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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 112)

Trump Says Roger Stone’s Conviction ‘Should Be Thrown Out’

Westlake Legal Group 5e4c109023000030000be308 Trump Says Roger Stone’s Conviction ‘Should Be Thrown Out’

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hours before a court session regarding his longtime ally Roger Stone, President Donald Trump is tweeting that Stone’s recent conviction for witness tampering and lying to Congress “should be thrown out.”

The barrage of Tuesday morning tweets comes days after Trump earned a public rebuke from his own attorney general, William Barr, who had said the president’s tweets were “making it impossible” for Barr to do his job.

Trump tweeted Fox News commentator Andrew Napolitano’s comment that the jury appears to have been biased against Trump and calling out Judge Amy Berman Jackson by name, saying “almost any judge in the country” would throw out the conviction.

Trump added in a subsequent tweet. “Everything having to do with this fraudulent investigation is badly tainted and, in my opinion, should be thrown out.”

Stone was convicted in November of a seven-count indictment that accused him of lying to Congress, tampering with a witness and obstructing the House investigation into whether the Trump campaign coordinated with Russia to tip the 2016 election. He is scheduled to be sentenced by Judge Jackson on Thursday with a logistical hearing planned for today.

Prosecutors had recommended a tough sentence of between seven to nine years in federal prison. But Barr reversed that decision and recommended a less harsh punishment, prompting the entire prosecution team to resign from the case.

Barr later denied that Trump’s Twitter denunciation of the sentencing recommendation had influenced his decision; in an interview with ABC News, Barr said he had not been asked by Trump to look into the case.

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Wounded veteran Noah Galloway: ‘I was prepared to die. I wasn’t prepared for the in-between’

Westlake Legal Group b6eea297-noah-galloway-men-health-mag Wounded veteran Noah Galloway: 'I was prepared to die. I wasn't prepared for the in-between' Matt London fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc fe0676cc-db63-5cc9-b246-b39c194b4eb2 article

Wounded Army veteran, motivational speaker and author Sgt. Noah Galloway opened up about his battle to overcome devastating physical injuries sustained on the battlefield in Iraq and the lingering mental health issues that he confronted after returning home.

“I always encourage people to get mental health … we thought that admitting that you needed help was weakness,” he said, “Now I see it as, after going through five years of depression, letting that darkness take over … that’s weakness. It takes real strength to stand up and get help. It took me five years.”

The decorated, double-amputee war veteran spoke with Fox Nation host John Rich on “The Pursuit! with John Rich” about patriotism, challenges and determination.

“The whole idea for this show… is the Constitution does not guarantee us happiness. It guarantees us the right to pursue happiness,” said Rich. “It’s what we call the American dream. You know why we call it the American dream? Because it is limitless and we all have a right to it. And it’s secured by our veterans and our active-duty military personnel — period.”

Galloway was first introduced to millions of Americans in 2016 when he competed on the reality TV show “Dancing with the Stars.” A few years before that, he was featured on the cover of “Men’s Health” magazine and dubbed the “Ultimate” guy. But his road to celebrity was anything but glamorous.

Three months into his second tour of duty in Iraq, the Humvee that he was driving was hit by an improvised explosive device.

“I went into Iraq — two deployments — with the mindset that I might die,” Galloway told Rich. “I’m going to either retire an old man in the military or I’m going to die in combat. And I was fine with either one of those options.”

However, he said he was not prepared for a third option.

The force of the IED blast that hit his Humvee threw the 9,000-pound armored vehicle into the air, across a dirt road and into a water-filled canal.

“I don’t remember any of it,” he told Rich. “They said the water was up to my chest. Arm was already taken off. Injuries all over my body.”

Galloway was transported from the battlefield to Baghdad, then to Germany and eventually to Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington D.C., where we regained consciousness for the first time since the attack. It was Christmas Day.

VETERAN, FOX NEWS CO-HOST PETE HEGSETH ON RETURNING FROM WAR TO ‘COUNTRY THAT MOSTLY DOESN’T GIVE A S—‘

“I … wake up six days later in a hospital unaware what happened and two of my limbs are gone, injuries to my right leg, my right hand, my jaw was shattered, my mouth was wired shut. I was prepared to die. I wasn’t prepared for the in-between.”

Under heavy sedation, Galloway had to be informed that he was missing his left arm above the elbow and left leg above the knee.

“When I was told, it, oh, it broke me,” he told Rich. “I would go through one phase of crying like a baby to just angry, yelling at anybody that wanted to help me … it was one emotion after another.”

Galloway said that he fell into a depression that lasted five years.

“To be brutally honest, for about five years I was not the person I am today or who I was before I got injured,” he said.

But then, one day, he explained that he came to a realization that set him on a path to rehabilitation.

“It was actually one day I walked into my living room and my three kids … were sitting on the couch watching TV,” he remembered. “All of a sudden, I realize, to my two boys, I’m showing them what a man is. And that’s what they’re gonna become one day.”

EXCLUSIVE: WYNONNA JUDD OPENS ABOUT DAUGHTER’S PRISON RELEASE: ‘THE STRONGEST JUDD WOMAN’

“And to my little girl, I’m showing her how a man is supposed to act and that’s what she’s going to look for one day,” he continued. “And, the man I was, I did not want my boys to be or my daughter to find. So I knew I had to make a change.”

“Now I always tell people life is not a movie. I didn’t just fix it right then. I still make mistakes. But every time I screwed up, and fell flat on my face, it was the thought of my three kids that motivated me to get up and push hard,” Galloway said. “I owe everything to my three kids to who I am today after my injury.”

To watch all of “The Pursuit! with John Rich” go to Fox Nation and sign up today.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR A FOX NATION FREE TRIAL

Fox Nation programs are viewable on-demand and from your mobile device app, but only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation to start a free trial and watch the extensive library from Tomi Lahren, Pete Hegseth, Abby Hornacek, Laura Ingraham, Ainsley Earhardt, Greg Gutfeld, Judge Andrew Napolitano and many more of your favorite Fox News personalities.

Westlake Legal Group b6eea297-noah-galloway-men-health-mag Wounded veteran Noah Galloway: 'I was prepared to die. I wasn't prepared for the in-between' Matt London fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc fe0676cc-db63-5cc9-b246-b39c194b4eb2 article   Westlake Legal Group b6eea297-noah-galloway-men-health-mag Wounded veteran Noah Galloway: 'I was prepared to die. I wasn't prepared for the in-between' Matt London fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc fe0676cc-db63-5cc9-b246-b39c194b4eb2 article

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Coronavirus Update: Quarantined Cruise Ship To Get Meals From José Andrés’ Charity

Westlake Legal Group coronavirus-evacuee-flight-china-japan-6e39fc651ea598d3fe4cf51fa68cf9b2bba06862-s1100-c15 Coronavirus Update: Quarantined Cruise Ship To Get Meals From José Andrés' Charity

Checking for signs of COVID-19, a medical worker in a protective suit checks the temperatures of people who were on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship as they fly on a chartered evacuation plane from Japan to Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Philip and Gay Courter/via Reuters hide caption

toggle caption

Philip and Gay Courter/via Reuters

Westlake Legal Group  Coronavirus Update: Quarantined Cruise Ship To Get Meals From José Andrés' Charity

Checking for signs of COVID-19, a medical worker in a protective suit checks the temperatures of people who were on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship as they fly on a chartered evacuation plane from Japan to Lackland Air Force Base in Texas.

Philip and Gay Courter/via Reuters

World Central Kitchen, initially created by chef José Andrés to help people stricken by natural disasters in the Caribbean, says it has set up a field kitchen in a parking lot near the Diamond Princess cruise ship at Shinko Pier in Yokohama, Japan, where the vessel is nearing the end of a 14-day coronavirus quarantine.

The charity is providing food for those on board in a bid to ease the strain on the ship’s crew, which has been working to feed passengers, keep the ship clean and perform other duties as the cruise ship sits in isolation at the terminal.

The Diamond Princess’s captain announced World Central Kitchen’s new role in a ship-wide address Tuesday, according to passenger Matthew Smith.

“This is to relieve pressure on the crew,” Smith said via Twitter, adding that he believes the extra help could make it easier for people working on the ship to observe quarantine rules.

“It’s definitely a different situation for us,” World Central Kitchen’s Sam Bloch said in a video update about the operation, acknowledging the uncertainty over how long the quarantine might last for some passengers and crew.

The food is prepared and cooked in a full kitchen before it’s taken to an impromptu kitchen at the terminal, the group says. From there, it gets reheated as needed and delivered to the ship. Bloch, who directs the group’s field operations, says the meals are ready to serve when their containers are loaded onto the ship by forklift.

“The crew doesn’t have to cook and do all the work,” Bloch says. “They get to get some rest.”

Andres said via Twitter that the World Central Kitchen team “will be there working side by side with everyone on the ground as long as we are needed.”

Before arriving in Japan, Bloch was working in Australia, where World Central Kitchen operates a “relief kitchen” to feed firefighters and evacuees. The organization is active in a number of other places, from Puerto Rico and the Bahamas to Venezuela and along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Hospital director in Wuhan dies of COVID-19

The director of a hospital in Wuhan, China, the center of a deadly coronavirus outbreak, has died from the disease COVID-19, state media reported Tuesday, highlighting the risk that the respiratory virus poses to health professionals.

Liu Zhiming, whose age is variously being reported as 50 or 51, was head of the Wuchang Hospital. He was also one of more than 1,700 medical workers confirmed to be infected with the highly contagious virus, according to China Daily. The state news outlet adds that the number of workers dates from last Tuesday — meaning even more doctors, nurses and other medical staff might now be infected.

Westlake Legal Group covid-19-coronavirus-china-19344bbe8d452d50f8930b88c794734a4b0c8198-s1100-c15 Coronavirus Update: Quarantined Cruise Ship To Get Meals From José Andrés' Charity

Mainland China currently has more than 70,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases. Here, people pass through a disinfection channel set up at the entrance to their residential compound in Tongzhou, east of Beijing. Greg Baker/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Greg Baker/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Coronavirus Update: Quarantined Cruise Ship To Get Meals From José Andrés' Charity

Mainland China currently has more than 70,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases. Here, people pass through a disinfection channel set up at the entrance to their residential compound in Tongzhou, east of Beijing.

Greg Baker/AFP via Getty Images

Outbreak’s pace is seen slowing in China

Mainland China currently has seen more than 70,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases, according to the World Health Organization. And while the country has suffered the majority of deaths associated with the outbreak, health experts in China say there are signs that the pace at which the virus is spreading might be slowing down.

As NPR’s Emily Feng reports from Beijing:

“Today’s numbers from China’s national health commission show that the rate at which new cases reported outside Hubei province, where the epidemic has been concentrated, has dropped for two weeks. China’s top state epidemiologist said earlier this week that he expected the outbreak to peak sometime in April.

“However, distrust in official state statistics is still high. Hubei in part has the largest share of virus cases in China because it is the only province that discloses so called clinical cases — symptomatic patients who haven’t tested positive for the virus. Other provinces are mandated to collect such data but have not disclosed these types of cases publicly.”

88 more cases on Diamond Princess cruise ship

The Diamond Princess cruise ship quarantined at a terminal in Yokohama, Japan, still represents the largest cluster of COVID-19 cases outside China. On Tuesday, Japan’s health ministry said tests confirmed 88 more cases — including 65 people who were identified as asymptomatic pathogen carriers. The diagnoses bring the total number of cases from the ship to 542 out of 2,404 people who have been tested, Japanese officials say.

The Diamond Princess had some 3,700 people aboard when it docked in the port south of Tokyo earlier this month. But hundreds of people have since disembarked, either to receive care at local hospitals or, in the case of more than 300 American passengers, to fly back to the U.S. on chartered evacuation flights.

“We walked into the airplane hangar, and there were military people clapping and cheering for us,” former Diamond Princess passenger Gay Courter told NPR, describing the scene as she and her husband, Philip, arrived at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. “

And that’s when I broke down in tears. It was this overwhelming relief.”

Infected U.S. evacuees taken to Omaha, Neb.

After the U.S. passengers were taken off the Diamond Princess, 14 of them were revealed to have tested positive for the new coronavirus. U.S. officials say they got the results after the patients had been taken off the ship — and that all 14 were placed in a special section at the rear of one of the chartered jets because of the possible health risk to other evacuees.

The evacuees were flown to Lackland in Texas and Travis Air Force Base in California — the two designated quarantine spots for Diamond Princess passengers taken to the U.S. But 13 infected evacuees were then flown to Omaha, Neb., to receive care at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. It’s not clear why the other infected evacuee wasn’t among them.

“Those who have tested positive for this novel coronavirus, are only showing mild symptoms of the disease,” Nebraska Medicine said in a statement.

The facility includes a 20-bed national quarantine unit, where 12 of the evacuees are now being monitored. But another evacuee was deemed to need specialized care and was placed in a biocontainment unit.

Sixty-one U.S. citizens remain on the Diamond Princess, which is slated to begin emerging from its blanket quarantine on Wednesday. While many passengers will be allowed to leave the ship if they test negative for the new coronavirus, others will have to undergo a longer quarantine if they’ve been in close contact with anyone who has the COVID-19 disease.

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Wounded veteran Noah Galloway: ‘I was prepared to die. I wasn’t prepared for the in-between’

Westlake Legal Group b6eea297-noah-galloway-men-health-mag Wounded veteran Noah Galloway: 'I was prepared to die. I wasn't prepared for the in-between' Matt London fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc fe0676cc-db63-5cc9-b246-b39c194b4eb2 article

Wounded Army veteran, motivational speaker and author Sgt. Noah Galloway opened up about his battle to overcome devastating physical injuries sustained on the battlefield in Iraq and the lingering mental health issues that he confronted after returning home.

“I always encourage people to get mental health … we thought that admitting that you needed help was weakness,” he said, “Now I see it as, after going through five years of depression, letting that darkness take over … that’s weakness. It takes real strength to stand up and get help. It took me five years.”

The decorated, double-amputee war veteran spoke with Fox Nation host John Rich on “The Pursuit! with John Rich” about patriotism, challenges and determination.

“The whole idea for this show… is the Constitution does not guarantee us happiness. It guarantees us the right to pursue happiness,” said Rich. “It’s what we call the American dream. You know why we call it the American dream? Because it is limitless and we all have a right to it. And it’s secured by our veterans and our active-duty military personnel — period.”

Galloway was first introduced to millions of Americans in 2016 when he competed on the reality TV show “Dancing with the Stars.” A few years before that, he was featured on the cover of “Men’s Health” magazine and dubbed the “Ultimate” guy. But his road to celebrity was anything but glamorous.

Three months into his second tour of duty in Iraq, the Humvee that he was driving was hit by an improvised explosive device.

“I went into Iraq — two deployments — with the mindset that I might die,” Galloway told Rich. “I’m going to either retire an old man in the military or I’m going to die in combat. And I was fine with either one of those options.”

However, he said he was not prepared for a third option.

The force of the IED blast that hit his Humvee threw the 9,000-pound armored vehicle into the air, across a dirt road and into a water-filled canal.

“I don’t remember any of it,” he told Rich. “They said the water was up to my chest. Arm was already taken off. Injuries all over my body.”

Galloway was transported from the battlefield to Baghdad, then to Germany and eventually to Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington D.C., where we regained consciousness for the first time since the attack. It was Christmas Day.

VETERAN, FOX NEWS CO-HOST PETE HEGSETH ON RETURNING FROM WAR TO ‘COUNTRY THAT MOSTLY DOESN’T GIVE A S—‘

“I … wake up six days later in a hospital unaware what happened and two of my limbs are gone, injuries to my right leg, my right hand, my jaw was shattered, my mouth was wired shut. I was prepared to die. I wasn’t prepared for the in-between.”

Under heavy sedation, Galloway had to be informed that he was missing his left arm above the elbow and left leg above the knee.

“When I was told, it, oh, it broke me,” he told Rich. “I would go through one phase of crying like a baby to just angry, yelling at anybody that wanted to help me … it was one emotion after another.”

Galloway said that he fell into a depression that lasted five years.

“To be brutally honest, for about five years I was not the person I am today or who I was before I got injured,” he said.

But then, one day, he explained that he came to a realization that set him on a path to rehabilitation.

“It was actually one day I walked into my living room and my three kids … were sitting on the couch watching TV,” he remembered. “All of a sudden, I realize, to my two boys, I’m showing them what a man is. And that’s what they’re gonna become one day.”

EXCLUSIVE: WYNONNA JUDD OPENS ABOUT DAUGHTER’S PRISON RELEASE: ‘THE STRONGEST JUDD WOMAN’

“And to my little girl, I’m showing her how a man is supposed to act and that’s what she’s going to look for one day,” he continued. “And, the man I was, I did not want my boys to be or my daughter to find. So I knew I had to make a change.”

“Now I always tell people life is not a movie. I didn’t just fix it right then. I still make mistakes. But every time I screwed up, and fell flat on my face, it was the thought of my three kids that motivated me to get up and push hard,” Galloway said. “I owe everything to my three kids to who I am today after my injury.”

To watch all of “The Pursuit! with John Rich” go to Fox Nation and sign up today.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR A FOX NATION FREE TRIAL

Fox Nation programs are viewable on-demand and from your mobile device app, but only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation to start a free trial and watch the extensive library from Tomi Lahren, Pete Hegseth, Abby Hornacek, Laura Ingraham, Ainsley Earhardt, Greg Gutfeld, Judge Andrew Napolitano and many more of your favorite Fox News personalities.

Westlake Legal Group b6eea297-noah-galloway-men-health-mag Wounded veteran Noah Galloway: 'I was prepared to die. I wasn't prepared for the in-between' Matt London fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc fe0676cc-db63-5cc9-b246-b39c194b4eb2 article   Westlake Legal Group b6eea297-noah-galloway-men-health-mag Wounded veteran Noah Galloway: 'I was prepared to die. I wasn't prepared for the in-between' Matt London fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc fe0676cc-db63-5cc9-b246-b39c194b4eb2 article

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‘Dark Towers’ Chases Scandal-Ridden Deutsche Bank’s Mysterious Ties To Donald Trump

Some of the world’s largest and most powerful banks spent the past decade mired in scandal, but none descended as far into ignominy as Germany’s Deutsche Bank. Its rap sheet includes a staggering array of ethical and legal lapses, including money laundering, tax fraud and sanctions violations — not to mention mysterious ties to President Trump that federal investigators are even now looking into.

How this plodding, conservative bank from a country famous for diligence and thrift turned into the most infamous casino on Wall Street is the subject of David Enrich’s excellent, deeply reported book Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction.

It is by now a familiar story. “This proud national icon was seduced by the siren song of Wall Street riches,” Enrich writes. Thanks partly to deregulation, big firms like Goldman Sachs and Merrill Lynch were coming up with tantalizing new ways to make money, and by 1994 Deutsche Bank wanted a piece of the action.

It started by recruiting Edson Mitchell, an American executive from Merrill, who believed Deutsche Bank’s “stubborn Germanness was the main impediment to unleashing its full animal spirits.” Mitchell set about building a global markets operation, not at the bank’s Frankfurt headquarters but in London, where he could function more independently. He hired a staff of “bloodthirsty piranhas” from Wall Street, who knew how to push boundaries, as Enrich’s tale tells.

Among them was Bill Broeksmit, a risk management genius who subsequently committed suicide as regulators were moving in on the bank and whose death is the mystery Enrich uses to frame the story.

Mitchell died early on a plane crash, but the machinery he built kept chugging along. Enrich tells the story of its rise and fall in the careful style of a good newspaper reporter (he is an editor at The New York Times), but allows the complicated material to unfold like a good novel.

Over time, he writes, Deutsche Bank became less German and more global, so much so that the bank had to post a sign in its London lobby explaining how to say “Deutsche.” Too many of the American traders were pronouncing it “douche bank.”

With the piranhas in charge, Deutsche Bank eventually became the biggest bank in the world, with 90,000 employees and some $2 trillion in assets —almost the size of the German economy, Enrich notes. Despite that, it was a clumsily managed place. The bank’s antiquated computer system made it difficult for senior management to monitor London’s activities, even if they’d wanted to — and it’s not clear they did. Management tended to look the other way when employees broke the rules, even when they did business with dictators like Russian President Vladimir Putin and their friends. “Even by the amoral standards of Wall Street, Deutsche exhibited a jarring lack of interest in its clients’ reputations,” Enrich writes.

Just how disconnected the bank became can be seen in its ongoing relationship with a then New York real estate developer named Donald Trump, whose multiple bankruptcies had made him a pariah in the banking world. One part of Deutsche Bank turned down Trump’s request for a loan. But the private banking division, which catered to the rich and famous, arranged the loan anyway and then, when Trump stopped making payments, arranged another one.

Trump’s murky relationship with Deutsche Bank is still under congressional investigation, so Enrich’s story is necessarily incomplete. Still, the book has enough detail to make its case that Deutsche Bank was more than just one more rogue bank. It is a cautionary tale of what happens when a bank pursues profits at any cost, without being weighed down by pesky moral scruples.

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Lisa Boothe predicts a ‘terrible’ debate performance by Mike Bloomberg

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2020-02-18-at-11.00.40-AM Lisa Boothe predicts a 'terrible' debate performance by Mike Bloomberg Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 0890fb17-28ef-5e6b-b6b3-861b418e4fab

Fox News contributor Lisa Boothe on Tuesday argued why she believes billionaire 2020 Democratic presidential hopeful Michael Bloomberg will perform terribly on the Nevada debate stage.

“He’s going to look terrible,” Boothe told “America’s Newsroom.”

Boothe said that the “manufactured version” of Bloomberg has been sensationalized while the unfiltered version of the former New York City mayor keeps leaking out.

BLOOMBERG QUALIFIES FOR LAS VEGAS DEBATE WITH LAST-MINUTE POLL

“Anyone at this table will look phenomenal if you had hundreds of millions of dollars spent on your behalf that have been put together by pollsters and campaign consultants,” Boothe said.

Boothe’s comments came after Bloomberg qualified for the Nevada Democratic presidential primary debate at the last minute, notching 19 percent support in a Marist, Newshour and NPR/PBS poll, the fourth national poll to put him above the 10 percent mark since Jan. 15. That means the billionaire, who has spent more than $400 million of his fortune on advertising, meets the polling threshold set by the DNC for the debate.

Bloomberg will be on the debate stage, his campaign confirmed in a statement.

“The challenge is any time we’ve seen this unfiltered version of him — which we have in recent days, whether it’s the comments about farmers or whether it’s talking about this cohort of black and Latino males who don’t know how to behave in the workforce, the comments about stop and frisk — he looks terrible,” said Boothe.

“The challenge for Michael Bloomberg is when you actually see this unfiltered version of him and it’s not this manufactured version,” she added.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

RealClearPolitics founder Tom Bevan said the “bad news” for Bloomberg is that he is going to face attacks from all sides during the debate, particularly from Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who will likely accuse him of trying to “buy the election.”

Bevan said if Bloomberg responds well to the attacks, he will likely see a boost in the polls, but a poor performance could hurt his campaign’s recent momentum.

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2020-02-18-at-11.00.40-AM Lisa Boothe predicts a 'terrible' debate performance by Mike Bloomberg Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 0890fb17-28ef-5e6b-b6b3-861b418e4fab   Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2020-02-18-at-11.00.40-AM Lisa Boothe predicts a 'terrible' debate performance by Mike Bloomberg Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 0890fb17-28ef-5e6b-b6b3-861b418e4fab

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Class ring lost in Maine 47 years ago is found buried in forest in Finland

A high school class ring lost in Maine in 1973 has been found buried beneath a forest floor in Finland and returned to its owner, who says the unlikely find might be more than just a coincidence.

Debra McKenna, 63, lost the Morse High School ring in a Portland department store shortly after her then-boyfriend and future husband, Shawn, gave it to her when he left for college.

CALIFORNIA POLICE FIND 106-YEAR-OLD VET’S CLASSIC CADILLAC, GIFTED BY RITA HAYWORTH, AFTER THIEVES STEAL IT

The couple was married for 40 years until Shawn died in 2017 after a six-year battle with cancer.

The ring, however, was largely forgotten until a sheet metal worker found it under 8 inches of soil in a Finnish forest last month after 47 years. The story of how the ring journeyed nearly 4,000 miles from Maine to Finland remains a mystery.

Marko Saarinen was using his metal detector in a city park in Kaarina, a small town in southwest Finland, when he dug up the blue-stoned, silver ring, according to Finnish news outlet Ilta-Sanomat. He said he usually only finds “bottle caps or other junk” and was surprised the ring had come from the U.S.

The markings on the ring, including the initials S.M., helped Saarinen track down the owner.

GERMAN WOMAN USES TINDER TO FIND HELP AFTER GETTING STUCK AT EUROPE’S MOST NORTHERN POINT

McKenna said she cried when the ring arrived in the mail at her Brunswick home last week.

“It’s very touching in this world of negativity, to have decent people step forward and make an effort,” McKenna told the Bangor Daily News. “There are good people in the world, and we need more of them.”

Westlake Legal Group iStock-Kaarina Class ring lost in Maine 47 years ago is found buried in forest in Finland Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maine fox-news/odd-news fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc fa736ab4-129f-5f72-a1cf-42f4ce4b44ed article

Kuusisto Bishop ruins in Kaarina, Finland. Marko Saarinen was using his metal detector in a city park in Kaarina when he dug up the blue-stoned, silver ring

McKenna believes the sudden discovery of the ring may be a message from her late husband.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“Shawn used to say there’s no such thing as coincidences,” she said. “He’s telling me to get my act together. To get going with the rest of my life.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-Kaarina Class ring lost in Maine 47 years ago is found buried in forest in Finland Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maine fox-news/odd-news fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc fa736ab4-129f-5f72-a1cf-42f4ce4b44ed article   Westlake Legal Group iStock-Kaarina Class ring lost in Maine 47 years ago is found buried in forest in Finland Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maine fox-news/odd-news fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc fa736ab4-129f-5f72-a1cf-42f4ce4b44ed article

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Class ring lost in Maine 47 years ago is found buried in forest in Finland

A high school class ring lost in Maine in 1973 has been found buried beneath a forest floor in Finland and returned to its owner, who says the unlikely find might be more than just a coincidence.

Debra McKenna, 63, lost the Morse High School ring in a Portland department store shortly after her then-boyfriend and future husband, Shawn, gave it to her when he left for college.

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The couple was married for 40 years until Shawn died in 2017 after a six-year battle with cancer.

The ring, however, was largely forgotten until a sheet metal worker found it under 8 inches of soil in a Finnish forest last month after 47 years. The story of how the ring journeyed nearly 4,000 miles from Maine to Finland remains a mystery.

Marko Saarinen was using his metal detector in a city park in Kaarina, a small town in southwest Finland, when he dug up the blue-stoned, silver ring, according to Finnish news outlet Ilta-Sanomat. He said he usually only finds “bottle caps or other junk” and was surprised the ring had come from the U.S.

The markings on the ring, including the initials S.M., helped Saarinen track down the owner.

GERMAN WOMAN USES TINDER TO FIND HELP AFTER GETTING STUCK AT EUROPE’S MOST NORTHERN POINT

McKenna said she cried when the ring arrived in the mail at her Brunswick home last week.

“It’s very touching in this world of negativity, to have decent people step forward and make an effort,” McKenna told the Bangor Daily News. “There are good people in the world, and we need more of them.”

Westlake Legal Group iStock-Kaarina Class ring lost in Maine 47 years ago is found buried in forest in Finland Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maine fox-news/odd-news fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc fa736ab4-129f-5f72-a1cf-42f4ce4b44ed article

Kuusisto Bishop ruins in Kaarina, Finland. Marko Saarinen was using his metal detector in a city park in Kaarina when he dug up the blue-stoned, silver ring

McKenna believes the sudden discovery of the ring may be a message from her late husband.

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“Shawn used to say there’s no such thing as coincidences,” she said. “He’s telling me to get my act together. To get going with the rest of my life.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-Kaarina Class ring lost in Maine 47 years ago is found buried in forest in Finland Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maine fox-news/odd-news fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc fa736ab4-129f-5f72-a1cf-42f4ce4b44ed article   Westlake Legal Group iStock-Kaarina Class ring lost in Maine 47 years ago is found buried in forest in Finland Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maine fox-news/odd-news fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc fa736ab4-129f-5f72-a1cf-42f4ce4b44ed article

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Coronavirus Updates: Hospital Director In Wuhan Dies Of COVID-19

Westlake Legal Group covid-19-coronavirus-china-b34b6928e86342669b6ae5e21336eb2fbc85e969-s1100-c15 Coronavirus Updates: Hospital Director In Wuhan Dies Of COVID-19

Mainland China currently has more than 70,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases, according to the World Health Organization. Here, people pass through a disinfection channel set up at the entrance to their residential compound in Tongzhou, east of Beijing. The channel uses humidifiers to spray a mist of disinfectant as residents pass through. Greg Baker/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Coronavirus Updates: Hospital Director In Wuhan Dies Of COVID-19

Mainland China currently has more than 70,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases, according to the World Health Organization. Here, people pass through a disinfection channel set up at the entrance to their residential compound in Tongzhou, east of Beijing. The channel uses humidifiers to spray a mist of disinfectant as residents pass through.

Greg Baker/AFP via Getty Images

Liu Zhiming, director of the Wuchang Hospital at the epicenter of a deadly coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan, has died from COVID-19, state media in China reported Tuesday, highlighting the risk that the respiratory virus poses to health professionals.

Liu, whose age is variously being reported as 50 or 51, was one of more than 1,700 medical workers who have been confirmed to be infected with the virus, according to China Daily. The state news outlet adds that the number dates from last Tuesday – meaning even more doctors, nurses and other medical staff may currently be infected.

Mainland China currently has more than 70,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases, according to the World Health Organization. And while the country has also endured the majority of deaths associated with the outbreak, health experts in China say there are signs that the pace at which the virus is spreading may be slowing down.

NPR’s Emily Feng reports for our Newscast unit from Beijing:

“Today’s numbers from China’s national health commission show that the rate at which new cases reported outside Hubei province, where the epidemic has been concentrated, has dropped for two weeks. China’s top state epidemiologist said earlier this week that he expected the outbreak to peak sometime in April. 

“However, distrust in official state statistics is still high. Hubei in part has the largest share of virus cases in China because it is the only province that discloses so called clinical cases – symptomatic patients who haven’t tested positive for the virus. Other provinces are mandated to collect such data but have not disclosed these types of cases publicly.” 

The largest cluster of COVID-19 cases outside of China remains the Diamond Princess cruise ship that is quarantined at a terminal in Yokohama, Japan. On Tuesday, Japan’s health ministry said tests confirmed 88 more cases – including 65 people who were identified as asymptomatic pathogen carriers. The diagnoses bring the total number of cases from the ship to 542 out of 2,404 people who were tested, Japanese officials say.

The Diamond Princess had some 3,700 people aboard when it docked in the port south of Tokyo earlier this month. But hundreds of people have now disembarked, either to receive care at local hospitals or, in the case of 328 American passengers, to fly back to the U.S. on special evacuation flights.

“We walked into the airplane hangar, and there were military people clapping and cheering for us,” passenger Gay Courter told NPR, describing the scene as she and her husband, Philip, arrived at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. “And that’s when I broke down in tears. It was this overwhelming relief.”

After the U.S. passengers were taken off the cruise ship, 14 of them were revealed to have tested positive for the coronavirus. U.S. officials say the results emerged after the patients were taken off the ship — and that because of the risk they could pose to the rest of the evacuees, the 14 were placed in a special section at the rear of one of the chartered jets.

The evacuees were flown to Lackland in Texas and Travis Air Force Base in California — the two designated quarantine spots for Diamond Princess passengers who return to the U.S. But the 13 infected evacuees were then flown to Omaha, Nebraska, to receive care at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

“Those who have tested positive for this novel coronavirus, are only showing mild symptoms of the disease,” Nebraska Medicine said in a statement.

The facility includes a 20-bed national quarantine unit, where 12 of the evacuees are now being monitored. But another evacuee was deemed to need special care and was placed in a biocontainment unit.

Sixty-one U.S. citizens remain on the Diamond Princess, which is slated to begin emerging from its blanket quarantine on Wednesday. While many passengers will be allowed to leave the ship if they test negative for the coronavirus, others will have to undergo a longer quarantine if they’ve been in close contact with anyone who has the COVID-19 disease.

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Walking 10,000 steps each day won’t aid with weight loss, study suggests

We may have been too foolish to believe that mere walking would be the answer to our weight problems.

A recent study from Brigham Young University suggests that the mere act of walking — specifically, walking between 10,000 and 15,000 steps per day — was not enough to prevent weight gain among the 120 freshmen students who took part in the research.

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Researchers determined the results by dividing the students into three groups, and instructing them to walk 10,000, 12,500 or 15,000 steps (respectively) for six days per week over the course of 24 weeks.

Westlake Legal Group FitnessTrackerIstokc Walking 10,000 steps each day won't aid with weight loss, study suggests Michael Bartiromo fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 331bb4fe-af17-524d-ab1b-a64c93dea997

Female jogger checking the fitness tracker on her wrist

In the end, the study’s authors observed that the increased step counts were not enough to prevent the students from gaining an average of 3.5 pounds over the 24-week period. (The researchers cited previous studies that suggested college students “commonly” gain between 2 and 9 pounds in their first year at school.)

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“Exercise alone is not always the most effective way to lose weight,” lead author Bruce Bailey, the professor of exercise science at BYU, said in a summary posted to the university’s website. “If you track steps, it might have a benefit in increasing physical activity, but our study showed it won’t translate into maintaining weight or preventing weight gain.”

However, Bailey was quick to add that the increased step counts did have benefits, albeit not necessarily when it came to the students’ waistbands. BYU researchers cited a study authored by a professor at Harvard Medical School who observed that mortality rates decreased among those who took more steps (although those rates “leveled off” once a subject reached 7,500 steps). The BYU study’s authors also observed an across-the-board reduction in sedentary time, which they suggested could have added physical and emotional benefits.

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“Even though it won’t prevent weight gain on its own, more steps is always better for you,” Bailey said.

Westlake Legal Group FitnessTrackerIstokc Walking 10,000 steps each day won't aid with weight loss, study suggests Michael Bartiromo fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 331bb4fe-af17-524d-ab1b-a64c93dea997   Westlake Legal Group FitnessTrackerIstokc Walking 10,000 steps each day won't aid with weight loss, study suggests Michael Bartiromo fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 331bb4fe-af17-524d-ab1b-a64c93dea997

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