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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 107)

Israel’s Netanyahu Announces Plan To Annex West Bank’s Jordan Valley

Westlake Legal Group 5d77ffce2300001005512b74 Israel’s Netanyahu Announces Plan To Annex West Bank’s Jordan Valley

JERUSALEM, Sept 10 (Reuters) – Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced his intention on Tuesday to annex the Jordan Valley, a large swathe of the occupied West Bank, if he wins a closely contested election just a week away.

Palestinian chief peace negotiator Saeb Erekat called the planned move a war crime under international law governing occupied territory. Israel captured the West Bank in a 1967 war and Palestinians seek to make the area part of a future state.

Israeli political commentators saw Netanyahu’s declaration, in a speech broadcast live on Israel’s main TV channels, as a bid to siphon support away from far-right rivals who have long advocated annexation of Jewish settlements in the West Bank.

“Today, I announce my intention, after the establishment of a new government, to apply Israeli sovereignty to the JordanValley and the northern Dead Sea,” Netanyahu said in a speech broadcast live on Israeli TV channels, calling the area”Israel’s eastern border.”

That step, he said, could be taken “immediately after the election if I receive a clear mandate to do so from you, the citizens of Israel.”

Arab League foreign ministers condemned Netanyahu’s plan, saying it would undermine any chance of progress towards Israeli-Palestinian peace.

Around 65,000 Palestinians and 11,000 Israeli settlers live in the Jordan Valley and northern Dead Sea area, according to the Israeli human rights group B’Tselem. The main Palestinian city is Jericho, with around 28 villages and smaller Bedouin communities.

Fighting for his political life after an inconclusive election in April, Netanyahu also reaffirmed a pledge to annex all of the settlements Israel has established in the territory. But he said that broader step could take longer and required “maximum coordination” with Washington, Israel’s close ally.

“Out of respect for President Trump and great faith in our friendship, I will await applying sovereignty until release of the president’s political plan,” he said, referring to along-awaited blueprint from Washington for Israeli-Palestinian peace.

The U.S. plan, Netanyahu reiterated, would likely be presented very soon after Israel goes to the polls on Sept. 17. Netanyahu, head of the right-wing Likud party and in office for the past decade, failed to form a governing coalition following a national ballot in April.

“There is no change in United States policy at this time,” a Trump administration official said when asked whether the White House supported Netanyahu’s move.

“We will release our Vision for Peace after the Israeli election and work to determine the best path forward to bring long sought security, opportunity and stability to the region.”

White House senior adviser Jared Kushner said in early May that he hoped Israel would take a hard look at President Donald Trump’s upcoming Middle East peace proposal before “proceeding with any plan” to annex West Bank settlements.

In an interview with the New York Times in June, U.S. ambassador to Israel David Friedman said that “under certain circumstances” Israel has the “right to retain some, but unlikely all, of the West Bank.”

‘PERPETUAL CONFLICT’

Hanan Ashrawi, a senior official in the Palestine Liberation Organization, said on Twitter after Netanyahu’s announcement that the Israeli leader was out to impose a “greater Israel on all of historical Palestine and (carry) out an ethnic cleansing agenda.”

“All bets are off. Dangerous aggression. Perpetual conflict,” she wrote.

Israeli-Palestinian peace talks collapsed in 2014 and Palestinians have called Trump’s proposal dead in the water, even before its publication, citing what they see as his pro-Israel policies.

Last March, just before Israel’s previous election, Trump — in a move widely seen as an attempt to bolster Netanyahu — recognized Israel’s 1981 annexation of the Golan Heights, captured from Syria in the 1967 conflict.

“It’s an election stunt and not a very impressive one because it’s so transparent,” Yair Lapid, co-leader of the centrist Blue and White Party, said in a statement about Netanyahu’s plan.

Blue and White, led by former armed forces chief Benny Gantz, and Likud are running neck and neck in opinion polls.

The Jordan Valley, which Palestinians seek for the eastern perimeter of a state in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, stretches from the Dead Sea in the south to the Israeli city of Beit Shean in the north. Israel captured the West Bank in a 1967 war.

The 2,4000-square-kilometer (926.65-square-mile) valley accounts for nearly 30 percent of the territory in the West Bank. Israel has long said it intends to maintain military control there under any peace agreement with the Palestinians.

(Additional reporting by Ali Sawafta in Ramallah; Editing by Ed Osmond and Howard Goller)

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DOJ asks Supreme Court to allow enforcement of Trump’s asylum restrictions

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6060905911001_6060901895001-vs DOJ asks Supreme Court to allow enforcement of Trump’s asylum restrictions Shannon Bream fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Bill Mears article 300b5284-35b9-5e14-8f4c-924424e0cd03

The Supreme Court is considering an emergency appeal from the Justice Department that would allow them to enforce, for now, the Trump administration’s ban on asylum for anyone trying to cross the southern border by transiting through a third country.

The Justice Department on Tuesday filed a supplemental brief with the justices, criticizing a federal judge’s Monday order reimposing a nationwide injunction that effectively blocks enforcement of the policy across the four states along the U-S Mexico border. That injunction would remain in place while the case is being litigated in the courts.

CALIFORNIA FEDERAL JUDGE REIMPOSES NATIONWIDE BAN ON TRUMP ASYLUM POLICY, DEFYING APPEALS COURT

The government’s new brief warned the court that unless the nationwide injunction is lifted, it “would severely disrupt the orderly administration of an already overburdened asylum system.”

That federal district court order follows a federal appeals court decision last month narrowing the scope of that injunction to just California. The American Civil Liberties Union and other groups then went back to the district court seeking to have the nationwide injunction reimposed, which the district court in California did on Monday, defying the appeals court.

“While nationwide injunctions are not the ‘general rule,’ they are appropriate ‘where such breadth [is] necessary to remedy a plaintiff’s harm,’” U.S. District Judge Jon Tigar wrote. “This is such a case. Accordingly, and for the reasons set forth above, the Court grants the [immigrant rights] Organizations’ motion to restore the nationwide scope of the injunction.”

The Trump administration in July announced the sweeping new policy tightening restrictions for asylum seekers. The new rule requires most migrants entering through America’s southern border to first seek asylum in one of the countries they traversed – whether in Mexico, in Central America, or elsewhere on their journey. In most cases, only if that application is denied would they then be able to seek asylum in the United States.

Monday’s ruling is another defeat for the administration on its asylum policies, and a win for immigrant rights groups.

The ACLU’s Lee Gelernt celebrated the order Monday, saying, “The court recognized there is grave danger facing asylum-seekers along the entire stretch of the southern border.”

The White House ripped the ruling.

“Immigration and border security policy cannot be run by any single district court judge who decides to issue a nationwide injunction,” press secretary Stephanie Grisham said.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6060905911001_6060901895001-vs DOJ asks Supreme Court to allow enforcement of Trump’s asylum restrictions Shannon Bream fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Bill Mears article 300b5284-35b9-5e14-8f4c-924424e0cd03   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6060905911001_6060901895001-vs DOJ asks Supreme Court to allow enforcement of Trump’s asylum restrictions Shannon Bream fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Bill Mears article 300b5284-35b9-5e14-8f4c-924424e0cd03

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Apple launches 3 new iPhones starting at $699, plus updated Watch and iPad

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Apple launches 3 new iPhones starting at $699, plus updated Watch and iPad

Using a few iPhone tips, you may not need the newest version because your phone still works well. USA TODAY

Apple today introduced three new editions of the iPhone – the iPhone 11, 11 Pro and 11 Pro Max – replacing the current XR, XS and XS Max. 

Additionally, Apple updated the Apple Watch with a fifth edition that includes “always on” display. It also offered discount pricing and debuted details on the new Apple TV+ subscription service. 

The new phones will start at $699, $999 and $1,099 and be available beginning Sept. 20. 

iOS13:13 hidden ways Apple’s new software can breathe life into your aging iPhone

Maybe you don’t need a new phone: Here’s why 

The Pro editions will sport a redesigned camera with a third camera lens, similar to recent models from Samsung. The extra lens will be an extreme wide-angle, offering the ability to get more people into group shots. 

At a media event in Cupertino, California, Apple execs said the new iPhones would be more powerful and have longer-lasting battery life. 

With the new phones, Apple has lowered the prices by $100 of the older iPhone 8 and 8 Plus models to $449 and $549 and discontinued the current XS and XS Max models. Those phones should be available at close-out prices. 

The new entertainment service, TV+, will launch on Nov. 1 and compete with the likes of Netflix, Amazon Prime Video and Disney’s set-to-debut Disney+ service with a lower price tag – $4.99 monthly. However, it will have way fewer shows, touting just nine in a release Tuesday, including “The Morning Show” with Jennifer Aniston and Reese Witherspoon. 

A new iPad, the seventh-generation model, will be available at the end of the month, with a higher-resolution 10.2-inch screen. 

The new phones come at a time when Apple’s iPhones sales have fallen because of consumer pushback at the rising prices of the phone and issues in China. CFRA Research says iPhone sales will be down 15% in 2019. 

Apple has historically sold over 200 million iPhones for the past several years, but analyst Daniel Ives from Wedbush Securities says Apple will ship 180 million of the new phones. 

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Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

The Apple Watch has turned into a surprise hit for Apple, after a rocky start when it was introduced in 2014. As part of the “Wearables” category, which also includes the AirPods Bluetooth earbuds, The Watch division brought in more revenue in the recent quarter than iPads, $5.5 billion to $5.0 billion, and is close behind Macintosh computers at $5.8 billion. 

The iPhone still rules at $26 billion, and No. 2 is the Services division with $11.4 billion. 

To make up the shortfall from declining iPhone sales, Apple has been pushing hard on Services, which includes iCloud storage and Music subscriptions. 

When to watch: Apple TV+ entertainment service launches Nov. 1

The TV+ service is the latest, with high-profile programming in the works from Steven Spielberg, Oprah Winfrey, Jason Momoa and Alfre Woodard, among others. 

Follow USA TODAY’s Jefferson Graham (@jeffersongraham) on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. 

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/talkingtech/2019/09/10/apple-new-iphones-and-watch/2264556001/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Among Arabs, a Muted Response to Netanyahu’s West Bank Vow

Westlake Legal Group 10arab-reax-facebookJumbo Among Arabs, a Muted Response to Netanyahu’s West Bank Vow Palestinians Netanyahu, Benjamin Israel

BEIRUT — At one time, if the prime minister of Israel had vowed to extend Israeli sovereignty over the Jordan Valley in the occupied West Bank, the unilateral promise would have set off outrage across the Arab world.

Not today.

The reasons for the muted response to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s pre-election promise on Tuesday were many: It was seen as a late-game appeal by Mr. Netanyahu to right-wing voters. Israel already has de facto control of the territory in question. And the Palestinian cause no longer stirs passions across the region as it once did.

“Yes they care,” the Palestinian journalist Daoud Kuttab said of Arabs in other countries. “But will they move their troops? No. Are they going to withdraw their money from American banks? No.”

Mr. Netanyahu’s vow comes after strategic shifts in the Middle East have pushed the Palestinian cause down the priority list of many Arab leaders and their people. It also follows President Trump’s endorsement of a number of unilateral steps by Israel toward other disputed territories.

Across the region, Arab states like Egypt, Syria, Yemen and Iraq are still reeling from the aftermath of the Arab Spring uprisings and the fight against the Islamic State, leaving them more focused on internal issues. And Persian Gulf monarchies like Saudi Arabia, which once staunchly backed the Palestinians, now worry more about Iran’s regional influence, a concern they share with Israel.

Those changes have left the Palestinians with fewer Arab allies willing to stand up for their cause.

“For the most part, the Palestinian issue has fallen off the agenda,” said Khaled Elgindy, a fellow at the Brookings Institution and author of a book about American involvement in the conflict.

Arab leaders may also avoid denouncing Mr. Netanyahu and his plans because they are unwilling or unable to confront him.

“It raises expectations,” Mr. Elgindy said. “If they say, ‘We oppose this. This is terrible,’ then there is an expectation from their people that they will do something about it.”

That does not mean that the Arab public does not care, he said. Support for the idea of a Palestinian state is a rare issue that still generates broad consensus across the Arab world, even if people’s ability to campaign for it is limited.

The issue is particularly sensitive for Jordan, a close United States ally that has a peace treaty with Israel but sits across the Jordan River from the very territory Mr. Netanyahu seeks to annex.

On Tuesday, Ayman Safadi, Jordan’s foreign minister, criticized Mr. Netanyahu’s vow on Twitter as “a serious escalation that undermines all peace efforts.”

“It’ll lead to more violence & conflict,” he wrote.

Mr. Trump’s unambiguous support for Israel over the Palestinians also played a role.

While previous presidents sought to maintain an air of American impartiality and often met with Palestinian officials as part of the effort to support a two-state solution, Mr. Trump has cast his lot with the Israelis. He has not met with Palestinian leaders and ordered the closing of the Washington office of the Palestine Liberation Organization.

Mr. Trump has also changed American policy by endorsing unilateral Israeli actions toward disputed territories.

He recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and moved the United States Embassy there, a departure from the previous United States position that the status of the city should be determined through negotiations. The Palestinians claim East Jerusalem as the capital of their hoped-for state.

Mr. Trump also recognized Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights, which Israel captured from Syria during the 1967 Mideast war.

Since Arab reaction to those moves was muted, Mr. Netanyahu’s Jordan Valley promise was unlikely to stir waves in the region, said Lina Khatib, the head of the Middle East and North Africa program at Chatham House.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Apple launches 3 new iPhones starting at $699, plus updated Watch and iPad

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Apple launches 3 new iPhones starting at $699, plus updated Watch and iPad

Using a few iPhone tips, you may not need the newest version because your phone still works well. USA TODAY

Apple today introduced three new editions of the iPhone – the iPhone 11, 11 Pro and 11 Pro Max – replacing the current XR, XS and XS Max. 

Additionally, Apple updated the Apple Watch with a fifth edition that includes “always on” display. It also offered discount pricing and debuted details on the new Apple TV+ subscription service. 

The new phones will start at $699, $999 and $1,099 and be available beginning Sept. 20. 

iOS13:13 hidden ways Apple’s new software can breathe life into your aging iPhone

Maybe you don’t need a new phone: Here’s why 

The Pro editions will sport a redesigned camera with a third camera lens, similar to recent models from Samsung. The extra lens will be an extreme wide-angle, offering the ability to get more people into group shots. 

At a media event in Cupertino, California, Apple execs said the new iPhones would be more powerful and have longer-lasting battery life. 

With the new phones, Apple has lowered the prices by $100 of the older iPhone 8 and 8 Plus models to $449 and $549 and discontinued the current XS and XS Max models. Those phones should be available at close-out prices. 

The new entertainment service, TV+, will launch on Nov. 1 and compete with the likes of Netflix, Amazon Prime Video and Disney’s set-to-debut Disney+ service with a lower price tag – $4.99 monthly. However, it will have way fewer shows, touting just nine in a release Tuesday, including “The Morning Show” with Jennifer Aniston and Reese Witherspoon. 

A new iPad, the seventh-generation model, will be available at the end of the month, with a higher-resolution 10.2-inch screen. 

The new phones come at a time when Apple’s iPhones sales have fallen because of consumer pushback at the rising prices of the phone and issues in China. CFRA Research says iPhone sales will be down 15% in 2019. 

Apple has historically sold over 200 million iPhones for the past several years, but analyst Daniel Ives from Wedbush Securities says Apple will ship 180 million of the new phones. 

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

The Apple Watch has turned into a surprise hit for Apple, after a rocky start when it was introduced in 2014. As part of the “Wearables” category, which also includes the AirPods Bluetooth earbuds, The Watch division brought in more revenue in the recent quarter than iPads, $5.5 billion to $5.0 billion, and is close behind Macintosh computers at $5.8 billion. 

The iPhone still rules at $26 billion, and No. 2 is the Services division with $11.4 billion. 

To make up the shortfall from declining iPhone sales, Apple has been pushing hard on Services, which includes iCloud storage and Music subscriptions. 

When to watch: Apple TV+ entertainment service launches Nov. 1

The TV+ service is the latest, with high-profile programming in the works from Steven Spielberg, Oprah Winfrey, Jason Momoa and Alfre Woodard, among others. 

Follow USA TODAY’s Jefferson Graham (@jeffersongraham) on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. 

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/talkingtech/2019/09/10/apple-new-iphones-and-watch/2264556001/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ilhan Omar says ‘good riddance’ after Bolton resignation, claims he made world ‘more dangerous’

Westlake Legal Group Bolton-Omar Ilhan Omar says 'good riddance' after Bolton resignation, claims he made world 'more dangerous' Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/executive/cabinet fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox news fnc/media fnc b8c8f135-611d-566c-9a5b-a7920c76ddcc article

Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., joined the chorus of voices celebrating former national security adviser John Bolton’s departure from the White House.

“John Bolton has been one of the leading proponents of making the world a more dangerous place,” she tweeted on Tuesday. “Good riddance.”

Bolton, notoriously hawkish on foreign policy, was the former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations during former George W. Bush’s incursion into Iraq. He has widely been criticized by people like Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., for pushing an aggressive foreign policy that resulted in long overseas wars.

EX-OBAMA OFFICIAL JOEL RUBIN ON OMAR, TLAIB: ‘NO, THE SQUAD IS NOT ANTI-SEMITIC’

Prior to his departure, Bolton was reportedly sidelined from major meetings on Afghanistan. When President Trump announced Bolton’s departure on Tuesday, he tweeted that Bolton “disagreed strongly” with him and others in the administration.

“I informed John Bolton last night that his services are no longer needed at the White House. I disagreed strongly with many of his suggestions, as did others in the Administration,” Trump said.

More from Media

Bolton seemed to push back on the president’s version of events, tweeting that he was the one who offered to resign.

“I offered to resign last night and President Trump said, ‘Let’s talk about it tomorrow,'” Bolton tweeted.

Not everyone was so critical of Bolton’s tenure, though. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., released a statement on Tuesday praising the former diplomat and top adviser.

“I have known John Bolton for many years and very much appreciate his service to our country in a variety of positions. John understands the world for what it is and the dangers that threaten America’s national security interests.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP
 
“As National Security Advisor to President Trump, I found him to be accessible and always pursuing an agenda that not only helps the President but makes America safe,” Graham said in the statement.

Westlake Legal Group Bolton-Omar Ilhan Omar says 'good riddance' after Bolton resignation, claims he made world 'more dangerous' Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/executive/cabinet fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox news fnc/media fnc b8c8f135-611d-566c-9a5b-a7920c76ddcc article   Westlake Legal Group Bolton-Omar Ilhan Omar says 'good riddance' after Bolton resignation, claims he made world 'more dangerous' Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/executive/cabinet fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox news fnc/media fnc b8c8f135-611d-566c-9a5b-a7920c76ddcc article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Apple Event: iPhone 11, Surprise Price Cuts, the Series 5 Watch

Here are the highlights:

CUPERTINO, Calif. — Apple’s product launches have long been full of surprises, but rarely has a price cut been among them.

On Tuesday, in a sign that Apple is paying attention to consumers who aren’t racing to buy more expensive phones, the company said the iPhone 11, its entry-level phone, would start at $700, compared with $750 for the comparable model last year.

Apple kept the starting prices of its more advanced models, the iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max, at $1,000 and $1,100. The company unveiled the new phones at a 90-minute press event at its Silicon Valley campus.

The cost cut on the iPhone 11 was unexpected because Apple had been raising prices each year as a way to keep revenues afloat while iPhone sales fell. But Apple might have hit the ceiling this past year. Sales of the two models that began at $1,000 or more lagged expectations, causing the company to cut revenue estimates and eventually slash prices in China to increase demand.

At the same time, Apple’s entry-level phone last year — the iPhone XR, at $750 — became the company’s best-selling device.

Analysts say that one issue with the rising prices has been that new iPhone features haven’t kept up. As a result, many people are holding onto their phones longer. The falling price suggests Apple sees that trend and is trying to entice more people to upgrade.

Apple said it would also still sell older models for even less. The iPhone 8 now costs $450 and the iPhone XR now costs $600.

Apple has rebranded its iPhone line to make the iPhone 11 its entry-level option, while adding a “Pro” label to its pricier models.

The move is a departure from Apple’s previous marketing strategy, which gave the cheapest phone a different label that branded it as the discounted model. (It still started at $750.) The iPhone XR became Apple’s best-selling iPhone, while its more expensive models struggled in some markets. Those lagging sales caused Apple to cut revenue estimates earlier this year.

The iPhone XR also likely outperformed its costlier cousins in part because tech reviewers considered it to be about as good as the flagship iPhone — for 25 percent less. Apple has long been in a bind on pricing and developing its line of iPhones, aiming to make the least expensive devices still worth paying hundreds of dollars for without undercutting the pricier models.

The rebranding suggests Apple is embracing the lowest-priced iPhone as the device most people will use, while marketing the pricier “Pro” devices for the higher end of the market. The company has done the same with its iPads, also labeling its most advanced tablets the iPad Pro.

The company introduced three new phones: the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro and the iPhone 11 Pro Max. The main difference? Each of the three iPhones gained a new camera lens.

The new high-end Pro models include a triple-lens main camera, up from two lenses in last year’s models, and the entry-level iPhone now has a dual-lens camera, up from a single lens in last year’s iPhone XR. All the iPhones include a so-called ultrawide angle lens.

Here’s what that means: The new ultrawide lens take photos with a wider field of view than traditional phone cameras, which makes it handy for shooting landscapes or large group gatherings. Samsung’s Galaxy S10, which was released this year, also includes an ultrawide angle lens.

The second lens on the entry-level iPhone will also make the camera more capable of shooting photos in portrait mode, which puts the picture’s main subject in sharp focus while softly blurring the background.

Last year’s iPhone XR had a single lens and was capable of shooting portrait photos of only human subjects. The second lens in the new entry-level iPhone will let you take portrait shots of nonhuman subjects like food, animals and plants.

On the high-end iPhones, the triple-lens system lets users zoom in closer on their subjects. Apple also said it had added a night mode for shooting photos in low light. By default, when users shoot photos in the dark, the camera will automatically make photos look better lit.

With its focus on camera tech, Apple is playing catch-up with Google. Google’s Pixel smartphones focus on camera innovations including Night Sight, a popular feature for shooting photos in low light, which led critics to conclude that the search giant had used its prowess in artificial intelligence to surpass Apple in camera tech.

ImageWestlake Legal Group jim-apple-event-2019-93-articleLarge Apple Event: iPhone 11, Surprise Price Cuts, the Series 5 Watch Prices (Fares, Fees and Rates) iPhone Apple TV Apple Inc

Stan Ng, Apple’s vice president for product marketing, Apple Watch.CreditJim Wilson/The New York Times

Apple detailed the Apple Watch Series 5. The watch’s most noteworthy new feature is its so-called always-on display. In previous models, the screen would turn on when you tilted your wrist to check the time.

The new watch uses a display technology (previously seen in Samsung phones) to keep some pixels activated just to show the time, consuming little power. The screen becomes fully illuminated when you tilt your wrist. Other updates to the watch, including a built-in compass, were minor. The watch starts at $400, the same price as the last model. It will be available on Sept. 20.

The company introduced a new version of its entry-level iPad, which costs $330. The new model includes a 10.2-inch screen, up from 9.7 inches. Unlike the previous model, the new tablet is compatible with Apple’s Smart Keyboard and the Apple Pencil. (Previous iPads worked only with third-party styluses and keyboards.)

The updated iPad is unremarkable compared with Apple’s high-end iPad Pros, which include sharper screens and infrared face recognition and work with a more advanced Apple stylus. However, the entry-level iPad is Apple’s best-selling tablet, and its investment in the entry-level model shows the company’s commitment to the category even though its sales have slowed down.

Tim Cook speaking about “The Morning Show.”CreditJim Wilson/The New York Times

At last, Apple’s original television shows have a premiere date and price point. The company’s chief executive, Tim Cook, announced that Apple would begin rolling out original shows and movies on Nov. 1 for $5 per month.

Apple TV Plus, which will be the home of all of Apple’s original content, will be free for a year to users who buy a company product like a new iPhone or a laptop.

Apple announced that on Nov. 1, it would feature a lineup of adult dramas, comedies, children’s programs and documentaries. Those series include four shows the company has released trailers for, including “The Morning Show,” starring Jennifer Aniston, Reese Witherspoon and Steve Carrell; “Dickinson,” a comedy starring Hailee Steinfeld and Jane Krakowski; “See,” an epic drama starring Jason Momoa; and “For All Mankind,” a space drama. The launch will also feature other programs, including Oprah Winfrey’s new book club, a Peanuts series called “Snoopy in Space” and a documentary that Apple bought the rights to last year called “The Elephant Queen.”

The launch date puts Apple in the thick of the so-called streaming wars, which have consumed Hollywood. Disney is rolling out its new streaming service, Disney Plus, on Nov. 12. AT&T’s Warner Media, the home of HBO, Warner Bros. and the DC comic universe, will introduce its own streaming service next year, and will announce new details for it on Oct. 29.

The price comes in below Disney’s service, which will be $7 a month, and is less than Netflix, which is $13 per month.

But questions linger: How will Apple market these programs in the coming months? Which shows will be introduced from the get-go? And will Apple drop all episodes of new series at once like Netflix, or will they roll out once a week?

— John Koblin

Ann Thai, product lead for Apple, onstage at the Steve Jobs Theater at Apple Park in Cupertino, Calif.CreditJim Wilson/The New York Times

Apple announced it was getting into gaming earlier this year. Now we know how much its subscription will cost: $5 a month.

The company said its gaming service, Apple Arcade, would be available starting Sept. 19 in more than 150 countries. The service will give users access to more than 100 games that aren’t available elsewhere. The games can be played on iPhones, iPads, Macs and on Apple TV.

Apple showed off several of the games on Tuesday, including an undersea-exploration game from the Japanese game maker Capcom and an updated version of the arcade classic Frogger.

Apple Arcade is part of a larger strategy by the company to create a steady, more predictable revenue stream from services as sales of iPhones continue to slide. Apple has also added subscription services for news, music and streaming video.

Apple spent hundreds of millions of dollars to fund the development of new games for Apple Arcade, The Financial Times reported in April. Analysts expect gaming could become a major moneymaker for Apple within the next several years. HSBC analysts forecast its revenues to reach $2.7 billion by 2022, outpacing the company’s news and video subscription services.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘UVA has ruined us’: Health system sues thousands of patients, seizes paychecks, claims homes

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close ‘UVA has ruined us’: Health system sues thousands of patients, seizes paychecks, claims homes

Heather Waldron and John Hawley are losing their four-bedroom house in the hills above Blacksburg, Virginia. A teenage daughter, one of their five children, sold her clothes for spending money. They worried about paying the electric bill. Financial disaster, they said, contributed to their divorce, finalized in April.

Their money problems began when the University of Virginia Health System pursued the couple with a lawsuit and a lien on their home to recoup $164,000 in charges for Waldron’s emergency surgery in 2017.

The family has lots of company: Over six years ending in June 2018, the health system and its doctors filed 36,000 lawsuits against patients, seeking a total of more than $106 million, seizing wages and bank accounts, putting liens on property and homes and forcing families into bankruptcy, a Kaiser Health News analysis found.

Unpaid hospital bills are a leading cause of personal debt and bankruptcy across the nation, and hospitals from Memphis to Baltimore have been accused of pushing families over the financial edge. UVA stands out for the scope of its collection efforts and how persistently it seeks payment, pursuing poor as well as middle-class patients for almost all they’re worth.

KHN’s findings, based on court records, documents and interviews with hospital officials and dozens of patients, show UVA:

  • Sued patients for as much as $1 million and as little as $13.91 and garnished thousands of paychecks, largely from workers at lower-pay employers such as Walmart, where UVA took wages more than 800 times.
  • Seized $22 million over six years in state tax refunds owed to patients with outstanding bills, most of it without court judgments, under a program intended to help state and local governments collect debts.
  • Sued about 100 patients every year who happened to be UVA Health System employees and filed thousands of property liens over the years, from Albemarle County all the way to Georgia.
  • Dunned some former patients an additional 15% for legal costs, plus 6% interest on their unpaid bills, which over years can add up to more than the original bill.
  • Has the most restrictive eligibility guidelines for patient financial assistance of any major hospital system in Virginia. Savings of only $4,000 in a retirement account can disqualify a family from aid, even if its income is barely above the poverty level.

The hospital, ranked No. 1 in Virginia by U.S. News & World Report, is taxpayer-supported and state-funded, not a company with profit motives and shareholder demands. Like other nonprofit hospitals, it pays no federal, state or local taxes on the presumption it offers charity care and other community benefits worth at least as much as those breaks. Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam, a pediatric neurologist, oversees its board.

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UVA defended the institution’s practices as legally required and necessary “to generate positive operating income” to invest in medical education, new facilities, research and the latest technology. It pointed to the Virginia Debt Collection Act of 1988, which requires state agencies to “aggressively collect” money owed.

“Sending unpaid bills to a collection agency or pursuing a civil claim is a last resort,” said UVA Health System spokesman Eric Swensen. Two years ago, he said, the health system limited lawsuits to cases in which patients owed more than $1,000. “For the vast majority of patients, we are able to agree upon workable payment plans without filing a legal claim,” he said.

UVA is “making a comprehensive review” of its charity care rules and “considering policies to provide additional financial assistance to low-income patients not covered by our existing charity care policies,” he said.

Swensen declined to discuss individual cases, saying the hospital was bound by patient confidentiality. UVA Health CEO Pamela Sutton-Wallace declined an interview request. A spokeswoman for Northam did not respond to repeated requests for comment.

Though there is no national data on hospital debt collection, UVA’s pursuit of patients goes beyond that of a number of institutions. Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore has sued patients 240 times a year on average, according to a report in May by The Baltimore Sun. UVA, by comparison, often sues that many former patients in a week and averages more than 6,000 cases annually, court data shows.

Private, nonprofit Yale New Haven Health System files liens only if a bill is more than $10,000 and then only if the property is worth at least $300,000, a spokesman said. Falls Church, Virginia-based Inova Health said it does not file liens on patients’ homes or garnish wages.

Tenet Healthcare, a national, for-profit chain whose stock trades on Wall Street, said it does not sue uninsured patients who are unemployed or who lack significant assets other than their house.

Industry standards are few and vague. The American Hospital Association said its members follow Internal Revenue Service guidelines, which merely require hospitals to have a financial assistance policy and to make “reasonable efforts” to determine whether a patient qualifies for help before initiating collections.

Patients find themselves unable to pay UVA bills for many reasons: They are uninsured or have short-term coverage that does not pay for treatment of preexisting illnesses. Or they are out-of-network or have a “high-deductible” plan – increasingly common coverage that can require patients to pay more than $6,000 before insurance kicks in. Virginia’s Medicaid expansion, effective this year, covers families with low income but is projected to leave hundreds of thousands uninsured.

Like many U.S. hospitals, UVA bills people lacking coverage at rates far higher than what insurance companies pay on behalf of members. Insurers obtain huge discounts off hospital sticker prices – 70% on average in UVA’s case, according to documents it files with Medicare.

UVA offers uninsured patients 20% off to start and an additional 15% to 20% if they pay promptly, Swensen said. Few are able to do that. Patients are subject to collections and lawsuits if they do not pay or arrange to do so within four months, he said.

The $164,000 billed to Heather Waldron for intestinal surgery was more than twice what a commercial insurer would have paid for her care, according to benefits firm WellRithms, which analyzed bills for Kaiser Health News using cost reports UVA files with the government. Charges on her bill included $2,000 for a $20 feeding tube.

UVA would not disclose basic information about patient lawsuits, liens and garnishments. Reporters reconstructed the hospital’s practices by talking directly with patients, analyzing court documents and hospital bills and observing the legal process in court. They gathered records in Charlottesville, where the UVA Health System is located, to supplement a courts database compiled by the nonprofit Code for Hampton Roads, which works to improve government technology.

Waldron, 38, an insurance agent and former nurse, said she appreciates the treatment she received for an intestinal malformation that almost killed her, but “UVA has ruined us.”

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‘Here for a hospital case?’

UVA sues so many patients that District Court Judge William Barkley doesn’t announce the cases as he takes the bench each Thursday in the historic brick courthouse in Charlottesville. He waves a thick stack of litigation at defendants, asking, “Is anybody here for a hospital case?” Nobody needs to ask which hospital.

An NPR report noted that nonprofit Mary Washington Healthcare, in Fredericksburg, Virginia, had 300 cases in court in one month. (After that report, the hospital announced it would suspend the practice of suing patients for unpaid bills.)

Barkley’s court often handles 300 UVA suits in a week.

The court often operates like a UVA billing office. UVA sends collections representatives, not lawyers, who sit near the judge’s bench. They give patients two weeks to commit to an interest-free payment plan, according to courtroom meetings witnessed by a reporter. Facing bills often in the tens of thousands of dollars, patients can find even the five-year, interest-free plans unaffordable.

Swensen said patients in court would have received “four to five” bills over several months and notifications about potential financial assistance.

Zann Nelson, 70, of Reva, Virginia, was sued by UVA for $23,849 a few years ago and is the rare patient who fought back. Admitted with a newly diagnosed uterine cancer, she was bleeding and in pain when she signed an open-ended payment agreement. In court, she argued the deal was so vague as to be unenforceable.

She lost. The judge, according to court records, said Nelson had “the ability to decline the surgery” if she didn’t like the terms of the deal. She lived with a lien on her farm until she managed to pay off the debt.

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‘Can’t afford to go back’

UVA Medical Center, the flagship of UVA Health System, earned $554 million in profit over the six years ending in June 2018 and holds stocks, bonds and other investments worth $1 billion, according to financial statements. CEO Sutton-Wallace earns a salary of $750,000, with bonus incentives that could push her annual pay close to $1 million, according to a copy of her employment contract, obtained under public information law.

UVA offers financial assistance that’s more limited than any other major health system in Virginia, according to an analysis of policies at organizations including Inova, Sentara Healthcare, Riverside Health and Carilion Clinic.

To qualify for help, UVA patients must earn less than 200% of federal poverty guidelines ($34,000 for a couple) and own less than about $3,000 in assets, not counting a house, according to the hospital’s website and guidelines UVA files with the state.

Carilion Clinic, by contrast, provides aid to families with income up to 400% of poverty guidelines and assets of less than $100,000, other than a house. If bills at Riverside Health exceed household income over 12 months, the hospital forgives the whole amount.

Sentara slashed lawsuit volume by using software to rule out patients who were unlikely to pay, said spokesman Dale Gauding. “We write off a lot of bad debt rather than put someone through a judgment they can’t pay and an additional black mark on their credit,” he said.

The only other policy in Virginia similar to UVA’s is that of VCU Health, a sister state hospital system with the same income and asset guidelines. In July, VCU started offering help to some patients with “catastrophic” and “prohibitively expensive” bills who don’t otherwise qualify, a spokesman said.

“We are considering those updates,” Swensen said of VCU’s changes. He noted that for the most recent fiscal year, UVA approved almost 10,000 applications for charity care. Most of the patients who qualify pay nothing beyond a $6 copay, he said.

UVA sued Carolyn Davis, 55, of Halifax County, for $7,448 to pay for nerve injections to treat back pain that she hadn’t realized would be out-of-network.

Her husband is a cook at Hardee’s, taking home $500 to $600 a week, she said. UVA refused their application for financial assistance because his Hardee’s 401(k) balance of $6,000 makes them too well-off, she said.

“We don’t have that kind of money,” Davis said. The hospital insisted on a monthly payment of $75. She met it by charging it to her credit card at 22% interest.

Charges for Davis’ treatment were about twice what a commercial insurer would have paid, according to an estimate by WellRithms.

Sometimes patients who are prepared to pay cash for UVA treatment find they can’t afford the charges. Wayne Williams, 43, of Charlottesville, is a custodian at a community college. He was uninsured but feared he had strep throat last year.

“I thought they were going to give me some antibiotics,” he said.

Instead, UVA’s emergency department gave him a CT scan, a bill for $6,931 and, when he didn’t pay, a lawsuit. UVA did give him a 30% discount based on his financial circumstances, he said – meaning the sore throat would cost about $4,800.

WellRithms calculated that a commercial insurance company would have paid $992 for the care Williams received, which would have covered costs and generated a profit.

Leigh Ann Beach, 37, of Palmyra, experienced how differently hospitals treat those who cannot pay after hurting her ankle in a bike accident.

Rising premiums left her uninsured when she fell off a bike and hurt her ankle last year. Her husband works in construction to provide for their family of seven children. A rainy 2018 washed out working days and his income. They couldn’t afford their $667 monthly insurance premium.

Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital, which first treated her, canceled the entire $4,650 bill in light of her family’s income, her paperwork shows. UVA, where she got surgery and metal implants, sued her for $9,505 and rejected her request for financial help.

A UVA representative said she could sell some acreage from her small rural home to pay the bill, she said. She limps and is in pain, but “I can’t afford to go back,” she said.

Resorting to bankruptcy

When Jesse Lynn, 42, of Orange County, bought short-term coverage as a bridge between policies, he and his wife, Renee, didn’t realize the plan considered his old back problems a preexisting illness, therefore would not pay for treatment.

After back surgery at Culpeper Medical Center, a UVA affiliate, he came out with a bill for about $230,000, Renee Lynn said.

The surgeon reduced Jesse’s portion of the charges – from $32,000 to $4,500, which the Lynns thought was reasonable. They asked for a similar break or a payment delay from UVA. “We are not a lending institution,” Renee said the billing office told her.

The Lynns decided bankruptcy was their only option.

“I probably see at least a couple a month,” said Marshall Slayton, a Charlottesville bankruptcy lawyer, holding up a file. “This is the third case this week.”

UVA said it doesn’t foreclose on primary residences, but often a UVA lawsuit leads to home loss because patients’ credit is downgraded and they cannot keep up with hospital payment plans and mortgages.

Property liens do give UVA a claim on the equity in patients’ homes.

“We see a lot of them,” said Tina Merritt, a partner with True North Title in Blacksburg. “And a lot of people don’t even know until they go to sell the property.”

It took Priti Chati, 62, of Roanoke six years to pay a $44,000 UVA bill for brain surgery and have a home lien removed last year, court records show. She had a pre-Obamacare policy that did not cover preexisting illness. The health system seized bank funds intended for her daughters’ college costs, she said. She sold jewelry and borrowed from friends, eventually paying more than $70,000, including interest, she said.

Paul Baker, 41, of Madison County, who ran a small lawn service, and his wife owe more than $500,000 for treatment after their truck rolled over. He is grateful to UVA “for saving my life,” he said, but he is “frustrated they are ultimately taking my farm” when he sells or dies.

Indigent care

Swensen said the medical center gave $322 million in financial assistance and charity care in fiscal 2018. Legal and finance experts said that’s not a reliable estimate.

The $322 million “merely indicates the amount they would have charged arbitrarily” before negotiated insurer discounts, said Ge Bai, an accounting and health policy associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School.

The figure is “based on customary reporting standards used by hospitals across the U.S.,” Swensen said.

Insurers would have paid UVA $88 million for that care, according to an accounting of unpaid bills presented in September 2018 to the UVA Health board. Even that unpaid figure did not come out of UVA’s purse since federal and state governments provided “funding earmarked to cover indigent care” for almost all of it – $83.7 million, according to Bai.

The real, “unfunded” cost of UVA indigent care: $4.3 million, or 1.3% of what it claims, according to the document.

“That’s nothing,” given how much money UVA makes, Bai said. “Nonprofit hospitals advance their charitable mission primarily through providing indigent care.”

The hospital recorded an additional $109 million in uncollectible debts not considered indigent care, the document shows.

Nacy Sexton, who is in his 30s and lives outside Richmond, hoped he might get a break on his medical bills as a student enrolled at Virginia. He was close to graduation in 2015 when he was hospitalized for lupus. After he was unable to cover the reduced bill offered by the hospital, the university blocked his enrollment, a notice he received from student financial services shows.

“The university places enrollment holds on student accounts for many reasons, including unpaid tuition and medical bills,” university spokesman Wesley Hester said. This semester, the university has “active holds” on 20 students because of unpaid medical center bills, which might or might not block their attendance depending on when the hold was placed, he said.

Sexton has about $4,000 to go on a bill that he said was more than $30,000 before UVA’s discount, a fundraising campaign and other payments. He hopes to reenroll and finish his degree in education next year.

“When you get sick, why should it affect your education?” he asked.

Shirley Perry was a registered nurse at the medical center who was “so proud of working at UVA,” said her mother, Vera. She became chronically ill, lost her job and insurance, then needed treatment from her former employer. UVA sued her for $218,730 plus $32,809 in legal fees. She died last year at age 51 with a UVA lien on her townhouse. It was auctioned off Aug. 7 at the Albemarle County Courthouse.

For Heather Waldron, the path from “having everything and being able to buy things and feeling pretty good” to “devastation” began when she learned after her UVA hospitalization that a computer error involving a policy bought on HealthCare.gov led to a lapse in her insurance.

She is on food stamps and talking to bankruptcy lawyers. A bank began foreclosure proceedings in August on the Blacksburg house she shared with her family. The home will be sold to pay off the mortgage.

She expects UVA to take whatever is left.

Methodology

KHN analyzed Virginia civil case records from the district and circuit courts from July 2012 through June 2018, based on the date a case was filed. These case records were acquired from Ben Schoenfeld, a volunteer for Code for America, a nonprofit group focused on improving government technology. Schoenfeld compiles court records that are available directly from Virginia’s court system (from circuit and district courts) and posts them on the website VirginiaCourtData.org.

The circuit courts of Alexandria and Fairfax do not use the statewide case management system and are not included in this analysis.

The online circuit court cases do not include the amount for which the plaintiff sued. KHN went to the Albemarle circuit court (where most of the UVA circuit cases were filed) and looked up each of more than 900 cases by hand to obtain the dollar amount, which totaled more than $60 million.

The online district court cases include a principal amount sought in a “Warrant in Debt” case. If the case is settled or dismissed, the principal amount is zero. Therefore, KHN’s reporting of the total for which UVA sued its patients during this period is probably a low estimate.

KHN focused on district cases that were “Warrant in Debt” cases and circuit cases that were “Complaint – Catch-all” or “Contract Action.” UVA sues to recover patient debt from all three categories. For cases brought by the University of Virginia, the plaintiff names (as entered by the court) vary widely: “University of Virginia,” “Rectors and Visitors of UVA” or just “UVA” are some examples. KHN included cases that mentioned the UVA Physicians Group and Health Services Foundation (although these were much less prevalent). In some cases, the UVA Medical Center was named specifically; in others, it was not. KHN analyzed cases brought by the university whether or not the case specifically mentioned the medical center, knowing that some cases omit this detail. KHN took a random sample of 30 “Warrant in Debt” cases from the Albemarle District Court in 2017 that were filed by “Rectors and Visitors” but did not specify the medical center. KHN looked up the original records at the courthouse; each one was related to the medical center.

KHN found several cases from 2012 filed in the Albemarle circuit court by UVA that were not in the public data available online, which suggests that the data is not necessarily complete.

KHN contacted UVA directly on multiple occasions and filed several public records requests for the number of cases involving medical debt and the total amount sought, as well as the total amount recovered. Each time, the request was denied.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2019/09/10/uva-health-system-sues-patients-seizes-paychecks-claims-homes/2274198001/

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Kansas Becomes Sixth State To Confirm Vaping-Related Death In National Outbreak

Westlake Legal Group 5d77ce27240000c92b77ca7c Kansas Becomes Sixth State To Confirm Vaping-Related Death In National Outbreak

Kansas health officials confirmed Tuesday the first vaping-related death in the state, pushing the nationwide toll to six as health experts sound the alarm over an outbreak of lung disease linked to the popular pastime.

The latest fatality was a man over the age of 50 who “had a history of underlying health issues and was hospitalized with symptoms that progressed rapidly,” the state’s Department of Health and Environment said in a press release. Officials are not sure of the exact vaping products the man used.

“It is time to stop vaping,” Kansas state health officer Dr. Lee Norman said in the release. “If you or a loved one is vaping, please stop.”

Though a national investigation into the series of deadly illnesses has not yet identified any particular vaping or e-cigarette products connected to all cases, many patients suffering illnesses report using ones containing cannabinoid products such as THC, the marijuana ingredient that creates a high.

The morning the Kansas death was announced, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg launched a $160 million program to ban all flavored e-cigarettes and stop vaping companies like Juul from advertising their products to minors.

The three-year initiative, titled “Protect Kids: Fight Flavored E-Cigarettes,” will be helmed by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, a Washington-based nonprofit combatting tobacco use.

In a joint New York Times op-ed, Bloomberg and Matt Meyers, the organization’s president, called vaping “an urgent health crisis,” warning that companies promoting the habit are using “flavorings, unfounded health claims and the hiring of celebrity promoters,” the same tactics used by big tobacco.

On Friday, federal health officials announced as part of their investigation with state and local health departments around the country that more than 450 cases of possible lung illness spanning 33 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands have been linked to e-cigarette products.

In addition to Kansas, vaping deaths have occurred in California, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota and Oregon.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, symptoms of lung disease reported by some patients in the outbreak include shortness of breath, coughing, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, fever or weight loss.

Certain patients have said the signs developed over the course of a few days, while others said it took several weeks.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ocasio-Cortez: ‘I want to see every Republican go on the record and knowingly vote against impeachment’

Westlake Legal Group 5bwyR-ZZC2QeBEyNLr6n2zdZbe9urdvntzgyuKz5e7M Ocasio-Cortez: 'I want to see every Republican go on the record and knowingly vote against impeachment' r/politics

One of many reasons to impeach.

  1. Impeachment will bring a lot of glossed over facts into the public eye, like Trump asking his lawyer to get rid of Mueller. Also Manafort giving polling data to Russians.

  2. Dems aren’t doomed in 2020 if it fails. Clinton’s acquittal in Feb 1999 was followed by Bush winning the presidency. Clinton didn’t even get an approval bump after it.

https://news.gallup.com/poll/116584/presidential-approval-ratings-bill-clinton.aspx

Every President who has been impeached (including Nixon’s likely impeachment) resulted in the opposition party winning the presidency. Democrat Johnson was followed by Republican Grant. Republican Nixon was followed by Democrat Carter. Democrat Clinton was followed by Republican Bush.

3. Trump’s name needs to go on the list of impeached presidents. He’s far worse than most. The narrative from people not paying attention will be “if he’s so bad why wasn’t he impeached like Clinton?” The majority of voters are not political news addicts. But they’ll all hear the word “impeachment” and some may decide to move on from all the smoke and chaos in their country when it’s time to vote.

4. Nixon had high approval ratings when impeachment talk started. The pretrial hearings brought out the facts to the public eye and everyone turned on him.

5. Raising the likelihood of prosecution after he’s out of office, or his children, may cause him to cut a deal to leave office.

6. There’s still a chance of conviction. People may turn on their senators once all the facts are blown up and a case is made. Nixon’s impeachment talk started when he had high approval ratings.

7. Barr’s word shouldn’t be the final say on this. He’s proven to be a cover-up artist.

8. It needs to be established that improper actions will be fought against to the fullest extent to deter future candidates from trying to steal elections.

9. Impeachment will be open to other issues that Mueller’s investigation was not like emoluments violations, conduct unbecoming of the presidency, tax violations, campaign finance violations, paying off pornstars to influence an election, wasting tax payer dollars on personal trips and benefiting financially from them, siding with Russia over US intelligence, separating families at the border, defrauding students at his university, ignoring Russia’s attack on our elections, attacking the press, attacking members of the judicial and legislative branches in order to control them, etc.

10. Trump uses lies, Fox News, and fake news. All that falls apart in a trial under oath. Get their damning testimonies on video and play clips around the clock. How many times have we seen Clinton’s “I did not have sexual relations with that woman”?

11. Impeachment may bring out more reason to examine his taxes and other financial documents.

12. Trump already convinced his base that Mueller exonerated him and it didn’t win over any Americans. A second “exoneration” will be meaningless. Everyone knows Republican senators won’t convict. Put them all on record supporting the president with the lowest approval ratings in modern history after the damning facts have been laid out. Republican and Independent supporters of the rule of law will turn against them. It will also hurt any chances of a Presidential run for any senators that vote to acquit.

13. Impeachment will be a game changer. It’s a household word, and it has only happened twice before. People that normally don’t pay attention will tune in just for the historical aspect. This will lead to greater support for impeachment as they learn the facts.

Bonus: here’s a powerful video of some former high ranking republicans speaking with conviction that Trump committed obstruction of justice

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwnMpneFR34&feature=player_embedded

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