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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 103)

Andrew McCarthy: On Trump impeachment, consider these fantasy thought experiments

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124343344001_6124349059001-vs Andrew McCarthy: On Trump impeachment, consider these fantasy thought experiments National Review fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc e74df53e-147a-553b-a74d-f4e76a1e5a64 article Andrew McCarthy

Thought experiment No. 1: Suppose Bob Mueller’s probe actually proved that Donald Trump is under Russian leader Vladimir Putin’s thumb.

Fill in the rest of the blanks with your favorite corruption fantasy: The Kremlin has video of the mogul-turned-president debauching himself in a Moscow hotel; the Kremlin has a bulging file of real-estate transfers through which Trump laundered racketeering proceeds for Putin’s favored mobsters and oligarchs; or Trump is recorded cutting a deal to drop Obama-era sanctions against Putin’s regime if Russian spies hack Democratic accounts.

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Thought experiment No. 2: Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., is not a demagogue. (Remember, this is fantasy.)

REPS. JORDAN, MEADOWS, BIGGS AND HOUSE FREEDOM CAUCUS BOARD: IMPEACHMENT — A CLOSING ARGUMENT

At the very first televised hearing, when he alleged that President Trump told Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, “I want you to make up dirt on my political opponent … lots of it,” Schiff was not defrauding the public.

Instead, impeachment’s Inspector Clouseau can actually prove that Trump was asking a foreign government to manufacture out of whole cloth evidence that former Vice President Joe Biden and his son were cashing in on the former’s political influence (as opposed to asking that Ukraine look into an arrangement so objectively sleazy that the Obama administration itself agitated over what to do about it).

What do these two scenarios have in common, besides being fictional? Answer: If either of them were real, we’d already be talking about President Pence’s upcoming State of the Union address.

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This is the point that gets lost in all the endless chatter over impeachment strategy and procedure. Everything that is happening owes to the fact that we do not have an offense sufficiently grave for invocation of the Constitution’s nuclear option. If we had one, the machinations and the posturing would be unnecessary — even ridiculous.

Why are we talking about how Chairman Schiff, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and House Democrats rushed through the impeachment inquiry without making a real effort to interview key witnesses?

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THIS COLUMN IN THE NATIONAL REVIEW

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM ANDREW MCCARTHY

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124343344001_6124349059001-vs Andrew McCarthy: On Trump impeachment, consider these fantasy thought experiments National Review fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc e74df53e-147a-553b-a74d-f4e76a1e5a64 article Andrew McCarthy   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124343344001_6124349059001-vs Andrew McCarthy: On Trump impeachment, consider these fantasy thought experiments National Review fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc e74df53e-147a-553b-a74d-f4e76a1e5a64 article Andrew McCarthy

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Japanese fashion house accused of cultural appropriation for putting models in cornrow wigs: ‘Racist show!’

Critics didn’t care for this “hair”-brained idea.

Commes des Garçons, a Japanese fashion house, is being accused of cultural appropriation after sending models down the runway in wigs designed to look like cornrows.

The show took place on Friday at Paris Fashion Week and showcased several different male models, many of whom were white, strutting down the runway modeling the brand’s latest Homme Plus menswear collection. Nearly all of them were seen sporting what appeared to be ill-fitting cornrow wigs.

‘REAL-LIFE RAPUNZEL’ DISCUSSES DAILY LIFE WITH 6 FEET OF HAIR

The criticism was swift on social media, with some deeming it a “racist” show, and others declaring that Commes des Garçons was “canceled.”

Westlake Legal Group CommesDesGarconsAnne-Christine-PoujoulatAFPviaGettyImages2 Japanese fashion house accused of cultural appropriation for putting models in cornrow wigs: 'Racist show!' Michael Bartiromo fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/world/world-regions/france fox-news/style-and-beauty/modeling fox-news/style-and-beauty fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article aaea9ad2-87c7-5e28-9c99-60d8f34be326

Japanese fashion label Comme Des Garçons faced backlash for the look, which appeared on the runway at its Paris Fashion Week show on Friday. (Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP via Getty Images)

“I’m outraged and disgusted by your models’ choice of hairstyle knowing where it originated from. Where is the real representation?!?” one user wrote on Instagram.

“Cancel culture incoming y’all really messed up on this one, man,” another user said.

“They wanna make money off the culture but don’t wanna show love and respect to the people,” someone else commented.

“Racist show!” another simply wrote.

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Others, still, appeared to be just as offended by the placement and quality of the lace-front wigs.

Westlake Legal Group CommesDesGarconsAnne-Christine-PoujoulatAFPviaGettyImages Japanese fashion house accused of cultural appropriation for putting models in cornrow wigs: 'Racist show!' Michael Bartiromo fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/world/world-regions/france fox-news/style-and-beauty/modeling fox-news/style-and-beauty fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article aaea9ad2-87c7-5e28-9c99-60d8f34be326

Critics on social media called the move “racist,” while others declared that Commes des Garçons was “canceled.” (Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP via Getty Images)

“Cornrow forehead wigs?” one asked.

“I can’t even be mad because I know y’all did this for attention but come on … the lace? At least do it right,” someone else added.

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On Friday, Canadian fashion designer and model Tani also called out the brand in a Twitter post that has been liked more than 3,300 times.

“Lmaoooo why?!” she wrote.

Commes des Garçons has not publicly commented on the backlash, nor shared any photos from the show on its Instagram page as of Saturday afternoon. The fashion house, however, had once come under similar scrutiny in 2018, following accusations from fashion writer Marin Lerma that it had not hired a black model in the two decades prior.

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That same year, Kim Kardashian also faced criticism for arriving at the 2018 MTV Movie and TV Awards with her hair in cornrows.

“It’s not cute to appropriate my culture,” one critic wrote on social media at the time. “Your privilege is really showing.”

Westlake Legal Group CommesDesGarconsAnne-Christine-PoujoulatAFPviaGettyImages Japanese fashion house accused of cultural appropriation for putting models in cornrow wigs: 'Racist show!' Michael Bartiromo fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/world/world-regions/france fox-news/style-and-beauty/modeling fox-news/style-and-beauty fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article aaea9ad2-87c7-5e28-9c99-60d8f34be326   Westlake Legal Group CommesDesGarconsAnne-Christine-PoujoulatAFPviaGettyImages Japanese fashion house accused of cultural appropriation for putting models in cornrow wigs: 'Racist show!' Michael Bartiromo fox-news/world/world-regions/japan fox-news/world/world-regions/france fox-news/style-and-beauty/modeling fox-news/style-and-beauty fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article aaea9ad2-87c7-5e28-9c99-60d8f34be326

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ICE subpoenas NY for info on illegal immigrant accused of murder, as sanctuary city fight escalates

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6123156379001_6123161531001-vs ICE subpoenas NY for info on illegal immigrant accused of murder, as sanctuary city fight escalates fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/topic/sanctuary-cities fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 9446c617-67be-578c-b5e6-db58202c904e

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) on Friday subpoenaed New York for information of multiple illegal immigrants who have been arrested in New York City, but were shielded by the city’s controversial sanctuary city policies — including one illegal immigrant who is accused of murdering a 92-year-old woman.

“Like any law enforcement agency, we are used to modifying our tactics as criminals shift their strategies; but it’s disheartening that we must change our practices and jump through so many hoops with partners who are restricted by sanctuary laws passed by politicians with a dangerous agenda,” Henry Lucero, acting Deputy Executive Associate Director for ICE’s Enforcement and Removal Operations, said in a statement announcing the subpoenas on Saturday.

The subpoenas are being served on the New York Department of Corrections.

ICE ISSUES LIST OF ‘FUGITIVE’ ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS FREED BY NEW YORK CITY’S SANCTUARY CITY POLICIES

In a press release, the agency says that ICE can use subpoenas to obtain information on potentially deportable immigrants but does not normally need to do so, as local law enforcement agencies will normally provide agents with the information about arrested aliens they need. The move represents another escalation by the Trump administration in its ongoing fight against so-called sanctuary policies.

Sanctuary jurisdictions demand that local law enforcement limit cooperation with federal immigration authorities and ignore most ICE detainers. Those detainers are requests that ICE should be informed of an illegal immigrant’s pending release from custody so they can be transferred to deportation proceedings.

The controversy over New York City’s sanctuary policies fired up again this week after it emerged that Reeaz Khan — an illegal immigrant from Guyana accused of sexually assaulting and murdering 92-year-old Maria Fuertes this month — had been arrested in November on assault and weapons charges. ICE filed a detainer for Khan, but it was ignored and he was set free.

“A phone call, one simple phone call and Maria Fuertes could be alive today,” a visibly furious ICE Director Matthew Albence told reporters in New York City on Friday.

New York City has pushed back against the criticism, however, claiming that the policy makes New Yorkers safer.

“New York City has passed its own common-sense laws about immigration enforcement that have driven crime to record lows. There are 177 crimes under NYC law that trigger cooperation with federal authorities, if and when someone is convicted,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said Wednesday. “That policy has kept us safe.”

The subpoenas issued by ICE request information on four illegal immigrants. While none of the aliens are named, one is clearly Khan, as the agency identifies a Guyanese national charged with murder and other crimes including sexual abuse of a 92-year-old woman.

The other illegal immigrants ICE is seeking information on are:

  • A citizen from El Salvador who was arrested in September for assault and is wanted in his home country for homicide. According to ICE, he was held in Riker Island and a detainer lodged against him. But he was released in December.  
  • A Mexican man arrested in January for attempted rape, unlawful imprisonment and attempted assault. He also had two prior arrests. ICE issued a detainer, but he was released after posting bail.  
  • A Mexican man arrested in October on drug charges, who had previously sentenced to 60 months in federal prison in 2012 for attempting to import methamphetamine. He had also been previously deported to Mexico. ICE lodged a detainer against him, but recently discovered he too had been freed.

It’s the second time ICE has used its subpoena power in a week. Earlier this week it subpoenaed Denver seeking information on three Mexicans and one Honduran who had been in custody.

NYPD UNION LEADER SIDES WITH ICE AGAINST DE BLASIO OVER ‘SANCTUARY’-TIED MURDER: ‘HE OWNS THIS’

One of the Mexicans had been arrested for sexual assault, another for vehicular homicide, and a third for child abuse and strangulation assault. The Honduran man arrested on domestic violence charges. All had been previously removed from the country. Three were released from custody and one was still in custody.

Denver, however, denied the request, saying it could be “viewed as an effort to intimidate officers into help enforcing civil immigration law.”

Albence on Friday warned that the agency could use the subpoena tool more broadly if sanctuary jurisdictions didn’t hand over information about potentially dangerous illegal immigrants.

“These subpoenas are an attempt to at least defray some of the damage that is being done by these sanctuary policies,” Albence said. “I suspect that we’ll start utilizing them much more broadly.”

But the move represents the next step in a fight that seems likely only to continue bubbling between the administration, which has pledged to take a hard line against criminals, illegal immigrants and liberal cities that have embraced sanctuary policies.

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Acting DHS Secretary Chad Wolf on Friday took aim at the policies again, and specifically rejected the claim that it makes law-abiding Americans safer.

“What this does, the only sanctuary it provides is to criminals,” he said on “Fox & Friends.” “It makes those communities less safe, it also makes ICE and law enforcement officials less safe so instead of picking up an individual in a confined jail setting, they have to go into communities to knock on doors and the like.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6123156379001_6123161531001-vs ICE subpoenas NY for info on illegal immigrant accused of murder, as sanctuary city fight escalates fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/topic/sanctuary-cities fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 9446c617-67be-578c-b5e6-db58202c904e   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6123156379001_6123161531001-vs ICE subpoenas NY for info on illegal immigrant accused of murder, as sanctuary city fight escalates fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/topic/sanctuary-cities fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 9446c617-67be-578c-b5e6-db58202c904e

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Deaths related to binge-drinking on the rise, new studies show

Next time you toast to your health, you might want to make it a water.

American drinkers are boozing more, according to two new studies this month, and that’s leading to more alcohol-related deaths.

Thanks to our ballooning benders, 73,000 Americans died from liver disease and other alcohol-related illnesses in 2017 — more than double in 1999 when that number was 36,000, according to data from the National Center for Health Statistics.

STUDY: AMERICANS DRINKING MORE NOW THAN JUST BEFORE PROHIBITION

While men died at higher rates overall, the study, published last week in the journal “Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research,” reported the largest increases in alcohol-induced deaths were among middle-aged individuals and women, especially white women.

“With the increases in alcohol use among women, there’s been increases in harms for women including ER visits, hospitalization and deaths,” Aaron White, lead study author, told NPR.

Their research indicates that alcohol is even deadlier than illicit drugs, including opioids, which claimed the lives of about 70,000 in 2017, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cigarettes, however, remain America’s No. 1 killer with more than 480,000 dying each year due to smoking-related illness.

Westlake Legal Group DrinkingLiquorIstock Deaths related to binge-drinking on the rise, new studies show New York Post Hannah Sparks fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fnc/health fnc article 4f3bb0f1-7b9a-53ea-9161-c687fe7b37db

American drinkers are boozing more, according to two new studies this month, and that’s leading to more alcohol-related deaths. (iStock)

That study wasn’t the only sobering evidence of America’s growing problem.

Researchers at the CDC revealed this week a 12 percent increase in binge drinking over a six year period ending in 2017, according to data pulled from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

FLORIDA GIRL WITH SEVERE BURNS DENIES PARTAKING IN ‘FIRE CHALLENGE’

The CDC totaled the annual number of drinks consumed by adult binge drinkers — meaning those who regularly have four or more alcoholic beverages during one occasion — and found the average number had jumped from 472 in 2011 to 529 in 2017.

For men, the average number escalated from 587 to 666 during the study period, compared to women whose binge drinking rose from 256 to 290 — a differential of 79 versus 34. They also found that those who had not completed high school saw a jump of 45.8 percent. For individuals with family incomes of less than $25,000 per year, the yearly average leaped from 543 to 673.

The CDC’s report also revealed binge drinking averages by state, and showed that nine states are drinking more than they did in 2011, including New Jersey and New York. In 2017, the state with the lowest average number of drinks during a binge was Massachusetts with 320; the highest was Wyoming with 1,219.

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The CDC reminds that binge-drinking and alcoholism can lead to risky behaviors, such as drunk driving, domestic violence, unprotected sex resulting in pregnancy and STDs, as well as stroke, heart and liver disease, among other illnesses.

This article originally appeared in The New York Post.

Westlake Legal Group DrinkingLiquorIstock Deaths related to binge-drinking on the rise, new studies show New York Post Hannah Sparks fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fnc/health fnc article 4f3bb0f1-7b9a-53ea-9161-c687fe7b37db   Westlake Legal Group DrinkingLiquorIstock Deaths related to binge-drinking on the rise, new studies show New York Post Hannah Sparks fox-news/health/mental-health/drug-and-substance-abuse fnc/health fnc article 4f3bb0f1-7b9a-53ea-9161-c687fe7b37db

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Dan Hoffman: US will stay in Iraq to fight ISIS – Trump’s order to kill Soleimani benefits both countries

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124381639001_6124379679001-vs Dan Hoffman: US will stay in Iraq to fight ISIS – Trump’s order to kill Soleimani benefits both countries fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Daniel Hoffman article 158a2dc7-a828-5fe3-986c-7436b6d68d76

America’s military involvement in Iraq and our fight against the ISIS terrorist group there is not over – despite initial concerns about U.S. troops being expelled from the country after President Trump ordered a drone strike that killed Iranian terrorist Gen. Qassem Soleimani in Iraq Jan. 3.

Soleimani’s fellow terrorist leader – Kataib Hezbollah militia head Abu Mahdi al Muhandis – was also killed in the U.S. strike, along with eight other terrorists.

Iraqi critics of the killings denounced the U.S. strikes as a violation of their nation’s sovereignty. And in the heat of the moment, Iraqi nationalist Muqtada al Sadr – who holds the most seats in Iraq’s Parliament – demanded that the remaining 5,000 U.S. troops in the country withdraw.

IRAN ROCKET ATTACK ON IRAQI MILITARY BASE INJURED 11 US SERVICE MEMBERS, OFFICIAL REVEALS

The second-largest faction in the Parliament – Hadi al Amiri’s Iranian proxy Badr Corps – joined with Sadr’s faction to pass a nonbinding resolution expelling U.S. troops. But significantly, lawmakers from Kurdish and Sunni parties abstained from the vote against the U.S. presence in Iraq.

While the U.S. media have shifted their focus to the impeachment trial of President Trump, you may have missed the fact that cooler heads now seem to be prevailing in Iraq. That’s very good news.

The caretaker prime minister of Iraq – Adil Abdul-Mahdi – has left it to his successor to deal with the issue of the U.S. troop presence in Iraq.

And after a 10-day hiatus, joint U.S.-Iraqi operations against ISIS have resumed. This is a positive development benefiting both our nations.

The bottom line: right now it doesn’t look like U.S. troops are exiting Iraq any time soon.

More from Opinion

And while the Democratic-controlled U.S. House of Representatives voted 224-194 Jan. 9 to approve a nonbinding resolution demanding that President Trump seek consent from Congress before taking new military action against Iran, there is no indication the Republican-controlled Senate will approve the measure.

Fortunately, no Americans were killed when Iran fired missiles Jan. 8 at two military bases in Iraq where U.S. troops were stationed, in a retaliatory attack for the Soleimani killing. However, the Defense Department announced Thursday that 11 U.S. military members were treated for symptoms of concussions resulting from the Iranian strikes.

Now the time is ripe for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and his brave, talented Baghdad Embassy team to double-down on engaging, especially with the many Iraqis who see the value in repelling Iran’s effort to subjugate their country while carrying on the fight against the ISIS terrorists who threaten us all.

Trump’s strategic goal in taking out Soleimani – a mass murderer responsible for the deaths of more than 600 Americans and thousands of others – was to restore strategic deterrence in the U.S.-Iran relationship. The president made a calculated risk that Iran would not respond with a significant retaliatory attack.

Going forward, Iran’s leaders know they will be in our crosshairs if they plan attacks against the U.S., including our embassy in Baghdad. Soleimani was responsible for an attack in which Iranian proxy militia forces penetrated the U.S. Embassy compound in the Iraqi capital shortly before his death.

Rather than precipitating a U.S.-Iran war that neither the Trump administration nor the Iranian regime desires, the killing of Soleimani has the potential to bolster efforts both to thwart Iranian influence in Iraq and to counter ISIS.

The elimination of the so-called ISIS “caliphate” by U.S. and allied forces under President Trump’s leadership was a major accomplishment. But we learned from the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on our country that terrorists can plot against our homeland from ungoverned space in failed states.

So we can’t afford to turn a blind eye to ISIS. The group is down but not out. There are reportedly 18,000 ISIS fighters still at large, threatening to melt into an insurgency in Iraq, as well as roughly 10,000 ISIS jihadists in detention.

U.S. forces need to continue the fight against ISIS to eliminate any remaining threat the group poses to Iraq and to prevent ISIS from threatening our own shores. This requires a modest ongoing presence in Iraq of deployed U.S. military, diplomats and intelligence officers who can leverage local partners in the fight against our common terrorist enemy.

How did we get to this point?

Following the overthrow of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein in 2003 after the U.S. invasion of his country, Iran took advantage by directing its ally Syria to provide the Al Qaeda terrorist group with a safe haven to launch attacks on U.S. troops.

Iran also deliberately benefited from Al Qaeda’s attacks on defenseless Shiite civilians in Iraq, which drove them into the arms of Iran’s proxy militias and enabled the militias to grow stronger as a result.

Soleimani directed Iran’s penetration of Iraqi government ministries and Parliament. He created Iranian proxy militias in Iraq, which developed into the popular mobilization units charged with fighting ISIS. But these militias also pursued Iran’s sectarian agenda by exacting revenge against the disenfranchised Sunni population in Iraq, most notoriously in Mosul after it was liberated from ISIS control.

Iraq’s toxic cocktail of failed governance, endemic corruption and ethno-sectarian violence – of which Soleimani was the architect – created the petri dish in which ISIS grew with impunity.

Over the past few months, Soleimani, whom the Obama administration designated a terrorist, dialed up the intensity and frequency of attacks on Iraqi bases that house U.S. service personnel.

Iran sought to induce the U.S. to withdraw its military from Iraq even if it meant striking Iraqi military bases housing US service personnel. Iran’s goal was to shape Iraq’s domestic political future, especially following the resignation of Prime Minister Abdul-Mahdi in November. For now, Abdul-Mahdi continues in office in a caretaker role.

President Trump’s decision to eliminate Soleimani may indeed have opened a pathway to counter the two greatest threats to Iraq’s stability and sovereignty: ISIS and Iran.

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Iraqi protests over the past few months against Iranian influence led to the attacks on Iranian consulates in the Iraqi holy cities of Najaf and Karbala.

Because he is opposed to Iranian domination of Iraq, Sadr might see the value of an ongoing U.S.-Iraqi partnership in the fight against ISIS, especially if there is some prospect that Iraqi territory will not be used in a U.S-Iran proxy war.

Predicting the future – especially in the Middle East, where sectarian conflict has carried on for centuries – is fraught with difficulty.

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President Trump’s bold decision to target Soleimani has the potential to benefit U.S. national security by weakening Iran’s ability to conduct asymmetric warfare in the region and beyond, as well as reducing Iran’s pernicious influence in Iraq.

Those who are critical of Trump’s calculated risk in ordering the killing of Soleimani should ask this question: Would the Middle East’s future look brighter if the terrorist mass murderer was still alive and continuing to lead Iran’s vicious Islamic Revolutionary Guards Quds Force in deadly attacks?

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY DAN HOFFMAN

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124381639001_6124379679001-vs Dan Hoffman: US will stay in Iraq to fight ISIS – Trump’s order to kill Soleimani benefits both countries fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Daniel Hoffman article 158a2dc7-a828-5fe3-986c-7436b6d68d76   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6124381639001_6124379679001-vs Dan Hoffman: US will stay in Iraq to fight ISIS – Trump’s order to kill Soleimani benefits both countries fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Daniel Hoffman article 158a2dc7-a828-5fe3-986c-7436b6d68d76

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Oregon woman fired from bank job after giving struggling man $20 to get home for Christmas: report

Westlake Legal Group US-Bank-iStock Oregon woman fired from bank job after giving struggling man $20 to get home for Christmas: report Paulina Dedaj fox-news/us/us-regions/west/oregon fox-news/politics/finance/banking fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox news fnc/us fnc article 587dc94c-44c6-5fd9-bd15-052e6dd5410e

An Oregon woman claims she was fired from her bank job after helping a struggling customer get home to his family on Christmas Eve by giving him $20 of her own money.

Emily James worked as a senior banker at a U.S. Bank call center in Portland when she received a call from a customer last month whose paycheck had been placed on hold, The Oregonian reported.

ILLINOIS DRUNK DRIVER CRASHES INTO COP CAR ALREADY ENGAGED IN SEPARATE TRAFFIC STOP

James worked to help Marc Eugenio, a Clackamas resident, get access to the more than $1,000 that should have been in his account before telling him to go to his local bank the next day to get the money cleared by a manager.

The following day, on Christmas Eve, Eugenio visited his local branch but because of the holiday, no one was able to help him.

A devasted Eugenio called the 1-800 line from a gas station where, according to report, he was stranded with no money to fill his tank to get home.

He requested to speak to James, explaining what had happened before adding: “I wish I had just 20 bucks to get home.”

UTAH-BASED SKI TECH COMPANY FOUNDER, 64, DIES IN FIREY PLANE CRASH, OFFICIALS SAY 

James, realizing how close the man was, decided to act.

Eugenio told the paper that the woman from the call center told him to wait for help, as she was just a few miles away.

“I didn’t want her to do it,” he said. “But I’m not proud to the point that I’m going to refuse help.”

According to the report, James said she received permission from her supervisor to drive out.

“I handed him $20 in cash, said ‘Merry Christmas’ and went right back to work,” she said.

But days later, on Dec. 31, she was informed by a service manager that her job had been terminated because of her “unauthorized interaction with a customer.” James told the paper that her supervisor was also fired, although this was not confirmed.

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In a statement to the New York Post, a spokesperson explained that James was fired after putting “herself and the bank at risk.”

“At U.S. Bank, we have policies and procedures in place to protect our customers and employees,” the statement read. “Ms. James was terminated following an internal investigation into her interactions with a customer. During this review it was determined Ms. James did not use the available solutions to remedy the customer’s situation and instead put herself and the bank at risk with her actions.”

Eugenio said he feels bad that James lost her job trying to help, but James seemed to not mind after seeing how the situation was handled.

“I don’t think I would want to continue to work for someone who would do that,” she told The Oregonian.

Westlake Legal Group US-Bank-iStock Oregon woman fired from bank job after giving struggling man $20 to get home for Christmas: report Paulina Dedaj fox-news/us/us-regions/west/oregon fox-news/politics/finance/banking fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox news fnc/us fnc article 587dc94c-44c6-5fd9-bd15-052e6dd5410e   Westlake Legal Group US-Bank-iStock Oregon woman fired from bank job after giving struggling man $20 to get home for Christmas: report Paulina Dedaj fox-news/us/us-regions/west/oregon fox-news/politics/finance/banking fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox news fnc/us fnc article 587dc94c-44c6-5fd9-bd15-052e6dd5410e

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Downed Ukrainian plane’s black boxes will be sent to Ukraine, Iranian news agency says

Iran says it won’t keep the black boxes from the Ukraine airliner it accidentally shot down last week with a missile, killing 176 people.

“The black boxes of Flight 752 will not be decoded in Iran and will be transferred to Ukraine instead as per the country’s request,” the semi-official Tasnim news agency said, Bloomberg reported Saturday.

Tasnim based its reporting on Hassan Rezaeifar, head of the Iranian Civil Aviation Organization’s accident-investigation office, according to Bloomberg.

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Westlake Legal Group Iran-Plane-AP Downed Ukrainian plane's black boxes will be sent to Ukraine, Iranian news agency says Robert Gearty fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox news fnc/world fnc article 65427778-3fc9-5f3d-a52c-05165d5de56d

Mourners attend a memorial, Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2020, in North Vancouver, British Columbia, to remember Canadian victims in the deadly downing of a Ukrainian airliner the week before, in Iran. (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press via AP)

Iran initially denied shooting down the plane, a Boeing 737-800. The accident sparked protests in Iran and put worldwide pressure on Iranian leaders to accept responsibility and let other countries participate in the investigation. It took three days for Iran to accept blame for the crash.

The accident came hours after Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard launched ballistic missiles at U.S. and coalition troops at two military bases in Iraq in response to the U.S. airstrike that killed Iran’s top commander, Gen. Qassem Soleimani, earlier this month.

NEW IRAN PLANE CRASH VIDEO SHOWS 2 MISSILES HIT UKRAINIAN JET

Iran says the plane was mistaken for a U.S. cruise missile by lower-ranking officers.

The victims included 57 Canadian citizens, as well as 11 Ukrainians, 17 people from Sweden, four Afghans and four British citizens. Most of those killed were Iranians.

Tasnim also reported that Iranian investigators were prepared for experts from France, Canada and the United States to examine the black box flight data recorder and the cockpit voice recorder, according to Reuters.

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It wasn’t clear when the black boxes would be sent to Ukraine, Reuters said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Iran-Plane-AP Downed Ukrainian plane's black boxes will be sent to Ukraine, Iranian news agency says Robert Gearty fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox news fnc/world fnc article 65427778-3fc9-5f3d-a52c-05165d5de56d   Westlake Legal Group Iran-Plane-AP Downed Ukrainian plane's black boxes will be sent to Ukraine, Iranian news agency says Robert Gearty fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox news fnc/world fnc article 65427778-3fc9-5f3d-a52c-05165d5de56d

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Oregon woman fired from bank job after giving struggling man $20 to get home for Christmas: report

Westlake Legal Group US-Bank-iStock Oregon woman fired from bank job after giving struggling man $20 to get home for Christmas: report Paulina Dedaj fox-news/us/us-regions/west/oregon fox-news/politics/finance/banking fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox news fnc/us fnc article 587dc94c-44c6-5fd9-bd15-052e6dd5410e

An Oregon woman claims she was fired from her bank job after helping a struggling customer get home to his family on Christmas Eve by giving him $20 of her own money.

Emily James worked as a senior banker at a U.S. Bank call center in Portland when she received a call from a customer last month whose paycheck had been placed on hold, The Oregonian reported.

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James worked to help Marc Eugenio, a Clackamas resident, get access to the more than $1,000 that should have been in his account before telling him to go to his local bank the next day to get the money cleared by a manager.

The following day, on Christmas Eve, Eugenio visited his local branch but because of the holiday, no one was able to help him.

A devasted Eugenio called the 1-800 line from a gas station where, according to report, he was stranded with no money to fill his tank to get home.

He requested to speak to James, explaining what had happened before adding: “I wish I had just 20 bucks to get home.”

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James, realizing how close the man was, decided to act.

Eugenio told the paper that the woman from the call center told him to wait for help, as she was just a few miles away.

“I didn’t want her to do it,” he said. “But I’m not proud to the point that I’m going to refuse help.”

According to the report, James said she received permission from her supervisor to drive out.

“I handed him $20 in cash, said ‘Merry Christmas’ and went right back to work,” she said.

But days later, on Dec. 31, she was informed by a service manager that her job had been terminated because of her “unauthorized interaction with a customer.” James told the paper that her supervisor was also fired, although this was not confirmed.

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In a statement to the New York Post, a spokesperson explained that James was fired after putting “herself and the bank at risk.”

“At U.S. Bank, we have policies and procedures in place to protect our customers and employees,” the statement read. “Ms. James was terminated following an internal investigation into her interactions with a customer. During this review it was determined Ms. James did not use the available solutions to remedy the customer’s situation and instead put herself and the bank at risk with her actions.”

Eugenio said he feels bad that James lost her job trying to help, but James seemed to not mind after seeing how the situation was handled.

“I don’t think I would want to continue to work for someone who would do that,” she told The Oregonian.

Westlake Legal Group US-Bank-iStock Oregon woman fired from bank job after giving struggling man $20 to get home for Christmas: report Paulina Dedaj fox-news/us/us-regions/west/oregon fox-news/politics/finance/banking fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox news fnc/us fnc article 587dc94c-44c6-5fd9-bd15-052e6dd5410e   Westlake Legal Group US-Bank-iStock Oregon woman fired from bank job after giving struggling man $20 to get home for Christmas: report Paulina Dedaj fox-news/us/us-regions/west/oregon fox-news/politics/finance/banking fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox news fnc/us fnc article 587dc94c-44c6-5fd9-bd15-052e6dd5410e

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Both sides of the aisle call for fair, dignified Senate impeachment trial: ‘It’s a process of democracy’

With President Trump‘s impeachment trial looming in the Senate, lawmakers and politicians on both sides of the aisle are calling for managers to follow the Constitution and keep to a fair and balanced approach.

Appearing on “Cavuto LIVE,” Arkansas Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson said he believes the trial under Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., will be very similar to the one held for the Bill Clinton impeachment.

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“The fallout in terms of our constitutional process is that we have to recognize this is a trial. It’s not going to be the circus atmosphere it was in the House. It will be a lot more dignified and orderly because you have the chief justice presiding over it,” the former Clinton impeachment manager said.

Hutchinson said that because the process will be more dignified, the American public will give the procedings in the Senate more credibility.

He told host Neil Cavuto that the Senate has set a “high bar” for impeachment, but there is a lot which has yet to unfold.

“And,what we learned from history is that our democracy is strong and our constitutional process works when you follow it closely,” he said.

DERSHOWITZ DOWNPLAYS HIS ROLE ON TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TEAM, AS WHITE HOUSE ADDS 8TH LAWYER

Appearing on the show immediately following Hutchinson, 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Michael Bennet told Cavuto that he believes the Senate has a “constitutional duty to fulfill.”

Westlake Legal Group Impeachement-managers-Pelosi Both sides of the aisle call for fair, dignified Senate impeachment trial: 'It's a process of democracy' Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/west/colorado fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/arkansas fox-news/us/constitution fox-news/us/congress fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 128969b1-13cf-524e-a65b-6b260d59a8aa /FOX NEWS/SHOWS/Your World Cavuto/Interviews

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., fourth from left, speaks during a news conference to announce impeachment managers on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020. The U.S. House is set to vote Wednesday to send the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump to the Senate for a landmark trial on whether the charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress are grounds for removal. With Pelosi, from left, are Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., Rep. Sylvia Garcia, D-Texas, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., Rep. Val Demings, D-Fla., Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., and Rep. Jason Crow, D-Colo. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The Colorado Democrat noted that while he thinks that “anybody could accuse anyone else of having an inherent bias,” it’s imperative that the Senate call witnesses and examine records.

“That’s the best way we can assure that the American people can get to the bottom of the truth,” he said.

Later on, Lousiana Republican Sen. Bill Cassidy urged the Senate to “keep a high threshold” in managing the impeachment trial and warned of those who will “[try] to distract from what is the crux of the issue.”

“Now, there’s going to be a lot of — you know — I call it monkey dust. People throwing dust around, trying to distract from what is the crux of the issue. If we look at the crux and remain focused on that crux, then we’ll establish whether or not the president did something illegal or not,” Cassidy said.

The trial will begin in earnest on Tuesday on two articles of impeachment against Trump: abuse of power; and obstruction of Congress. House impeachment managers, who will prosecute the case against Trump, were practicing their arguments this weekend. Lawyers for both sides were filing initial briefings and pleadings in the case on Saturday.

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“President Trump has done nothing wrong and is confident that this team will defend him, the voters, and our democracy from this baseless, illegitimate impeachment,” White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham said in a statement. “The Articles of Impeachment House Democrats have adopted threaten grave and lasting damage to our institutions and to our Nation. The President looks forward to the end of this partisan and unconstitutional impeachment.”

The president’s legal team is set to submit his reply to the articles of impeachment later today.

Fox News’ Marisa Schultz and John Roberts contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Asa-Hutch-Bill-Cassidy-Michael-Bennet-FOX Both sides of the aisle call for fair, dignified Senate impeachment trial: 'It's a process of democracy' Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/west/colorado fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/arkansas fox-news/us/constitution fox-news/us/congress fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 128969b1-13cf-524e-a65b-6b260d59a8aa /FOX NEWS/SHOWS/Your World Cavuto/Interviews   Westlake Legal Group Asa-Hutch-Bill-Cassidy-Michael-Bennet-FOX Both sides of the aisle call for fair, dignified Senate impeachment trial: 'It's a process of democracy' Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/west/colorado fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/arkansas fox-news/us/constitution fox-news/us/congress fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 128969b1-13cf-524e-a65b-6b260d59a8aa /FOX NEWS/SHOWS/Your World Cavuto/Interviews

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Lebanon Police Fire Tear Gas, Water Cannons At Protesters Amid Riot

Westlake Legal Group 5e235a7d24000052006c4500 Lebanon Police Fire Tear Gas, Water Cannons At Protesters Amid Riot

BEIRUT (AP) — Riot police fired tear gas and sprayed water cannon near parliament in Lebanon’s capital Saturday to disperse thousands of protesters after riots broke out during a march against the ruling elite amid a severe economic crisis.

The riots began when some protesters started throwing stones at police deployed near the parliament building while others removed street signs and metal barriers and hurled them at security forces. Protesters also threw firecrackers at police.

As rioting took place in central Beirut, thousands of other protesters arrived later from three different parts of the city to join the demonstration.

The Lebanese Red Cross said it took 30 people to hospitals, while 45 others were treated on the spot.

Lebanon has witnessed three months of protests against the political elites who have ruled the country since the end of the 1975-90 civil war. The protesters blame politicians for widespread corruption and mismanagement in a country that has accumulated one of the largest debt ratios in the world.

The protesters had called for a demonstration Saturday afternoon with the theme “we will not pay the price” in reference to debt that stands at about $87 billion, or more than 150% of GDP.

Panic and anger gripped the public as they watched their local currency, pegged to the dollar for more than two decades, plummet, losing more than 60% of its value in recent weeks on the black market. The economy has seen no growth and foreign inflows dried up in the already heavily indebted country that relies on imports for most of its basic goods.

Meanwhile, banks have imposed informal capital controls, limiting withdrawal of dollars and foreign transfers.

Earlier this week, protesters carried out acts of vandalism in a main commercial area in Beirut targeting mostly private banks.

Adding to the crisis, Lebanon has been without a government since Prime Minister Saad Hariri resigned Oct. 29, meeting a key demand of the protesters.

Prime Minister-designate Hassan Diab had been expected to announce an 18-member Cabinet on Friday, but last-minute disputes among political factions scuttled his latest attempt.

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