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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 139)

Woman manages to board Delta flight with no ID or boarding pass, passenger says

A woman managed to board a Delta flight from Orlando to Atlanta with no ID or boarding pass, says a passenger who helped uncover the alleged security breach after the woman in question took her seat.

Delta and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) were investigating how it happened, Fox 35 reported.

According to the passenger who didn’t want to be identified, the woman refused to get up from the seat. “I also had a boarding pass for that seat, and she said very bluntly, ‘I’m not moving.'”

The passenger told WFTV she asked for a flight attendant who came over and noted the woman wasn’t listed on the flight’s manifest.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-delta-orlando Woman manages to board Delta flight with no ID or boarding pass, passenger says fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc David Aaro article 4f6fdea0-03c2-5526-89ce-7514149d3ffe

A passenger said the woman showed the pilot and a supervisor a photo of herself on her phone when they asked for ID. (File)

The pilot and a supervisor then reportedly tried to remove the woman to no avail.

When they asked for her boarding pass, the woman said she threw it away and when they asked for her ID, she showed them a photo of herself on her phone, WFTV reported.

The passenger recalled a conversation between the woman and the flight attendant.

Well, I’m showing you a picture ID,” the woman said. “Ma’am, that’s not a government-issued ID. That’s a photo,” the flight attendant said. “Well, this is just as good,” the woman said. “No, ma’am, it’s not just as good,” the flight attendant said.

ARE AIRPLANE BLANKETS, PILLOWS SANITARY TO USE DURING FLIGHTS?

“They eventually told her, ‘You’re breaking federal law,'” the passenger said, according to the outlet.

Soon after, the pilot called the police who were able to remove the woman. She reportedly left the plane cursing, to the confusion of many other passengers.

“We were stopped pretty quickly, and the pilot explained it was because the lady was not cooperating with TSA, and she did not have a ticket to any airline at all,” the passenger told WFTV. “They could not figure out how she even got on the plane.”

SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS FLIGHT ATTENDANTS ARRESTED FOR ALLEGEDLY TRAFFICKING $3 MILLION OF COCAINE

She said TSA agents and dogs searched the plane for about an hour, and workers patted down every passenger and searched their bags before the flight took off for Atlanta.

The TSA told the outlet the woman was screened but didn’t provide more information. It’s still unknown how the woman managed to get on the plane without a boarding pass or ID.

Delta released a statement following the incident.

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“Delta apologizes to customers of flight 1516 for the delay after a person not ticketed for that flight was removed from the aircraft,” Delta said. “Security officials then directed precautionary rescreen of everyone onboard. Delta is working with local law enforcement and the Transportation Security Administration on their investigation and we are conducting our own review of this as well.”

Orlando Police Lt. Wanda Miglio, who was called to the airport just before 10:30 a.m. after getting reports of a “suspicious person,” said the investigation was ongoing and the FBI has been notified of the incident, ABC News reported.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-delta-orlando Woman manages to board Delta flight with no ID or boarding pass, passenger says fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc David Aaro article 4f6fdea0-03c2-5526-89ce-7514149d3ffe   Westlake Legal Group iStock-delta-orlando Woman manages to board Delta flight with no ID or boarding pass, passenger says fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc David Aaro article 4f6fdea0-03c2-5526-89ce-7514149d3ffe

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4 Dead, 5 Wounded In Bar Shooting In Kansas City, Kan.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1179396003-75cf8ffa756a7c0f1bd37efd4c39bab6f306185e-s1100-c15 4 Dead, 5 Wounded In Bar Shooting In Kansas City, Kan.

Four people were killed and five others injured in a shooting at a bar in Kansas City, Kan., early Sunday morning. The suspects were armed with handguns when they fled the scene, according to police. Ed Zurga/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Zurga/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  4 Dead, 5 Wounded In Bar Shooting In Kansas City, Kan.

Four people were killed and five others injured in a shooting at a bar in Kansas City, Kan., early Sunday morning. The suspects were armed with handguns when they fled the scene, according to police.

Ed Zurga/Getty Images

Four people were killed and five others were injured during a shooting early Sunday morning at a bar in Kansas City, Kan.

The five people who were wounded suffered non-life threatening injuries and were taken to local hospitals, according to a statement by the Kansas City police department.

Police spokesman Thomas Tomasic said a call came in around 1:27 a.m. about a shooting in the area around 10th Street and Central Avenue. Tomasic said that when officers arrived at the Tequila KC bar, they found four people dead inside.

Authorities say they are now looking for two suspects that were armed with handguns at the time of the shooting. In a statement, the department said “a preliminary investigation suggests that an earlier dispute occurred inside the bar which lead to the shooting incident.”

The four killed were all Hispanic males, ranging in age from mid-20s to late-50s, according to a CNN report.

Police said that although the investigation is still in its early stages, they do not believe the shooting was racially motivated, according to The Washington Post.

David Alvey, the mayor of Kansas City, spoke to reporters on Sunday and said his prayers were with the victims.

“It’s a sad day for all those involved,” Alvey said. “The businesses and families who live in these neighborhoods are growing our community … They deserve to feel safe in their neighborhoods and businesses and deserve to be protected.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Amy Schumer Gets Real About Being Afraid To Return To Work As New Mom

Amy Schumer is talking about the highs and lows of going back to work five months after giving birth to her first child. 

The comedian, who’s kept it candid with fans throughout her pregnancy and motherhood journey, welcomed son Gene Attell Fischer with husband Chris Fischer in May and she’s still adjusting to her new normal. 

The “I Feel Pretty” star shared a sweet snap of the newborn on Saturday, but it was the caption about her mixed emotions surrounding her decision to return to work that caught people’s attention. 

“I’m feeling strong and good and like I’m still a human being with interests and ambitions and goals I’m excited to reach,” she wrote. “It’s felt good to be back at work. I was so worried about it and was afraid to go back after he was 3 months old.”

Schumer went on to reveal that there have been a “couple days I’ve cried from missing” her son, but said she’s ultimately grateful to get back in the swing of things. 

“It’s mostly good to be back and the breaks energize me to be a better mom and appreciate our time even more,” she continued. “I have it a lot easier than many people but I wanted to share my experience.”

The comic ended her post by asking her followers how they first learned to balance responsibilities at home and at work, prompting some famous friends, including Debra Messing, Drew Barrymore and Padma Lakshmi, to share their own stories in the comments. 

Westlake Legal Group 5d9a391c200000f2004e168b Amy Schumer Gets Real About Being Afraid To Return To Work As New Mom

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Westlake Legal Group 5d9a390620000093034e1678 Amy Schumer Gets Real About Being Afraid To Return To Work As New Mom

Instagram

Westlake Legal Group 5d9a3949200000d0024e169d Amy Schumer Gets Real About Being Afraid To Return To Work As New Mom

Instagram

Earlier in the week, Schumer took a trip down memory lane, posting the photo of her reaction when she first discovered that she was pregnant. 

#tbt the day I found out I was pregnant in @jessseinfeld bathroom,” she wrote alongside a photo of her looking shocked while sitting on a toilet.  

While Schumer didn’t name the project that’s keeping her busy, she’s set to write, direct and executive produce in the upcoming Hulu series “Love, Beth” as part of her first-look deal with the streaming service. The 10-episode first season is set to arrive sometime in 2020.

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Catholic Church to debate married men becoming priests

Pope Francis on Sunday convened a meeting of bishops to discuss a list of topics — including whether the Catholic Church should ease its policy of celibacy for priests, a 1,000-year-old precedent that is expected to spark a heated debate between adherents of the tradition and proponents who’ve said ordaining married men would help solve the church’s clergy shortage.

The Vatican meeting, known as a synod, was to focus on the church’s activity in South America’s Amazon region, a sparsely populated region where Catholic parishes could go for months without seeing a priest.

Westlake Legal Group AP19279340024454 Catholic Church to debate married men becoming priests fox-news/world/world-regions/italy fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/religion/vatican fox-news/world/religion/christianity fox-news/us/religion/roman-catholic fox-news/person/pope-francis fox news fnc/faith-values fnc Bradford Betz b93aaf92-72ba-5733-9d84-d8932a83afc1 article

Pope Francis delivering a blessing as he celebrated an opening Mass for the Amazon synod, in St. Peter’s Basilica, at the Vatican, on Sunday. (AP)

Cardinal Cláudio Hummes, a former archbishop of São Paulo, told reporters last Thursday that the priest shortage has meant Catholics in the Amazon frequently have lacked access to the sacraments, a bleak sign for the church’s ministry.

NEW YORK ARCHDIOCESE COMPLYING WITH SEX ABUSE CLAIMS, YEAR-LONG REVIEW SHOWS

To reverse this trend, the church has considered the ordination of indigenous elders, “even if they have an existing and stable family, in order to ensure availability of the sacraments that accompany and sustain the Christian life,” according to the synod’s official working document which The Wall Street Journal cited.

But, some analysts have doubted whether ordaining married indigenous leaders in the Amazon would solve the priest shortage there. Canadian Cardinal Marc Ouellet, the head of the Congregation for Bishops, argued in a book published last week that a clergy’s celibacy was precisely why local communities revered them.

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Others have argued that loosening the celibacy rule in remote places such as the Amazon or the Pacific Islands – which the church has considered in the past – would open the door to other controversial issues including homosexuality and women’s ordination.

Still, any decision would require the final approval of the pope who has said he would pray and reflect on the decision further.

Westlake Legal Group AP19279340024454 Catholic Church to debate married men becoming priests fox-news/world/world-regions/italy fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/religion/vatican fox-news/world/religion/christianity fox-news/us/religion/roman-catholic fox-news/person/pope-francis fox news fnc/faith-values fnc Bradford Betz b93aaf92-72ba-5733-9d84-d8932a83afc1 article   Westlake Legal Group AP19279340024454 Catholic Church to debate married men becoming priests fox-news/world/world-regions/italy fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/religion/vatican fox-news/world/religion/christianity fox-news/us/religion/roman-catholic fox-news/person/pope-francis fox news fnc/faith-values fnc Bradford Betz b93aaf92-72ba-5733-9d84-d8932a83afc1 article

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Coco Austin slams critics who say she can’t be ‘sexy after having children’

Westlake Legal Group Ice-T-and-Coco-14e86c6aa6114510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ Coco Austin slams critics who say she can't be 'sexy after having children' Sasha Savitsky fox-news/tech/companies/instagram fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc fc45b733-1c3a-5c05-b516-fc8cf7723352 article

Coco Austin is firing back at critics who say she can’t be “sexy after having children.”

Austin, 40, welcomed daughter, Chanel, 3, in 2015 with husband Ice-T, 61.

She posted two revealing photos to her Instagram account on Sunday from what appeared to be her shoe closet.

“I hate seeing comments that say you cant be sexy after having children.. who says?” she asked.

ICE T’S WIFE COCO AUSTIN HOLDS BABY DAUGHTER WHILE SWIMMING WITH SHARKS

“And yes,I dont have has much time as I used too before Chanel but I can still pick my moments .. I will always and forever be Coco.. no matter what, I still rock as a wife and a mother!!! 💋💋💋 You hear me?”

The post resonated with her fans who flooded the comments section with support for the model.

“You tell them!! You look great,” one person wrote.

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Another shared: “Oh yeah you can and who ever said that must not have any selfesteem. Girl you are inspiring others.”

Others simply shared flame emojis.

Westlake Legal Group Ice-T-and-Coco-14e86c6aa6114510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ Coco Austin slams critics who say she can't be 'sexy after having children' Sasha Savitsky fox-news/tech/companies/instagram fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc fc45b733-1c3a-5c05-b516-fc8cf7723352 article   Westlake Legal Group Ice-T-and-Coco-14e86c6aa6114510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ Coco Austin slams critics who say she can't be 'sexy after having children' Sasha Savitsky fox-news/tech/companies/instagram fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc fc45b733-1c3a-5c05-b516-fc8cf7723352 article

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4 Dead, 5 Wounded In Bar Shooting In Kansas City, Kan.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1179396003-75cf8ffa756a7c0f1bd37efd4c39bab6f306185e-s1100-c15 4 Dead, 5 Wounded In Bar Shooting In Kansas City, Kan.

Four people were killed and five others injured in a shooting at a bar in Kansas City, Kan., early Sunday morning. The suspects were armed with handguns when they fled the scene, according to police. Ed Zurga/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Ed Zurga/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  4 Dead, 5 Wounded In Bar Shooting In Kansas City, Kan.

Four people were killed and five others injured in a shooting at a bar in Kansas City, Kan., early Sunday morning. The suspects were armed with handguns when they fled the scene, according to police.

Ed Zurga/Getty Images

Four people were killed and five others were injured during a shooting early Sunday morning at a bar in Kansas City, Kan.

The five people who were wounded suffered non-life threatening injuries and were taken to local hospitals, according to a statement by the Kansas City police department.

Police spokesman Thomas Tomasic said a call came in around 1:27 a.m. about a shooting in the area around 10th Street and Central Avenue. Tomasic said that when officers arrived at the Tequila KC bar, they found four people dead inside.

Authorities say they are now looking for two suspects that were armed with handguns at the time of the shooting. In a statement, the department said “a preliminary investigation suggests that an earlier dispute occurred inside the bar which lead to the shooting incident.”

The four killed were all Hispanic males, ranging in age from mid-20s to late-50s, according to a CNN report.

Police said that although the investigation is still in its early stages, they do not believe the shooting was racially motivated, according to The Washington Post.

David Alvey, the mayor of Kansas City, spoke to reporters on Sunday and said his prayers were with the victims.

“It’s a sad day for all those involved,” Alvey said. “The businesses and families who live in these neighborhoods are growing our community … They deserve to feel safe in their neighborhoods and businesses and deserve to be protected.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

How Boeing vs. Airbus Became Trump vs. Europe

Westlake Legal Group 00boeing-wto4-facebookJumbo How Boeing vs. Airbus Became Trump vs. Europe World Trade Organization Muilenburg, Dennis A International Trade and World Market Boeing Company Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters Airbus Industrie

Just weeks after his inauguration, President Trump toured Boeing’s factory in North Charleston, S.C., holding a rally with workers, admiring a new 787 Dreamliner and calling on the company to bring down the cost of new Air Force One planes.

But Boeing wanted something from Mr. Trump, too.

During a private conversation at the event, Boeing’s chief executive, Dennis A. Muilenburg, talked to Mr. Trump about a long-running trade dispute between the United States and the European Union that had its roots in the pitched rivalry between Boeing and Airbus, according to three people familiar with the meeting, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss a delicate matter.

The case, which centered on subsidies that Europe provides Airbus, had been working its way through the World Trade Organization for years, but an end was finally in sight. In the event that it was settled on Mr. Trump’s watch, Mr. Muilenburg urged the president to enforce the ruling, which would mean levying tariffs on European goods.

On Wednesday, Boeing got its wish. After an announcement by the World Trade Organization, the Trump administration said it would tax as much as $7.5 billion of European exports annually.

It was the largest-ever authorized retaliation in the organization’s history, adding another layer of complexity to a global economy already rattled by brewing trade wars and further straining relations between the United States and the European Union. And it was the government’s boldest-ever step to protect Boeing, America’s largest manufacturing exporter.

“All of those countries were ripping off the United States for many years,” Mr. Trump said Wednesday at a news conference with the president of Finland, a European Union member. “They know I’m wise to it. We’ve had a lot of wins. This was a $7 billion win. Not bad.”

It was also a win for Boeing, one decades in the making. Boeing has pursued its case against Airbus since the waning days of the Clinton administration, compiling evidence and finally persuading the United States to file a complaint with the World Trade Organization in 2004.

Yet this is hardly a clean victory for Boeing. The company is in the midst of the biggest crisis of its 103-year history after the 737 Max was grounded because of two deadly crashes, and has infuriated many of its most important customers with its faltering response. Some of the customers affected by the Max grounding also buy Airbus planes and now face the prospect of higher costs as a result of the tariffs, adding to their frustrations with Boeing.

What’s more, in a case that the World Trade Organization is expected to decide next year, Europe accuses the United States of providing illegal subsidies to Boeing. A ruling against the United States could lead to tariffs against Boeing planes sold to European customers. Europe could also find ways to retaliate against the tariffs announced after last week’s ruling.

“It’s a Boeing victory,” said Richard Aboulafia, an aviation analyst at the Teal Group. “But one that may have unintended consequences that are not in Boeing’s interest.”

At issue was the substantial financial support that European countries have given to Airbus in the form of below-market-rate loans that are often forgiven. Without that support, the United States and Boeing argued, Airbus would never have been able to become a true rival to Boeing. With help from those loans, Airbus went from having less than 25 percent of the market share for large commercial airplanes in 1990 to overtaking Boeing in 2003. Today, Airbus and Boeing roughly split the market for commercial jets.

Boeing hopes the new tariffs will reverse some of those gains. Airlines in the United States will now have to pay at least 10 percent more for Airbus jets coming from Europe, potentially steering more orders toward Boeing. And the European Union may be forced to reconsider its support for Airbus, with the tariffs in place until the two sides negotiate a settlement or the World Trade Organization decides that Europe is in compliance with its rules.

“Europe is facing tariffs today because Airbus has refused for years to comply with W.T.O. rulings,” Boeing said in a statement. “Unfortunately, Airbus’s noncompliance will negatively impact European member states, industries and businesses completely unrelated to Airbus’s actions, as well as Airbus’s airline customers.”

Airbus accepted the ruling, while calling for a settlement. Its chief executive, Guillaume Faury, said tariffs “would be a barrier against free trade and would have a negative impact on not only the U.S. airlines but also U.S. jobs, suppliers and air travelers.”

Airlines expressed their displeasure with the ruling last week, and the stocks of American Airlines, United Airlines and Southwest Airlines, the three domestic carriers that fly Boeing’s Max, all fell as a result of the pending tariffs.

Delta called them “an unfair tax on U.S. consumers and companies.” JetBlue, which does not fly Boeing planes, said it was “concerned about the detrimental impact aircraft tariffs will have” and argued they would “harm customers who rely on us to offer competitive, low fares.”

Other major airlines in the United States did not comment on the tariffs, preferring to avoid publicly criticizing Mr. Trump, yet were quietly fuming.

The tariff package could have been worse for Europe and its customers. The Office of the United States Trade Representative said it planned to start by levying a 10 percent tariff on European aircraft and a 25 percent tariff on agricultural goods, including French wine and Spanish olive oil. Those taxes may be manageable for a time, but leave the United States room to increase pressure in the future.

[Read how these new tariffs could make your dinner more expensive.]

But no party got everything it wanted. Boeing had hoped the tariffs would tax airplane parts from Europe, a move that would have hurt Airbus, which opened a factory in Mobile, Ala., in 2015. In the end, the Trump administration declined to do so, believing that such a move might damage manufacturing in a pro-Trump state.

Airlines, meanwhile, had been lobbying for the tariffs to be structured in a way that minimized their pain. Last week, a bipartisan group of 34 lawmakers sent a letter urging Robert Lighthizer, the United States trade representative, to avoid levying tariffs and, if he did, to exempt existing aircraft orders. But the tariffs will hit existing orders.

With more rulings from the World Trade Organization and the threat of European tariffs targeting American products looming, Boeing may not have long to savor its success. Yet in the midst of a trying year for the company, the decision was a welcome bit of good news.

“The extent to which European member states went to create and sustain Airbus for the purpose of competing with Boeing, an iconic American company, is unprecedented,” said Robert Novick, a partner at the law firm WilmerHale who represented Boeing in the case. “Indeed, the W.T.O. established that, and the level of harm it found to Boeing is unprecedented.”

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National Geographic reporter shot while conducting interview in Mexico

A National Geographic journalist was recovering Saturday after being shot in the leg in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, while interviewing a purported drug dealer for a story about violence in the border city.

The incident involving an unidentified American journalist happened Friday night at an address where officials said two drug traffickers were also killed in April, according to reports. Ciudad Juarez is located about 10 miles south of El Paso, Texas.

The subject of the interview was killed and another suspected drug dealer died after being taken to a hospital.

Westlake Legal Group Journalist-Killed National Geographic reporter shot while conducting interview in Mexico Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/location-mexico fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/world/crime fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox news fnc/world fnc fa1627a4-b2a0-5c71-87d4-a38364f99fb8 article

Police vehicles and a yellow police line cordon are pictured at a crime scene after a National Geographic journalist was shot in the leg late Friday while interviewing an alleged drug dealer. (REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez)

Investigators said the men were targeted by four assassins who showed up and opened fire, KTSM-TV reported. The attackers appeared to be female, according to Chihuahua Deputy Attorney General Jorge Nava Lopez.

MEXICAN DRUG CARTELS FUELING METH COMEBACK IN US, WITH SEIZURES AT ‘HISTORICALLY HIGH LEVELS’

The reporter, who was with three other journalists, did not alert the police that they were going to be in the area and they were not being guarded at the time of the interview, KTSM added.

Lopez said the state was in possession of the journalists’ equipment to determine whether they recorded the attack, according to the station.

KIDNAPPED MEXICAN POLICE COMMANDER FOUND BEHEADED IN CANCUN

The Associated Press quoted Nava as saying the journalist appeared to have been caught in an ambush that resulted in a shootout.

Nava said the plan to interview members of organized crime was “obviously risky.”

The journalist and crew left Mexico for El Paso on Saturday after investigators interviewed them.

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National Geographic representatives did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Mexico is considered the most dangerous country for journalists in the Western Hemisphere.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Journalist-Killed National Geographic reporter shot while conducting interview in Mexico Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/location-mexico fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/world/crime fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox news fnc/world fnc fa1627a4-b2a0-5c71-87d4-a38364f99fb8 article   Westlake Legal Group Journalist-Killed National Geographic reporter shot while conducting interview in Mexico Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/location-mexico fox-news/world/world-regions/latin-america fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/world/crime fox-news/topic/mexican-cartel-violence fox news fnc/world fnc fa1627a4-b2a0-5c71-87d4-a38364f99fb8 article

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‘Why should I care at all?’: GOP defends Trump as second whistleblower comes forward

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'Why should I care at all?': GOP defends Trump as second whistleblower comes forward

Whistleblowers have been at time essential and detrimental to a country’s democracy, but what makes them different than a leaker? We explain. Just the FAQs, USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – Congressional Republicans spent Sunday morning defending President Donald Trump as news of a second whistleblower started to come out.

The second whistleblower has firsthand information to back up what’s contained in the first complaint, according to his attorney.  

The first complaint, a seven-page document released to the public on Sept. 26, helped spark an impeachment inquiry by revealing details of a call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky in which Trump had pressured Zelensky to open an investigation into former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter Biden.

Rep. Chris Stewart, R-Utah, when asked on “Fox News Sunday” about the second whistleblower, said, “It does not matter.”

“It does not matter. This person is going to come forward and say, yep the president had this phone call,” said Stewart. “And yep, we have this transcript. Why should I care at all?”

Second whistleblower: Second whistleblower on Trump-Ukraine call, reportedly with firsthand knowledge, to come forward

Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., sparred with NBC’s “Meet the Press” host Chuck Todd about Johnson’s previous comments on Ukraine. 

Todd asked Johnson why he said in an Oct. 4 Wall Street Journal interview that he had “winced” after being told about Trump’s conditioning of aid to Ukraine on the opening of an investigation into the Biden family 

“At that suggestion, I winced. My reaction was, ‘Oh God. I don’t wanna see those two things combined,” he had told the Wall Street Journal at the time.

Todd and Johnson went back and forth over the issue, and Johnson did not elaborate on his previous comments, instead saying that Trump’s presidency had been “sabotaged” says the day after his inauguration. 

“You set this thing up totally biased,” Johnson said to Todd.

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, when asked about it on CBS News’ “Face the Nation” gave a more evenhanded response. 

“I think it will be interesting to find out more about who that person is and what kind of contacts they had,” he said. 

Blunt said he planned on working with the Senate Intelligence Committee to “assemble all of the facts.”

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., responded to the news of the second whistleblower by comparing the situation to the controversy around Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination process. 

“I’ve seen this movie before — with Brett #Kavanaugh. More and more doesn’t mean better or reliable,” he wrote on Twitter. 

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/10/06/ukraine-gop-defends-trump-another-whistleblower-comes-forward/3890558002/

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Talks to End G.M. Strike Take ‘Turn for the Worse,’ U.A.W. Says

Westlake Legal Group 06motors1-facebookJumbo Talks to End G.M. Strike Take ‘Turn for the Worse,’ U.A.W. Says Wages and Salaries United Automobile Workers Strikes Mexico General Motors Foreign Investments Factories and Manufacturing Automobiles

General Motors and the striking United Auto Workers hit an impasse in contract talks on Sunday over the question of moving production from Mexico to plants in the United States, two people close to the talks said.

The union, which has been on strike since Sept. 16, has pressed G.M. to shift production of some sport utility vehicles and pickup trucks from Mexican factories in order to create and secure jobs in domestic plants, these people said.

After the two sides appeared to make progress in recent days, a U.A.W. vice president said Sunday that the union had offered a new contract proposal over the weekend but that G.M.’s response failed to address key concerns.

“We, in this union, could not be more disappointed with General Motors,” Terry Dittes, the U.A.W.’s lead negotiator with G.M., said in a letter to members. “These negotiations have taken a turn for the worse.”

He did not refer specifically to the issue of where G.M. produced cars, but said G.M.’s latest response “did nothing to provide job security” for its American workers.

In a statement, G.M. said it was committed to continuing discussions around the clock to reach a resolution. “We continue to negotiate in good faith with very good proposals that benefit employees today and build a stronger future for all of us,” the company said.

The two sides were continuing negotiations on Sunday.

By Saturday, the union and the company appeared to have reached agreements on most major issues, including wage increases and a path for temporary workers to become permanent employees, the people close to the talks said. Two unresolved matters, they said, included the time of service required for less senior workers to reach the top union wage — it currently takes eight years — and inflation and cost-of-living adjustments for pensions and 401(k) retirement plans.

But then the issue of moving work from Mexico to United States plants arose as a major stumbling block.

G.M. has three vehicle-assembly plants in Mexico that make S.U.V.s and pickup trucks sold under the Chevrolet and GMC brands. The company’s decision a few years ago to make the new Chevrolet Blazer in Mexico in particular has rankled the union since the midsize S.U.V. is the kind of vehicle that typically can be made profitably in United States plants.

At the same time, G.M. has closed a car plant in Lordstown, Ohio, and engine and transmission plants in Baltimore and in Warren, Mich. A second car plant in Detroit is scheduled to close in January.

The union is pressing G.M. to move some production from Mexico to the idled United States plants. Automakers sometimes move production between plants, but doing so can disrupt production and incur costs for new machinery or moving existing assembly lines.

G.M. has offered to invest $7 billion in United States plants that would create 2,700 jobs and preserve 2,700 others, including keeping the Detroit car factory open. It has also offered to build a new battery plant with a partner near Lordstown that would hire union workers.

“They are down to the toughest issue,” said Erik Gordon, a University of Michigan business professor who follows the auto industry. “G.M. sees it as the flexibility to survive the changes in buyer tastes and from gas to electric vehicles. The U.A.W. sees it as job security for workers who are as worried as G.M. is about the changes.”

The union had chosen G.M. as the negotiating target for this cycle of contract talks with the Detroit automakers in part because the company has been closing United States plants, in contrast to Ford Motor and Fiat Chrysler, and has substantially trimmed its domestic work force.

President Trump, even before taking office, was critical of G.M.’s foreign car production, and shortly after the strike began he reiterated that point. “I don’t want General Motors building plants in China and Mexico,” he told reporters.

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