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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 129)

Strong November Jobs Report Counters Anxieties Over Weakening Economy

■ The unemployment rate was 3.5 percent, down from the previous month.

■ Average hourly earnings rose 0.2 percent, with a year-over-year gain of 3.1 percent.

The return of tens of thousands of striking workers to their jobs at General Motors helped supercharge hiring totals last month.

The reassuring jobs report, released Friday morning by the Labor Department, offered a counterpoint to renewed anxieties about an escalating trade war and a weakening global economy.

“I think that this report is a real blockbuster; payrolls smashed expectations,” said Daniel Zhao, senior economist at the career site Glassdoor.

Another 41,000 jobs were added to September and October’s employment totals after revisions. A broader measure of unemployment, which includes part-timers who would prefer full-time jobs and people who are too discouraged to look for work, inched down to 6.9 percent.

Stocks rose following the report, with the S&P 500 up by more than 0.8 percent in early trading.

The health of the manufacturing sector has been somewhat clouded by the 40-day G.M. strike this fall and disruption in the aerospace industry stemming from the crash of two Boeing airplanes. Friday’s report showed a gain of 54,000 jobs in that sector, reversing last month’s losses, but it did not signal a significant upturn.

“Manufacturing is still flat after you pull out the returning strike numbers,” Mr. Zhao said. “It’s still suffering from headwinds from the trade war, but at least it’s not worsening.”

Average monthly payroll gains for the past three months reached 205,000, a hefty number for the 11th year of an economic expansion.

Mr. Zhao noted that given the record-low jobless rate, wage growth over all remained stubbornly slow, and has decelerated this year.

The overall employment picture was impressive, said Diane Swonk, chief economist for the accounting firm Grant Thornton, but manufacturing was lagging compared to a strong service sector.

“We’re getting a lot of the gains in leisure, hospitality and health care,” she said, adding that the additions in professional services indicated more hiring of college graduates, which had softened slightly over the summer.

In a newsletter this week, David Kelly, chief global strategist at JPMorgan Funds, compared recent hiring to squeezing one more glob of toothpaste out of a seemingly empty tube. “Over the last few years,” he said, “an apparently fully tapped-out labor market has yielded a surprising number of new workers.”

The buffet of available job postings has drawn many Americans back to work. Employers have widened their scope, recruiting people with disabilities or criminal records. Older baby boomers are working past retirement age and stay-at-home parents are switching to paid employment.

The labor force participation rate inched up through most of the spring and fall, driven in part by an increase in women 25 to 34 getting jobs or starting to look for work. Over the last year, nearly 1.7 million people joined the ranks of workers.

Mr. Kelly does not expect the historically low unemployment rates to fall much more. “Gains in employment going forward will have to come from an increase in the labor force,” he wrote.

Economists are engaged in a vigorous debate about how tight the labor market is and how many more people are available to work. Mr. Trump’s more restrictive immigration policies have significantly shrunk the supply of foreigners who could come to work in the United States.

Employment agencies say they are often unable to find candidates to fill the jobs that are open. “At every level of employment, it’s been super tight,” said Yvonne Rockwell, owner of an Express Employment Professionals agency in Santa Clarita, Calif. “I truly believe that anybody who wants to work is working.”

Southern California has a lot of aerospace companies, and Ms. Rockwell focuses on skilled trades and higher-level positions. “This is our best year ever,” said Ms. Rockwell, who opened her franchise five years ago.

The competition for workers has helped push up wages, particularly at the lower end of the scale.

And Amazon’s decision last year to raise its minimum wage to $15 across the country has turned up the pressure in some places.

“Everyone is struggling now to keep up with Amazon,” said John Dickey, who owns two Express Employment agencies in Massachusetts.

One company he works with, a light manufacturer in the chemical and food industry, is looking to hire 30 people for jobs that pay $14 to $15 an hour. “This company does drug tests and background tests, and it requires 12 hours on your feet,” he said. “And you need to be able to speak and communicate in English.”

Employers routinely complain about their inability to find reliable workers, but Mr. Dickey acknowledged that many of the available jobs could be less than desirable.

“These can be pretty rough working conditions,” he said, pointing to the food industry, where people can spend a lot of time in refrigerated warehouses or near industrial ovens. “It’s cold, it’s hot, it’s wet, the floors are slippery, so there tends to be a fair amount of turnover,” he said.

The clamor for more workers may make it easier for people who want to turn temporary holiday jobs into permanent ones. Historically, about 4 percent to 7 percent of seasonal workers are hired, said Amy Glaser, senior vice president of the staffing firm Adecco. This year, she expects that 20 percent could be retained after the new year.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_165443403_f49893e6-5f02-4592-ba09-79f3f06abb81-articleLarge Strong November Jobs Report Counters Anxieties Over Weakening Economy Wages and Salaries United States Economy Unemployment Trump, Donald J Labor Department (US) Labor and Jobs Interest Rates

A worker at LB Steel in Harvey, Ill., manufactures a wheel assembly known as a “bogie” to be used on the new Amtrak Acela trains.Credit…Scott Olson/Getty Images

Despite the low unemployment rate, stable, secure jobs that pay a middle-income wage can be hard to find across a range of skills.

Alan Kirshner worked as a budget analyst at Bristol Myers Squibb in New Jersey for 18 years before a restructuring eliminated his job in 2015.

“My goal was to find something more permanent like I had in the past,” he said, “but those opportunities were much more limited.” Companies have used technology to reduce staffing, shifted full-time workers to contracts and often moved the better-paying jobs out of the country or to lower-cost areas in the United States.

Mr. Kirschner is now a career coach — a business that he controls, but that offers no steady income or benefits.

Researchers have often documented bias against workers over 50 and minorities, especially African-American women.

The job market can differ radically from one place to another, with a 1.6 percent jobless rate in Fargo, N.D., 4.2 percent in Binghamton, N.Y., and 6.1 percent in Bakersfield, Calif.

Large urban centers tend to gulp much of the gains, said Julia Pollak, a labor economist at the online employment company ZipRecruiter.

Holiday hiring plunged among traditional retailers, according to ZipRecruiter’s listings, with rural and suburban areas hit particularly hard. And a much larger share of temporary holiday job postings are in e-commerce compared to in stores, she said.

President Trump stoked trade tensions this week by imposing new tariffs on steel and aluminum from Brazil and Argentina, suggesting that the feud with China could continue for another year and threatening European allies with import taxes.

The White House’s unpredictable trade policy has unsettled businesses and cramped investment. They have also helped heighten concerns about a faltering manufacturing sector.

“When you look globally, there are some tentative signs that the global manufacturing slowdown is bottoming out,” Michael Gapen, chief United States economist for Barclays, said. “But it may take the U.S. manufacturing sector a little longer than the rest of the world to stabilize.”

“We still don’t have a Phase 1 agreement,” he said, referring to the promised first edition of a comprehensive trade accord with China. “And private sector spending in the U.S. is moderate at best.”

A trade agreement with China would, of course, be welcome, but Mr. Gapen said that at this point, he did not expect that it would help lift growth. “It’s more of a going back to the beginning,” he said, noting that in the end, China is likely to commit to agricultural purchases that it might have made earlier without tariffs.

The government will revise its November estimates two more times, and its October estimate once more.

“We have seen some moderation in jobs gains, which you would expect,” said Rubeela Farooqi, chief United States economist at High Frequency Economics. But the average monthly increases to date, the low jobless rate and the growing share of adults joining the work force all point to a strong foundation, she said. “I think the labor market over all is looking pretty healthy.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Limbaugh on impeachment, jobs report: Trump has achieved ‘peace and prosperity,’ Dems have nothing but ‘hatred’

Westlake Legal Group Rush-Limbaugh-FF Limbaugh on impeachment, jobs report: Trump has achieved 'peace and prosperity,' Dems have nothing but 'hatred' Julia Musto fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 2e290b49-c0d8-5c45-b178-f11083eb356b

House Democrats don’t care about the needs of the American people because their hatred for President Trump is blinding, conservative radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh said Friday.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends” with hosts Pete Hegseth, Ainsley Earhardt, and Brian Kilmeade, Limbaugh said that Democrats have “sacrificed every bit of concern for the American people” in their efforts to impeach the president.

On Thursday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced that Democrats will proceed with articles of impeachment against President Trump, declaring that the president’s conduct “leaves us no choice but to act.”

DOES PELOSI HAVE THE VOTES FOR IMPEACHMENT?

Her announcement comes after a heated House Judiciary Committee hearing Wednesday featuring four law professors — most of them notably Democrat-invited witnesses who presented arguments for impeachment.

Pelosi claimed the facts are now “uncontested” that Trump “abused his power for his own personal political benefit at the expense of our national security” by allegedly using aid as leverage to seek an investigation of Joe Biden and his son Hunter from Ukraine.

However, the Trump administration and Republicans say the president did nothing wrong.

Trump accused Democrats of trying to impeach him over “NOTHING” and warned that this impeachment could set a dangerous precedent in the future. Limbaugh said Democrats are motivated by one thing — hatred of Trump.

“Democrats are wandering aimlessly and being propelled by one thing, you guys. You’re watching it. You watched it with the three so-called expert witnesses. We are watching pure, raw, hatred. They hate the man and they hate the people who elected him. They hate him because he beat them,” Limbaugh explained.

He told the “Friends” hosts that Democrats have “not a shred of evidence for any allegation they have made for three-and-a-half, going on four years” and that Pelosi and her leadership are “almost sickeningly absorbed with destroying Donald Trump.”

“Meanwhile, Trump keeps plugging away. The economy is roaring, its future looks great, wages are up, Trump’s job approval numbers are up…The Democrat Party does not care about the things the American people [care] about,” he said.

On Friday, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported the United States added a staggering 266,000 jobs in November with unemployment down to 3.5 percent — a 50-year low.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Limbaugh cited stalling legislation including passing the United States-Mexico-Canada-Agreement (USMCA) and lowering prescription drug prices as further evidence that Democrats are not working on behalf of the American people.

“They have abandoned any pretense of any care or concern of what the American people want,” he said. “After Trump wins 2020, they’ll keep going like he’s John Gotti. So people better get ready for this because this isn’t going to end because the Democrats are nothing but pure raw hatred.”

Westlake Legal Group Rush-Limbaugh-FF Limbaugh on impeachment, jobs report: Trump has achieved 'peace and prosperity,' Dems have nothing but 'hatred' Julia Musto fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 2e290b49-c0d8-5c45-b178-f11083eb356b   Westlake Legal Group Rush-Limbaugh-FF Limbaugh on impeachment, jobs report: Trump has achieved 'peace and prosperity,' Dems have nothing but 'hatred' Julia Musto fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 2e290b49-c0d8-5c45-b178-f11083eb356b

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

November Jobs Report Shows Gain of 266,000; Unemployment at 3.5%

■ The unemployment rate was 3.5 percent, down from the previous month.

■ Average hourly earnings rose 0.2 percent, with a year-over-year gain of 3.1 percent.

The return of tens of thousands of striking workers to their jobs at General Motors helped supercharge hiring totals last month.

The reassuring jobs report, released Friday morning by the Labor Department, offered a counterpoint to renewed anxieties about an escalating trade war and a weakening global economy.

“I think that this report is a real blockbuster; payrolls smashed expectations,” said Daniel Zhao, senior economist at the career site Glassdoor.

Another 41,000 jobs were added to September and October’s employment totals after revisions. A broader measure of unemployment, which includes part-timers who would prefer full-time jobs and people who are too discouraged to look for work, inched down to 6.9 percent.

The health of the manufacturing sector has been somewhat clouded by the 40-day G.M. strike this fall and disruption in the aerospace industry stemming from the crash of two Boeing airplanes. Friday’s report showed a gain of 54,000 jobs in that sector, reversing last month’s losses, but it did not signal a significant upturn.

“Manufacturing is still flat after you pull out the returning strike numbers,” Mr. Zhao said. “It’s still suffering from headwinds from the trade war, but at least it’s not worsening.”

Average monthly payroll gains for the past three months reached 205,000, a hefty number for the 11th year of an economic expansion.

Mr. Zhao noted that given the record-low jobless rate, wage growth over all remained stubbornly slow, and has decelerated this year.

The overall employment picture was impressive, said Diane Swonk, chief economist for the accounting firm Grant Thornton, but manufacturing was lagging compared to a strong service sector.

“We’re getting a lot of the gains in leisure, hospitality and health care,” she said, adding that the additions in professional services indicated more hiring of college graduates, which had softened slightly over the summer.

In a newsletter this week, David Kelly, chief global strategist at JPMorgan Funds, compared recent hiring to squeezing one more glob of toothpaste out of a seemingly empty tube. “Over the last few years,” he said, “an apparently fully tapped-out labor market has yielded a surprising number of new workers.”

The buffet of available job postings has drawn many Americans back to work. Employers have widened their scope, recruiting people with disabilities or criminal records. Older baby boomers are working past retirement age and stay-at-home parents are switching to paid employment.

The labor force participation rate inched up through most of the spring and fall, driven in part by an increase in women 25 to 34 getting jobs or starting to look for work. Over the last year, nearly 1.7 million people joined the ranks of workers.

Mr. Kelly does not expect the historically low unemployment rates to fall much more. “Gains in employment going forward will have to come from an increase in the labor force,” he wrote.

Economists are engaged in a vigorous debate about how tight the labor market is and how many more people are available to work. Mr. Trump’s more restrictive immigration policies have significantly shrunk the supply of foreigners who could come to work in the United States.

Employment agencies say they are often unable to find candidates to fill the jobs that are open. “At every level of employment, it’s been super tight,” said Yvonne Rockwell, owner of an Express Employment Professionals agency in Santa Clarita, Calif. “I truly believe that anybody who wants to work is working.”

Southern California has a lot of aerospace companies, and Ms. Rockwell focuses on skilled trades and higher-level positions. “This is our best year ever,” said Ms. Rockwell, who opened her franchise five years ago.

The competition for workers has helped push up wages, particularly at the lower end of the scale.

And Amazon’s decision last year to raise its minimum wage to $15 across the country has turned up the pressure in some places.

“Everyone is struggling now to keep up with Amazon,” said John Dickey, who owns two Express Employment agencies in Massachusetts.

One company he works with, a light manufacturer in the chemical and food industry, is looking to hire 30 people for jobs that pay $14 to $15 an hour. “This company does drug tests and background tests, and it requires 12 hours on your feet,” he said. “And you need to be able to speak and communicate in English.”

Employers routinely complain about their inability to find reliable workers, but Mr. Dickey acknowledged that many of the available jobs could be less than desirable.

“These can be pretty rough working conditions,” he said, pointing to the food industry, where people can spend a lot of time in refrigerated warehouses or near industrial ovens. “It’s cold, it’s hot, it’s wet, the floors are slippery, so there tends to be a fair amount of turnover,” he said.

The clamor for more workers may make it easier for people who want to turn temporary holiday jobs into permanent ones. Historically, about 4 percent to 7 percent of seasonal workers are hired, said Amy Glaser, senior vice president of the staffing firm Adecco. This year, she expects that 20 percent could be retained after the new year.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_165443403_f49893e6-5f02-4592-ba09-79f3f06abb81-articleLarge November Jobs Report Shows Gain of 266,000; Unemployment at 3.5% Wages and Salaries United States Economy Unemployment Trump, Donald J Labor Department (US) Labor and Jobs Interest Rates

A worker at LB Steel in Harvey, Ill., manufactures a wheel assembly known as a “bogie” to be used on the new Amtrak Acela trains.Credit…Scott Olson/Getty Images

Despite the low unemployment rate, stable, secure jobs that pay a middle-income wage can be hard to find across a range of skills.

Alan Kirshner worked as a budget analyst at Bristol Myers Squibb in New Jersey for 18 years before a restructuring eliminated his job in 2015.

“My goal was to find something more permanent like I had in the past,” he said, “but those opportunities were much more limited.” Companies have used technology to reduce staffing, shifted full-time workers to contracts and often moved the better-paying jobs out of the country or to lower-cost areas in the United States.

Mr. Kirschner is now a career coach — a business that he controls, but that offers no steady income or benefits.

Researchers have often documented bias against workers over 50 and minorities, especially African-American women.

The job market can differ radically from one place to another, with a 1.6 percent jobless rate in Fargo, N.D., 4.2 percent in Binghamton, N.Y., and 6.1 percent in Bakersfield, Calif.

Large urban centers tend to gulp much of the gains, said Julia Pollak, a labor economist at the online employment company ZipRecruiter.

Holiday hiring plunged among traditional retailers, according to ZipRecruiter’s listings, with rural and suburban areas hit particularly hard. And a much larger share of temporary holiday job postings are in e-commerce compared to in stores, she said.

President Trump stoked trade tensions this week by imposing new tariffs on steel and aluminum from Brazil and Argentina, suggesting that the feud with China could continue for another year and threatening European allies with import taxes.

The White House’s unpredictable trade policy has unsettled businesses and cramped investment. They have also helped heighten concerns about a faltering manufacturing sector.

“When you look globally, there are some tentative signs that the global manufacturing slowdown is bottoming out,” Michael Gapen, chief United States economist for Barclays, said. “But it may take the U.S. manufacturing sector a little longer than the rest of the world to stabilize.”

“We still don’t have a Phase 1 agreement,” he said, referring to the promised first edition of a comprehensive trade accord with China. “And private sector spending in the U.S. is moderate at best.”

A trade agreement with China would, of course, be welcome, but Mr. Gapen said that at this point, he did not expect that it would help lift growth. “It’s more of a going back to the beginning,” he said, noting that in the end, China is likely to commit to agricultural purchases that it might have made earlier without tariffs.

The government will revise its November estimates two more times, and its October estimate once more.

“We have seen some moderation in jobs gains, which you would expect,” said Rubeela Farooqi, chief United States economist at High Frequency Economics. But the average monthly increases to date, the low jobless rate and the growing share of adults joining the work force all point to a strong foundation, she said. “I think the labor market over all is looking pretty healthy.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Doubts raised after Schiff claims phone records prove Giuliani’s White House budget office calls

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6112927255001_6112923357001-vs Doubts raised after Schiff claims phone records prove Giuliani’s White House budget office calls fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox news fnc/politics fnc c0a546a7-ecf7-59cb-be7d-4293f820e0e3 Brooke Singman article

Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee claimed in their impeachment inquiry report this week that President Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani over the summer had contact with a phone number for the White House budget office where military aid to Ukraine was temporarily being withheld. However, Trump administration officials are disputing that finding, saying the phone number presented as evidence for the claim is not linked to that office.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., released the panel’s findings from the months-long impeachment inquiry into Trump on Tuesday before transmitting the report to the House Judiciary Committee for the next phase of the process.

NADLER SCHEDULES NEW IMPEACHMENT HEARING FOR ‘PRESENTATIONS OF EVIDENCE’

In that report, Democrats provided call logs that appeared to show that on August 8, Giuliani “texted several times with a number associated with the White House.”

The report notes that the committee was unable to identify the specific White House official associated with the phone number, but said that, later, a number associated with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) called Giuliani for a phone discussion that lasted almost 13 minutes.

The report also states that Giuliani called “the OMB number” “several more times” that evening, but did not connect for more than “a few seconds.”

But “the OMB number,” according to the Wall Street Journal was not directly associated with the Office of Management and Budget, and Giuliani, instead, could have been having a call with another part of the White House. The New York Times also reported that “the OMB number” was actually a general White House switchboard number, which makes it difficult to determine who Giuliani was speaking with at the White House.

“No one from OMB has talked to Giuliani,” a White House spokesperson told RealClearPolitics this week, noting that the calls were not coming from their office.

The White House did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Meanwhile, an aide on the House Intelligence Committee told The Wall Street Journal that they characterized the phone number as being “associated with OMB” based on “public directories.”

TRUMP THREATENS TO HAVE SCHIFF, BIDENS, PELOSI TESTIFY IN SENATE TRIAL AS HE DARES HOUSE TO IMPEACH

The section of the report referencing the Giuliani calls, however, is being used as evidence of his direct involvement and regular contact with the White House during the critical period over the summer when nearly $400 million in military assistance was being withheld from Ukraine—an arrangement Democrats have cited as a “quid pro quo.”

At the center of the impeachment inquiry, which began in September, is Trump’s July 25 phone call when he pressed Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden’s business dealings in Ukraine. That call prompted a whistleblower complaint to the intelligence community inspector general, and in turn, the impeachment inquiry in the House. Trump challenged the accuracy of the complaint, though the transcript released by the White House did support the core allegations that he pressed for politically related investigations.

The president’s request came after millions in U.S. military aid to Ukraine had been frozen, which Democrats and witnesses have claimed shows a “quid pro quo” arrangement, and argue that military aid and an Oval Office meeting with Zelensky was being withheld until the public announcement of an investigation into the Bidens and issues related to the 2016 presidential election. Trump denies any wrongdoing.

Meanwhile, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said Thursday morning that Democrats will proceed with articles of impeachment against President Trump, claiming the president’s conduct left Democrats with “no choice but to act.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6112927255001_6112923357001-vs Doubts raised after Schiff claims phone records prove Giuliani’s White House budget office calls fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox news fnc/politics fnc c0a546a7-ecf7-59cb-be7d-4293f820e0e3 Brooke Singman article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6112927255001_6112923357001-vs Doubts raised after Schiff claims phone records prove Giuliani’s White House budget office calls fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox news fnc/politics fnc c0a546a7-ecf7-59cb-be7d-4293f820e0e3 Brooke Singman article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Dallas Cowboys’ Jason Witten lashes out on sidelines during loss to Chicago Bears

Westlake Legal Group Jason-Witten Dallas Cowboys' Jason Witten lashes out on sidelines during loss to Chicago Bears Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/dallas-cowboys fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc e3a60546-686c-5396-a15f-e419715911fd article

Dallas Cowboys tight end Jason Witten appeared visibly upset on the sidelines Thursday during the team’s loss to the Chicago Bears.

Witten had five catches for 37 yards as the Cowboys picked up their third straight loss and fourth in five games. He was seen in two instances on the sideline yelling at coaches and teammates. He was also visibly upset with the play-calling as well.

DALLAS COWBOYS HAVE ‘VERY REAL INTEREST’ IN MAKING URBAN MEYER NEXT HEAD COACH: REPORT

The 16-year veteran acknowledged he was upset after the game and that the loss was worse than the 31-24 score indicated.

“I don’t think it matters enough compared to any other time,” he told reporters, according to the Dallas-Morning News. “We’re all frustrated, we’re all pissed. You see the game — it wasn’t good enough. We got to get better, and we better do it in a hurry. We’ve been given a gift with where our record is, 6-7, still on top of the division. But we got to play better football.”

BEARS BEAT COWBOYS 31-24 BEHIND QB MITCHELL TRUBISKY

Witten chose to come out of retirement to rejoin the Cowboys this season. He spent last year in the booth for ESPN’s “Monday Night Football.”

He has played in 13 games this season. He has 53 catches for 455 yards and three touchdowns.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

Dallas still holds the NFC East division lead over the Philadelphia Eagles – even with the loss.

Westlake Legal Group Jason-Witten Dallas Cowboys' Jason Witten lashes out on sidelines during loss to Chicago Bears Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/dallas-cowboys fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc e3a60546-686c-5396-a15f-e419715911fd article   Westlake Legal Group Jason-Witten Dallas Cowboys' Jason Witten lashes out on sidelines during loss to Chicago Bears Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/dallas-cowboys fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc e3a60546-686c-5396-a15f-e419715911fd article

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Job Market Surges As Employers Add 266,000 Jobs In November

Westlake Legal Group rtx7b29y-1e3172fb5db21e79ca6b7686200b7e6fb8fdd6dd-s1100-c15 Job Market Surges As Employers Add 266,000 Jobs In November

An employee stocks the toy section of a Walmart on Black Friday, in King of Prussia, Pa. Sarah Silbiger/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption

Sarah Silbiger/Reuters

Westlake Legal Group  Job Market Surges As Employers Add 266,000 Jobs In November

An employee stocks the toy section of a Walmart on Black Friday, in King of Prussia, Pa.

Sarah Silbiger/Reuters

Updated at 9:47 a.m. ET

U.S. employers added a better-than-expected 266,000 jobs in November, in a sign the economy continues to power ahead.

The unemployment rate dipped to 3.5%. Job gains for the two previous months were revised up by a total of 41,000.

The overall jobs number got a boost from the roughly 41,000 people who returned to work, after being idled in October by the United Auto Workers strike at General Motors.

Manufacturing added a total of 54,000 jobs, even though factory activity has declined in each of the last four months.

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Factories — many of which rely on global supply chains and global markets — have been especially vulnerable to President Trump’s trade war, as well as a general slowdown in overseas demand.

The much larger services side of the economy, including hospitals and restaurants that cater to local customers, has been more insulated from global headwinds.

Service sector jobs accounted for the lion’s share of the November gains, with 206,000 jobs added.

Wage gains accelerated slightly with average wages rising 3.1% over the last 12 months.

Labor force participation dropped slightly, contributing to the drop in the unemployment rate.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Germany’s Angela Merkel visits Auschwitz for first time amid rising anti-Semitism

German Chancellor Angela Merkel visited the former Nazi death camp Auschwitz-Birkenau on Friday, marking her first-ever visit to the notorious site in her 14 years as Germany’s leader.

Merkel, accompanied by Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki, began her visit by seeing a crematorium and then walked under the infamous gate with the words “Arbeit Macht Frei” – “Work will set you free” – before seeing the camp’s brick barracks.

The two leaders also went to the so-called Black Wall, where thousands of prisoners were executed. There they bowed their heads before two wreaths bearing their nations’ colors.

GERMAN ACTIVISTS APOLOGIZE FOR USE OF HOLOCAUST VICTIMS’ REMAINS IN ANTI-NAZI INSTALLATION

Westlake Legal Group AP19340406090785 Germany's Angela Merkel visits Auschwitz for first time amid rising anti-Semitism Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/germany fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/religion/judaism fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/topic/holocaust fox-news/topic/anti-semitism fox-news/person/angela-merkel fox news fnc/world fnc article 6f935c0a-85f8-5a19-b8c8-fd4e9b191a88

Museum director Piotr Cywinski, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki and deputy director Andrzej Kacorzyk, from left, visit the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland on Friday, Friday, Dec. 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

Merkel is set to give a speech at the Birkenau extermination camp, where the gas chambers and crematoriums were built. She was invited to the death camp for the 10th anniversary of the Auschwitz-Birkenau Foundation.

During her tenure as chancellor, Merkel has not shied away from admitting German responsibility for the atrocities at the hands of Adolf Hilter and the Nazis during World War II.

Merkel has paid her respects at other Nazi concentration camps, and she has been five times to Israel’s Holocaust museum and memorial Yad Vashem.

Her visit to Auschwitz will ensure she follows in the footsteps of two former chancellors by seeing the site before her term ends.

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Westlake Legal Group AP19340428279579 Germany's Angela Merkel visits Auschwitz for first time amid rising anti-Semitism Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/germany fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/religion/judaism fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/topic/holocaust fox-news/topic/anti-semitism fox-news/person/angela-merkel fox news fnc/world fnc article 6f935c0a-85f8-5a19-b8c8-fd4e9b191a88

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, left, and Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki, right, place flowers at the Death Wall during their visit of the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland. (AP)

Merkel brought a donation of 60 million euros ($66.6 million) that will go to a fund to conserve the physical remnants of the site — the barracks, watchtowers, and personal items like shoes and suitcases of those killed.

Those objects endure as evidence of German atrocities and as one of the world’s most recognizable symbols of humanity’s capacity for evil. But they also are deteriorating under the strain of time and mass tourism, prompting a long-term conservation effort.

That donation to the Auschwitz Foundation comes in addition to 60 million euros that Germany donated when the fund was created a decade ago, according to the Auschwitz-Birkenau state museum. It also makes Germany by far the most generous of 38 countries that have contributed to the fund.

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“Auschwitz is a museum but is also the biggest cemetery in the world… (Memory) is the key to building the present and future,” museum director Piotr Cywinski told Reuters ahead of Merkel’s visit at the invitation of the Auschwitz Foundation.

Westlake Legal Group AP19340436963307 Germany's Angela Merkel visits Auschwitz for first time amid rising anti-Semitism Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/germany fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/religion/judaism fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/topic/holocaust fox-news/topic/anti-semitism fox-news/person/angela-merkel fox news fnc/world fnc article 6f935c0a-85f8-5a19-b8c8-fd4e9b191a88

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, center left, and Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki, center right, attend a wreath-laying ceremony at the death wall in the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Germany, Friday, Dec. 6, 2019. Merkel visits the former death camp in the occasion of the 10th anniversary of the founding of the Auschwitz Foundation. (Photo/Markus Schreiber)

Poland’s Foreign Ministry called her visit “historic,” in an acknowledgment of the unique status Auschwitz has in the world’s collective memory.

Merkel’s visit comes as Europe has seen a spike in anti-Semitic sentiment. A new report by the New York-based Anti-Defamation League (ADL) found that one in four Europeans hold anti-Semitic beliefs.

“These findings serve as a powerful wake-up call that much work remains to be done to educate broad swaths of the populations in many of these countries to reject bigotry, in addition to addressing the pressing security needs where violent incidents are rising,” ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt said.

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Nazi German forces killed an estimated 1.1 million people at the Auschwitz-Birkenau complex during their occupation of Poland during World War II. Most of the victims were Jews transported from across Europe to be killed in gas chambers. But tens of thousands of others were killed there too, including Poles, Soviet prisoners of war and Roma, or Gypsies. The camp was liberated by the Soviet army on Jan. 27, 1945.

Fox News’ Talia Kaplan and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19340406090785 Germany's Angela Merkel visits Auschwitz for first time amid rising anti-Semitism Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/germany fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/religion/judaism fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/topic/holocaust fox-news/topic/anti-semitism fox-news/person/angela-merkel fox news fnc/world fnc article 6f935c0a-85f8-5a19-b8c8-fd4e9b191a88   Westlake Legal Group AP19340406090785 Germany's Angela Merkel visits Auschwitz for first time amid rising anti-Semitism Lucia Suarez Sang fox-news/world/world-regions/germany fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/religion/judaism fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox-news/topic/holocaust fox-news/topic/anti-semitism fox-news/person/angela-merkel fox news fnc/world fnc article 6f935c0a-85f8-5a19-b8c8-fd4e9b191a88

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U.S. Added 266,000 Jobs in November; Unemployment at 3.5%

Westlake Legal Group 06jobs2-facebookJumbo U.S. Added 266,000 Jobs in November; Unemployment at 3.5% Wages and Salaries United States Economy Unemployment Trump, Donald J Labor Department (US) Labor and Jobs Interest Rates

■ 266,000 jobs were added in November. Analysts had expected a gain of about 180,000, according to MarketWatch.

■ The unemployment rate was 3.5 percent, down from the previous month.

■ Average hourly earnings rose 0.2 percent, with a year-over-year gain of 3.1 percent.

The return of tens of thousands of striking workers to their jobs at General Motors helped supercharge hiring totals last month.

The reassuring jobs report, released Friday morning by the Labor Department, offered a counterpoint to renewed anxieties about an escalating trade war and a weakening global economy.

President Trump stoked trade tensions this week by imposing new tariffs on steel and aluminum from Brazil and Argentina; suggesting that the feud with China could continue for another year; and threatening European allies with import taxes.

The White House’s unpredictable trade policy has unsettled businesses and cramped investment. They have also helped heighten concerns about a faltering manufacturing sector.

Still, the American economy has a firm footing as consumers spend and employers hire.

“We still see pretty healthy underlying labor market conditions,” said Robert Rosener, an economist at Morgan Stanley. The number of people applying for unemployment benefits remains at historically low levels, and Americans continue to show a willingness to quit their jobs. “That tells you that consumers are still pretty confident of labor market conditions,” he said

Among businesses, worries about the economy seemed to peak this summer. Since then, there have been signs that the slowdown was slowing, said Joe Galvin, chief research officer of Vistage, an association of small-business owners and executives.

Roughly 60 percent of the 654 employers surveyed in November by Vistage said they planned to expand head count next year. Just 4 percent are planning cuts.

Since employment gains can bounce unpredictably from month to month, what matters is the underlying trend. So far this year, average monthly payroll gains have buzzed around 170,000. That is less than the average for last year, when tax cuts and government spending helped juice the economy, but it is still hefty considering that the expansion is in its 11th year.

In a newsletter this week, David Kelly, chief global strategist at JPMorgan Funds, compared recent hiring to squeezing one more glob of toothpaste out of a seemingly empty tube. “Over the last few years,” he said, “an apparently fully tapped-out labor market has yielded a surprising number of new workers.”

The buffet of available job postings has drawn many Americans back to work. Employers have widened their scope, recruiting people with disabilities or criminal records. Older baby boomers are working past retirement age and stay-at-home parents are switching to paid employment.

The labor force participation rate inched up through most of the spring and fall, driven in part by an increase in women 25 to 34 getting jobs or starting to look for work. Over the last year, nearly 1.7 million people joined the ranks of workers.

Mr. Kelly does not expect the historically low unemployment rates to fall much more. “Gains in employment going forward will have to come from an increase in the labor force,” he wrote.

Economists are engaged in a vigorous debate about how tight the labor market is and how many more people are available to work. Mr. Trump’s more restrictive immigration policies has significantly shrunk the supply of foreigners who could come to work in the United States.

Employment agencies say they are often unable to find candidates to fill the jobs that are open. “At every level of employment, it’s been super tight,” said Yvonne Rockwell, owner of an Express Employment Professionals agency in Santa Clarita, Calif. “I truly believe that anybody who wants to work is working.”

Southern California has a lot of aerospace companies, and Ms. Rockwell focuses on skilled trades and higher-level positions. “This is our best year ever,” said Ms. Rockwell, who opened her franchise five years ago.

The competition for workers has helped push up wages, particularly at the lower end of the scale.

And Amazon’s decision last year to raise its minimum wage to $15 across the country has turned up the pressure in some places.

“Everyone is struggling now to keep up with Amazon,” said John Dickey, who owns two Express Employment agencies in Massachusetts.

One company he works with, a light manufacturer in the chemical and food industry, is looking to hire 30 people for jobs that pay $14-to-$15 an hour. “This company does drug tests and background tests, and it requires 12 hours on your feet,” he said. “And you need to be able to speak and communicate in English.”

While employers routinely complain about their inability to find reliable workers, Mr. Dickey acknowledged that many of the available jobs can be less than desirable.

“These can be pretty rough working conditions,” he said, pointing to the food industry, where people can spend a lot of time in refrigerated warehouses or near industrial ovens. “It’s cold, it’s hot, it’s wet, the floors are slippery, so there tends to be a fair amount of turnover,” he said.

The clamor for more workers may make it easier for people who want to turn temporary holiday jobs into permanent ones. Historically, about 4 percent to 7 percent of seasonal workers are hired, said Amy Glaser, senior vice president of the staffing firm Adecco. This year, she expects that 20 percent could be retained after the new year.

Despite the low unemployment rate, stable, secure jobs that pay a middle-income wage can be hard to find across a range of skills.

Alan Kirshner worked as a budget analyst at Bristol Myers Squibb in New Jersey for 18 years before a restructuring eliminated his job in 2015.

“My goal was to find something more permanent like I had in the past,” he said, “but those opportunities were much more limited.” Companies have used technology to reduce staffing, shifted full-time workers to contracts and often moved the better-paying jobs out of the country or to lower-cost areas in the United States.

Mr. Kirschner is now a career coach — a business that he controls, but that offers no steady income or benefits.

Researchers have often documented bias against workers over 50 and minorities, especially African-American women.

The job market can differ radically from one place to another, with a 1.6 percent jobless rate in Fargo, N.D., 4.2 percent in Binghamton, N.Y., and 6.1 percent in Bakersfield, Calif.

Large urban centers tend to gulp much of the gains, said Julia Pollak, a labor economist at the online employment company ZipRecruiter.

Holiday hiring plunged among traditional retailers, according to ZipRecruiter’s listings, with rural and suburban areas hit particularly hard. And a much larger share of temporary holiday job postings are in e-commerce compared to in stores, she said.

The manufacturing picture is more mixed. Overall, job postings have increased, Ms. Pollak said, but they differ radically by type. Listings related to computer manufacturing are strong, for example, but demand for automotive workers has been weak.

The industry’s health has been somewhat clouded by the 40-day G.M. strike this fall and disruption in the aerospace industry stemming from the crash of two Boeing airplanes. And manufacturing activity measures have provided conflicting signals.

“When you look globally, there are some tentative signs that the global manufacturing slowdown is bottoming out,” Michael Gapen, chief United States economist for Barclays, said. “But it may take the U.S. manufacturing sector a little longer than the rest of the world to stabilize.”

“We still don’t have a Phase 1 agreement,” he said, referring to the promised first edition of a comprehensive trade accord with China. “And private sector spending in the U.S. is moderate at best.”

A trade agreement with China would, of course, be welcome, but Mr. Gapen said that at this point, he doesn’t expect that it will help lift growth. “It’s more of a going back to the beginning,” he said, noting that in the end, China is likely to commit to agricultural purchases that it might have made earlier without tariffs.

The government will revise its November estimates two more times, and its October estimate once more.

“We have seen some moderation in jobs gains, which you would expect,” said Rubeela Farooqi, chief United States economist at High Frequency Economics. But the average monthly increases to date, the low jobless rate and the growing share of adults joining the work force all point to a strong foundation, she said. “I think the labor market overall is looking pretty healthy.”

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Million-dollar ‘traffic jam’ created from sand on Miami Beach

It took artist Leandro Erlich two years and 330 tons of sand to create his largest work of art to date — a giant traffic jam, made entirely of sand.

Westlake Legal Group sand3 Million-dollar 'traffic jam' created from sand on Miami Beach fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/travel fox-news/entertainment/genres/arts fox-news/auto/attributes/custom fnc/auto fnc bfab5b4a-902f-5183-8da2-1110e0e33a9f Associated Press article

Erlich was commissioned by the city of Miami Beach to create the work, which was unveiled during Art Basel. The surreal traffic jam depicts 66 life-sized sculptures of cars and trucks stuck in an imaginary traffic jam on the oceanfront of popular Lincoln Road.

Westlake Legal Group sand2 Million-dollar 'traffic jam' created from sand on Miami Beach fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/travel fox-news/entertainment/genres/arts fox-news/auto/attributes/custom fnc/auto fnc bfab5b4a-902f-5183-8da2-1110e0e33a9f Associated Press article

Artist Leandro Erlich spent two years on the project. (AP)

The installation is meant to suggest a future relic, like a contemporary Pompeii, and alludes to Florida’s fragile position in the large universal canvas, touching on climate crisis and rising sea levels.

Westlake Legal Group sand1 Million-dollar 'traffic jam' created from sand on Miami Beach fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/travel fox-news/entertainment/genres/arts fox-news/auto/attributes/custom fnc/auto fnc bfab5b4a-902f-5183-8da2-1110e0e33a9f Associated Press article

The installation cost over a million dollars, but the city paid $300,000 thanks to sponsors and donations. It will remain on display until Dec. 15.

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Bernie Sanders unveils plan to boost broadband access, break up internet and cable titans

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