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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 113)

Katie Hill Is Not Accused Of Committing A Crime. But She Might Be A Victim Of One.

Westlake Legal Group 5db219b42100005f2534afcf Katie Hill Is Not Accused Of Committing A Crime. But She Might Be A Victim Of One.

When Democratic Rep. Katie Hill won election in 2018, she gained attention for securing a tough district held by a Republican. She also made history as the first openly bisexual congresswoman from California. Now she’s capturing headlines again, only this time for all the wrong reasons.

Last week, RedState, a conservative news website, ran a story accusing Hill of having extramarital affairs with a female campaign staffer and a male congressional aide. The article included a nude photo of Hill with her breasts obscured. On Thursday, The Daily Mail published more sexually explicit photos of Hill, along with breathless details of her romantic relationships. As a result, private photos of her are spreading like a rot online, and there’s little Hill can do to stop it. Intimate, personal snapshots of her life are currently being ogled by anyone with a Wi-Fi connection. 

Hill has confirmed that she was in a relationship with the campaign worker, though she denies any romantic involvement with her congressional aide. The House Committee on Ethics has begun an investigation, since it is against House rules for representatives to have sexual relationships with congressional staff. (Those rules do not appear to extend to campaign staff.)

Much of the media coverage surrounding Hill has focused on her sex life; who she did or did not sleep with. The fascination likely stems from the fact that she is LGBTQ and allegedly involved in a polyamorous relationship. But by focusing on her sexuality, an important fact is being lost in translation.

Hill is not accused of committing a crime by dating her campaign staffer, but she may be a victim of one. In most states, including California, it is illegal to share sexually explicit photos of a person without his or her consent. That’s commonly called revenge porn ― and in Hill’s home state, that could be punished by up to six months in jail.

It is unclear how the news outlets acquired the photos of Hill. In a statement released Wednesday, Hill said, “I am going through a divorce from an abusive husband who seems determined to try to humiliate me. I am disgusted that my opponents would seek to exploit such a private matter for political gain.” Hill did not elaborate further or offer evidence linking her estranged husband to the leaked photos. He did not immediately respond to HuffPost’s request for comment. 

On Thursday, Hill sent a cease and desist letter to the Daily Mail, demanding the news outlet remove the photos they had published. 

“Katie Hill, like many women in marriages that end in separation, endured years of emotional abuse from a now-estranged husband,” her lawyers wrote in the letter, which HuffPost obtained. “By spreading these purported claims, and dehumanizing and shaming images across the globe, you have perpetuated the cycle of abuse Representative Hill has endured.”

HuffPost reached out to the Daily Mail for comment but did not immediately receive a response. 

Under California’s “revenge porn” statute, it is illegal for a person to intentionally distribute “the image of the intimate body part or parts of another identifiable person … under circumstances in which the persons agree or understand that the image shall remain private, the person distributing the image knows or should know that distribution of the image will cause serious emotional distress, and the person depicted suffers that distress.” 

Revenge porn may be used as a tactic in abusive relationships to control, blackmail or harm an intimate partner. But contrary to popular belief, images do not have to be shared by a vengeful ex to be considered “revenge porn.” A person who shares nonconsensual pornography for financial gain or for another reason can still be engaging in the practice. 

“Anybody who released or published Ms. Hill’s image should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law,” said Carrie Goldberg, a lawyer specializing in sexual privacy violations and author of “Nobody’s Victim: Fighting Psychos, Stalkers, Pervs, and Trolls.” 

She noted that many state’s “revenge porn laws” have exceptions when the distribution is newsworthy. “There is nothing newsworthy here,” she said. ”Ms. Hill is entitled to sexual privacy just like any other public or private figure.”

Female lawmakers are often attacked for their sexuality ― especially if they are young and attractive like Hill, said Jennifer Piscopo, an assistant professor of politics at Occidental College who has studied gender and politics. 

“It’s a way to undermine their authority, to call into question their ability, and to make them feel intimidated,” she said. 

The more prominent women politicians are, the more likely they are to sustain and receive online abuse, Piscopo added. 

“Hill was thought to be a rising star in the Democratic Party. Not just because of her gender but also the way she won that close race in California,” she said. “That makes her more vulnerable to attacks.” 

Hill has apologized for having a sexual relationship with her campaign worker, saying in a statement that “even a consensual relationship with a subordinate is inappropriate.” But she has pushed back on the idea that her personal life and private photos should be anyone’s business, calling the reports a “smear campaign.” 

“This coordinated effort to try to destroy me and the people close to me is despicable and will not succeed,” she said. “I, like many women who have faced attacks like this before, am stronger than those who want me to be afraid.” 

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For Impeachment Witnesses, Testifying Can Cost $15,000 or More

Westlake Legal Group merlin_162851514_4137510f-3c8a-4bfb-a10d-bc472af735a8-facebookJumbo For Impeachment Witnesses, Testifying Can Cost $15,000 or More Yovanovitch, Marie L Volker, Kurt D United States Politics and Government Ukraine Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Taylor, William B Jr State Department Sondland, Gordon D (1957- ) Legal Profession House Committee on Intelligence Ethics and Official Misconduct American Foreign Service Assn

WASHINGTON — As a parade of State Department officials began trooping to Capitol Hill this month to testify in the impeachment inquiry imperiling President Trump, officials from the department’s employee association dispatched an appeal to its nearly 17,000 members.

Send money, they pleaded.

For the second time since Mr. Trump took office, an investigation into his conduct has set off a scramble across Washington for lawyers to represent witnesses — and for the money to pay them. This time, instead of high-rolling players in Mr. Trump’s 2016 campaign, many of the witnesses are career government workers who helped shape or carry out policy toward Ukraine.

On civil-servant salaries, they have racked up bills of $15,000 or more for lawyers who can guide them through the morning-to-dusk sessions before congressional inquisitors. Already caught in a struggle between two branches of government, many are now worried about how to pay for legal advice that can cost $750 to $1,500 an hour.

“We have never faced a comparable situation,” said Eric Rubin, a senior American diplomat who runs the organization, the American Foreign Service Association. “Our colleagues are facing unprecedented legal bills.”

He said his association has received a steady stream of donations, mostly in small amounts, since asking for them on Oct. 8.

The impeachment inquiry has some pluses for lawyers: opportunities to wrestle with high-profile legal issues like the limits of executive privilege and to reap free publicity escorting clients through a gantlet of cameras to the Capitol chambers where depositions are being conducted. At the least, they get a front-row seat in an inquiry that has gripped the nation.

But a moneymaker it is not. Even if a client pays in full, representing a single congressional witness is far less profitable than the corporate work that is the lifeblood of many Washington law firms.

“I don’t think anybody takes these cases because they are lucrative. They are not,” said Robert Luskin, who represents Gordon D. Sondland, a wealthy Republican donor-turned-ambassador and one of the inquiry’s few deep-pocketed witnesses.

“You do these cases because you believe in the client or you believe in the cause or you believe in the process, not because they are financially rewarding.”

Over the years, he said, he has asked so many friends to represent civil servants in politically charged inquiries that “when these are going on, they don’t want to take my call.”

So far, nearly a dozen witnesses have cooperated with the inquiry, most of whom are still in the government.

Their pool of potential lawyers is restricted because ethics rules bar federal officials from accepting free or discounted legal services from lawyers that have business before their agencies, according to Virginia Canter, the chief ethics counsel for Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a nonprofit watchdog group. Exceptions are made if the lawyer is a friend.

And while senior government officials are sometimes encouraged to buy inexpensive legal liability insurance, the policies typically cover only the cost of a bargain-basement lawyer skilled in handling routine employment battles over issues like dismissals and discipline, according to one senior diplomat who is knowledgeable about such policies.

The witnesses in the impeachment inquiry need a higher caliber of legal advice because testifying is fraught with pitfalls. Witnesses still in government service could be risking their jobs by cooperating in defiance of a White House directive declaring the inquiry illegitimate.

None of them can fact-check their testimony against official records of meetings and phone calls because the administration is withholding such documents. But they must be mindful of what they say, because lying to Congress is a crime that carries a punishment of up to five years in prison.

Typically, Mr. Luskin said, he would have spent days going through officials records to prepare a witness like Mr. Sondland, the American ambassador to the European Union who testified for nearly nine hours this month. But the State Department has refused to turn over those documents, so Mr. Sondland testified based largely on memory.

Members of Congress publicly criticized him for all the times he said he could not remember. “It is much more difficult in these circumstances,” Mr. Luskin said.

The witnesses have relied on a small and disparate group of lawyers, ranging from senior litigators like Lawrence S. Robbins, who has argued 18 cases before the Supreme Court, to Margaret E. Daum, who joined the firm of Squire Patton Boggs just seven months ago after more than a decade leading investigations in Congress.

Mr. Robbins represents Marie L. Yovanovitch, whom Mr. Trump forced out as ambassador to Ukraine in May. Ms. Daum represents Kurt D. Volker, who resigned last month as the special envoy to Ukraine, and Philip T. Reeker, the acting assistant secretary of state for Europe and Eurasia.

Other lawyers have deep backgrounds in intelligence or foreign policy, including John Bellinger, a legal adviser to the National Security Council and the State Department under President George W. Bush, and Lee S. Wolosky, a national security official under both Mr. Bush and President Bill Clinton.

Mr. Bellinger represents William B. Taylor Jr., the top American diplomat in Ukraine who on Tuesday provided the most damning testimony to date against the president. He also represents Michael McKinley, who quit his senior State Department post after the White House forced out Ms. Yovanovitch.

Mr. Wolosky, who represents Fiona Hill, a former Russia expert on Mr. Trump’s National Security Council, wound up in a standoff with the White House Counsel’s Office over his client’s testimony.

Three days before Ms. Hill was to testify, two lawyers from the counsel’s office argued to him in a telephone conversation that the discussions she was privy to were protected by executive privilege.

Mr. Wolosky replied in a letter that not only had those topics already been aired publicly, but that government misconduct wipes away privilege claims. Ms. Hill’s testimony on Oct. 14 illuminated the divisions within the White House over the president’s efforts to pressure Ukraine’s leader for political gain.

Andrew Bakaj and Mark S. Zaid, who represent the C.I.A. officer whose whistle-blower complaint touched off the impeachment investigation, are fighting a different battle. Republicans are trying to force their client to testify, hoping it would reveal a bias against Mr. Trump. But his lawyers are trying to keep his identity confidential for his protection. They also say investigators no longer need him because a stream of other witnesses, many with firsthand information, have given accounts.

Neither that whistle-blower nor a second one is paying them, but a charitable organization established to aid whistle-blowers has raised about $220,000 to cover their firm’s work.

As investigators assemble facts and work their way through witnesses, the legal bills are certain to mount. The House Intelligence Committee, which is leading the investigation, has yet to summon a parade of high-profile witnesses, including John R. Bolton, who left last month as national security adviser.

Mr. Bolton has already secured a high-powered lawyer: Charles J. Cooper, who represented Jeff Sessions when he was attorney general during the Russia investigation.

Mr. Cooper also represents Charles M. Kupperman, the former acting national security adviser, who is expected to testify next week.

Julian E. Barnes and Michael S. Schmidt contributed reporting.

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NASA announces new VIPER Moon rover that will explore the lunar surface

NASA has unveiled its plan to send a new lunar rover, VIPER, to the surface of the Moon.

“VIPER is going to rove on the South Pole of the moon and assess where the water ice is,” said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine during a wide-ranging speech at the International Astronautical Congress in Washington D.C. on Friday.

The government space agency notes that the Moon has vast reservoirs of water ice, an amount that could potentially reach millions of tons. The water will be used to sustain a human presence on the lunar surface.

NASA ASTRONAUT EYES MOON JACKPOT, RANGING FROM SPACE MINING TO POLAR ICE

“Water ice is oxygen to breathe, it’s water to drink,” Bridenstine said, adding that hydrogen in the water ice could also be used for rocket fuel. “We’re going to utilize the resources of the Moon to live and work for long periods of time.”

Westlake Legal Group NASAViper NASA announces new VIPER Moon rover that will explore the lunar surface James Rogers fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc fd11c0e1-df8a-557b-a77b-2d9ac79faaac article

Artist’s impression of NASA’s Volatiles Investigating Polar Exploration Rover, or VIPER. (Credits: NASA Ames/Daniel Rutter)

NASA plans to land VIPER, which stands for Volatiles Investigating Polar Exploration Rover, on the Moon in December 2022. When it reaches the lunar surface, the golf-cart sized rover will collect about 100 days of data, roaming several miles. VIPER’s instruments, including a 1-meter (3.28 foot) drill, will be used to perform soil samples.

The lander and launch vehicle that will deliver the mobile robot to the Moon will be provided through NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) contract to deliver science and technology payloads to and near the Moon, the space agency said, in a statement.

TRUMP CALLS TO CONGRATULATE ‘BRILLIANT’ NASA ASTRONAUTS DURING THEIR HISTORIC ALL-FEMALE SPACEWALK

NASA’s Artemis program aims to land American astronauts, including the first woman, on the Moon by 2024 and establish a sustainable human presence on Earth’s natural satellite.

Westlake Legal Group NASAViper2 NASA announces new VIPER Moon rover that will explore the lunar surface James Rogers fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc fd11c0e1-df8a-557b-a77b-2d9ac79faaac article

A VIPER mobility testbed, an engineering model created to evaluate the rover’s mobility system. (Credits: NASA/Johnson Space Center)

Initial mission capability for 2024 involves landing two astronauts on the Moon’s south pole. Astronauts will live and work out of the lander for six-and-a-half days, according to the agency.

NASA REVEALS ITS VISION FOR THE ARTEMIS MOON LANDER THAT WILL RETURN US ASTRONAUTS TO THE LUNAR SURFACE

Speaking at IAC, Bridenstine also raised the possibility that the next two astronauts to reach the moon could both be female. “That’s an important point to make,” he added.

NASA recently released a “woman on the Moon” illustration for the Artemis mission. “Artemis, the twin sister of Apollo and Goddess of the Moon and the hunt, encompasses all of our present efforts to return humans to the Moon — to prepare us and propel us on to Mars,” the space agency explains on its website. “The portrait of the Greek Goddess, Artemis is illustrated in the highlights and shadows of the crescent Moon topography. Her features are abstract enough that any woman can see themselves in her.”

Earlier this year, NASA released details of its vision for the Artemis Moon lander that will return U.S. astronauts to the lunar surface.

ON APOLLO 11 ANNIVERSARY, PENCE ANNOUNCES THAT ORION CAPSULE FOR MANNED MOON MISSIONS IS READY FOR DEBUT FLIGHT

In July, NASA said it was seeking “proposals from industry for the development of integrated human lunar landers and execution of crewed flight demonstrations to the lunar surface by 2024,” according to a notice posted to the Federal Business Opportunities website.

Speaking at Kennedy Space Center on the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing on July 20, Vice President Mike Pence also announced that the Orion capsule that will take American astronauts back to the Moon is ready.

In documents posted on the FBO website, NASA explained that astronauts will be flown in an Orion spacecraft to the ‘Gateway,’ a space station orbiting the Moon. The Gateway vessel will be used to support the transfer of crew and supplies into the Moon Lander.

APOLLO 11 SHOCKER: BUZZ ALDRIN’S FACE DISCOVERED IN ICONIC PHOTO

After Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin set foot on the Moon on July 20, 1969, only 10 more men, all Americans, walked on the lunar surface.  Apollo 17 Mission Cmdr. Cernan became the last NASA astronaut to set foot on the Moon on Dec. 14, 1972.

Last week, NASA astronauts Christina Koch and Jessica Meir made history when they completed the first all-female spacewalk.

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The Associated Press contributed to this article. Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group NASAViper NASA announces new VIPER Moon rover that will explore the lunar surface James Rogers fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc fd11c0e1-df8a-557b-a77b-2d9ac79faaac article   Westlake Legal Group NASAViper NASA announces new VIPER Moon rover that will explore the lunar surface James Rogers fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc fd11c0e1-df8a-557b-a77b-2d9ac79faaac article

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Elijah Cummings’s Funeral Brings Attention, and 2 Former Presidents, to Baltimore

BALTIMORE — Representative Elijah E. Cummings was firmly rooted in Baltimore, but for decades his voice extended far from his brick rowhouse on the city’s west side. On Friday, the legacy of his tireless advocacy brought powerful leaders from Washington and elsewhere to his city.

Mr. Cummings, a Democrat who rose in prominence in recent years for his unwavering pursuit of President Trump, died at 68 last week in the city he called home, the same one in which he was born and lived all his life.

Among the prominent cast of politicians, mentees and relatives expected to speak at his funeral on Friday morning were two former presidents, Barack Obama and Bill Clinton, as well as Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren, the Massachusetts senator and presidential candidate.

Following a psalm read by Ms. Warren and a song from one of Mr. Cummings’s favorite singers, BeBe Winans, Ms. Clinton took the stage and thanked members of Mr. Cummings’s district “for sharing him with our country and the world.”

Ms. Clinton said Mr. Cummings never backed down in the face of abuses of power or from “those who put party ahead of country or partisanship above truth.”

“But he could find common ground with anyone willing to seek it with him,” she continued. “And he liked to remind all of us that you can’t get so caught up in who you are fighting that you forget what you are fighting for.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_163291821_362832b8-980f-411b-bbef-e4dbebb7bc1c-articleLarge Elijah Cummings’s Funeral Brings Attention, and 2 Former Presidents, to Baltimore Funerals and Memorials Cummings, Elijah E Baltimore (Md)

Hillary Clinton spoke during the funeral service for Representative Elijah Cummings at New Psalmist Baptist Church in Baltimore.Credit…Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Ms. Pelosi asked attendees how many had been mentored by Mr. Cummings, and at least a dozen raised their hands. She recalled that he had sought to mentor as many freshman representatives as he could after Democrats took control of the House in the 2018 election.

“By example, he gave people hope,” she said.

Ms. Pelosi had spoken at another funeral in Baltimore on Wednesday for her own brother, Thomas D’Alesandro III, a former mayor of the city.

Earlier in the morning, thousands of grieving Baltimoreans stood in looping lines as the sun rose outside of New Psalmist Baptist Church, which seats 4,000 people and filled up shortly before 10, with many still outside. It’s the same church where Mr. Cummings sat in the front row most Sundays even after he began using a walker and wheelchair.

Mr. Cummings’s body lay in an open coffin at the front of the church on Friday, his left hand resting on his right as mourners passed by and a choir sang gospel music. An usher stood nearby with a box of tissues in each hand.

Elonna Jones, 21, skipped her classes at the University of Maryland to attend with her mother, Waneta Ross, who nearly teared up as she contemplated Baltimore’s loss.

“He believed in the beauty of everything, especially our city,” Ms. Ross said. “It’s important we’re here to honor a civil rights activist who was still around in my generation.”

Ms. Jones, a volunteer coordinator for a City Council candidate, said Mr. Cummings had motivated her to pursue a role in improving her city.

“As a young, black woman in Baltimore who wants to be in politics, he inspired me,” she said.

Mourning residents stood in black coats, hats and heels and sang Mr. Cummings’s praises as the police corralled the extended lines of people who woke up early to pay their respects. Above all, attendees noted, he always looked out for his city.

“He never forgot who we were,” said Bernadette McDonald, who lives in West Baltimore. “He was a son of Baltimore and a man of the people.”

The big names on the service’s agenda, the television cameras lined up outside and the large crowd belied the way many attendees interacted with the devoted congressman, who lived in the heart of West Baltimore and would simply give a knowing nod to those who recognized him on the street. He carried himself like anyone else when running errands or taking a walk around the block.

“If you didn’t already know him, you wouldn’t know who he was,” Ms. McDonald said.

Mr. Cummings saw his profile rise in recent years as he consistently sparred with Mr. Trump, determinedly pursuing the president, his businesses and his associates as head of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform. Mr. Cummings became a leading figure in the impeachment inquiry and was said to still be joining strategy discussions with colleagues from his hospital bed.

Rhonda Martin, who works at a local high school, said Mr. Cummings had inspired the next generation of Baltimore’s leaders by speaking to students in schools around the city.

“He brought a message of hope and told students that he did it, and they can do it, too,” Ms. Martin said.

Mr. Cummings, whose parents were former sharecroppers in South Carolina, graduated from Howard University in Washington and earned a law degree at the University of Maryland. He was first elected to Congress in 1996 and never faced a serious challenge over 11 successful re-election campaigns.

On Thursday, Mr. Cummings’s body lay in state in the Capitol, the first black lawmaker to do so, and Republicans and Democrats praised his integrity and his commitment to his constituents.

Over more than two decades in Congress, Mr. Cummings championed working people, environmental reform and civil rights. He served for two years as the chair of the Congressional Black Caucus and frequently spoke of his neighborhood while pushing legislation to lower drug prices, promoting labor unions and seeking more funding for affordable housing.

Even in his war of words with the president, the battle made its way to Baltimore when, in July, Mr. Trump called Mr. Cummings’s district a “disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess” and appeared to make light of a break-in at Mr. Cummings’s home, during which the congressman scared an intruder away.

The president’s insults still anger Baltimore residents. “See? We’re not all trash and rats,” one congregant said as she sat down in the church on Friday.

Mr. Cummings responded to the president by saying it was his “moral duty” to fight for residents in his district. “Each morning, I wake up,” he wrote, “and I go and fight for my neighbors.”

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Felicity Huffman released from prison early, served 11 out of 14 days

Felicity Huffman was released from prison Friday after serving 11 days of her 14-day sentence for her role in the college admissions scandal.

Fox News confirmed that Huffman was released from the Federal Correctional Institution in Dublin, Calif. on Friday per Program Statement 5140.36, which states inmates who are scheduled to be released on a weekend or legal holiday be released on the last preceding weekday.

“Ms. Huffman released from the custody of the BOP,” officials told Fox News.

INSIDE FELICITY HUFFMAN’S 14-DAY PRISON STAY INSIDE ‘CLUB FED’

Huffman reported to the prison on Oct. 15. At the time of her surrender, a rep for the actress told us: “Ms. Huffman is prepared to serve the term of imprisonment Judge Talwani ordered as one part of the punishment she imposed for Ms. Huffman’s actions.”

Westlake Legal Group felicity-huffman-2-Getty Felicity Huffman released from prison early, served 11 out of 14 days Tyler McCarthy fox-news/topic/college-admissions-scandal fox-news/person/felicity-huffman fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article ad13a8a8-34d3-55f1-9c12-24be6f77b4c3

Actress Felicity Huffman was released from prison early for her part in the college admissions scandal. 

Huffman, 56, pleaded guilty in May and accepted responsibility for her part in the high-profile college admissions scandal that demonstrated the lengths wealthy parents will go in order to secure their kids a spot at the college of their choice.

The “Desperate Housewives” star pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud earlier this year. She confessed to paying an admissions consultant $15,000 to have a proctor correct her older daughter’s answers on the SAT. She considered the same for her younger daughter but decided against it.

In addition to serving in prison, Huffman also received one year of probation, was ordered to perform 250 hours of community service and pay a $30,000 fine.

MARTHA STEWART MOCKS FELICITY HUFFMAN’S PRISON STYLE: ‘SHE LOOKED PRETTY SCHLUMPY’

“I think this is the right sentence here,” U.S. District Court Judge Indira Talwani told Huffman at the time of her sentencing. “You can move forward and rebuild your life after this. Without this sentence, I think the community around you would ask why you got away with this.”

Westlake Legal Group huffmanjail Felicity Huffman released from prison early, served 11 out of 14 days Tyler McCarthy fox-news/topic/college-admissions-scandal fox-news/person/felicity-huffman fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article ad13a8a8-34d3-55f1-9c12-24be6f77b4c3

Actress Felicity Huffman leaves federal court after her sentencing in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal, Friday, Sept. 13, 2019, in Boston. (AP)

A tearful Huffman addressed Judge Talwani in Boston federal court before she received her sentence.

“I’m sorry to you, judge. I am deeply sorry to the students, parents and colleges impacted by my actions,” the Emmy-award winning actress said. “I am sorry to my daughters and my husband. I have betrayed them all.

“My mind keeps returning to the 30-minute drive to the testing center. I kept thinking, ‘Turn around,'” she said.

Huffman said her daughter Sophia asked why she didn’t believe in her.

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“I had no answer,” Huffman said. “I can only say I’m so sorry, Sophia. I was frightened, I was stupid, and I was so wrong. I am deeply ashamed of what I have done. I have done more damage than I could ever imagine. I realize now with my mothering that love and truth go hand in hand. I take full responsibility for my actions.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086178071001_6086176939001-vs Felicity Huffman released from prison early, served 11 out of 14 days Tyler McCarthy fox-news/topic/college-admissions-scandal fox-news/person/felicity-huffman fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article ad13a8a8-34d3-55f1-9c12-24be6f77b4c3   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086178071001_6086176939001-vs Felicity Huffman released from prison early, served 11 out of 14 days Tyler McCarthy fox-news/topic/college-admissions-scandal fox-news/person/felicity-huffman fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article ad13a8a8-34d3-55f1-9c12-24be6f77b4c3

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Adam Devine And Chloe Bridges Get Engaged And He Has Jokes

Westlake Legal Group 5db2fec3210000872ead3e63 Adam Devine And Chloe Bridges Get Engaged And He Has Jokes

Actors Adam Devine and Chloe Bridges announced Thursday that they’re engaged after years of dating.

Funnyman Devine, of the “Pitch Perfect” movies and Comedy Central’s “Workaholics,” wasn’t about to let the milestone occasion pass without a few jokes.

“She said yes!” he wrote on an Instagram photo showing the two glowing in happiness on a boat. “Well actually she said “ahh Adam” and then kissed me but I’m pretty sure that means YES!”

He praised his beloved for wanting to get old and wrinkly with him ― “I’m gonna look like a Saint Bernard” ― and vowed not to help preparing for the nuptials.

“Have fun planning the wedding,” he wrote. “I’ll be there for the cake tasting.”

Bridges, whose credits include “The Carrie Diaries,” “Pretty Little Liars” and “Insatiable,” praised her fiance’s butt and sense of humor, noting they had a connection from the moment they met five years ago.

“Let’s do this baby,” she wrote.

Devine, 35, and Bridges, 27, met on the set of “The Final Girls” in 2014, Us Weekly noted.

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I’m Aaron Glantz, investigative reporter at Reveal and the author of Homewreckers. Let’s talk about the close associates of Donald Trump — like Steve Mnuchin, Wilbur Ross, Tom Barrack, and Jared Kushner— who made billions off the housing crisis. AMA.

I’m Aaron Glantz, senior investigative reporter for Reveal and the author of Homewreckers: How a Gang of Wall Street Kingpins, Hedge Fund Magnates, Crooked Banks, and Vulture Capitalists Suckered Millions Out of Their Homes and Demolished the American Dream.

It all started with a piece on Tom Barrack Jr, Trump’s oldest friend and inauguration chairman, who used the housing bust to buy 30,000 homes. From there, I homed in on a single house: a 834-foot bungalow in South L.A, where 5 members of the Trump administration had profited off personal pain and financial dispossession. After that, I investigated Steve Mnuchin’s OneWest Bank, and then broke news on modern-day redlining in 61 cities – including Philadelphia, Atlanta, San Antonio, and Washington, D.C.

More information:

READ THE BOOK: Homewreckers: https://www.harpercollins.com/9780062869531/homewreckers/

LISTEN, to the story of Sandy Jolley, the homeowner who fought back: https://www.revealnews.org/episodes/homewreckers/

WATCH, my Emmy-nominated investigation into modern-day redlining on the PBS Newshour: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/struggle-for-black-and-latino-mortgage-applicants-suggests-modern-day-redlining

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Pentagon, With an Eye on China, Pushes for Help From American Tech

Westlake Legal Group 00pentagonchip-facebookJumbo-v2 Pentagon, With an Eye on China, Pushes for Help From American Tech United States Defense and Military Forces Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Ltd Politics and Government Mobile Applications GlobalFoundries Factories and Manufacturing Defense Department Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Computers and the Internet Computer Chips

SAN FRANCISCO — Pentagon officials have been holding private discussions with tech industry executives to wrestle with a key question: how to ensure future supplies of the advanced computer chips needed to retain America’s military edge.

The talks, some of which predate the Trump administration, recently took on an increased urgency, according to people who were involved or briefed on the discussions. Pentagon officials encouraged chip executives to consider new production lines for semiconductors in the United States, said the people, who declined to be identified because the talks were confidential.

The discussions are being driven by the Pentagon’s increased dependence on chips made abroad, especially in Taiwan, as well as recent tensions with China, these people said.

One chip maker, the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, better known as TSMC, plays a particularly crucial role producing commercial chips that also have applications for aircraft, satellites, drones and wireless communications. And because of unrest over the past few months in the semiautonomous Chinese territory of Hong Kong, some Pentagon officials and chip executives have wondered about situations that could force suppliers in Taiwan to limit or cut off silicon shipments, the people said.

Mark Liu, the chairman of TSMC, said he had recently discussed options for a new factory in the United States with the Commerce Department. The stumbling block was money; major subsidies would be required, he said, as it is more expensive to operate in America than Taiwan.

“It is all up to when we can close the cost gap,” he said in an interview.

The conversations are a sign of how federal agencies are grappling with a deep-rooted technology conundrum. The United States has long fielded the most advanced weaponry by exploiting electronic components once exclusively produced in the country. Chips help tanks, aircraft, rockets and ships navigate, communicate with one another and engage enemy targets.

But domestic production lines of many chips have long since moved overseas, raising questions about supply interruptions in the event of political or military crises abroad. Those fears have been exacerbated by the increasing importance of particular components — such as programmable chips that figure prominently in the F-35 fighter jet, which are designed by the Silicon Valley company Xilinx and mainly fabricated in Taiwan.

Some chips, such as the wireless baseband processors needed for new 5G communications abilities that Pentagon officials covet, require advanced manufacturing technology that has become a key selling point of TSMC.

“We in the Defense Department cannot afford to be shut out of all of those capabilities,” said Lisa Porter, deputy under secretary for research and engineering, in remarks at an event in July that were later widely circulated among chip makers.

Dr. Porter, at a technology event in Los Angeles on Wednesday, said secure supply chains for both essential components and software were a “macro” issue that the Pentagon and the tech industry had to collaborate on. She declined to discuss specific efforts to bolster American chip production. A Defense Department spokesman also declined to comment.

In another sign of action, Skywater Technology, a Minnesota chip manufacturing service, said this week that the Defense Department would invest up to $170 million to increase its production and enhance technologies, such as the ability to produce chips that can withstand radiation in space.

The Skywater investment illustrates how the Pentagon is also wrestling with how to upgrade aging technology at domestic companies that make small volumes of classified chips tailored for the military. Such “trusted” factories, as they are called, operate under Pentagon rules aimed at preventing sabotage or data theft.

Dr. Porter and other Pentagon officials have pushed for new technical safeguards besides guards and employee background checks to keep sensitive chip designs secure, a strategy that would help the Defense Department use more advanced commercial factories. She called the idea a “zero-trust” philosophy.

TSMC, which dominates the build-to-order services called foundries, recently took the lead from Intel in shrinking chip circuitry to give chips greater capability. Its production edge is one reason the company has continued to win business from big American chip designers such as Apple, Qualcomm and Nvidia, whose chips have become increasingly important for defense as well as civilian applications.

The United States remains the leading supplier and innovator in most chip technologies, including the processors that Intel sells for nearly all personal computers and server systems. But the Pentagon’s research arm — DARPA, for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency — has been trying since 2017 to spur chip innovations under a $1.5 billion Electronics Resurgence Initiative.

Its goals include finding alternatives to silicon for manufacturing and packaging small “chiplets” together instead of making big monolithic chips.

“We have vulnerabilities we really need to address, but we are still the dominant producer of electronics in the world,” said Mark Rosker, the director of DARPA’s microsystems technology office. He said questions about the American semiconductor industry called for “a graceful and considered kind of panic.”

Much of the recent urgency stems from China’s growing stature as a chip innovator. Designers there have developed chips for sensitive applications such as supercomputers. Many of the designers — including Huawei, a key target of the Trump administration in the trade war — also rely on TSMC for manufacturing.

Another impetus for action stems from a recent pullback by GlobalFoundries. The chip maker, owned by investors in Abu Dhabi, has spent around $12 billion on a sophisticated factory in Malta, N.Y. But it announced last year that it would stop trying to create smaller circuitry than that on its existing production processes.

GlobalFoundries now produces classified chips under the trusted foundry rules in two former IBM factories it took over in 2015. Company executives believe the technology in its Malta facility remains advanced enough to also serve military needs for years, and it is negotiating with officials to handle future classified work through proposed modifications to the government’s trusted foundry regulations. It recently filed a lawsuit accusing TSMC of patent infringement, an action that it said was aimed partly at protecting the American manufacturing base.

The company, which announced plans for a $10 billion factory in China in 2017, is also rethinking that project as the promised demand from customers there now seems uncertain, said Thomas Caufield, the chief executive of GlobalFoundries.

Influencing the chip industry used to be easier when the Defense Department accounted for a major portion of chip sales. Now defense applications are dwarfed by civilian uses, such as smartphones and personal computers. More of the Pentagon’s budget now goes to chips like memory and processors whose designs are shaped by commercial needs.

At a recent panel of semiconductor industry veterans in Silicon Valley, the concern about an overreliance on TSMC was evident.

“What will happen when China makes its drive toward Taiwan? What will happen to TSMC?” asked Diane Bryant, a former Intel executive who is now a technology investor. “What is our way out of this pickle?”

The panelists suggested that the federal government should subsidize more domestic chip production. But advanced commercial factories can cost as much as $15 billion, plus the additional recurring costs to run, staff and supply such facilities.

“It’s a big dilemma,” said Handel Jones, a semiconductor consultant with International Business Strategies. “Our assessment was you have to spend big money.”

Dr. Liu of TSMC dismissed fears about Taiwan’s continued autonomy. He said he was weighing the pros and cons of a new American factory, though it was too early for a decision. If the financial challenges are overcome, he said, any new facility is likely to be smaller than TSMC’s massive plants in Taiwan and built near a factory it operates in Camas, Wash.

“We want to do what makes the best sense for our customers to help them to be competitive, and also deal with national-security concerns,” Dr. Liu said.

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Kellyanne Conway responds to claims she threatened and bullied reporter in phone call

Westlake Legal Group kelly-ann-conway-sandra-smith-FOX Kellyanne Conway responds to claims she threatened and bullied reporter in phone call Julia Musto fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 17b603ac-9c28-54fa-bab9-d3e9771ca33d

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway denied bullying a reporter Friday after the Washington Examiner released a recording of a phone call in which Conway ripped into one of their staffers.

Appearing on “America’s Newsroom” with host Sandra Smith, Conway said that her comments to reporter Caitlin Yilek were not intended to be off-the-record and she “didn’t much care” whether they became public.

“Everything I said in that phone call I’ve said publicly before,” she said.

“By the way, you can’t characterize my feelings unless you’ve met me, talked to me, and asked me about my feelings. So, I called her and said, ‘Why would you characterize my feelings without even calling me to ask me about my feelings?’ That’s not reporting.”

In the phone conversation, which occurred on Thursday, Conway ripped into Yilek, who had mentioned Conway’s relationship with her husband, George, who has become an outspoken critic of President Trump on Twitter.

KELLYANNE CONWAY, IN HEATED CLASH WITH REPORTER, SAYS HUSBAND ‘GETS HIS POWER THROUGH ME’

Conway has rarely commented on her relationship while serving in the White House, as her husband continues his pointed criticisms. The two appeared to have mostly avoided criticizing one another, although Conway did tell Fox News in July that she “totally disagreed” with an op-ed her husband had written.

Additionally, President Trump famously called George Conway the “husband from Hell” in March and claimed he was jealous of his wife’s success.

“You’re really going places,” Conway told Yilek. “Let me tell you something, from a powerful woman — don’t pull the crap where you’re trying to undercut another woman based on who she’s married to. He gets his power through me, if you haven’t noticed.

“So, listen,” Conway continued, “if you’re going to cover my personal life…then we’re welcome to do the same around here. If it has nothing to do with my job, which it doesn’t, that’s obvious, then we’re either going to expect you to cover everybody’s personal life or we’re going to start covering them over here.

Conway told Smith in her Friday appearance on “America’s Newsroom,” “What I said is there for everybody to listen to and a lot of reporters, particularly old school reporters, have read it and contacted me. And, they have a very different opinion.”

Part of the call included Conway asking about the way Yilek performed her job and questioning her title.

“When I was young and starting in my career, I was in the friend-making business,” the White House adviser said on the call. “And I’ve worked super hard. You could have put that in paragraph two also. But I’m not caught in the middle of anything except trying to understand somebody whose title is breaking news reporter, what that means.”

CLICK HERE TO CHECK OUT THE FOX NEWS APP

In a statement released Thursday, Editor-in-Chief Hugo Gurdon said “Off the record conversations are agreed in good faith and in advance between people known to be participating. They are not, and never have been, blanket coverage to shield people who pull a bait and switch, peremptorily enter the conversation, and then spend ten minutes abusing, bullying and threating a reporter. Other organizations may agree to be played for saps, but the Washington Examiner won’t.”

Yilek had repeatedly asked if Conway wanted to speak to her editor, but Conway said she didn’t because it “wasn’t important to me.”

She urged viewers to “read her statement” about the interview on Twitter.

“The false tweet below makes my point about how dangerous it is to characterize someone else’s intentions, feelings, or state of mind, even if it’s for clicks and kicks,” she wrote.

“I know it got 15 minutes of fame, and I know it gets some kicks and clicks, but watch my statement,” she said. “But, focus on what I did say there. That George and I agree on many big things. We disagree on many big things. None of that affects my job here. And, exactly none of that is anybody’s business.

“I think that people constantly covering that is lazy, and it doesn’t add to the conversation. So, that’s all I asked,” she added.

Fox News’ Sam Dorman contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group kelly-ann-conway-sandra-smith-FOX Kellyanne Conway responds to claims she threatened and bullied reporter in phone call Julia Musto fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 17b603ac-9c28-54fa-bab9-d3e9771ca33d   Westlake Legal Group kelly-ann-conway-sandra-smith-FOX Kellyanne Conway responds to claims she threatened and bullied reporter in phone call Julia Musto fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 17b603ac-9c28-54fa-bab9-d3e9771ca33d

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‘Cha Cha Slide’ singer DJ Casper details cancer battle, says it was ‘God’s way of slowing me down’

The man behind the famous dance floor anthem “Cha Cha Slide” recently opened up about his battle with cancer.

DJ Casper – whose real name is Willie Perry Jr. – was diagnosed with kidney and liver cancer in 2016, according to ABC7. The diagnosis stunned the Chicago native, his wife, Joyce, previously told Jet magazine.

DAD’S SKIN CANCER BATTLE LEAVES HIM WITH MASSIVE CHUNK MISSING FROM NECK, BACK

“When he found out, it was kind of hard, because he’s always been a free-flowing person. So, to be stopped in his tracks was difficult for him, but I think he’s come to the point now that he’s accepted it,” she said at the time.

Now, three years later, Perry is celebrating remission.

Westlake Legal Group dj-casper-Facebook 'Cha Cha Slide' singer DJ Casper details cancer battle, says it was 'God’s way of slowing me down' Madeline Farber fox-news/health/cancer fox-news/faith-values/faith fox-news/entertainment/music fox news fnc/health fnc article 9e2b2231-2c45-50e4-9211-97e4290529e8

DJ Casper now spends time offering support and understanding to other cancer patients. (DJ Casper Facebook)

“Maybe in the process of me going through the cancer situation, that was God’s way of just slowing me down just a little bit,” he told ABC7. “But he kept me here for a reason, definitely for a reason.”

NORTH CAROLINA MOM DIAGNOSED WITH BREAST CANCER WHILE PREGNANT SAYS GOD, FAMILY HELPED HER THROUGH ILLNESS

The DJ now spends time at John H. Stroger, JR. Hospital of Cook County in Chicago with other cancer patients, offering support and understanding. He also appears at many cancer-focused charity events in the city where he often plays his 2000 hit song, he said.

“If you have the disease that they call cancer and you feel that you can get up and do this dance, let’s do it because that makes you feel better,” he said. “As long as you’re keeping that positive mind like, ‘Hey, we’re gonna beat this, I’m gonna win,’ you know you can do it.”

Westlake Legal Group dj-casper-Facebook 'Cha Cha Slide' singer DJ Casper details cancer battle, says it was 'God’s way of slowing me down' Madeline Farber fox-news/health/cancer fox-news/faith-values/faith fox-news/entertainment/music fox news fnc/health fnc article 9e2b2231-2c45-50e4-9211-97e4290529e8   Westlake Legal Group dj-casper-Facebook 'Cha Cha Slide' singer DJ Casper details cancer battle, says it was 'God’s way of slowing me down' Madeline Farber fox-news/health/cancer fox-news/faith-values/faith fox-news/entertainment/music fox news fnc/health fnc article 9e2b2231-2c45-50e4-9211-97e4290529e8

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