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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 107)

Las Vegas police K-9 stabbed repeatedly by suspect ‘doing extremely well’ in recovery

A Las Vegas police K-9 was recovering Tuesday after being stabbed by a man who refused to come down from a roof, officials said.

“Hunter,” a Belgian Malinois, was stabbed multiple times on Saturday by 27-year-old Joseph Arquilla, investigators said. Arquilla had climbed onto the roof of a business around midnight and wouldn’t come down.

TRUMP RELEASED PHOTO OF HERO DOG INJURED IN ABU BAKR AL-BAGHDADI RAID

Police officers responded to the scene and once Arquilla came down around 4:45 a.m., he allegedly stabbed Hunter repeatedly — until his knife blade broke, KVVU-TV reported.

Westlake Legal Group dog1 Las Vegas police K-9 stabbed repeatedly by suspect 'doing extremely well' in recovery Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/las-vegas fox news fnc/us fnc article 4b5751cb-9468-5325-ac0e-5c8bce2db207

Hunter, a Belgian Malinois working with police in Las Vegas, Nev., was repeatedly stabbed by a suspect on Saturday morning, officials said.  (Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department)

The K-9 was injured on the left side of his neck, just below his ear, according to photos posted online by the police department. Authorities said he “was lucky that the attacker’s blade broke at some point during the assault when it struck the dog’s collar, making it harder for the wounds to penetrate deeply.”

DOG ALERTS FAMILY TO FIRE, BUT DOESN’T MAKE IT OUT ALIVE: ‘HE WAS A PART OF THE FIRE ALAR, HE WAS BARKING’

Hunter — a 7-year veteran of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department — is recovering and “doing extremely well” after the attack, police wrote in a Facebook post Monday.

Westlake Legal Group 72604532_10158129940925639_1513386397384310784_o Las Vegas police K-9 stabbed repeatedly by suspect 'doing extremely well' in recovery Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/las-vegas fox news fnc/us fnc article 4b5751cb-9468-5325-ac0e-5c8bce2db207

As of Monday, Hunter was “doing extremely well” during his recovery following the attack. (Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Working is the activity that makes him the happiest — and if recovery continues going well, he’ll be returning to service in a matter of weeks!” authorities said. “Go Hunter, Go!”

Arquilla was arrested on several charges, including the mistreatment of a police animal and resisting a public officer with a deadly weapon.

Westlake Legal Group dog1 Las Vegas police K-9 stabbed repeatedly by suspect 'doing extremely well' in recovery Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/las-vegas fox news fnc/us fnc article 4b5751cb-9468-5325-ac0e-5c8bce2db207   Westlake Legal Group dog1 Las Vegas police K-9 stabbed repeatedly by suspect 'doing extremely well' in recovery Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions/west/nevada fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us/crime fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/las-vegas fox news fnc/us fnc article 4b5751cb-9468-5325-ac0e-5c8bce2db207

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Sen. Rubio: Many Dems made up their minds about impeaching Trump in November 2016

Westlake Legal Group MARCO-CROP Sen. Rubio: Many Dems made up their minds about impeaching Trump in November 2016 Julia Musto fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 0cb5653e-849f-52d1-b842-fe931ccc8572

Florida Senator Marco Rubio said Tuesday House Democrats have lost credibility with their impeachment charge, since many have wanted to take such an action since President Trump‘s election.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends” with host Steve Doocy, Rubio said that Americans should not forget the gravity of an impeachment.

“Impeachment is really a big deal, like removing the President of the United States is not just an extraordinary measure — it’s also really bad for the country, it’s traumatic,” said Rubio.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Monday the House will vote this week on a resolution to formalize -–and establish the parameters – of the Trump impeachment inquiry. Fox News has learned the vote will take place Thursday on the House floor.

Republicans, who have been calling for a vote for weeks now, hit back Monday at Pelosi over the planned vote.

NEWT GINGRICH: HOW SEN. LINDSEY GRAHAM BOXED PELOSI IN ON IMPEACHMENT AND WHAT COMES NEXT

South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham – the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, which would play a role in a Senate impeachment trial – said, “A vote now is a bit like unringing a bell as House Democrats have selectively leaked information in order to damage President Trump for weeks.”

REP. COLLINS: UPCOMING HOUSE IMPEACHMENT VOTES IS A ‘SHAM,’ SHOWS DEMS’ DESPERATION

Rubio noted that there are a “significant number of the House [members]” that have been looking for a reason to impeach Trump since he took office.

“So, you’ll start to lose some credibility when you make up your mind about this back in … 2016 because you didn’t like the results of the election,” he told Doocy.

He added that no Democrats who were elected in districts that “Trump won” were sent to Congress to impeach the president.

“They sent them here to deal with drug prices, to deal with China, to help our economy continue to grow, to defund our military — where they won’t even pass an appropriations bill that we need to get done which is really important for [the] long-term plan,” said Rubio.

CLICK HERE TO CHECK OUT THE FOX NEWS APP

“Very few people, unless you come from the most radical fringes of the American political system, were sent up here to spend all of their time – every single day – focused on the issue. They’re going to do what they’re going to do. I can’t control what the House does. But, we’re going to continue to do our jobs, or at least try to here in the Senate,” he said.

Fox News’ Alex Pappas, Chad Pergram, Mike Emanuel and Brooke Singman contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group MARCO-CROP Sen. Rubio: Many Dems made up their minds about impeaching Trump in November 2016 Julia Musto fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 0cb5653e-849f-52d1-b842-fe931ccc8572   Westlake Legal Group MARCO-CROP Sen. Rubio: Many Dems made up their minds about impeaching Trump in November 2016 Julia Musto fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 0cb5653e-849f-52d1-b842-fe931ccc8572

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G.M. Puts Strike Impact on 2019 Earnings at Almost $3 Billion

Westlake Legal Group 16uaw-workers10-facebookJumbo G.M. Puts Strike Impact on 2019 Earnings at Almost $3 Billion Strikes General Motors Company Reports Automobiles

With a lengthy strike finally behind it, General Motors offered its first look Tuesday at some of the financial fallout.

For the full year, G.M. said the strike’s impact on earnings was likely to be almost $3 billion.

G.M. reported that its third-quarter net income was $2.3 billion, down 9 percent from $2.5 billion in the same period in 2018.

The company earned $1.72 per share in the quarter on an adjusted basis, which ended Sept. 30, compared with $1.87 per share in the same quarter last year. It said the strike had cost $1 billion in the quarter, reducing earnings by 52 cents a share.

Revenue declined to $35.5 billion from $35.8 billion.

The strike’s effect on earnings will be greater in the fourth quarter because it shut down G.M.’s North American operations for almost all of October.

The company’s 49,000 union employees walked off the job on Sept. 16, idling 34 plants across the Midwest and South for the final two weeks of the third quarter. Most of G.M.’s plants in Mexico and Canada were also affected.

The strike was settled last week when the contract was ratified by a majority of the United Automobile Workers union members employed by G.M. Workers began returning to work over the weekend.

“Our new labor agreement maintains our competitiveness, preserves our operating flexibility and allows us to continue improving our quality and productivity,” G.M.’s chief executive, Mary T. Barra, said in a statement Tuesday. “We remain focused on strengthening our core business and leading in the future of personal mobility.”

G.M. shares were up about 5 percent in morning trading.

[How it looked in Flint: The G.M. strike from the picket lines.]

G.M.’s contract with the union provides for pay increases over the next four years, including substantial jumps for about a third of its hourly workers who currently earn considerably less than the top wage of $31. After four years, most hourly workers will earn the new top wage of $32.

Analysts estimate that the contract will increase G.M.’s labor costs by about $100 million a year.

The contract allows G.M. to close three United States factories, including a small-car plant in Lordstown, Ohio. The reduction in manufacturing capacity will leave G.M. in a more stable position if auto sales continue to slow or the United States economy slips into a recession.

Helped by strong sales of high-margin trucks and sport utility vehicles, G.M. has earned $35 million in North America over the last three years. Under the new labor agreement, the company has promised to invest $7.7 billion over the next four years in United States plants. An additional $1.3 billion will be invested by G.M. and joint-venture partners. The spending is supposed to create or preserve as many as 9,000 jobs.

In first three quarters of 2019, G.M. sold 2.15 million cars and light trucks in the United States, a decline of about 1 percent from the comparable period last year.

[G.M. on Monday sided with the Trump administration in its clash with California over pollution standards.]

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Lebanon’s Prime Minister Hariri Resigns After Weeks Of Protests

Westlake Legal Group ap_19302518111510-c3183334afb4c1dbeb00ce02fc798c0eca732832-s1100-c15 Lebanon's Prime Minister Hariri Resigns After Weeks Of Protests

Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri speaks during an address to the nation in Beirut, Lebanon on Tuesday. The embattled prime minister said he was presenting his resignation after he hit a “dead end” amid nationwide anti-government protests. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Hassan Ammar/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Lebanon's Prime Minister Hariri Resigns After Weeks Of Protests

Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri speaks during an address to the nation in Beirut, Lebanon on Tuesday. The embattled prime minister said he was presenting his resignation after he hit a “dead end” amid nationwide anti-government protests.

Hassan Ammar/AP

Lebanon’s Prime Minister Saad Hariri is submitting his resignation, after nearly two weeks of anti-government protests brought hundreds of thousands of Lebanese to the streets.

In a televised address, Hariri said Tuesday that he has reached a “dead end” amid the widespread demonstrations that had paralyzed the country.

“For 13 days the Lebanese people have waited for a decision for a political solution that stops the deterioration [of the economy],” Hariri said, according to Reuters. “And I have tried, during this period, to find a way out, through which to listen to the voice of the people.”

“It is time for us to have a big shock to face the crisis,” he said. “To all partners in political life, our responsibility today is how we protect Lebanon and revive its economy.”

Hariri’s resignation would effectively force Lebanon to form a new government, if President Michel Aoun accepts the resignation.

Lebanon’s demonstrations began in reaction to the government’s tax proposals, including one on calls over WhatsApp. But the protests grew into a call for Hariri to resign. The country’s unrest has been paralleled by demonstrations in Chile, Iraq and elsewhere, but the protests in Lebanon have often been notable for their decidedly festive atmosphere.

The protests are the largest demonstrations in the country since 2005, when Prime Minister Rafik Hariri – Saad’s father — was assassinated in a car bombing in Beirut.

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It’s a Big Week for Economic News, With Implications for the 2020 Race

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160681683_5e46015b-693d-4ae2-a8a3-4d7b8b1e6dd8-articleLarge It’s a Big Week for Economic News, With Implications for the 2020 Race Wages and Salaries Unemployment Recession and Depression Presidential Election of 2020 Labor and Jobs Factories and Manufacturing Economic Conditions and Trends

The New York Stock Exchange last month. Stocks have continued to boom. Credit…Johannes Eisele/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

If you want to know what the economic backdrop to the 2020 elections is likely to be, pay close attention to some of this week’s headlines.

Over the next few days, we are going to get readings that tell us a lot about how the economy is holding up after a summer recession scare. If the numbers and policy announcements play out as forecasters are expecting, we’ll also see some of the contradictions of the Trump-era economy exposed.

Specifically, the economy in late 2019 appears to feature a combination of economic growth that is slowing but not falling into a recession, a booming stock market, low interest rates, a tight labor market and a weak manufacturing sector. There is always the possibility of surprises, but this could be the mix that shapes the discussion on the campaign trail in the year before Election Day.

In particular, if recent trends hold up, Democrats will have a lane to attack President Trump, pointing to weak growth in employee wages and a struggling factory sector. Republicans will be able to boast about some of the lowest jobless levels in decades and a robust stock market.

The coming week will offer new clarity about the state of the economy.

On Monday, the S&P 500 reached a record high, continuing what has been a boom year for stocks. That index is now up 21 percent so far in 2019, suggesting that investors are shrugging off this summer’s recession fears and are confident that corporate earnings will remain robust.

On Wednesday morning, the Commerce Department will release its first estimate of overall economic growth in the quarter ended in September. Analysts expect to see a slowing growth rate — only a 1.5 percent annual rate of G.D.P. growth.

Those quarter-to-quarter numbers can be volatile, but there is an unmistakable deceleration in America’s growth path. The economy grew 3.2 percent in the 12 months concluding in the second quarter of 2018. But the growth rate has fallen in every quarter since then, and if the forecasts from analysts for the third quarter prove accurate, the economy will have grown only about 2 percent over the last year.

The economy appears to have experienced only a brief and temporary surge to the 3 percent growth rate President Trump had promised. It has now returned to puttering along at much the same modest growth rate that was in evidence through most of the Obama years.

On Wednesday afternoon, the Federal Reserve will announce its latest policy move, most likely a quarter-point interest rate cut, the third such cut since the summer. The Fed is aiming to keep the expansion going, reversing 2018 interest rate increases and trying to protect the American economy from being dragged down by a global slowdown and trade wars.

The Fed’s expected move helps explain the apparent contradiction between a booming stock market and the slumping growth rate. Lower interest rates from the central bank make stocks and other financial assets more attractive, while reducing the risk of an outright recession.

Early Friday, the Labor Department will release numbers on how the job market performed in October. Although a now-resolved General Motors strike most likely dragged down growth in payroll jobs — a temporary effect — the numbers are also expected to show an unemployment rate that remains near its lowest levels in five decades, combined with modest growth in workers’ wages.

In other words, economic growth may be slowing, but at a time when the vast majority of Americans who want to be working are able to find a job. That makes the weakening growth in G.D.P. and job creation less worrisome than it would have been in an era of higher unemployment.

Slower growth is less problematic when the economy is mostly healthy. Still, having a job is not the same as having a well-paid job, and the data so far in 2019 does not support the idea that American workers are receiving big pay increases, despite the low jobless rate.

If anything, wage growth seems to be weakening. Forecasters expect Friday’s news release will show that average hourly earnings rose only 0.3 percent in October. If that proves correct, it will imply wage increases over the last year of a mere 3 percent. That number was 3.4 percent for the year ended in February.

A final major economic report this week could help explain why. The manufacturing sector in particular has taken it on the chin, the biggest victim of slower global growth.

The Institute for Supply Management’s monthly survey of purchasing managers showed the sector was contracting in September. The October number is due out at 10 a.m. Friday, and analysts expect it to show a factory sector that is still contracting but less rapidly than it had been.

That would support the case that the manufacturing downturn is contained — that it’s damaging for certain companies and their workers, but not turning into an all-out rout that will endanger the overall economy.

It also looks more likely that the economy is not slumping into a recession, contrary to a wave of worry that emerged over the summer. Strong American consumer spending and Fed rate cuts seem to have kept things afloat — good news for supporters of the incumbent president.

If analysts’ basic story of the economy remains true in the next few months, there will still be room for the Democratic nominee to attack President Trump. Democrats could argue that the Trump economy is helping stock investors more than workers, and that weaker G.D.P. growth, a troubled manufacturing sector and soft wage growth mean there is a lot of room for improvement.

If nothing else, the next four days could show whether the data fits this narrative.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

California Fires Fanned by Strong Winds: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:

Video

Westlake Legal Group 29fires-01sub-videoSixteenByNine3000-v4 California Fires Fanned by Strong Winds: Live Updates Wind Wildfires Weather Protective Clothing and Gear National Weather Service Forests and Forestry Fires and Firefighters Environmental Protection Agency California Cal Fire

A forecast of powerful winds and low humidity was expected to worsen conditions for the fires that are burning in Northern and Southern California.CreditCredit…Eric Thayer for The New York Times

The worst kind of weather for wildfires — strong, gusty winds and very low humidity — is returning on Tuesday after a relative respite on Monday, the National Weather Service said, raising the prospect of more fire outbreaks and rapid growth of the blazes that are already burning.

The agency has posted “red flag” warnings for most of Northern California and much of Southern California, taking effect at various times on Tuesday.

Forecasters are predicting winds between 50 m.ph. and 70 m.p.h. in Los Angeles County and Ventura County starting late Tuesday and continuing on Wednesday and Thursday, with some gusts up to 80 m.p.h. in the mountainous areas of Los Angeles County, the National Weather Service said. The scale for Category 1 hurricanes begins at 74 m.p.h.

[Read more about how climate change could shift California’s winds.]

Winds gusts of up to 60 miles an hour could be expected beginning in the morning over a vast stretch of the state from the Sierras to the Pacific and from the southern fringes of the Bay Area north nearly to the Oregon border, except for coastal areas north of Sonoma County.

The winds, known as Santa Anas in the southern part of the state and Diablos in the north, arrive regularly in the fall. Recent research suggests that as the climate warms, Santa Ana winds may become less frequent. Coupled with precipitation changes, that could mean more intense fires later in the year.

Red-flag weather has played an important role in driving the growth of the Kincade, Getty and other fires, and has prompted pre-emptive blackouts by utility companies hoping to keep wind-damaged power lines and equipment from touching off more blazes.

[ The New York Times has photographers on the ground, documenting the California wildfires and the battle to contain them. Follow their work here. ]

Hundreds of firefighters mobilized to fight the Kincade fire gathered in the morning darkness on Tuesday for a briefing at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds. Crowded into an event hall in navy blue uniforms and yellow jackets, they listened as commanders took stock: Monday had been a good day.

The wind had died down, allowing for a real attack on the fire, which is now 15 percent contained. But today was going to be difficult, the crews were told.

“We’re going to be wind-tested again,” Ben Nichols, a representative from Cal Fire, told them. The breeze was supposed to get particularly powerful in the afternoon and evening, hurling hot embers toward dry areas and threatening the many houses tucked into the wooded areas of Sonoma County. Protecting those houses would be a major priority.

Many of the firefighters have been on the line for days, and some have worked as many as 36 hours at a stretch with no rest. Top officials warned them against fatigue.

Think things through, they were told. Have an escape plan. Throw out lunches that have gone bad after days in the truck. Don’t let sickness get in the way of work. And get ready for the wind.

Tuesday, said Mike Blankenheim of Cal Fire, was going to be a “max effort day.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_163492827_9be556f9-629e-471b-a68e-4b1578143d7e-articleLarge California Fires Fanned by Strong Winds: Live Updates Wind Wildfires Weather Protective Clothing and Gear National Weather Service Forests and Forestry Fires and Firefighters Environmental Protection Agency California Cal Fire

A firefighter worked on a hot spot in Windsor, Calif., on Monday.Credit…Jim Wilson/The New York Times

The Kincade fire has grown to more than 74,000 acres but is now 15 percent contained, according to Cal Fire, the state firefighting and fire prevention agency. It has destroyed more than than 120 structures and damaged another 20.

As the Kincade and Getty fires raged through dry vegetation at opposite ends of California on Monday, they raised fears that the state’s vicious wildfire season was straining the resources of fire departments that are already spread out battling 16 fires across the state, pushing fire crews beyond the brink of exhaustion.

“It’s all starting to blend together,” said Joe Augino, a firefighter with the Arcadia Fire Department in Southern California who had just finished battling a wildfire in the canyons north of Los Angeles last week when his company was summoned to travel eight hours to the north to help fight the Kincade fire in Sonoma County.

On a winding road near the front lines of the Kincade fire, where about 156,000 people remained under mandatory evacuation orders, Mr. Augino and his fellow firefighters were extinguishing spot fires with water and hand tools.

We’re continuing to update our page of maps showing the extent of the fires, power outages and evacuation zones. Data from Cal Fire shows how the Kincade fire in Northern California has spread and where it is burning most intensely. Satellite images pinpoint the Getty and Tick fires and affected areas nearby.

Westlake Legal Group california-fire-map-promo-1572020277850-articleLarge-v8 California Fires Fanned by Strong Winds: Live Updates Wind Wildfires Weather Protective Clothing and Gear National Weather Service Forests and Forestry Fires and Firefighters Environmental Protection Agency California Cal Fire

Maps: Kincade and Getty Fires, Evacuation Zones and Power Outages

Detailed maps show the current fire extents, power outage zones and areas under evacuation orders.

Fernanda Santos, a former New York Times correspondent based in Phoenix, is the author of “The Fire Line,” the story of 19 firefighters killed in an Arizona wildfire in 2013.

It is an arresting scene, the dangers unimaginable: Firefighters clad in yellow and green flame-resistant uniforms, battling a wind-whipped and fast-moving blaze with what amount to farming and logging tools.

Fighting fires — including immense untamed wildfires — requires a combination of brutal force, endurance and skill. From the air, firefighters may release water and fire retardant, which can slow its spread but will not extinguish the raging flames. The most effective man-made way to contain a wildfire is to box it inside buffer zones that are absent of everything that burns — a laborious, intense pursuit that requires clearing the land.

Members of a 20-person crew work in a line, hacking at the hardened ground, chopping down trees, yanking out roots and sawing down undergrowth. It is a carefully choreographed ballet, where one person’s movements affect the next’s.

“Imagine, if you can, 16-hour days of manual labor where you’re hustling all the time, and you do it oftentimes for 14 days straight,” said Doug Harwood, a firefighter in the city of Prescott, Ariz., who spent years fighting wildfires in the Western United States.

The mechanics of the job have not changed considerably since 1910, when a monster wildfire known as the Big Burn devoured 3 million acres and killed 85 people across three Northwestern states, and a United States Forest Service ranger named Ed Pulaski returned from obscurity a handy tool that can both dig soil and chop wood.

The Pulaski, as it is known, combines an ax and an adz in one head, and is now arguably the most important piece of equipment in wildfire suppression.

Alan Sinclair, who commands one of 16 teams trained to manage the most challenging wildfires in the United States, said team leaders have to weigh the risks of clearing land when flames may be racing toward them. At some point, it may be too risky, he said.

Communities can help, he said, by working together to create buffer zones around them, what is known as “defensible space,” before a fire strikes.

“It’s really hard for firefighters to go into an area where no work has been done and be expected to save the neighborhood,” Mr. Sinclair said.

Power companies across the state warned that power could be cut pre-emptively because of worsening weather conditions.

Pacific Gas & Electric said it would shut off power to an additional 600,000 customers in 29 counties in Northern California on Tuesday and Wednesday because of the danger that wind-damaged lines or equipment could cause more fires. Some 500,000 PG&E customers were still blacked out from previous shut-offs, and the company said it could be several days before power is restored.

In and around Los Angeles, Southern California Edison said on Tuesday morning that as many as 205,000 customers could be affected by safety-related shutoffs, but that so far only a few hundred had been blacked out.

San Diego Gas & Electric warned that shutoffs may become necessary in some inland areas east and northeast of the city, but none had been imposed yet.

A new state web portal includes links to updated information on the power outages, as well as shelters and housing, road conditions and other information related to the fires, compiled by state agencies like Cal Fire and Caltrans.

As ashen skies, raging wildfires and blackouts blanket areas of Northern and Southern California, many residents and evacuees are relying on Twitter hashtags for up-to-date information about their homes, loved ones, road closures and further evacuations.

Over the past week, “Kincadefire,” “Gettyfire,” “Tickfire,” “Skyfire” and “Sawdayfire”— the names of the wildfires — have become popular search terms on social media. But often there is confusion as to where their names come from.

As opposed to the predetermined list of names provided for hurricanes, wildfires are named by officials according to the location or local landmark, including streets, lakes and mountains, where the fire broke out. Fires often go without names if they are too small.

“Quickly naming the fire provides responding fire resources with an additional locator, and allows fire officials to track and prioritize incidents by name,” the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said.

If there is a long human presence in the area, there’s no challenge in finding a name — officials just draw from geographically local, named landmarks, according to Susie Kocher, a Natural Resources Advisor at the University of California.

The 2003 San Diego Cedar fire, one of the state’s largest wildland fires in history, unsurprisingly spread across the Cedar Creek Falls area. It burned over 270,000 acres, destroyed more 2,200 homes and killed 14 civilians and one firefighter.

But when it comes to naming there are always weird exceptions. The 416 Fire, for example, burned more than 50,000 acres in Colorado in 2018. Why 416? According to the Durango Interagency Dispatch Center, it was after a “system-generated number” that represented the 416th “incident” in the San Juan National Forest that year.

Another curious choice was in 2015, when fire officials in southeast Idaho ran out of naming ideas following the outbreak of a swarm of fires; for a fire with few landmarks nearby, they went with “Not Creative.

The Kincade fire in Sonoma County, which had burned more than 66,000 acres and has displaced nearly 200,000 residents as of Monday night, has proved challenging to remember for journalists and people on social media alike.

Misspellings online include Kincaid, Kincaide, Kinkade and Kinkaid.


Reporting was contributed by Adeel Hassan, Liam Stack, Sarah Mervosh and Vanessa Swales.

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Catholic priest denies Joe Biden Holy Communion at Mass in South Carolina because of abortion views

Former Vice President Joe Biden was denied Holy Communion at a Catholic church in South Carolina on Sunday morning because of his views on abortion, a priest said in a statement. 

Rev. Robert Morey said on Monday that the 2020 Democratic presidential candidate attended Mass at Saint Anthony Catholic Church in Florence and was refused the sacrament because any “public figure who advocates for abortion places himself or herself outside of Church teaching.” 

“Sadly, this past Sunday, I had to refuse Holy Communion to Former Vice President Joe Biden,” Morey said. “Holy Communion signifies we are one with God, each other and the Church. Our actions should reflect that.” 

Morey added that as “a priest, it is my responsibility to minister to those souls entrusted to my care, and I must do so even in the most difficult situations. I will keep Mr. Biden in my prayers.” 

The Biden campaign did not immediately reply to USA TODAY’s request for comment. The South Carolina Morning News, which first reported the story, said the campaign declined to comment or confirm that Biden attended Mass at the church, saying if he had, it would be a private matter. 

At Catholic Masses, Communion is when congregants eat bread and drink wine, which signify the body and blood of Jesus Christ.

Poll:Who’s sticking with President Trump, through trouble and tweets? His base

The Catholic Church has debated the issue of giving Communion to politicians who support abortion rights for decades, with some church leaders arguing such lawmakers should be excommunicated entirely. 

In 2004, some bishops threatened to deny Communion to then-Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts, the Democratic presidential nominee, because of his stance on abortion rights. 

When former President Barack Obama named Biden as his running mate in 2008, several bishops, including Denver Archbishop Charles Chaput, said they would refuse Biden if he sought Communion in their diocese, according to the Catholic News Agency

Biden’s stance on abortion has shifted over time. In 1974, during his first term in the Senate, Biden said the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision “went too far” and he didn’t “think that a woman has the sole right to say what should happen to her body.” 

“I do not view abortion as a choice and a right. I think it’s always a tragedy,” Biden said in a 2006 interview. He added that abortions should be “rare and safe” and that the focus should be on limiting the number of them performed. 

In his 2007 book, “Promises to Keep: On Life and Politics,” Biden said he had “stuck to my middle-of-the-road position on abortion for more than thirty years.” He wrote that he personally opposes abortion “but I don’t think I have the right to impose my view – on something I accept as a matter of faith – on the rest of society.” 

Hero dog:Hero military dog injured in al-Baghdadi raid returns to duty after treatment. Trump praises ‘talented dog’

This year, Biden has said Roe v. Wade is the “law of the land” and that abortion is a matter to be decided on by a “woman and her doctor.” 

In June, Biden dropped his longstanding support for the Hyde Amendment, which blocks federal funding for abortion in most cases, amid criticism from his rivals in the Democratic primary. 

Westlake Legal Group  Catholic priest denies Joe Biden Holy Communion at Mass in South Carolina because of abortion views

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Ford recalling over 300K vans, 384 SUVs to fix three issues

Ford is recalling over 300,000 Transit vans in the U.S. and North America for the second time to replace driveshaft couplings that can crack and potentially cause the shaft to come loose.

Westlake Legal Group tran-1 Ford recalling over 300K vans, 384 SUVs to fix three issues Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/make/ford fox-news/auto/attributes/safety fox news fnc/auto fnc bdbcab62-b3d2-56ed-8f9d-26181e88efd1 article

The issue could lead to a loss of power to the wheels and allow the vehicles to move while the transmission is in Park with the parking brake disengaged. Ford said the replacement parts should be good for at least 40,000 miles and that a permanent solution is in development. The vehicles subject to the recall were built from Jan. 17, 2014, to June 15, 2017.

Westlake Legal Group edge Ford recalling over 300K vans, 384 SUVs to fix three issues Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/make/ford fox-news/auto/attributes/safety fox news fnc/auto fnc bdbcab62-b3d2-56ed-8f9d-26181e88efd1 article

Ford is also recalling 366 2019 Edge models to replace seatbelt anchors and a total of 18 Ford Expedition and Lincoln Navigator full-size SUVs that possibly left the factory with suspension parts that weren’t securely fastened.

Westlake Legal Group ex Ford recalling over 300K vans, 384 SUVs to fix three issues Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/make/ford fox-news/auto/attributes/safety fox news fnc/auto fnc bdbcab62-b3d2-56ed-8f9d-26181e88efd1 article

There are no known accidents or injuries related to any of the issues.

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Westlake Legal Group tran-1 Ford recalling over 300K vans, 384 SUVs to fix three issues Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/make/ford fox-news/auto/attributes/safety fox news fnc/auto fnc bdbcab62-b3d2-56ed-8f9d-26181e88efd1 article   Westlake Legal Group tran-1 Ford recalling over 300K vans, 384 SUVs to fix three issues Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/make/ford fox-news/auto/attributes/safety fox news fnc/auto fnc bdbcab62-b3d2-56ed-8f9d-26181e88efd1 article

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House Seeks To Rebuke Turkey With Vote On Armenian Genocide

Westlake Legal Group ap_19114798865017-dd2df9c95900ed83a9c49618366d375a08ee5442-s1100-c15 House Seeks To Rebuke Turkey With Vote On Armenian Genocide

Armenian Americans march in Los Angeles on April 24 during an annual commemoration of the deaths of 1.5 million Armenians under the Ottoman Empire. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Westlake Legal Group  House Seeks To Rebuke Turkey With Vote On Armenian Genocide

Armenian Americans march in Los Angeles on April 24 during an annual commemoration of the deaths of 1.5 million Armenians under the Ottoman Empire.

Damian Dovarganes/AP

House Democrats will bring to the floor on Tuesday a long-stalled and controversial resolution that could further inflame already tense U.S.-Turkey relations. Top Democrats say that is exactly the point.

“I think some of us are a little bit annoyed with Turkey, and we want them to know how much annoyed we are,” House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., told NPR last week.

Engel said he believes the resolution — which has existed in some form for decades but has never been brought to the House floor — will pass. “Obviously, I believe we will, or we wouldn’t put it out,” Engel said. The resolution is part of a pair of actions — the other is a bipartisan economics sanctions bill — aimed at rebuking Turkey for its military incursion into Syria, among other recent transgressions.

One of the lead co-sponsors of the four-page resolution is House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., who represents one of the largest concentrations of Armenian Americans in the United States. The resolution also enjoys support from many House Republicans, including Rep. Gus Bilirakis of Florida and Rep. Peter King of New York, both co-sponsors.

“It’s an extremely contentious historical issue,” said Lisel Hintz, a Johns Hopkins University professor who studies Turkish politics and international relations. “For the U.S. to take a position on it, I think for frankly any country to take a position on it — from the Turkish perspective — is meddling in the international affairs of that country’s sovereignty.”

According to the Congressional Caucus on Armenian Issues, 49 states have already recognized that an estimated 1.5 million Armenians from 1915 to 1923 were systematically killed in the Ottoman Empire, which is now modern-day Turkey.

The resolution is a victory for Armenian Americans and their allies, who have long unsuccessfully lobbied Congress to recognize it. “We urge all members to support this bipartisan human rights legislation and ensure that the days of genocide denial are over and that America’s proud chapter in helping the survivors of the first genocide of the 20th century is honored and preserved,” said Bryan Ardouny, executive director of the Armenian Assembly of America.

In recent decades, the U.S. government has been coy about efforts to formally recognize those events out of fears of inflaming relations with Turkey, where the government denies that a genocide occurred. The Turkish government has traditionally deployed intense and effective lobbying efforts on Capitol Hill to discourage Congress from passing the resolution.

“I came here 23 years ago. One of the things I thought was morally incumbent upon Congress was to recognize the first genocide of the 20th century, the Armenian genocide,” said Rep. Brad Sherman, D-Calif., at an Oct. 23 House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing. “We were told: ‘But Turkey is a great ally of the United States. Don’t put that at risk.’ How’s that working out for us?”

U.S. lawmakers’ attitudes toward Turkey have been degrading for years, most recently over Turkey carrying out military attacks against Syrian Kurdish forces that are allies of the U.S. fight against ISIS. “There’s an extremely high level of tension right now, which means particularly within the U.S. Congress right now, there is an almost unified sentiment against Turkey,” said Hintz, adding that passage of the resolution will likely ratchet up tensions even further.

However, Hintz said the resolution could have unintended consequences, including bolstering Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s political strength back home. “It would be absolutely perfect timing for him,” Hintz said. “I think a recognition of the genocide resolution, what that’s going to do is unite the opposition, and the opposition is the only chance you have of defeating Erdogan.”

There is a bipartisan Senate resolution by Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., and Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, recognizing the Armenian genocide as well. Republican Sens. Marco Rubio of Florida and Cory Gardner of Colorado are among the co-sponsors. All four senators are members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. However, the Senate plays a more direct role in shaping foreign policy and tends to take a less reactionary stance on such issues. There is no current plan to bring the resolution up for a Senate vote.

The Trump administration has not yet weighed in on the House resolution. In recent decades, both Republican and Democratic administrations have generally tried to avoid the Armenian genocide debate. Turkey is a NATO member, stores many U.S. nuclear weapons and is a strategic military ally in regards to U.S. policy in the Middle East.

For example, President Obama declined to use the term “genocide,” which some of his top administration officials later said was a mistake. “I’m sorry that we disappointed so many Armenian Americans,” Samantha Power, Obama’s U.N. ambassador, told the Pod Save the World podcast last year.

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Boeing C.E.O. Faces Congress: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group 29boeing6-articleLarge Boeing C.E.O. Faces Congress: Live Updates Muilenburg, Dennis A Boeing Company Boeing 737 Max Groundings and Safety Concerns (2019) Airlines and Airplanes

Boeing President and Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg testifies before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.Credit…Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times

Boeing’s chief executive, Dennis A. Muilenburg, appearing before Congress on Tuesday, started with a note of contrition.

Mr. Muilenburg, an engineer who has been criticized for his response to the crashes, appeared emotional in his opening remarks at a hearing of the Senate commerce committee.

“We are sorry,” he said, addressing his remarks to the families of the crash victims. “Deeply and truly sorry.”

Mr. Muilenburg outlined changes being made to the Max and the company in response to the crashes. “We’ve been challenged and changed by these accidents,” he said. “We made some mistakes, and we got some things wrong.”

His opening remarks came after Senators Roger Wicker and Maria Cantwell made sharp opening statements about Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration.

“One thing is crystal clear,” Ms. Cantwell said. “If you want to be the leader in aviation manufacturing, you have to be the leader in aviation safety.”

Before the hearing began, a group of victims’ family members filed in to the room holding posters of their loved ones.

“He needs to resign, I will say that to his face,” said Nadia Milleron, whose daughter Samya Stumo died in the second Max crash in Ethiopia in March. “I think he’s very bad for Boeing, he’s very bad for the U.S., he’s very bad for safety. He should resign, the whole board should resign.”

In 2016, well before the 737 Max was certified by the Federal Aviation Administration, the plane’s chief technical pilot told a colleague that a new system on the plane was “running rampant” in simulator tests. The pilot, Mark Forkner, went on to say that he had unknowingly lied to regulators.

The messages, which were made public this month, raise serious new questions about what Boeing knew about the new system, known as MCAS, which played a role in both crashes. Mr. Muilenburg said that it had not been able to speak to Mr. Forkner, who now works for Southwest Airlines, about the messages.

However, when asked when he learned of the messages from Mr. Forkner, Mr. Muilenburg said: “I believe it was prior to the second crash.”

Senator Amy Klobuchar, Democrat of Minnesota, said during her questioning that Mr. Forkner voiced concerns about a new system in the plane before asking the F.A.A. to remove mention of the system from pilot manuals.

Lawmakers a also asked why Boeing, which has known about the messages for months, waited so long to hand the messages over to Congress and the F.A.A.

“Boeing should have notified the F.A.A. about that conversation upon its discovery immediately,” Senator Roger Wicker, chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, said in his opening statement.

The Times was the first to report on Mr. Forkner’s involvement in the Max, revealing that during the plane’s development, he asked the F.A.A. to remove mention of MCAS from the training manual.

As the 737 Max was developed, it was Boeing employees working on behalf of the F.A.A., not government inspectors, who signed off on many aspects of the plane. This system of so-called delegation, which lets manufacturers sign off on their own work, is under scrutiny.

Investigations by The New York Times have revealed that Boeing employees sometimes felt pressure to play down safety concerns and meet deadlines, that key F.A.A. officials didn’t fully understand MCAS and that the F.A.A. office in Seattle that oversees Boeing was seen inside the regulator as excessively deferential to the company.

“We cannot have a race for commercial airplanes become a race to the bottom when it comes to safety. The company, the board cannot prioritize profits over safety,” Senator Maria Cantwell, a Democrat from Washington, where Boeing has its major operations, said in her opening statement.

Boeing and its allies in industry also waged a yearslong lobbying campaign to get the F.A.A. to delegate even more to the company, an effort that paid off with the passage of last year’s F.A.A. reauthorization act. Now, lawmakers are questioning whether the entire system of certifying airplanes needs an overhaul.

“No matter what we did last year, we need to be pulling some of that back into the public sphere, and take some of it out of the hands of industry,” Representative Rick Larsen, a Democrat from Washington, told The Times.

More than seven months after the plane was grounded after the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 in March, Boeing has still not satisfied the F.A.A.’s requirements.

In addition to completing a software update for MCAS and updated training requirements for the plane, Boeing and regulators have discovered additional problems that have resulted in months of delays.

As the delays persist, airlines that were counting on the Max are facing growing financial pressure. If the Max remains grounded into next year, it could force Boeing to shut down production of the plane, which would have a major impact on the United States economy.

Boeing last week reiterated that it still expected the F.A.A. to clear the Max to fly before the end of the year. But the company has already had to push back its estimates on the plane’s return to service several times.

Boeing decided to produce the Max as it raced to keep up with its chief rival, Airbus. Engineers working on the plane faced pressure to avoid delays, and efforts were made to minimize differences between the Max and previous generations of the 737 in order to avoid costly training.

On a conference call with reporters on Monday, Representative Peter DeFazio, chairman of the House transportation committee, said he had documents suggesting that there was a cultural issue at the company that resulted in “a pattern at Boeing of extraordinary production pressures.”

Given that setup, lawmakers including Mr. DeFazio are likely to zero in on what Boeing is doing to avoid letting production deadlines compromise passenger safety.

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