoner.

At one point, one of the officers calmly radioed the chaotic scene to police surrounding the building.

“We are pinned down in the second floor with three individuals handcuffed,” one officer said. “You can hear the male moving down stairs on the first floor.”

‘We have to do something’: Mayor calls for gun control after Philadelphia shooting; suspect identified

During another round of gunfire, another officer can be heard saying, “The male is reloading, the male is reloading, shots fired inside.”

A SWAT team eventually made its way into the structure and brought the officers to safety.

Outside, meanwhile, officers hunkered down behind cars while others tried to keep residents and circling news helicopters at bay.

Dozens of officers on foot lined the streets. Others were in cars and some on horses.

At one point, an armored police vehicle known as a BearCat arrived to move some of the cars outside the targeted home.

“I was just coming off the train and I was walking upstairs and there were people running back downstairs who said that there was someone up there shooting cops,” said Abdul Rahman Muhammad, 21, an off-duty medic. “There was just a lot of screaming and chaos.”

For a large portion of the standoff, the gunman refused to engage with police beyond answering the phone they were using to contact him. Ross said the man would answer but not say anything for much of the time.

At one point, late in the evening, the gunman called his lawyer Shaka Johnson, who told CBS3 that his client him around 8:30 p.m. on his personal phone “in a panic.”

“I told him, ‘you gotta surrender, man,’” Johnson said.

Police still haven’t determined how much weaponry the gunman had, other than what was found on him when officers took him into custody. Ross said that weapon was a handgun, possibly a .380.

SWAT officers “preliminarily confirmed” there was a long gun inside the residence, as well, but said the scene has not yet been processed because of the use of tear gas inside the house.

“It was a very dynamic situation,” Ross said, “one I hope we never see again.”

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney said he was thankful that officers’ injuries weren’t life-threatening.

“I’m a little angry about someone having all that weaponry and all that firepower, but we’ll get to that another day,” Kenney said.

Contributing: Associated Press

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/08/15/philadelphia-standoff-gunman-surrenders-6-officers-injured/2017086001/

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Atlanta Braves’ Tyler Flowers bloodied after getting hit in head with Pete Alonso’s bat

Westlake Legal Group Tyler-Flowers Atlanta Braves' Tyler Flowers bloodied after getting hit in head with Pete Alonso's bat Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/mlb/new-york-mets fox-news/sports/mlb/atlanta-braves fox-news/sports/mlb fox news fnc/sports fnc article 8879f8ae-6b97-5134-b33c-4671aa1e6f3d

Atlanta Braves catcher Tyler Flowers kept his head in the game Wednesday night against the New York Mets and was left bloodied because of it.

The Braves and Mets were in the seventh inning with Pete Alonso at-bat. The Mets rookie took a gigantic cut at an offering and whiffed. He ended up nailing Flowers in the head with the end of the bat.

QUANTRILL, PADRES BEAT RAYS FOR 1ST TIME SINCE 2010

Alonso was immediately apologetic for the swing. But Flowers was feeling the effects of it.

Footage showed Flowers bleeding from the head.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Flowers ended up staying in the game and contributed with an RBI in the bottom of the inning to help Atlanta come back to defeat New York, 6-4.

Westlake Legal Group Tyler-Flowers Atlanta Braves' Tyler Flowers bloodied after getting hit in head with Pete Alonso's bat Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/mlb/new-york-mets fox-news/sports/mlb/atlanta-braves fox-news/sports/mlb fox news fnc/sports fnc article 8879f8ae-6b97-5134-b33c-4671aa1e6f3d   Westlake Legal Group Tyler-Flowers Atlanta Braves' Tyler Flowers bloodied after getting hit in head with Pete Alonso's bat Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/mlb/new-york-mets fox-news/sports/mlb/atlanta-braves fox-news/sports/mlb fox news fnc/sports fnc article 8879f8ae-6b97-5134-b33c-4671aa1e6f3d

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

'Nothing short of a miracle': Dramatic standoff with Philadelphia gunman ends with no loss of life

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'Nothing short of a miracle': Dramatic standoff with Philadelphia gunman ends with no loss of life

This is the second major police shooting this week. The first occurred at a California traffic stop. USA TODAY

PHILADELPHIA — Throughout a seven-hour gun battle that turned a Philadelphia neighborhood into a war-zone and left six officers injured, the goal was “preservation of life,” police commissioner Richard Ross said, explaining a day of intense gunfire and tear gas salvos before the gunman surrendered early Thursday.

At one point, with hundreds of officers pinned down by erratic gunfire, a SWAT team rescued two officers trapped upstairs with handcuffed prisoners in the north Philadelphia home. 

In the end, the police tactics worked as the shooter, with his hands up, was driven from his home after a tear gas barrage and all the injured officers were treated and released.

“It’s nothing short of a miracle that we don’t have multiple officers killed today,” Ross said.

Throughout the ordeal, he said, the goal was “preservation of life, irrespective of who it is.”

The gunman was identified as Maurice Hill, 36, a Philadelphia man with an extensive record of gun convictions and resisting arrest, the Philadelphia Inquirer and Associated Press reported.

The melee erupted as officers came to the house in a north Philadelphia neighborhood of brick and stone row homes to serve drug arrest warrants.

The standoff was especially unnerving as hundreds of officers, often pinned down by barrages of erratic gunfire from the house, had to operate in the densely populated area of narrow streets and tightly packed houses.

Seven-hour standoff: Gunman surrenders after ‘volatile’ standoff in Philadelphia; 6 officers shot

At one point, dozens of children had to be evacuated from a nearby day care center next door.

Temple University’s medical campuses nearby were placed on lockdown and trains and buses were ordered not to stop along neighborhood routes.

The chaotic confrontation even included an unusual move by Ross, the police commissioner, who got on the phone to negotiate directly with the shooter.

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

“I wouldn’t have been able to live with myself,” he said explaining why, from his perch 200 yards away, he decided to get directly involved in the effort to end the stalemate.

The standoff near Temple University unfolded Wednesday afternoon with an attempt to serve arrest warrants that “went awry almost immediately,” Ross said.

Many officers “had to escape through windows and doors to get (away) from a barrage of bullets,” he said.

As gunfire erupted and officers scrambled to safety, two officers were trapped on the second floor – one officer guarding two handcuffed prisoners and the other holed up in a bathroom with a third prisoner.

At one point, one of the officers calmly radioed the chaotic scene to police surrounding the building.

“We are pinned down in the second floor with three individuals handcuffed,” one officer said. “You can hear the male moving down stairs on the first floor.”

‘We have to do something’: Mayor calls for gun control after Philadelphia shooting; suspect identified

During another round of gunfire, another officer can be heard saying, “The male is reloading, the male is reloading, shots fired inside.”

A SWAT team eventually made its way into the structure and brought the officers to safety.

Outside, meanwhile, officers hunkered down behind cars while others tried to keep residents and circling news helicopters at bay.

Dozens of officers on foot lined the streets. Others were in cars and some on horses.

At one point, an armored police vehicle known as a BearCat arrived to move some of the cars outside the targeted home.

“I was just coming off the train and I was walking upstairs and there were people running back downstairs who said that there was someone up there shooting cops,” said Abdul Rahman Muhammad, 21, an off-duty medic. “There was just a lot of screaming and chaos.”

For a large portion of the standoff, the gunman refused to engage with police beyond answering the phone they were using to contact him. Ross said the man would answer but not say anything for much of the time.

At one point, late in the evening, the gunman called his lawyer Shaka Johnson, who told CBS3 that his client him around 8:30 p.m. on his personal phone “in a panic.”

“I told him, ‘you gotta surrender, man,’” Johnson said.

Police still haven’t determined how much weaponry the gunman had, other than what was found on him when officers took him into custody. Ross said that weapon was a handgun, possibly a .380.

SWAT officers “preliminarily confirmed” there was a long gun inside the residence, as well, but said the scene has not yet been processed because of the use of tear gas inside the house.

“It was a very dynamic situation,” Ross said, “one I hope we never see again.”

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney said he was thankful that officers’ injuries weren’t life-threatening.

“I’m a little angry about someone having all that weaponry and all that firepower, but we’ll get to that another day,” Kenney said.

Contributing: Associated Press

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/08/15/philadelphia-standoff-gunman-surrenders-6-officers-injured/2017086001/

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Iowa driver leads authorities on chase, claims car she was driving was stolen: police

An Iowa woman allegedly fleeing a traffic stop called authorities to report her car had been stolen — but she had been driving it all along.

Rachel Thornburg, 20, was speeding Tuesday on a highway in Clinton, a city roughly 85 miles east of Cedar Rapids, officials said, and a deputy tried to stop her.

CAR THIEF NAMED HENRY FORD ARRESTED IN MICHIGAN, OFFICIALS SAY

The driver fled, went through a red light, and led police on a chase, the Clinton County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release.

Westlake Legal Group Rachel-Thornburg-Clinton-County-Sherifs-Office Iowa driver leads authorities on chase, claims car she was driving was stolen: police Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 46b128ff-18ba-5a9d-8f0c-549e593d2ea1

Rachel Thornburg, 20, allegedly told authorities her car was stolen — but it turns out she was driving it all along. (Clinton County Sheriff’s Office)

During that chase, the sheriff’s office received a call from Thornburg claiming she left her keys in her car, and that it had been stolen. The vehicle, she said, was a 1998 grey Buick Century — the same car the deputy was pursuing.

Thornburg allegedly drove into neighboring Scott County, where police tried and failed to use Stop Sticks — a device used to deflate tires. Iowa State Patrol, however, had better luck with the device, and was able to stop the pursuit less than an hour later.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Authorities took the driver into custody and identified her as the caller who reported her own car missing while leading police on a multi-county chase.

Thornburg was charged with eluding, driving with a suspended license, reckless driving, and speeding.

Westlake Legal Group Rachel-Thornburg-Clinton-County-Sherifs-Office Iowa driver leads authorities on chase, claims car she was driving was stolen: police Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 46b128ff-18ba-5a9d-8f0c-549e593d2ea1   Westlake Legal Group Rachel-Thornburg-Clinton-County-Sherifs-Office Iowa driver leads authorities on chase, claims car she was driving was stolen: police Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime fox-news/odd-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 46b128ff-18ba-5a9d-8f0c-549e593d2ea1

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John Hickenlooper to drop out of 2020 presidential race, aides say

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close John Hickenlooper to drop out of 2020 presidential race, aides say

John Hickenlooper speaks about his experience with health care exchanges as Colorado Gov. and the Green New Deal, April 12, 2019 in Coralville, Iowa. Joseph Cress, Iowa City Press-Citizen

Former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper on Thursday will end his 2020 White House bid, two campaign aides tell USA TODAY.

Hickenlooper was struggling to meet the donor and polling thresholds set by the Democratic National Committee to qualify for the September debate in Houston and was unlikely to make the stage.

One of the aides told USA TODAY that Hickenlooper is still weighing a Senate bid against Colorado Sen. Cory Gardner, among the most vulnerable Republicans up for re-election in the 2020 election cycle. The aide said Hickenlooper will not announce whether he’ll seek the party’s nomination to run against Gardner during Thursday’s announcement.

Hickenlooper has previously acknowledged that Democratic leadership would like him to run for the Senate, but pushed back against the notion that the party needs him with a large field of high-profile Colorado Democrats who have already announced their candidacy.

“There are several other top-flight candidates running for Senate in Colorado, I think any one of which could beat Cory Gardner,” Hickenlooper said during a campaign stop in Iowa last month. “I mean, he is amazingly vulnerable.”

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Hickenlooper entered the Democratic primary on March 4 and raised $1 million in the 48 hours that followed. But after a lackluster performance in the June debates in Miami, his campaign showed signs of cracking.

Earlier this summer, Hickenlooper confirmed that some of his aides were urging him to withdraw from the presidential race and instead run for Colorado’s U.S. Senate seat or pursue other opportunities. At least six Hickenlooper staffers bailed on the campaign in late June and early July. 

If Hickenlooper were to enter the Senate primary, he could start with a substantial polling lead over the 11 other declared Democratic candidates, according to polling conducted by “a national Democratic group involved in Senate races” and published Monday by the Denver Post.

Hickenlooper entering the Senate race would be a big win for Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, who has struggled to persuade several high-profile Democrats to take a shot at the Senate.

Most notably, fellow Democratic presidential hopefuls Montana Gov. Steve Bullock and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas are languishing in their bids for the White House. But like Hickenlooper, both are seen by party leaders and Democratic voters as attractive candidates to take on incumbent Senate Republicans in their home states.

But Bullock and O’Rourke have resisted calls to run for the Senate. 

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Before running for president, Hickenlooper served as mayor of Denver from 2003 to 2011, then was elected governor of Colorado, where he served from 2011 to 2019. He is the second serious candidate to leave the race. Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., dropped out in June.

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Hickenlooper’s campaign

In his time as a presidential candidate, Hickenlooper staked his claim as one of the more moderate candidates in the race.

While he supported universal healthcare, he did not endorse the Medicare for All plans other candidates had proposed. California Democrats even booed him in June when he told them “socialism is not the answer” at the Democratic Party State Convention. 

“My point that I was trying to make is that the Republicans are going to try to define us,” Hickenlooper told USA TODAY following his tough reception at the California convention. “Any large expansion of government, they’re going to call socialism, rightly or wrongly, and the word socialist has huge negative baggage in the United States. If we don’t draw a bright line saying we are not socialists, we could end up running the risk of helping to reelect the worst president in U.S. history.”

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Hickenlooper failed to garner much attention from his appearances in the first round of Democratic debates. As of early August, his national polling average was less than 1%, according to RealClearPolitics

Hickenlooper was one of the few Democrats to emerge victorious in the 2014 Republican swing midterm election that saw Republicans take control of the Senate and increase their House majority. He left office with a plurality of voters (49%) approving of his tenure, according to Morning Consult.

He had enough buzz during his second term as governor that Hillary Clinton’s campaign vetted him in 2016 as a potential vice presidential candidate. She picked Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia.

But he was hardly registering with voters during his five-month run for the White House.

He was about 45 minutes into a campaign roundtable in Chicago last month when the moderator forgot his name.

The former Colorado governor had been listening intently as the participants – a group of elementary-school-age children, formerly incarcerated men, worried mothers and retirees – described how a mix of gun violence, government indifference and systemic racism had decimated their neighborhood.

The moderator, Peace Coleman, stumbled when he sought to bring Hickenlooper into the conversation.

“With great power comes great responsibility, and in the place of power, there is a power dynamic for one person to fail, for one people to fail and for one people to be up,” Coleman said. “So I ask the question to Hicken–.”

The governor bailed out Coleman and said he should call him John.

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