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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 128)

The Gulf Of Maine Is Warming, And Its Whales Are Disappearing

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1018270078_custom-fb90811b01e6d50e7458bfa2ac7cd619bbfff245-s1100-c15 The Gulf Of Maine Is Warming, And Its Whales Are Disappearing

A Minkey whale breaches the surface near Boothbay Harbor in the Gulf of Maine on Aug. 10, 2018. Researchers say warming in the gulf is driving whales into waters further north where fewer environmental protections exist. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The Gulf Of Maine Is Warming, And Its Whales Are Disappearing

A Minkey whale breaches the surface near Boothbay Harbor in the Gulf of Maine on Aug. 10, 2018. Researchers say warming in the gulf is driving whales into waters further north where fewer environmental protections exist.

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Each summer for the last two decades, Jim Parker has readied his small whale watch boat, and made a business out of ferrying tourists out into the cool blue waters of the Gulf of Maine.

For years, it was steady work. The basin brimmed with species that whales commonly feed on, making it a natural foraging ground for the aquatic giants. Whales would cluster at certain spots in the gulf, providing a reliable display for enchanted visitors to the coastal community of Milbridge, Maine.

But lately, the whales have been harder and harder to find. Waters in the gulf have been warming, sending the whales’ food supply searching for cooler temperatures. The whales have gone with them. Some days this summer, Parker says he didn’t spot a single one. Business fell 20%, forcing him to cut his season short.

To help make ends meet, he’s been leading nature tours instead of whale watching expeditions. It’s gotten so bad, Parker says, that he and his partner have considered moving away from whale watching.

“What I don’t want to do is put a half dozen people on the boat, have them all excited about going out and seeing whales when I know there’s not one there,” Parker says.

At a time of accelerating changes in the environment brought on by climate change, Parker’s struggles are a reflection of how coastal communities, their ecosystems and the businesses that rely on them, are being forced to adapt. It’s a challenge that is only growing more urgent, according to a dire report released by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change last month. The report found that over the last 25 years or so, oceanic warming has nearly doubled.

The changes have been especially pronounced in the Gulf of Maine, where data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Coral Reef Watch shows that waters are warming faster than 99% of the global ocean.

Loading…

Don’t see the graphic above? Click here.

Temperatures in the gulf — which stretches from Cape Cod to Nova Scotia — are climbing for two principle reasons, researchers say. First, rising air temperatures and greenhouse gas concentrations are causing oceanic warming worldwide. The U.N. says this warming has given way to a new phenomenon in the oceans: marine heat waves. Second, ice melt in Greenland is pumping fresh water out of the arctic, which has disturbed normal ocean currents in the region.

Andrew Pershing, the chief scientific officer at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, says these changing patterns are bringing warmer currents into the area, which disrupts whales’ prey: herring and sandlace fish, among other species.

“As we see this food web start to become disrupted and start to change, we’re seeing changes in where the whales are feeding,” Pershing says. As a result, whales are moving further north toward Canada in search of food — a shift that comes with a dangerous set of consequences.

With their changing migration patterns, the whales are increasingly navigating waters that haven’t yet been adapted to protect them — and they’re dying because of it.

So far this year, at least nine North Atlantic right whales have died in the Gulf of St. Lawrence along the Canadian coast, according to NOAA. Two years ago, 12 right whales died in Canadian waters, with five additional deaths coming along the United States East Coast. Fishing net entanglements and boat strikes were the primary causes of those deaths, according to data from NOAA.

The longer journey also has implications for whales’ reproductive rates.

“From a whale’s perspective it matters greatly,” says Sean Todd, a researcher at the College of the Atlantic, where he studies the diets of whales in the Gulf of Maine. It matters, he says, because whales have a particular “energy budget” that sustains them while migrating long distances.

“If you increase the energy expenditure a whale has to undergo to get to its food, then the animal does not meet its calorific needs. And if it’s a female, that could very likely result in a failure of pregnancy.”

Today, there are around 400 remaining North Atlantic right whales in the world, according to an estimate by NOAA. Of those, less than 95 are breeding females.

Todd warns that shifting migration patterns could mean “lower reproductive rates” for whales in the gulf, which risks bringing their populations “down to endangered status.”

While animals can adapt to climate change, that process can take hundreds, if not thousands, of years, Todd says — not nearly fast enough to keep up with the rapidly accelerating effects of climate change.

Today, Todd says the Gulf of Maine resembles the oceanic equivalent of a desert. In the old days, there might have been 1,000 whales in the waters of the Gulf of Maine, he adds. Now, it’s a fraction of that.

“That’s really difficult for me to be out here now, and see a flat ocean with almost no biological activity readily observable,” says Todd. “Five, 10 years ago, I could be out here and we would have our pick of animals to work with.”

Parker has seen these changes too, and while he agrees “100% the climate is changing,” he says he’s still not convinced that it’s warming.

“If you look back in history you can’t find a 10-year period in history, we didn’t have climate change of some form,” Parker says.

The overwhelming scientific consensus refutes this notion, and as Pershing says, it gives the U.S. an “imperative” to figure out how to adapt to the “rapidly changing ocean.” In the coming years, he predicts that places ranging from Norway, to Alaska and the Caribbean will also be subject to dramatic oceanic shifts.

But “it’s only in the United States where climate change has become a politically based argument,” according to Todd.

“Will we save the Gulf of Maine? I don’t know. I don’t know if we can or not. But I hope we can save the planet.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The Gulf Of Maine Is Warming, And Its Whales Are Disappearing

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1018270078_custom-fb90811b01e6d50e7458bfa2ac7cd619bbfff245-s1100-c15 The Gulf Of Maine Is Warming, And Its Whales Are Disappearing

A Minkey whale breaches the surface near Boothbay Harbor in the Gulf of Maine on Aug. 10, 2018. Researchers say warming in the gulf is driving whales into waters further north where fewer environmental protections exist. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The Gulf Of Maine Is Warming, And Its Whales Are Disappearing

A Minkey whale breaches the surface near Boothbay Harbor in the Gulf of Maine on Aug. 10, 2018. Researchers say warming in the gulf is driving whales into waters further north where fewer environmental protections exist.

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Each summer for the last two decades, Jim Parker has readied his small whale watch boat, and made a business out of ferrying tourists out into the cool blue waters of the Gulf of Maine.

For years, it was steady work. The basin brimmed with species that whales commonly feed on, making it a natural foraging ground for the aquatic giants. Whales would cluster at certain spots in the gulf, providing a reliable display for enchanted visitors to the coastal community of Milbridge, Maine.

But lately, the whales have been harder and harder to find. Waters in the gulf have been warming, sending the whales’ food supply searching for cooler temperatures. The whales have gone with them. Some days this summer, Parker says he didn’t spot a single one. Business fell 20%, forcing him to cut his season short.

To help make ends meet, he’s been leading nature tours instead of whale watching expeditions. It’s gotten so bad, Parker says, that he and his partner have considered moving away from whale watching.

“What I don’t want to do is put a half dozen people on the boat, have them all excited about going out and seeing whales when I know there’s not one there,” Parker says.

At a time of accelerating changes in the environment brought on by climate change, Parker’s struggles are a reflection of how coastal communities, their ecosystems and the businesses that rely on them, are being forced to adapt. It’s a challenge that is only growing more urgent, according to a dire report released by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change last month. The report found that over the last 25 years or so, oceanic warming has nearly doubled.

The changes have been especially pronounced in the Gulf of Maine, where data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Coral Reef Watch shows that waters are warming faster than 99% of the global ocean.

Loading…

Don’t see the graphic above? Click here.

Temperatures in the gulf — which stretches from Cape Cod to Nova Scotia — are climbing for two principle reasons, researchers say. First, rising air temperatures and greenhouse gas concentrations are causing oceanic warming worldwide. The U.N. says this warming has given way to a new phenomenon in the oceans: marine heat waves. Second, ice melt in Greenland is pumping fresh water out of the arctic, which has disturbed normal ocean currents in the region.

Andrew Pershing, the chief scientific officer at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, says these changing patterns are bringing warmer currents into the area, which disrupts whales’ prey: herring and sandlace fish, among other species.

“As we see this food web start to become disrupted and start to change, we’re seeing changes in where the whales are feeding,” Pershing says. As a result, whales are moving further north toward Canada in search of food — a shift that comes with a dangerous set of consequences.

With their changing migration patterns, the whales are increasingly navigating waters that haven’t yet been adapted to protect them — and they’re dying because of it.

So far this year, at least nine North Atlantic right whales have died in the Gulf of St. Lawrence along the Canadian coast, according to NOAA. Two years ago, 12 right whales died in Canadian waters, with five additional deaths coming along the United States East Coast. Fishing net entanglements and boat strikes were the primary causes of those deaths, according to data from NOAA.

The longer journey also has implications for whales’ reproductive rates.

“From a whale’s perspective it matters greatly,” says Sean Todd, a researcher at the College of the Atlantic, where he studies the diets of whales in the Gulf of Maine. It matters, he says, because whales have a particular “energy budget” that sustains them while migrating long distances.

“If you increase the energy expenditure a whale has to undergo to get to its food, then the animal does not meet its calorific needs. And if it’s a female, that could very likely result in a failure of pregnancy.”

Today, there are around 400 remaining North Atlantic right whales in the world, according to an estimate by NOAA. Of those, less than 95 are breeding females.

Todd warns that shifting migration patterns could mean “lower reproductive rates” for whales in the gulf, which risks bringing their populations “down to endangered status.”

While animals can adapt to climate change, that process can take hundreds, if not thousands, of years, Todd says — not nearly fast enough to keep up with the rapidly accelerating effects of climate change.

Today, Todd says the Gulf of Maine resembles the oceanic equivalent of a desert. In the old days, there might have been 1,000 whales in the waters of the Gulf of Maine, he adds. Now, it’s a fraction of that.

“That’s really difficult for me to be out here now, and see a flat ocean with almost no biological activity readily observable,” says Todd. “Five, 10 years ago, I could be out here and we would have our pick of animals to work with.”

Parker has seen these changes too, and while he agrees “100% the climate is changing,” he says he’s still not convinced that it’s warming.

“If you look back in history you can’t find a 10-year period in history, we didn’t have climate change of some form,” Parker says.

The overwhelming scientific consensus refutes this notion, and as Pershing says, it gives the U.S. an “imperative” to figure out how to adapt to the “rapidly changing ocean.” In the coming years, he predicts that places ranging from Norway, to Alaska and the Caribbean will also be subject to dramatic oceanic shifts.

But “it’s only in the United States where climate change has become a politically based argument,” according to Todd.

“Will we save the Gulf of Maine? I don’t know. I don’t know if we can or not. But I hope we can save the planet.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The Gulf Of Maine Is Warming, And Its Whales Are Disappearing

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1018270078_custom-fb90811b01e6d50e7458bfa2ac7cd619bbfff245-s1100-c15 The Gulf Of Maine Is Warming, And Its Whales Are Disappearing

A Minkey whale breaches the surface near Boothbay Harbor in the Gulf of Maine on Aug. 10, 2018. Researchers say warming in the gulf is driving whales into waters further north where fewer environmental protections exist. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The Gulf Of Maine Is Warming, And Its Whales Are Disappearing

A Minkey whale breaches the surface near Boothbay Harbor in the Gulf of Maine on Aug. 10, 2018. Researchers say warming in the gulf is driving whales into waters further north where fewer environmental protections exist.

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Each summer for the last two decades, Jim Parker has readied his small whale watch boat, and made a business out of ferrying tourists out into the cool blue waters of the Gulf of Maine.

For years, it was steady work. The basin brimmed with species that whales commonly feed on, making it a natural foraging ground for the aquatic giants. Whales would cluster at certain spots in the gulf, providing a reliable display for enchanted visitors to the coastal community of Milbridge, Maine.

But lately, the whales have been harder and harder to find. Waters in the gulf have been warming, sending the whales’ food supply searching for cooler temperatures. The whales have gone with them. Some days this summer, Parker says he didn’t spot a single one. Business fell 20%, forcing him to cut his season short.

To help make ends meet, he’s been leading nature tours instead of whale watching expeditions. It’s gotten so bad, Parker says, that he and his partner have considered moving away from whale watching.

“What I don’t want to do is put a half dozen people on the boat, have them all excited about going out and seeing whales when I know there’s not one there,” Parker says.

At a time of accelerating changes in the environment brought on by climate change, Parker’s struggles are a reflection of how coastal communities, their ecosystems and the businesses that rely on them, are being forced to adapt. It’s a challenge that is only growing more urgent, according to a dire report released by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change last month. The report found that over the last 25 years or so, oceanic warming has nearly doubled.

The changes have been especially pronounced in the Gulf of Maine, where data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Coral Reef Watch shows that waters are warming faster than 99% of the global ocean.

Loading…

Don’t see the graphic above? Click here.

Temperatures in the gulf — which stretches from Cape Cod to Nova Scotia — are climbing for two principle reasons, researchers say. First, rising air temperatures and greenhouse gas concentrations are causing oceanic warming worldwide. The U.N. says this warming has given way to a new phenomenon in the oceans: marine heat waves. Second, ice melt in Greenland is pumping fresh water out of the arctic, which has disturbed normal ocean currents in the region.

Andrew Pershing, the chief scientific officer at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, says these changing patterns are bringing warmer currents into the area, which disrupts whales’ prey: herring and sandlace fish, among other species.

“As we see this food web start to become disrupted and start to change, we’re seeing changes in where the whales are feeding,” Pershing says. As a result, whales are moving further north toward Canada in search of food — a shift that comes with a dangerous set of consequences.

With their changing migration patterns, the whales are increasingly navigating waters that haven’t yet been adapted to protect them — and they’re dying because of it.

So far this year, at least nine North Atlantic right whales have died in the Gulf of St. Lawrence along the Canadian coast, according to NOAA. Two years ago, 12 right whales died in Canadian waters, with five additional deaths coming along the United States East Coast. Fishing net entanglements and boat strikes were the primary causes of those deaths, according to data from NOAA.

The longer journey also has implications for whales’ reproductive rates.

“From a whale’s perspective it matters greatly,” says Sean Todd, a researcher at the College of the Atlantic, where he studies the diets of whales in the Gulf of Maine. It matters, he says, because whales have a particular “energy budget” that sustains them while migrating long distances.

“If you increase the energy expenditure a whale has to undergo to get to its food, then the animal does not meet its calorific needs. And if it’s a female, that could very likely result in a failure of pregnancy.”

Today, there are around 400 remaining North Atlantic right whales in the world, according to an estimate by NOAA. Of those, less than 95 are breeding females.

Todd warns that shifting migration patterns could mean “lower reproductive rates” for whales in the gulf, which risks bringing their populations “down to endangered status.”

While animals can adapt to climate change, that process can take hundreds, if not thousands, of years, Todd says — not nearly fast enough to keep up with the rapidly accelerating effects of climate change.

Today, Todd says the Gulf of Maine resembles the oceanic equivalent of a desert. In the old days, there might have been 1,000 whales in the waters of the Gulf of Maine, he adds. Now, it’s a fraction of that.

“That’s really difficult for me to be out here now, and see a flat ocean with almost no biological activity readily observable,” says Todd. “Five, 10 years ago, I could be out here and we would have our pick of animals to work with.”

Parker has seen these changes too, and while he agrees “100% the climate is changing,” he says he’s still not convinced that it’s warming.

“If you look back in history you can’t find a 10-year period in history, we didn’t have climate change of some form,” Parker says.

The overwhelming scientific consensus refutes this notion, and as Pershing says, it gives the U.S. an “imperative” to figure out how to adapt to the “rapidly changing ocean.” In the coming years, he predicts that places ranging from Norway, to Alaska and the Caribbean will also be subject to dramatic oceanic shifts.

But “it’s only in the United States where climate change has become a politically based argument,” according to Todd.

“Will we save the Gulf of Maine? I don’t know. I don’t know if we can or not. But I hope we can save the planet.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘I literally do not know what he’s talking about’: Trump’s story about my apology to him never happened, CNN host says: Van Jones suggests president may have confused him with John Legend

Westlake Legal Group 3ht2NxB_-ku6kl1Y9JyDyL_kHCeS1slRHiQHl4uC2bU 'I literally do not know what he's talking about': Trump's story about my apology to him never happened, CNN host says: Van Jones suggests president may have confused him with John Legend r/politics

O’Brien asked Trump about the painting: “Was it an original?” Trump said it was. O’Brien disagreed, and Trump protested: Yes, it was an original.

“Donald, it’s not,” O’Brien said. “I grew up in Chicago, that Renoir is called Two Sisters on the Terrace and it’s hanging on a wall at the Art Institute of Chicago. That’s not an original.”

Trump apparently did not agree but O’Brien dropped the subject and continued the interview, thinking it would not be discussed again. However, boarding the jet again to return to New York City, O’Brien says Trump pointed to the painting again. As though the previous conversation had never happened, he reportedly said: “You know, that’s original Renoir.” O’Brien chose not to respond.

Years later, when Trump became President of the United States of America, O’Brien says he spotted it hanging in the background during one of his first interviews as president-elect.

O’Brien said that the story was emblematic of how Trump “believes his own lies in a way that lasts for decades.”

“Its foundation is that he’s the final arbiter of what is true and what isn’t,” he continued, “and it’s one of the reasons that he’s so dangerous.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ginger Baker, Cream’s Legendary And Fiery Drummer, Dies At 80

Westlake Legal Group 5d99d18d2100002e04321706 Ginger Baker, Cream’s Legendary And Fiery Drummer, Dies At 80

LONDON (AP) — Ginger Baker, the volatile and propulsive British musician who was best known for his time with the power trio Cream, has died at 80, his family says.

Baker’s family said on Twitter that he died Sunday: “We are very sad to say that Ginger has passed away peacefully in hospital this morning.”

Gary Hibbert, a media representative for Baker’s family, confirmed his death.

Baker wielded his blues power and jazz technique to help break open popular music and become one of the world’s most admired and feared musicians.

With blazing eyes and orange-red hair, and a temperament to match, the London native ranked with The Who’s Keith Moon and Led Zeppelin’s John Bonham as the embodiment of musical and personal fury. Using twin bass drums, Baker fashioned a pounding, poly-rhythmic style uncommonly swift and heavy that inspired and intimidated countless musicians. But every beat seemed to mirror an offstage eruption — whether his violent dislike of Cream bandmate Jack Bruce or his on-camera assault of a documentary maker, Jay Bulger, whom he smashed in the nose with his walking stick.

Bulger would call the film, released in 2012, “Beware of Mr. Baker.”

While the Rolling Stone magazine once ranked him the third-greatest rock drummer of all time, behind Moon and Bonham, Baker had contempt for Moon and others he dismissed as “bashers” without style or background. Baker and his many admirers saw him as a rounded, sophisticated musician — an arranger, composer and student of the craft absorbing sounds from around the world. He had been playing jazz since he was a teenager and spent years in Africa in the 1970s, forming a close friendship with the Nigerian musician-activist Fela Kuti.

“He was so unique and had such a distinctive personality,” Stewart Copeland of the Police told www.musicradar.com in 2013. “Nobody else followed in his footsteps. Everybody tried to be John Bonham and copy his licks, but it’s rare that you hear anybody doing the Ginger Baker thing.”

But many fans thought of him as a rock star, who teamed with Eric Clapton and Bruce in the mid-1960s to become Cream — one of the first supergroups and first power trios. All three were known individually in the London blues scene and together they helped make rock history by elevating instrumental prowess above the songs themselves, even as they had hits with “Sunshine of Your Love,” “I Feel Free” and “White Room.”

Cream was among the most successful acts of its time, selling more than 10 million records. But by 1968 Baker and Bruce had worn each other out and even Clapton had tired of their deafening, marathon jams, including the Baker showcase “Toad,” one of rock’s first extended drum solos. Cream split up at the end of the year, departing with two sold-out shows at London’s Albert Hall. When told by Bulger that he was a founding father of heavy metal, Baker snarled that the genre “should have been aborted.”

To the surprise of many, especially Clapton, he and Baker were soon part of another super group, Blind Faith, which also featured singer-keyboardist Stevie Winwood and bassist Ric Grech.

As Clapton would recall, he and Winwood had been playing informally when Baker turned up (Baker would allege that Clapton invited him). Named Blind Faith by a rueful Clapton, the band was overwhelmed by expectations from the moment it debuted in June 1969 before some 100,000 at a concert in London’s Hyde Park. It split up after completing just one, self-titled album, as notable for its cover photo of a topless young girl as for its music. A highlight from the record: Baker’s cymbal splashes on Winwood’s lyrical ballad “Can’t Find My Way Home.”

From the 1970s on, Baker was ever more unpredictable. He moved to Nigeria, took up polo, drove a Land Rover across the Sahara, lived on a ranch in South Africa, divorced his first wife and married three more times.

He recorded with Kuti and other Nigerians, jammed with Art Blakey, Elvin Jones and other jazz drummers and played with John Lydon’s Public Image Ltd. He founded Ginger Baker’s Air Force, which cost a fortune and imploded after two albums. He endured his old enemy, Bruce, when Cream was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993 and for Cream reunion concerts a decade later. Bruce died in 2014.

Baker continued to perform regularly in his 70s despite arthritis, heart trouble, hearing loss dating from his years with Cream and lung disease from smoking. No strangers to vices and not a fan of modesty, he called his memoir “Hellraiser: The Autobiography of the World’s Greatest Drummer.”

“John Bonham once made a statement that there were only two drummers in British rock ‘n’ roll; himself and Ginger Baker,” Baker wrote in his book. “My reaction to this was, ‘You cheeky little bastard!’”

Born in 1939, Peter Edward Baker was the son of a bricklayer killed during World War II when Ginger was just 4. His father left behind a letter that Ginger Baker would quote from: “Use your fists; they’re your best pals so often.”

Baker was a drummer from early on, even rapping out rhythms on his school desk as he mimicked the big band music he loved and didn’t let the occasional caning from a teacher deter him. As a teenager, he was playing in local groups and was mentored by percussionist Phil Seamen.

“At this party, there was a little band and all the kids chanted at me, ‘Play the drums!’”, Baker told The Independent in 2009. “I’d never sat behind a kit before, but I sat down — and I could play! One of the musicians turned round and said, ‘Bloody hell, we’ve got a drummer’, and I thought, ‘Bloody hell, I’m a drummer.’”

Baker came of age just as London was learning the blues, with such future superstars as Clapton, Mick Jagger and Jimmy Page among the pioneers. Baker joined Alexis Korner’s Blues Incorporated, where he met (and soon disliked, for allegedly playing too loud) the Scottish-born bassist Jack Bruce, with whom he was thrown together again as members of the popular British group the Graham Bond Organization.

Clapton, meanwhile, was London’s hottest guitarist, thanks to his work with the Yardbirds and John Mayall’s Blues Breakers, his extraordinary speed and agility inspiring “Clapton is God” graffiti. Clapton, Baker and Bruce would call their band Cream because they considered themselves the best musicians around.

“Oh for god’s sake, I’ve never played rock,” Baker told the blog JazzWax in 2013. “Cream was two jazz players and a blues guitarist playing improvised music. We never played the same thing two nights running. Jack and I had been in jazz bands for years. All that stuff I did on the drums in Cream didn’t come from drugs, either. It was from me. It was jazz.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump should be allowed ‘confrontation rights’ against Ukraine call whistleblower, ex-Clinton prosecutor says

Westlake Legal Group Robert-Ray Trump should be allowed 'confrontation rights' against Ukraine call whistleblower, ex-Clinton prosecutor says fox-news/shows/life-liberty-levin fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 126b9b89-ee2c-5bd0-8eb7-88e3fd3c1085

President Trump should be afforded “confrontation rights” when it comes to the whistleblower that set off the Democrats’ impeachment inquiry, according to an independent counsel who prosecuted former President Bill Clinton’s probe.

“Although the act of impeachment is not actually the same thing as a judicial proceeding, it shares many of the same components,” ex-Whitewater prosecutor Robert Ray told Mark Levin in an interview airing Sunday on “Life, Liberty & Levin.”

VICTOR DAVIS HANSON: HUNTER BIDEN’S UKRAINE BUSINESS DEALINGS ‘LOOK VERY SUSPICIOUS’

“If we’re going to be in a proceeding where the consequences are potentially the removal from office, the president enjoys obviously, as he’s suggested, confrontation rights,” Ray said. “And, that doesn’t allow for hiding behind anonymity — and it certainly doesn’t preclude full and extensive cross-examination of the basis of the whistleblower’s complaint.”

The Sixth Amendment to the Constitution includes the so-called Confrontation Clause, which states that “[i]n all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right … to be confronted with the witnesses against him.”

More from Media

“We always in this country, particularly with regard to important matters, have due process — one of the sort of pillars of our constitutional structure contained in the Bill of Rights.”

In response, Levin said the impeachment inquiry heralded by lawmakers like Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., seems “choreographed.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

“They’re going to bring out this — I say so-called — whistleblower. They’re going to bring this person out when Schiff decides they’re going to bring him out,” said Levin, adding the Democrats appear to know more about the case than Republicans or the average American.

Ray agreed, telling Levin the situation rings similar to the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

“Not only do they know about it behind the screen, that they’ve had a heads up even before the whistleblower complaint was filed,” Ray said. “But if you had any doubts about that, just go back most recently to the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings if you want an example of the Democratic Party being involved in a heads-up about what was coming in order to coordinate their activities.”

Following independent counsel Kenneth Starr’s resignation from the Whitewater probe following the impeachment of Clinton and his acquittal in a Senate trial, Ray continued the investigation and filed the case’s final report in 2002.

He also served as independent counsel in the investigation involving Clinton secretary of agriculture Mike Espy, who unsuccessfully ran for the U.S. Senate from Mississippi in 2018 and is reportedly seeking the office again in 2020.

Westlake Legal Group Robert-Ray Trump should be allowed 'confrontation rights' against Ukraine call whistleblower, ex-Clinton prosecutor says fox-news/shows/life-liberty-levin fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 126b9b89-ee2c-5bd0-8eb7-88e3fd3c1085   Westlake Legal Group Robert-Ray Trump should be allowed 'confrontation rights' against Ukraine call whistleblower, ex-Clinton prosecutor says fox-news/shows/life-liberty-levin fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 126b9b89-ee2c-5bd0-8eb7-88e3fd3c1085

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Kim Komando on black hat hackers, VHS archives, smart homes for seniors, and more: Tech Q&A

Hacker Tales

Q: I’ve heard of white hat hackers and black hat hackers. What do they do? Have you ever been hacked?

A: Most of us will never encounter a white hat hacker. In general, they are busy testing major security networks. But you have almost certainly benefited from their work, even if you will never know who they are: white hat hackers help companies protect consumers against black hat hackers.  If you want to learn more about the difference, as well as my own experiences with internet security, I strongly recommend watching my interview with a white hat hacker. It’s pretty enlightening. Tap or click here for a video about my hacking experience.

Archive Your Analog

Q: My photos and videotapes are sitting in shoeboxes. It’s a mess. What can I do to get them into the cloud or something like that?

A: Not long ago, I knew several people who were re-photographing their old slides. They would project the old carousel images on the wall and then, using a tripod, snap a picture with a digital camera. Just remember: the digital versions are all you’ll have, so you don’t necessarily want to scrimp on quality. Luckily, an entire industry has grown around digital transfers, and you no longer require bulky or expensive equipment to turn old Polaroids and VHS tapes into sharp digital files. Such services are likely as close as your nearest Costco. They aren’t exactly free, but you may be surprised how affordable these upgraded copies are. Tap or click here for easy ways to preserve your old photos and videotapes.

Better Than Tech Support

Q: I have questions that are the tech support type. Can you help me fix my digital issues?

A: That’s what I’m here for. But there’s only one of me, and there are so many people with questions to answer. While my radio shows, podcasts, and newsletters are a great place to find out the latest tips and breaking news, I wanted to create a positive space for tech enthusiasts to help each other out. Komando Community is like a social media network, minus all the junk and fake accounts. You, you can meet likeminded individuals with a wealth of knowledge, many of whom work in the tech industry and have ready answers to all your questions. I can’t guarantee you will find exactly the answer you’re looking for, but I can definitely guarantee that the Komando Community is more fun than filing a ticket and waiting for a technician to call you back. Tap or click here to join the official Komando Community

Wi-Fi Fix

Q: The Wi-Fi stinks. It works great in one part of the house, and on the other side, it’s practically dead. What’s the fix? Is there one?

A: Houses are notoriously bad environments for a strong Wi-Fi signal, and users frequently hit dead spots in their dens and living rooms. But assuming you have tried a little troubleshooting already, you may find that your modem and router simply don’t work very well in the space you occupy. Your more technical option is to buy a Wi-Fi extender, which, true to its name, extends your Wi-Fi signal to the weaker corners of your house. Wi-Fi extenders are not all created equal, and you definitely don’t want to waste your money on a substandard product. Luckily, I’ve already cataloged the best on the market. Tap or click here for the best Wi-Fi extenders.

Senior Smart Tech

Q: I’d like to get my older parents smart tech to turn off the lights and lock the door. They’re not tech-savvy. Can you recommend any tech they might be able to use?

A: This is an important question because it may be the best use of smart technology. I sometimes encounter critics of smart homes who insist that intelligent devices make us “lazy.” But one thing we can all agree on: the older we get, the more we could use a little help to get through our daily tasks. A medical alert smartwatch can automatically contact emergency services, and a smart vacuum can help folks with ambulatory issues to tidy up the house. A walk can happen without a set of keys, which is helpful if you have a habit of misplacing things. You could argue that smart homes were designed for senior living, providing a whole world of freedom and independence. Tap or click here for smart home gadgets that won’t break the bank.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Copyright 2019, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on the Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.     

Westlake Legal Group 547008-hacker-hacking-security Kim Komando on black hat hackers, VHS archives, smart homes for seniors, and more: Tech Q&A The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fnc/tech fnc article 34beaf1e-32ab-5c75-8238-a4e17b7b4521   Westlake Legal Group 547008-hacker-hacking-security Kim Komando on black hat hackers, VHS archives, smart homes for seniors, and more: Tech Q&A The Kim Komando Show Kim Komando fnc/tech fnc article 34beaf1e-32ab-5c75-8238-a4e17b7b4521

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Trump should be allowed ‘confrontation rights’ against Ukraine call whistleblower, ex-Clinton prosecutor says

Westlake Legal Group Robert-Ray Trump should be allowed 'confrontation rights' against Ukraine call whistleblower, ex-Clinton prosecutor says fox-news/shows/life-liberty-levin fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 126b9b89-ee2c-5bd0-8eb7-88e3fd3c1085

President Trump should be afforded “confrontation rights” when it comes to the whistleblower that set off the Democrats’ impeachment inquiry, according to an independent counsel who prosecuted former President Bill Clinton’s probe.

“Although the act of impeachment is not actually the same thing as a judicial proceeding, it shares many of the same components,” ex-Whitewater prosecutor Robert Ray told Mark Levin in an interview airing Sunday on “Life, Liberty & Levin.”

VICTOR DAVIS HANSON: HUNTER BIDEN’S UKRAINE BUSINESS DEALINGS ‘LOOK VERY SUSPICIOUS’

“If we’re going to be in a proceeding where the consequences are potentially the removal from office, the president enjoys obviously, as he’s suggested, confrontation rights,” Ray said. “And, that doesn’t allow for hiding behind anonymity — and it certainly doesn’t preclude full and extensive cross-examination of the basis of the whistleblower’s complaint.”

The Sixth Amendment to the Constitution includes the so-called Confrontation Clause, which states that “[i]n all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right … to be confronted with the witnesses against him.”

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“We always in this country, particularly with regard to important matters, have due process — one of the sort of pillars of our constitutional structure contained in the Bill of Rights.”

In response, Levin said the impeachment inquiry heralded by lawmakers like Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., seems “choreographed.”

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“They’re going to bring out this — I say so-called — whistleblower. They’re going to bring this person out when Schiff decides they’re going to bring him out,” said Levin, adding the Democrats appear to know more about the case than Republicans or the average American.

Ray agreed, telling Levin the situation rings similar to the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

“Not only do they know about it behind the screen, that they’ve had a heads up even before the whistleblower complaint was filed,” Ray said. “But if you had any doubts about that, just go back most recently to the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings if you want an example of the Democratic Party being involved in a heads-up about what was coming in order to coordinate their activities.”

Following independent counsel Kenneth Starr’s resignation from the Whitewater probe following the impeachment of Clinton and his acquittal in a Senate trial, Ray continued the investigation and filed the case’s final report in 2002.

He also served as independent counsel in the investigation involving Clinton secretary of agriculture Mike Espy, who unsuccessfully ran for the U.S. Senate from Mississippi in 2018 and is reportedly seeking the office again in 2020.

Westlake Legal Group Robert-Ray Trump should be allowed 'confrontation rights' against Ukraine call whistleblower, ex-Clinton prosecutor says fox-news/shows/life-liberty-levin fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 126b9b89-ee2c-5bd0-8eb7-88e3fd3c1085   Westlake Legal Group Robert-Ray Trump should be allowed 'confrontation rights' against Ukraine call whistleblower, ex-Clinton prosecutor says fox-news/shows/life-liberty-levin fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 126b9b89-ee2c-5bd0-8eb7-88e3fd3c1085

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Bostonians Lament Loss Of 137-Year-Old Pub And Its Trove Of History

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-631333544_wide-b92c9c9c091558c979ae8d5153364e1a927ab959-s1100-c15 Bostonians Lament Loss Of 137-Year-Old Pub And Its Trove Of History

Doyle’s owner, Gerry Burke Jr., is selling the cafe’s liquor license. The restaurant business has changed, and for Burke, the pub (shown here in 2015) is no longer viable. Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Bostonians Lament Loss Of 137-Year-Old Pub And Its Trove Of History

Doyle’s owner, Gerry Burke Jr., is selling the cafe’s liquor license. The restaurant business has changed, and for Burke, the pub (shown here in 2015) is no longer viable.

Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Doyle’s Café, which has been serving up drinks and food to locals, famous politicians and Hollywood celebs in Jamaica Plain since 1882, is expected to close its doors by the end of October. Its owner says he can’t afford to keep the business running in the Boston neighborhood..

The landmark pub may not be fancy, but Doyle’s is the kind of place where you might find a governor hanging out.

“It’s a resource for a lot of different people, for a lot of different things,” said Michael Weinstein, a Jamaica Plain neighbor and faithful Doyle’s patron. “People have all kinds of parties. We’ve had parties in the back for our family and stuff. Organizations have parties back there. I mean … there’s no place that can replicate what they do here.”

Now the place is going away. No one at Doyle’s could say exactly when the cafe will close, though they expect it will be by the end of the month. In fact, none of the staff wanted to talk at all, pointing out that not only was Boston losing an institution, but they were all losing their jobs.

Doyle’s owner, Gerry Burke Jr., is selling the cafe’s liquor license to a local steakhouse chain Davio’s, which is planning a massive 15,000-square-foot restaurant in the Seaport, where another Boston institution, Anthony’s Pier 4 restaurant, used to be. The license is expected to fetch around $450,000. The transfer was approved last month by the city.

A Facebook group has been set up, called Save Doyle’s Cafe, but that’s unlikely to happen.

“Will there be development? Yes, the answer to that is yes. We are selling the property with the potential for development of some sort,” said Peter Gori, a spokesman for the building’s owner. “We are open to discussing anything. I have been asked to entertain any and all discussion about, frankly, anything.”

Gori said the family would love to be able to keep the place going, but the restaurant business has changed, and Doyle’s as it is now just isn’t viable.

Westlake Legal Group dsc_9647_custom-71332989fb82cbad6c106adad712b440656698e8-s1100-c15 Bostonians Lament Loss Of 137-Year-Old Pub And Its Trove Of History

Doyle’s is a place open to everyone, townies, tourists and Hollywood celebs when they are in town filming. But Doyle’s may be best known as a spot where politicians have gone to press the flesh. Meredith Nierman/WGBH hide caption

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Meredith Nierman/WGBH

“The restaurant is an institution, the bar is an institution, but it needs many hundreds of thousands of dollars in upgrades,” Gori said. “In terms of things like handicapped accessibility … the aesthetics don’t lend themselves to how people dine today. The layout is obsolete, the kitchen needs a complete overhaul.”

Gori said that doesn’t mean there won’t continue to be a Doyle’s of some sort. The name can be sold with the building, and he expects whoever buys the property will see the name as a selling point. He said he could envision someone setting up another Irish pub in addition to housing.

“We’ve been coming every Friday night — every Friday night — for 40 years after basketball,” said Weinstein. “So we’re distraught. We have our own table in the back. The waitresses all know you’re the guy who drinks Corona, you’re the guy who drinks Jameson … They know who we are.”

Doyle’s is a place open to everyone, townies, tourists and Hollywood celebs when they are in town filming. But Doyle’s may be best known as a spot where politicians have gone to press the flesh.

“It was the closest thing Boston had to a citywide living room because everyone was welcome there,” said WGBH News’ political analyst Peter Kadzis. “Other political watering holes were, well, more tribal.”

Audrey Fannon has lived a few minutes away from Doyle’s for about 60 years, since third grade. She called the closing the end of an era and wondered if there’s any place in the area that could ever match the ambiance. She also expressed the concerns of many that the building will be turned into yet another boxy brick and steel condo building, unaffordable to most of the people who live here now.

“It definitely feels like JP is changing a lot in the past few months, accelerating from the past few years,” said 28-year-old Sophia Silverglass, who grew up in the neighborhood. “All these old places that I remember from my childhood, everything’s disappearing.”

Silverglass said she grew up at Doyle’s, going with her mother’s group of friends who played softball together.

In addition to being a famed gathering place, Doyle’s is home to a treasure trove of memorabilia — pictures, photographs, ephemera — reflecting the 137 years the bar has been in business. It’s a history that neighbors would like to see preserved.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-585817762_custom-0550c711904c3b85aa043849bf84aa8c8cc52252-s1100-c15 Bostonians Lament Loss Of 137-Year-Old Pub And Its Trove Of History

A telephone booth from 1882, which could only be used for receiving calls, is pictured at Doyle’s Cafe in Boston, July 21, 2016. It is one of three telephone booths in the restaurant. Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Bostonians Lament Loss Of 137-Year-Old Pub And Its Trove Of History

A telephone booth from 1882, which could only be used for receiving calls, is pictured at Doyle’s Cafe in Boston, July 21, 2016. It is one of three telephone booths in the restaurant.

Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images

“There is an unbelievable trove of history in this place — all the photos, newspaper clippings, paintings and so forth,” said Richard Youngstrom, an artist who lives about five minutes away. “And it would be a shame if something couldn’t be done with that, you know, that was useful.”

Youngstrom was part of a group who met at Doyle’s this week to figure if they could petition the Burke family to save the memorabilia, though Youngstrom said he’s not sure what would happen to it all. He suggested someone could set up a museum or another kind of repository where people could view the history, since the walls of Doyle’s Cafe won’t be available for much longer.

“At the very least,” Youngstrom said, “there’s gotta be some kind of farewell party where people get to tell their stories.”

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The Movement Bernie Started Is Bigger Than Any One Person. Have Faith in That Movement, Not Just the Man.

Westlake Legal Group oRqAerTKbYeOPOysZ3aRjWhXJ0oPoI0eOiaYrYeeXns The Movement Bernie Started Is Bigger Than Any One Person. Have Faith in That Movement, Not Just the Man. r/politics

He fights for the issues that are dear to us, and people trust him to fill his administration with those who will carry on in these fights. I have no doubt that his administration will be one of moral integrity. That every person appointed and hired will truly have these ideals at heart and will have the moral fortitude to stand up to corporate interests and lobbyists. A government for the people and by the people. And while I would love for Sanders to fill the role of president for four whole years, we would be blessed to have even one day because that’s all we truly need. For just a moment, someone to put their foot in the door, so the rest of us can gather the strength to get out of this sandpit, push open that door more fully, and allow in the integrity and compassion we’ve been missing.

Ultimately, the choice is his, but knowing Bernie, I believe that he’ll be fighting with every bit of his strength until his final days (may they be many years from now!), win or lose, rain or shine, because that is simply the type of person he is.

So, as selfish as it may be, I ask that he keep fighting for us. Just a little longer. I am willing to put my faith in the movement as a whole. I am putting my faith in every person that is a part of this. Keep pulling. Not me, us.

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