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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 136)

Woman slammed for crowdfunding butt lift after free nose job scandal

One surgery-obsessed woman in the U.K. who certainly believes that “pain is beauty” is asking the public to crowdfund her butt lift in a request that has rubbed many the wrong way, especially after she successfully got the National Health Service (NHS) to foot the bill for her $8,450 nose job back in the spring by allegedly faking depression.

In recent days, Carla Bellucci has set up a crowdfunding page to raise money for a $7,240 butt lift, The Sun reports, and feels hopeful that her fellow Brits will empathize with her plea.

“I really, really need a new bum. I have to have a bum lift and I am out of work and I can’t pay for it myself and I so need a new bum,” the 37-year-old from Borehamwood, Hertfordshire, England explained to the Daily Star.

WOMAN CLAIMS PANTENE CONDITIONER, POSSIBLY CONTAMINATED WITH NAIR, MADE HER HAIR FALL OUT

“I need it for my mental health, for my self-esteem and it is just something that I need doing so bad and I know I can’t pay for it,” she continued. “The NHS definitely won’t pay for it this time.

“(I) don’t know why, transgender [people] get operations left, right and center but they will not pay for my bum lift,” Bellucci claimed. “So I am relying on you guys, the great British public, to donate.”

Westlake Legal Group carla-bellucci-Instagram Woman slammed for crowdfunding butt lift after free nose job scandal Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/beauty-and-skin/cosmetic-surgery fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 4ba2b6d5-1946-5f17-bd74-71808f8cc380

In recent days, Carla Bellucci, pictured, has set up a crowdfunding page to raise money for a $7,240 butt lift, and feels hopeful that her fellow Brits will empathize with her plea. (Carla Bellucci)

The woman’s donation page has raised $12 to date, according to the Sun.

Back in June, the former “glamour model” and mom of three sparked great outcry when she admitted that she lied about having depression in order to receive a free nose job – to the tune of $8,450 – from the national health care bureau, Metro reports.

Weeks before, Bellucci was crowned “the most hated woman in Britain” for revealing that she convinced her 14-year-old daughter to begin a plastic surgery regime of her own upon her 16th birthday.

Tentative plans for the teen’s future cosmetic surgery include fillers, Botox, breast implants and teeth veneers.

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“If she wants to be a successful influencer and reality star then she will have to fit the look of the time – so surgery is the obvious option,” Bellucci said at the time, as per Metro. “She’s good looking, but surgery will make her prettier.”

As for her own young daughter’s derriere, Bellucci said that the girl’s behind is “very flat” and “needs improving.”

In 2018, about 24,099 Americans went under the knife for the so-called Brazilian butt lift, a surgical procedure which involves liposuction and fat grafting, the New York Post reports.

Nevertheless, many doctors refuse to perform the operation due to high mortality rates.

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The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) estimates that 1 in 3,000 people die from the so-called Brazilian butt lift as compared to 1 in 25,000 for all cosmetic procedures.

“It has the highest mortality rate of any surgical procedure tracked by the ASPS,” Dr. Daniel Maman, a board-certified plastic surgeon based in New York, told the Post.

Bellucci, however, seems to be paying no mind to that alarming statistic — while remaining optimistic about her own future, hopeful butt lift.

“People gonna talk the talk … haters gonna hate in the meantime I’ll just keep doing me,” the woman told her Instagram following of 73,000 last week.

Westlake Legal Group carla-bellucci-Instagram Woman slammed for crowdfunding butt lift after free nose job scandal Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/beauty-and-skin/cosmetic-surgery fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 4ba2b6d5-1946-5f17-bd74-71808f8cc380   Westlake Legal Group carla-bellucci-Instagram Woman slammed for crowdfunding butt lift after free nose job scandal Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health/beauty-and-skin/cosmetic-surgery fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 4ba2b6d5-1946-5f17-bd74-71808f8cc380

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16 Million Could Cast Paperless Ballots Vulnerable To Hacking

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than one in 10 voters could cast ballots on paperless voting machines in the 2020 general election, according to a new analysis, leaving their ballots more vulnerable to hacking.

A study released by the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law on Tuesday evaluates the state of the country’s election security six months before the New Hampshire primary and concludes that much more needs to be done. While there has been significant progress by states and the federal government since Russian agents targeted U.S. state election systems ahead of the 2016 presidential election, the analysis notes that many states have not taken all of the steps needed to ensure that doesn’t happen again.

The report also notes that around a third of all local election jurisdictions were using voting machines that are at least a decade old, despite recommendations they be replaced after 10 years. The Associated Press reported last month that many election systems are running on old Windows 7 software that will soon be outdated.

“We should replace antiquated equipment, and paperless equipment in particular, as soon as possible,” the report recommends.

Westlake Legal Group 5d52cc2e2400003600b76c0c 16 Million Could Cast Paperless Ballots Vulnerable To Hacking

ASSOCIATED PRESS Steve Marcinkus, an Investigator with the Office of the City Commissioners, demonstrates the ExpressVote XL voting machine at the Reading Terminal Market in Philadelphia, Thursday, June 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

The analysis comes as Congress is debating how much federal government help is needed to ensure state election systems are protected. Democrats have put forward legislation to require paper balloting, give more assistance to the states and give them more money to make improvements. But some Republicans, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, are wary of too much federal intervention and have said no more funding is needed.

Using voter registration and turnout data, the Brennan Center estimates that as many as 12% of voters, or around 16 million people, will vote on paperless equipment in November 2020. Security experts have said that paper-based systems provide better security because they create a record that voters can review before casting their ballots and election workers can use them to audit results.

Still, the number represents an improvement from 2016, when 20 percent of voters cast ballots on paperless equipment. In the last presidential election, 14 states used paperless voting machines as the primary polling place equipment in at least some counties and towns. In 2020, the Brennan Center estimates, that number will drop to no more than eight.

The states that could still have some paperless balloting are Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, New Jersey, Mississippi, Texas and Tennessee.

Three states, Arkansas, Delaware and Virginia, transitioned to paper-based voting equipment since the 2016 election. And Georgia, South Carolina and Pennsylvania have committed to replacing equipment by the 2020 election.

Homeland Security officials notified election officials in 21 states in 2017 that their systems had been targeted by Russia. Authorities have since said they believe all states were targeted to varying degrees.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, responding to a question from the AP during a meeting with chief executives of international news agencies in St. Petersburg in June, denied that his government interfered in the 2016 U.S. presidential election despite the extensive evidence to the contrary. Putin also insisted that Moscow has no intention of interfering in any future elections, saying that “we didn’t meddle, we aren’t meddling and we will not meddle in any elections.”

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The House v. Trump: Stymied Lawmakers Increasingly Battle in the Courts

WASHINGTON — Democrats took control of the House this year promising to use legislation and investigations to check President Trump. But facing substantial roadblocks to each, they are increasingly opposing him in a different way: Eight months into their majority, the House is going to court at a tempo never seen before.

Fighting in courtrooms as much as in hearing rooms, the House has already become a party to nine separate lawsuits this year, while also filing briefs for judges in four others. More lawsuits are being drafted, according to a senior aide to Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

The fights include efforts to reveal Mr. Trump’s hidden financial dealings, force his aides to testify about his attempts to obstruct the Russia investigation, challenge his invocation of emergency powers to spend more taxpayer money on a border wall than Congress approved and defend laws like the Affordable Care Act that his Justice Department abandoned.

While it is routine for the executive branch to be in court, it was once vanishingly rare for Congress, which has typically used its authority to pass laws, appropriate funds and investigate the executive branch, to balance out the president’s power.

Now, as Senate Republicans refuse to take up the bills they pass, Trump administration witnesses refuse to show up for their hearings and the president levels his own highly unusual lawsuits against the House’s oversight requests, two of the three branches of government are regularly facing off before the third, creating a new stress with uncertain consequences for the political system.

“It is unprecedented,” said Charles Tiefer, a former longtime House lawyer who is now a University of Baltimore law professor. “The challenges for the House counsel ebb and flow over time, but this is like nothing else in history.”

The consequences of the specific disputes could be significant. In the short term, they could determine whether House Democrats are able to drag information to light about Mr. Trump that could lead to his impeachment or damage his re-election prospects. And potential decisions by the higher courts could clarify the long-ambiguous line between a president’s secrecy power and Congress’s oversight authority — determining whether future presidents can systematically stonewall congressional subpoenas.

But the broader phenomenon is also significant.

As an immediate matter, the surge in litigation is a consequence of Mr. Trump’s norm-busting presidency. House Democrats are looking for additional venues through which to take him on — or, in some cases, fighting lawsuits that the president filed against Congress himself to try to block lawmakers from obtaining information about him from entities outside the federal government. But it is also bringing into clearer view how, over the past generation, Congress was already starting to go to court more often than had been the historical norm, as political compromise gave way to deadlock amid growing partisan polarization.

That trend line suggests that even if the number of congressional lawsuits declines when the next president takes office, the constitutional order could change in a way that Mr. Tiefer and other legal scholars view as dangerous. He said it is better if the two parties were able to resolve high-level policy disputes through compromise rather than through the “rigid and formalized system” of litigation, and suggested that routinely pushing those disputes into court could heighten politicization of the judiciary.

To handle the mounting workload, the House’s general counsel, Douglas Letter, a former Justice Department litigator, and his staff of seven lawyers have increasingly relied on volunteer lawyers at white-shoe law firms and at public interest groups — including several prominent veterans of the Obama legal team — to help research and draft court filings.

Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and the chairman of the Intelligence Committee, which was a party in one of the subpoena lawsuits for Mr. Trump’s banking records, portrayed the increasing litigation as an unfortunate necessity.

“The blanket refusal to comply with any legitimate process has forced us to go to court to validate Congress’s power of oversight,” he said. “If we don’t, we are at risk of losing that power, and that would be a tragedy for the country because it would take any limit off the executive.”

Republicans say it is the Democrats who are out of control and violating traditional norms of governance. The Justice Department has accused the House of asking the judiciary “to take its side in political disputes” and of trying to “use federal courts to accomplish through litigation what it cannot achieve using the tools the Constitution gives to Congress.”

For most of American history, Mr. Tiefer said, Congress never went to court over disputes with the executive branch. The seeds of change began during the Watergate scandal, when Congress enacted a special law enabling a Senate committee to sue President Richard M. Nixon to try to gain access to his Oval Office tapes.

In the post-Watergate reform era, the House created a small general counsel office, raising the possibility of filing civil lawsuits seeking enforcement of its subpoenas to executive branch officials if a president tried to block them. But that threat remained essentially theoretical for more than a generation, as the two branches resolved such disputes through negotiations.

But in 2008, House Democrats went to court to compel disclosure of information from the Bush administration about its firing of a group of United States attorneys. In 2012, House Republicans sued for internal Obama Justice Department documents related to the botched gun-trafficking case known as Operation Fast and Furious.

Those rare subpoena-related cases have now grown routine. Already this year, Democrats have filed lawsuits seeking to enforce subpoenas for Mr. Trump’s federal tax returns and for testimony from Donald F. McGahn II, his former White House counsel and a key witness to several obstruction episodes in the special counsel’s Russia investigation report.

Separately, Mr. Trump’s personal lawyers have filed lawsuits against the House seeking to block financial firms — Mazars USA and Deutsche Bank and Capital One — from complying with its subpoenas for his business records. Mr. Trump has also filed one against the House to block it from requesting his state tax returns from New York.

Several more subpoena-related lawsuits are under development, including most likely a suit for executive branch information that could reveal the administration’s motivation for trying to add a citizenship question to the census.

The House has also filed litigation asking a judge to grant the House Judiciary Committee access to secret evidence Robert S. Mueller III, the former special counsel, gathered using a grand jury. That effort draws on a Watergate-era precedent, but the House was not itself a party to the 1974 request.

Also on an upward trend are cases in which the House is intervening in court to defend statutes because the executive branch refuses to do so, contrary to the Justice Department’s longstanding role of defending acts of Congress that come under constitutional challenge.

Although there have been several lawsuits in the past where Congress stepped in to defend a law that the executive branch said permitted lawmakers to unconstitutionally encroach on presidential power, it is now starting to become more common for the Justice Department to refuse to defend a law — and for the House to step in — without a separation-of-powers rationale.

In 2011, House Republicans intervened to defend a law that barred federal recognition of same-sex marriages that were lawful at the state level after the Obama administration deemed it unconstitutional and stopped defending it in court. At the time, such an intervention by Congress was highly unusual.

But this year, it has already happened twice. The Justice Department under Mr. Trump has refused to defend the Affordable Care Act and a law against female genital mutilation. The House has sought to intervene and provide lawyers to argue that both are constitutional.

It is also becoming more common for the House to sue the executive branch over spending and policy disputes. In 2014, the Republican-controlled House filed an unusual lawsuit over how the Obama administration was putting the Affordable Care Act into effect, including its provision of insurer subsidies the lawmakers said were unauthorized.

Echoing that move, House Democrats this year filed a lawsuit challenging Mr. Trump’s plan to use emergency powers to spend more on a border wall than Congress appropriated for that purpose. A district court judge ruled that the House lacked standing, and it has appealed.

Across this array of litigation, Mr. Letter — a former Justice Department civil litigation specialist — has handled courtroom appearances. But his office has been working with outside lawyers for research and brief drafting.

The aide to Ms. Pelosi said that all of the outside legal services have been provided for free, in contrast to the several million dollars that House Republicans spent on outside lawyers for the marriage law case.

The lawyers volunteering to help the House Democrats include Donald B. Verrilli Jr., a former solicitor general, and a team at his firm, Munger, Tolles & Olson; Virginia A. Seitz, a former head of the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel, and others at her firm, Sidley Austin; Neal K. Katyal, a former acting solicitor general and a partner at Hogan Lovells; and Georgetown Law Center’s Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection, run by two former national security officials, Joshua A. Geltzer and Mary McCord.

Beyond immediate political consequences, legal specialists said that the fate of the litigation wave might carry broader implications for Congress’s ability to counterbalance the presidency in the future, regardless of which party was in power.

Kerry W. Kircher, who served as House counsel under Republican speakers between 2011 and 2016, said many of the House’s lawsuits were justified, regardless of politics, to ensure that Mr. Trump’s vow to defy “all” of its subpoenas did not set a precedent.

House Democrats “are trying to do what they think they were elected to do and make sure that the House in the future will be able to conduct oversight,” he said. “What is going on with this administration is no less than an all-out declaration of war on oversight.”

Pondering Impeachment, House Sues Don McGahn, Ex-White House Counsel, for Testimony

Aug 7, 2019

Westlake Legal Group merlin_143268213_b36ede44-b244-4c50-a4a7-85b08f030717-threeByTwoSmallAt2X The House v. Trump: Stymied Lawmakers Increasingly Battle in the Courts United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Suits and Litigation (Civil) Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Presidents and Presidency (US) Pelosi, Nancy Law and Legislation Justice Department House of Representatives House Committee on the Judiciary Courts and the Judiciary Constitution (US)
Raising Prospect of Impeaching Trump, House Seeks Mueller’s Grand Jury Secrets

Jul 26, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 26dc-judiciary-sub-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v3 The House v. Trump: Stymied Lawmakers Increasingly Battle in the Courts United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Suits and Litigation (Civil) Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Presidents and Presidency (US) Pelosi, Nancy Law and Legislation Justice Department House of Representatives House Committee on the Judiciary Courts and the Judiciary Constitution (US)
House Files Lawsuit Seeking Disclosure of Trump Tax Returns

Jul 2, 2019

Westlake Legal Group merlin_157279272_22646757-a2e5-4791-8df5-7b351e98f7bf-threeByTwoSmallAt2X The House v. Trump: Stymied Lawmakers Increasingly Battle in the Courts United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Suits and Litigation (Civil) Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Presidents and Presidency (US) Pelosi, Nancy Law and Legislation Justice Department House of Representatives House Committee on the Judiciary Courts and the Judiciary Constitution (US)
Trump’s Secrecy Fight Escalates as Judge Rules for Congress in Early Test

May 20, 2019

Westlake Legal Group merlin_143354247_f5bb6722-b2e7-4eac-8e3d-9a64a1ae3be6-threeByTwoSmallAt2X The House v. Trump: Stymied Lawmakers Increasingly Battle in the Courts United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Suits and Litigation (Civil) Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Presidents and Presidency (US) Pelosi, Nancy Law and Legislation Justice Department House of Representatives House Committee on the Judiciary Courts and the Judiciary Constitution (US)
Trump Vows Stonewall of ‘All’ House Subpoenas, Setting Up Fight Over Powers

Apr 24, 2019

Westlake Legal Group merlin_143268213_4c8cf66f-c8db-4ab4-951e-76d719496803-threeByTwoSmallAt2X The House v. Trump: Stymied Lawmakers Increasingly Battle in the Courts United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Suits and Litigation (Civil) Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Presidents and Presidency (US) Pelosi, Nancy Law and Legislation Justice Department House of Representatives House Committee on the Judiciary Courts and the Judiciary Constitution (US)

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VDOE: New Testing Rules and Standards Impact SOL Results

Westlake Legal Group 7238727_G VDOE: New Testing Rules and Standards Impact SOL Results

Currently, school divisions are required to provide reading intervention services to students in grades K-3 who demonstrate deficiencies on diagnostic tests. The Standards of Quality, however, do not mandate that school divisions provide reading specialists. Rather, the SOQ recommends that one reading specialist be provided in each elementary school, at the discretion of the local school board.

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Arizona Cardinals’ Kliff Kingsbury makes light of Antonio Brown helmet controversy

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Kliff-Kingsbury2 Arizona Cardinals' Kliff Kingsbury makes light of Antonio Brown helmet controversy Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/arizona-cardinals fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 296b8571-43a7-57e4-85f9-50874592b50c

Arizona Cardinals head coach Kliff Kingsbury entered the helmet controversy with a comment about Oakland Raiders star Antonio Brown’s situation about wearing prohibited equipment.

Kingsbury took a slight jab at Brown during an interview with Arizona Sports 98.7FM on Monday after it was reported Brown threatened to quit football because he was barred from wearing a helmet that was not recertified under the NFL’s safety policy.

TOM BRADY HAVING HARD TIME ADJUSTING TO NEW HELMET: ‘I DON’T REALLY LOVE THAT ONE THAT I’M IN’

Kingsbury was asked if there was a helmet for which he would ever consider leaving the sport.

“I haven’t met a woman I would consider leaving the game of football for,” Kingsbury quipped to the radio hosts, according to SB Nation.

It doesn’t appear that Brown wants to leave the game anymore. He lost his grievance with the NFL on Monday over the helmet. He later tweeted he was looking forward to rejoining the Raiders.

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“While I disagree with the arbitrator’s decision, I’m working on getting back to full health and looking forward to rejoining my teammates on the field,” he said in a tweet. “I’m excited about this season appreciate all the concerns about my feet.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Kliff-Kingsbury2 Arizona Cardinals' Kliff Kingsbury makes light of Antonio Brown helmet controversy Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/arizona-cardinals fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 296b8571-43a7-57e4-85f9-50874592b50c   Westlake Legal Group NFL-Kliff-Kingsbury2 Arizona Cardinals' Kliff Kingsbury makes light of Antonio Brown helmet controversy Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/arizona-cardinals fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 296b8571-43a7-57e4-85f9-50874592b50c

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New procedure that postpones menopause could also lead to longer fertility

Westlake Legal Group doctor-consulting-iStock New procedure that postpones menopause could also lead to longer fertility Manny Alvarez fox-news/health/reproductive-health/infertility fox-news/health/medical-research fox-news/health/healthy-living/womens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 77019136-8472-5303-a6a3-17144f8402ee

One quest to significantly postpone menopause could allow women to have children later in life.

According to the National Institute on Aging, women going through menopause can have a host of symptoms, ranging from irritability to hot flashes to a lowered sex drive. In addition, post-menopausal women have a higher risk of weight gain, heart disease and osteoporosis.

However, a team of specialists from the company ProFaM have developed a procedure that freezes tissue from a woman in her 20s to 30s, The Telegraph reported. The tissue can then be implanted again to rejuvenate fertility or hormones that prolong the menopausal process.

UK BABY LOSES ALL 4 LIMBS FOLLOWING HORRIFIC SEPSIS INFECTION

ProFaM is led by IVF specialist Professor Simon Fishel, and the company name stands for Protecting Fertility and Menopause. The company performs this quick procedure lasting only 30 minutes for about $6,000.

According to The Guardian, nine women have already undergone the procedure. Although this particular use is new, doctors already perform this same surgery on girls who want to preserve their fertility before undergoing cancer treatments.

If young women get the procedure done in their 20s, when hormones and fertility are still strong, it could postpone menopause as much as 20 years, The Guardian reported.

‘VAGINAL STEAMING’ LEAVES WOMAN WITH SECOND-DEGREE BURN: REPORT

However, a few older women have also been known to carry children using traditional IVF with donor eggs. In fact, multiple women in their 50s and 60s have carried their own grandchildren. That includes one 60-year-old whose daughter died of bowel cancer at a young age. The daughter had frozen her eggs before she died, and her mother quite literally carried out her wishes to have children.

For those shying away from menopause symptoms, women could choose hormone replacement therapy (HRT). However, HRT also has its own risks, including blood clots, heart problems and breast cancer.

Professor Fisher told The Guardian that this procedure could benefit women trying to avoid menopause for any reason.

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The National Institute on Aging states that normal menopause can last anywhere from 7 to 14 years —and then women deal with the post-menopausal stage for the rest of their lives. This innovative technique could help women avoid that process for a lot longer.

Westlake Legal Group doctor-consulting-iStock New procedure that postpones menopause could also lead to longer fertility Manny Alvarez fox-news/health/reproductive-health/infertility fox-news/health/medical-research fox-news/health/healthy-living/womens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 77019136-8472-5303-a6a3-17144f8402ee   Westlake Legal Group doctor-consulting-iStock New procedure that postpones menopause could also lead to longer fertility Manny Alvarez fox-news/health/reproductive-health/infertility fox-news/health/medical-research fox-news/health/healthy-living/womens-health fox news fnc/health fnc article 77019136-8472-5303-a6a3-17144f8402ee

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Former ‘Deadliest Catch’ star Jake Harris sentenced to 18 months in jail for police chase: report

Westlake Legal Group 19665_01766.7a763dc43664 Former 'Deadliest Catch' star Jake Harris sentenced to 18 months in jail for police chase: report Tyler McCarthy fox-news/us/crime fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox-news/entertainment/events/in-court fox-news/entertainment/deadliest-catch fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 7573d3bf-75b3-5d09-9c0b-74ec7e67de04

Former “Deadliest Catch” star Jake Harris was sentenced to 18 months in jail after leading police on a chase in Washington this past January, according to a new report.

Harris appeared on the hit Discovery series about Alaskan crab fisherman until 2012. Many fans of the hit TV series may remember Jake as the son of the late Captain Phil Harris. Phil died in 2010 of an apparent stroke. Harris’ brother, Josh, still appears on the show as captain of the family ship, the Cornelia Marie.

FORMER ‘DEADLIEST CATCH’ STAR JAKE HARRIS HAS WARRANT OUT FOR HIS ARREST

According to TMZ, Jake was sentenced for felony charges of driving under the influence and possession with intent to manufacture or deliver heroin.

The charges reportedly stem from an incident in Washington in January when the 33-year-old allegedly refused to identify himself to park rangers before taking off in an RV. State troopers pursued him and forced him to stop. The outlet reports that police found drugs and a stolen firearm inside the vehicle.

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Jake, who was previously skipper on his father’s boat, will reportedly have to undergo an evaluation for drug dependency when he’s released. He’ll have to abstain from alcohol and will reportedly have an ignition interlock device installed in his car that will prevent him from driving if he is not sober.

Westlake Legal Group 19665_01766.7a763dc43664 Former 'Deadliest Catch' star Jake Harris sentenced to 18 months in jail for police chase: report Tyler McCarthy fox-news/us/crime fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox-news/entertainment/events/in-court fox-news/entertainment/deadliest-catch fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 7573d3bf-75b3-5d09-9c0b-74ec7e67de04   Westlake Legal Group 19665_01766.7a763dc43664 Former 'Deadliest Catch' star Jake Harris sentenced to 18 months in jail for police chase: report Tyler McCarthy fox-news/us/crime fox-news/entertainment/genres/reality fox-news/entertainment/events/in-court fox-news/entertainment/deadliest-catch fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 7573d3bf-75b3-5d09-9c0b-74ec7e67de04

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A nation on edge: Spike in mass shooting false alarms has a 'hidden cost' for police, community

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close A nation on edge: Spike in mass shooting false alarms has a 'hidden cost' for police, community
CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close A nation on edge: Spike in mass shooting false alarms has a 'hidden cost' for police, community

USA TODAY’s headquarters in Virginia was evacuated after reports of a man with a weapon. The building remained subject to a mandatory evacuation Wednesday afternoon. USA TODAY

Within minutes of the 911 call, police squad cars, ambulances and firetrucks showed up. Officers wore body armor and toted rifles as they searched stairwells and hallways. A helicopter hovered overhead.

The Fairfax County Police Department responded quickly and with full force last Wednesday to a report of a man with a weapon at an office tower in suburban McLean, Virginia, that is home to Gannett, the parent company of USA TODAY.

In all, 89 police officers as well as personnel agencies were deployed for the next three hours. 

They were ready for the worst – but it was all for naught. A worker from a company on a different floor had called in the threat after spotting a disgruntled former employee believed to be dangerous. It was a case of mistaken identity and, in the end, a false alarm.

This nation is on edge following mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, that killed 31. 

‘Everyone is safe’: USA TODAY headquarters evacuated after unconfirmed report of person with a weapon

Similar false alarms about active shooters popped up last week in New York’s Times Square, a Walmart in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and at a shopping mall in West Valley City, Utah. Each triggered full-fledged emergency responses but turned out to be nothing. 

Nevertheless, all that police manpower has a cost even if the threats don’t materialize. And it’s not just the financial cost of assigning so many men and women to one incident, experts say. 

“I’m more concerned with the psychological costs and the psychological impact, the stress and the potential trauma of these than I am of the monetary costs,” said Frank Straub, former police chief of Spokane, Washington, and the director of mass violence response studies at the National Police Foundation. 

He called them “hidden costs” – the trauma and stress of police officers who respond to what they believe are life-and-death situations and the psychological effect on an individual community.

“They have to get amped up. They have to get mentally prepared. They have to make sure that they respond in a way that’s safe in the communities that they serve. There’s an emotional impact on the officers,” he said. For the communities, Straub said there’s a dual impact of “reassurance” that police are ready but heightened anxiety.

Law enforcement officials encourage citizens to alert authorities whenever they spot suspicious activity. None of the cities are second-guessing their responses from last week. Each incidents underscores the extent police will go to try to prevent the next major mass shooting.

“God forbid we don’t take it seriously and that point in time we don’t there is a real active shooter or somebody who is preparing an explosive device, or preparing to drive vehicle into the crowd,” Straub said. “I think the human costs to that would be incredibly tragic to the community and to the officers who are responding.”  

False alarms, real trauma: Americans are on edge after string of mass shootings

During large-scale emergency responses, police departments face operating costs to mobilize. There’s also the funds needed to buy the equipment needed for response teams. Sometimes officers assigned to the investigation can be pushed away from their normal duties.  

Sgt. Greg Bedor, spokesman for the Fairfax County Police Department, said the department doesn’t have an exact dollar-figure on the cost to deploy 89 police officers because they were on-duty officers. 

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Fairfax County Police Chief Edwin Roessler Jr. said authorities “treated this event as though we had an active shooter.” No crime was ultimately found committed, and the disgruntled employee was found at an off-site location.

“We need to look at this as a positive event,” Roessler said. “Everybody in that building did the right thing. They saw something that was out of place and they called 911. Although this disrupted business, I’m glad to report no one has been harmed.”

He added: “This shows that people in our county and hopefully throughout the country are training themselves, both in the public and private sector. If you see something, say something.”

In West Valley City, Utah, last week, a sign at the Valley Fair Mall fell, causing a loud noise that prompted someone to yell “shots!” 

Video from the scene showed a crowd fleeing and shouting, unaware that there was no immediate danger. The mall was evacuated, and police said “a few skirmishes” occurred, according to KSL-TV, although no injuries were ultimately reported.

Roxeanne Vainuku, public information officer at the West Valley City Police Department, said 55 of the department’s officers responded to the call from the mall. She estimated each worked three hours on the incident, at an average of $30 per employee, putting the overall cost at $4,950.

A Walmart in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, was the site of a scare after two men pulled weapons on each other last Tuesday, but there was ultimately no shooting. 

Savannah Jones, spokeswoman of the East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office, said 65 sheriff’s office employees – patrol deputies, detectives, traffic units and SWAT members – responded to multiple 911 phone calls that came in about the possible attack. She said an exact cost is unknown. 

Jones said the department “responded appropriately” given the recent mass-shooting incidents in the nation.

In New York, panic ensued after a loud noise sparked panic about a possible shooting in Times Square, which has long been a place on high alert. Crowds started screaming and running in the streets to get away from where the sound was originating. 

The New York Police Department soon discovered that backfire from a motorcycle caused the commotion, and all was clear.

The NYPD declined to answer questions about the amount of resources deployed to the false alarm.

Straub, a 30-year police veteran, said tips about threats can come in anonymously or on social media and that sometimes it turns into news before the incident is even investigated. He said each has to be taken seriously. 

“I’d rather see a strong response and it turn out to be false and nobody get hurts than it be a real attack and insufficient number of resources.”

Contributing: Ryan W. Miller in McLean, Virginia

Reach Joey Garrison on Twitter @joeygarrison.

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Shards from Norwegian Air flight fall ‘like bullets’ on neighborhood in Italy, damaging cars, rooftops

Westlake Legal Group NorwegianIstock Shards from Norwegian Air flight fall 'like bullets' on neighborhood in Italy, damaging cars, rooftops Michael Bartiromo fox-news/travel/general/travel-safety fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc article 4ed45da5-df2c-5276-9b1e-d6bafc43b58f

Italian authorities are investigating after debris that detached from a departing Norwegian Air flight allegedly rained down “like bullets” on a neighborhood just outside of Rome.

Locals in Isola Sacra, a neighborhood in the city of Fiumicino, south of the Rome-Fiumicino International Airport, said pieces from the plane damaged cars, rooftops and awnings, and one even reported being burned by a shard that fell from the sky.

PHOTOS: FLIGHT ATTENDANT FIRED FOR ALLEGEDLY BEING DRUNK DURING FLIGHT

“They were like bullets,” one witness told Italy’s Il Messaggero, per a translation from The Sun. “My shirt was on fire.”

Photos from the damage shared on social media and aviation blogs show several of the shards, which are described as being between 2 and 4 inches long, as well as some of the damage they caused to car windshields.

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The airline says the flight, which departed for Los Angeles on Aug. 10, safely returned to Fiumicino after experiencing a “technical issue a few minutes after take-off,” but would not specify what the issue was. A news release shared by Italy’s National Agency for Flight Safety, which is currently investigating, blamed “engine problems” for the incident.

The aircraft, a Boeing 787, was taken out of service.

The airline also confirmed that the 298 passengers aboard the flight were reaccommodated on other flights, while reiterating the carrier’s commitment to safety.

“The safety of customers and crew is always our main priority. We are actively collaborating with Aeroporti di Roma and the Italian authorities in the investigation,” reps for the airline wrote in a statement obtained by Fox News. “As it is an ongoing investigation, we cannot comment of specific aspects of this event.”

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On Facebook, however, Fiumicino Mayor Esterino Montino said the incident has renewed concerns over the planes’ trajectories, and claimed that the airport had “disregarded” a former agreement to not use that particular runway in the mornings or at night.

Montino also said the incident calls for an “urgent” meeting with the Italian Civil Aviation Authority, the Ministry of Infrastructure and Transport, and the Aeroporti di Roma “to address and resolve the issue and secure homes and people.”

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A representative for the Italian Civil Aviation Authority was not immediately available to share details of the ongoing investigation.

Westlake Legal Group NorwegianIstock Shards from Norwegian Air flight fall 'like bullets' on neighborhood in Italy, damaging cars, rooftops Michael Bartiromo fox-news/travel/general/travel-safety fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc article 4ed45da5-df2c-5276-9b1e-d6bafc43b58f   Westlake Legal Group NorwegianIstock Shards from Norwegian Air flight fall 'like bullets' on neighborhood in Italy, damaging cars, rooftops Michael Bartiromo fox-news/travel/general/travel-safety fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc article 4ed45da5-df2c-5276-9b1e-d6bafc43b58f

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Trump Immigration Chief: Give Me Tired, Poor Who Can Stand On ‘Own 2 Feet’

Ken Cuccinelli, the Trump administration’s acting head of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, defended its new rule effectively barring legal immigrants on government benefits such as food stamps and Medicaid from becoming permanent residents by suggesting that the inscription on the Statue of Liberty should read: “Give me your tired and your poor who can stand on their own two feet.”

In an interview Tuesday on NPR’s “Morning Edition,” Cuccinelli repeatedly claimed that “it doesn’t seem like too much to ask.” He argued that “self-sufficiency is central to the American value set, and it’s also central to our immigration history.”

“If they don’t have future prospects of being legal permanent residents without welfare, that will be counted against them,” he said. “It doesn’t seem like too much to ask that we have Americans here who aren’t likely to go on welfare.”

When host Rachel Martin pressed him on exactly which immigrants would be welcome to the U.S., he replied: “All immigrants who can stand on their own two feet, [be] self-sufficient, pull themselves up by their bootstraps — again, as in the American tradition,” going on to cite “his Italian-Irish heritage.”

“Would you also agree that Emma Lazarus’ words etched on the Statue of Liberty, ‘give me your tired, your poor,’ are also part of the American ethos?” Martin asked, after noting that many immigrants throughout history have come to the U.S. “with nothing.” 

“They certainly are,” Cuccinelli said. “Give me your tired and your poor who can stand on their own two feet, and who will not become a public charge.”

Westlake Legal Group 5d52b4482200003100f51703 Trump Immigration Chief: Give Me Tired, Poor Who Can Stand On ‘Own 2 Feet’

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The new policy, announced Monday and set to go into effect in October, is an effort from the Trump administration to crack down on legal immigration. It will make it more difficult for legal immigrants to apply for visas and permanent residency (also known as green cards) by expanding the definition of who is considered a “public charge,” or someone the government says could become dependent on its programs.

Under the expanded definition, immigrants who are use government services like food stamps, Medicaid or housing vouchers would be considered a public charge — making them ineligible for a green card.

The policy change also adds to the factors the government would consider when evaluating an immigrant’s visa or green card application, including an applicant’s English proficiency, income level and health conditions. This could also further restrict legal immigration.

Immigrant rights advocates have warned that the rule change could have a “chilling effect” and prompt eligible immigrants to avoid or unenroll in government services, even if they are not seeking green cards or visas.

“We invite people to come here and join us as a privilege,” Cuccinelli said later in Tuesday’s interview. “No one has a right to become an American who isn’t born here as an American. America has generously opened its doors.”

When given an opportunity to clarify, Cuccinelli asserted that “it is a privilege to become an American, not a right, for anybody who is not already an American citizen.”

This article has been updated with more details about the Trump administration’s new policy. 

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