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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 140)

Tesla’s Cyberquad electric ATV isn’t really a Tesla

At the end of Tesla’s infamous Cybertruck reveal last Thursday, Elon Musk rolled out a little surprise. “We also made an ATV,” he said.

Westlake Legal Group cyberquad Tesla's Cyberquad electric ATV isn't really a Tesla Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/style/pickups fox-news/auto/style/motorcycles fox-news/auto/make/tesla fox-news/auto/attributes/electric fox news fnc/auto fnc article 919db108-59ea-532a-b5a3-f9a3701dc4b5

A four-wheel electric ATV then rolled onto the stage and into the bed of the pickup, where it fit perfectly and was plugged in to an outlet that could charge it off the truck’s battery.

Musk didn’t offer any details about it, but later followed up on Twitter that a two-person electric ATV would be offered as an option for Cybertruck buyers. But what’s come to be known as the Cyberquad is likely to be very different than the one at the event.

Westlake Legal Group ecbbf108-cyber3 Tesla's Cyberquad electric ATV isn't really a Tesla Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/style/pickups fox-news/auto/style/motorcycles fox-news/auto/make/tesla fox-news/auto/attributes/electric fox news fnc/auto fnc article 919db108-59ea-532a-b5a3-f9a3701dc4b5

7 FUNKY FEATURES ON TESLA’S CYBERTRUCK

Many observers quickly deduced that under the black, polygonal bodywork was a Yamaha 700 Raptor ATV that had its internal combustion engine swapped for an electric motor, leading some to suggest it represented a collaboration between Tesla and the motorsports company.

But it doesn’t. A Yamaha spokesman told Fox News Autos “we have no affiliation with the ATV concept Tesla recently unveiled, but it’s not surprising they might take cues from Yamaha’s Raptor 700, as it’s been the best-selling sport ATV for many years now.”

Westlake Legal Group cyberf-2 Tesla's Cyberquad electric ATV isn't really a Tesla Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/style/pickups fox-news/auto/style/motorcycles fox-news/auto/make/tesla fox-news/auto/attributes/electric fox news fnc/auto fnc article 919db108-59ea-532a-b5a3-f9a3701dc4b5

The Cyberquad wasn’t the only thing on stage that wasn’t production spec. Although neither Musk nor the reservation website have referred to it as a concept, prototype or pre-production vehicle, the Cybertruck itself is not the final product. Not only is it missing the federally-required sideview mirrors and center high mounted stop light, but Automobile magazine reported that it features a body-on-frame construction, while Tesla says the production truck was designed with an “exoskeleton” that will require new production methods to be developed in order to build it.

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Westlake Legal Group ecbbf108-cyber3 Tesla's Cyberquad electric ATV isn't really a Tesla Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/style/pickups fox-news/auto/style/motorcycles fox-news/auto/make/tesla fox-news/auto/attributes/electric fox news fnc/auto fnc article 919db108-59ea-532a-b5a3-f9a3701dc4b5   Westlake Legal Group ecbbf108-cyber3 Tesla's Cyberquad electric ATV isn't really a Tesla Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/style/pickups fox-news/auto/style/motorcycles fox-news/auto/make/tesla fox-news/auto/attributes/electric fox news fnc/auto fnc article 919db108-59ea-532a-b5a3-f9a3701dc4b5

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Giuliani Pursued Business in Ukraine While Pushing for Inquiries for Trump

Westlake Legal Group 27giuliani-facebookJumbo Giuliani Pursued Business in Ukraine While Pushing for Inquiries for Trump Yovanovitch, Marie L United States Politics and Government Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Presidential Election of 2016 Parnas, Lev Lutsenko, Yuri V Giuliani, Rudolph W Giuliani Partners Fruman, Igor diGenova, Joseph E Burisma Holdings Ltd Biden, Joseph R Jr Biden, Hunter

As Rudolph W. Giuliani waged a public campaign this year to unearth damaging information in Ukraine about President Trump’s political rivals, he privately pursued hundreds of thousands of dollars in business from Ukrainian government officials, documents reviewed by The New York Times show.

Mr. Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer, has repeatedly said he has no business in Ukraine, and none of the deals was finalized. But the documents indicate that while he was pushing Mr. Trump’s agenda with Ukrainian officials eager for support from the United States, Mr. Giuliani also explored financial agreements with members of the same government.

His discussions with Ukrainian officials proceeded far enough along that he prepared at least one retainer agreement, on his company letterhead, that he signed.

In an interview on Wednesday, Mr. Giuliani played down the discussions. He said that a Ukrainian official approached him this year, seeking to hire him personally. Mr. Giuliani said he dismissed that suggestion, but spent about a month considering a separate deal with the Ukrainian government. He then rejected that idea.

“I thought that would be too complicated,” Mr. Giuliani said. “I never received a penny.”

Mr. Giuliani’s shadow diplomacy campaign in Ukraine on behalf of the president is a central focus of the current House impeachment inquiry. At the same time, a federal criminal investigation into Mr. Giuliani is examining his role in the campaign to oust Marie L. Yovanovitch, the American ambassador to Ukraine, and whether he sought to make money in Ukraine at the same time he was working against her, according to people briefed on the matter.

Prosecutors and F.B.I. agents in Manhattan are examining whether Mr. Giuliani was not just working for the president, but also doing the bidding of Ukrainians who wanted the ambassador removed for their own reasons, the people said. It is a federal crime to try to influence the United States government at the request or direction of a foreign government, politician or party without registering as a foreign agent. Mr. Giuliani did not register as one, he has said, because he was acting on behalf of his client, Mr. Trump, not Ukrainians.

Mr. Giuliani has not been accused of wrongdoing.

The documents reviewed by The Times portray an evolving effort over the course of several months by Mr. Giuliani and lawyers close to him to consider taking on various Ukrainian officials or their agencies as clients.

One of the documents, a proposal signed in February by Mr. Giuliani, called for the Ukrainian Ministry of Justice to pay his firm $300,000. In return, Mr. Giuliani would help the government recover money it believed had been stolen and stashed overseas.

In another unsigned draft proposal that was not on letterhead, Mr. Giuliani looked to enter into a similar deal with Yuriy Lutsenko, who was then Ukraine’s top prosecutor. At the time, Mr. Giuliani had been working with Mr. Lutsenko to encourage investigations into the Bidens and the 2016 election.

Mr. Giuliani was critical of Ms. Yovanovitch, whom he and other Republicans have said was opposed to the president. Mr. Giuliani’s moves against her, however, were also aligned with the interests of Mr. Lutsenko, who had butted heads with the ambassador.

Ultimately, Ms. Yovanovitch was removed from her post in May, and Mr. Lutsenko was replaced in August after a new Ukrainian president took office.

The Times could not determine whether the documents it reviewed comprise the entirety of the efforts by Mr. Giuliani and other lawyers to represent Ukrainian government officials.

The documents date to mid-February, when a draft proposal said Mr. Giuliani would represent Mr. Lutsenko “to advise on Ukrainian claims for the recovery of sums of money in various financial institutions outside Ukraine.” It called for Mr. Lutsenko to pay $200,000 to retain Giuliani Partners, Mr. Giuliani’s firm, and a husband-and-wife legal team aligned with Mr. Trump, Joseph E. diGenova and Victoria Toensing.

The proposal came a few weeks after Mr. Giuliani met at his office in New York with Mr. Lutsenko to discuss Ukrainian corruption. Mr. Lutsenko told Mr. Giuliani and others about payments involving Mr. Biden, Hunter Biden and Burisma Holdings, a Ukrainian company that had named the younger Mr. Biden to its board, according to a memo summarizing the meetings.

An updated proposal was circulated on Feb. 20, along with instructions on how to wire money to Giuliani Partners. This version made no mention of Mr. Lutsenko, but instead sought $300,000 from the Ukrainian Ministry of Justice and the Republic of Ukraine. The proposal was signed by Mr. Giuliani, but not by the justice minister at the time, Pavlo Petrenko.

The Ukrainian Ministry of Justice said Wednesday that it did not enter into any contracts or make payments to Mr. Giuliani.

In March, a document proposed that the Ukrainian justice ministry would hire Ms. Toensing and Mr. diGenova for asset recovery. But it said that the General Prosecutor’s office, run by Mr. Lutsenko, would pay $300,000 to Giuliani Partners.

Several later draft retainer agreements involved Ms. Toensing and Mr. diGenova but did not reference Mr. Giuliani.

In April, Mr. Lutsenko reappeared as a potential client in some new versions of documents, along with one of his deputies. Under the proposals, which were signed only by Ms. Toensing and printed on her law firm’s letterhead, she and Mr. diGenova would represent the officials “in connection with recovery and return to the Ukraine government of funds illegally embezzled from that country.”

Asked for comment by The Times, a spokeswoman for Mr. Lutsenko, Larisa Sarhan, on Wednesday referred to an interview Mr. Lutsenko gave to a Ukrainian news outlet confirming that aides to Mr. Giuliani had asked him to hire a lobbying company. He did not specify which company.

Mr. Lutsenko told Ukrainska Pravda he had been seeking a meeting with William P. Barr, the United States attorney general, and was in touch with unnamed advisers to Mr. Giuliani. “In the end, they said the meeting would be impossible unless I hired a company that would lobby for such a meeting,” Mr. Lutsenko told the news outlet, adding that he declined to do that.

The proposed April agreement between Mr. Lutsenko and Ms. Toensing and Mr. diGenova also referenced another assignment: helping the Ukrainians meet with American officials about “the evidence of illegal conduct in Ukraine regarding the United States, for example, interference in the 2016 U.S. elections.”

The proposals noted that Ms. Toensing and Mr. diGenova might have to register as foreign agents under American law.

“We have always stated that we agreed to represent Ukrainian whistle-blowers,” Mark Corallo, a representative for the law firm of Ms. Toensing and Mr. diGenova, said in a statement on Wednesday. Mr. Corallo said the business proposals were “unaccepted” and the lawyers never represented the Ukrainians. “No money was ever received and no legal work was ever performed,” he said.

In another agreement signed by Ms. Toensing in April, the client would have been Victor Shokin, the top Ukrainian prosecutor before Mr. Lutsenko. Mr. Shokin was ousted after critics, among them Mr. Biden, said he was soft on corruption.

Mr. Shokin did not respond to a request for comment.

Mr. Shokin had also spoken with Mr. Giuliani and his associates in January, via Skype. In the call, Mr. Shokin asserted that American officials applied pressure on the Ukrainian government to kill an investigation of Burisma, and that he was fired after Mr. Biden accused the prosecutor of being corrupt, according to a memo summarizing the discussion.

Ms. Toensing proposed that, for $25,000 a month, she and her partner represent Mr. Shokin “for the purpose of collecting evidence regarding his March 2016 firing as Prosecutor General of Ukraine and the role of then-Vice President Joe Biden in such firing, and presenting such evidence to U.S. and foreign authorities.”

Andrew E. Kramer, Maggie Haberman and Ken Vogel contributed reporting. Maria Varenikova contributed reporting from Kyiv.

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KFC shooter who became angry over missing fork and napkin arrested: police

Westlake Legal Group Jonelle-Dare KFC shooter who became angry over missing fork and napkin arrested: police Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/food/fast-food fox news fnc/food-drink fnc fae3b635-270a-5255-972e-6064c5a789d5 article

A woman who allegedly shot at a KFC drive-thru for not getting a fork and napkin with her order has been arrested.

The 33-year-old woman from Sandy Springs, Ga., was taken into custody almost a month after the incident occurred at a KFC in Shelbyville, Ky. She is currently awaiting extradition from Georgia to Kentucky.

Jonelle Jade Dare, 33, was arrested on Tuesday after authorities tracked her to Atlanta, WSB-TV 2 reports. No one was injured during the original incident, although there were several customers and employees in the restaurant at the time.

MCDONALD’S EMPLOYEE ASSAULTED WITH MOP BUCKET, RELEASED FOOTAGE SHOWS

In a statement obtained by Newsweek when the incident originally occurred on October 28, a spokesperson for the Shelbyville Police Department said, “At approximately 11:50 am, officers were dispatched to KFC on a ‘shots fired’ call. According to employees, a customer (adult African American female) in the drive-thru lane became agitated and verbally abusive. After the customer received her drinks and food, a gunshot from inside the vehicle struck a store window. The subject driving a white Mercedes Benz then left the scene driving at a high rate of speed going south on Boone Station Road.”

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The statement continued to confirm that, “No one was injured. Detectives are currently working on the case and the identity of the driver is currently unknown. There does not seem to be a known motive at this time.”

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According to witnesses, however, the shooter was upset over not receiving the utensil and napkins. A local resident shared an image of the shattered window to Facebook and captioned it, “This happened at KFC early today, some women got mad over paper towels and a fork and shot a 9 mm at workers in Shelbyville today.”

Westlake Legal Group Jonelle-Dare KFC shooter who became angry over missing fork and napkin arrested: police Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/food/fast-food fox news fnc/food-drink fnc fae3b635-270a-5255-972e-6064c5a789d5 article   Westlake Legal Group Jonelle-Dare KFC shooter who became angry over missing fork and napkin arrested: police Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/food/fast-food fox news fnc/food-drink fnc fae3b635-270a-5255-972e-6064c5a789d5 article

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Steelers’ JuJu Smith-Schuster posts video of him driving fast, antics draw comparisons to Antonio Brown

Pittsburgh Steelers star JuJu Smith-Schuster came under fire when he posted a video Tuesday of himself appearing to be driving more than 100 mph down a highway in his BMW.

Smith-Schuster didn’t appear to receive any discipline from the authorities for driving over the speed limit or driving while using a cell phone. He was seen driving as fast as 104 mph.

PITTSBURGH STEELERS’ DEVLIN HODGES CHIDED FOR OLD TWEETS SUPPORTING TRUMP

The video was posted to his Instagram Stories. It’s unclear where he was driving at the time.

As the video hit social media, Steelers fans were quick to criticize the third-year wide receiver with his antics being compared to former Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown.

PITTSBURGH STEELERS BENCH MASON RUDOLPH AHEAD OF REMATCH WITH CLEVELAND BROWNS WEEKS AFTER FIGHT

Smith-Schuster has played in 10 games this season, catching 38 passes for 524 yards and three touchdowns. However, he missed the team’s Week 12 game against the Cincinnati Bengals because of a concussion. His status for Sunday’s game against the Cleveland Browns was unclear.

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It’s unclear whether he will receive discipline from the Steelers over the incident.

Westlake Legal Group NFL-JuJu-Smith-Schuster3 Steelers' JuJu Smith-Schuster posts video of him driving fast, antics draw comparisons to Antonio Brown Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/pittsburgh-steelers fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article ac3adcde-6a31-5d2d-9930-530a43ea0d7d   Westlake Legal Group NFL-JuJu-Smith-Schuster3 Steelers' JuJu Smith-Schuster posts video of him driving fast, antics draw comparisons to Antonio Brown Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/pittsburgh-steelers fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article ac3adcde-6a31-5d2d-9930-530a43ea0d7d

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Trump Lawyers, Skeptical of Engaging on Impeachment, Weigh Hearing Strategy

Westlake Legal Group merlin_163630737_52e9ef11-1147-4b95-8805-12ac1c9dc7f8-facebookJumbo Trump Lawyers, Skeptical of Engaging on Impeachment, Weigh Hearing Strategy United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Nadler, Jerrold impeachment House Committee on the Judiciary

WASHINGTON — The White House is reviewing an invitation from House Democrats for President Trump’s legal team to participate in the first Judiciary Committee impeachment hearing next week, even as his lawyers privately question whether to engage with a proceeding his administration branded “an illegitimate sham partisan process” to drive Mr. Trump from office.

Representative Jerrold Nadler, Democrat of New York and the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, wrote to the president on Tuesday offering him or his lawyers the opportunity to appear before lawmakers at a Dec. 4 hearing with constitutional scholars to discuss the historical precedents for impeachment, the definition of an impeachable offense and whether Mr. Trump’s actions meet the bar for removal.

In a statement on Wednesday, Stephanie Grisham, the White House press secretary, did not give any indication about whether Mr. Trump or his lawyers intended to accept the invitation. But people familiar with the president’s legal strategy have said privately that they are deeply suspicious of taking part in a process they view as unfair to Mr. Trump.

“What is obvious to every American is that this letter comes at the end of an illegitimate sham partisan process,” Ms. Grisham said in the statement. “The president has done nothing wrong, and the Democrats know it.”

Next week’s hearing will begin a new phase in the inquiry, as the Judiciary Committee prepares to draft articles of impeachment related to charges that Mr. Trump abused his power to enlist Ukraine in tarnishing his political rivals. The committee is also expected to consider an article of impeachment charging that Mr. Trump obstructed the investigation by blocking witnesses from testifying and refusing to provide documents.

Democrats are also weighing whether to draft an obstruction-of-justice article based on the report by Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel who investigated Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and the Trump campaign.

The bulk of the charges, however, will be based on evidence to be laid out in a detailed report by the House Intelligence Committee after weeks of public and private depositions of current and former administration officials on the Ukraine affair. The report, which Democrats have said will be submitted soon after Thanksgiving, is expected to charge the president with abusing his power by appealing to a foreign government for help in the 2020 presidential election. It will outline Mr. Trump’s efforts to pressure Ukrainian leaders to announce investigations of former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and other Democrats, while denying the country’s president a White House meeting and withholding nearly $400 million in military assistance.

“I remain committed to ensuring a fair and informative process,” Mr. Nadler wrote to Mr. Trump in his letter. He noted that he retained the right under the rules of the impeachment inquiry to deny the president participation in the proceedings if the White House continued to stonewall witnesses and other evidence.

Mr. Nadler gave the president and his lawyers until 6 p.m. Sunday to decide whether they want to be part of the Dec. 4 hearing.

The question of how much the president and his legal advisers decide to participate is likely to be a contentious one as his team wrangles with Democrats over Mr. Trump’s rights to present his defense to lawmakers and the public.

Lawyers for former Presidents Richard M. Nixon and Bill Clinton worked to some extent with the Judiciary Committee to present defenses for their clients during impeachment proceedings. But Mr. Trump and his allies on Capitol Hill have repeatedly criticized the Democratic-led impeachment inquiry as illegitimate.

In a letter to House Democratic leaders shortly after they formally opened the impeachment inquiry, Pat Cipollone, the White House counsel, said Mr. Trump would refuse to cooperate in any way with the inquiry.

“In order to fulfill his duties to the American people, the Constitution, the executive branch, and all future occupants of the office of the presidency, President Trump and his administration cannot participate in your partisan and unconstitutional inquiry under these circumstances,” Mr. Cipollone wrote.

On Tuesday, Mr. Trump claimed on Twitter that he “would actually like people to testify” as part of the inquiry because he believes they would say he did nothing wrong. But he also blasted the Democratic investigation, calling it a “phony Impeachment Hoax” and saying it is “a Democrat Scam that is going nowhere.”

A person familiar with deliberations among the president’s legal team said Wednesday morning that no decision had been made about whether to engage in a public defense of the president during the Judiciary Committee hearings.

Representative Doug Collins of Georgia, the top Republican on the Judiciary Committee, said in an interview on Wednesday that he would not blame the White House for declining to participate, underscoring skepticism among the president’s allies about whether it would be a fair forum for the president.

“If they come, great,” he said. “If they don’t, I would understand completely because what is the use of this hearing?”

Maggie Haberman and Nicholas Fandos contributed reporting.

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AP mocked after etiquette coach says Thanksgiving hosts should offer special rooms for impeachment talk, moderators

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6109513626001_6109520834001-vs AP mocked after etiquette coach says Thanksgiving hosts should offer special rooms for impeachment talk, moderators fox-news/special/occasions/thanksgiving fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood article 822ba8f9-8e4d-5e2e-94d5-8283092018dc

The Associated Press was lampooned by critics on Wednesday after sharing a story in which an etiquette coach offered over-the-top advice on how to keep Thanksgiving Day political discussions peaceful.

The piece by the AP’s Dan Sewell, titled “On the Thanksgiving menu: Turkey, with a side of impeachment,” suggests Americans could use special rooms dedicated for political discussion and even an in-house moderator.

TRUMP USES TURKEY PARDON TO MOCK SCHIFF, SAYS BIRDS ALREADY RECEIVED SUBPOENAS

“Already polarized over Republican Donald Trump’s presidency, Americans are deeply split on a looming historic impeachment,” Sewell wrote. “Many families reflect the nation’s divisions, setting up heated holiday debates in households with a taste for politics.”

The AP scribe then spoke with several Americans who plan to celebrate with people who have opposing views before enlisting an “etiquette coach” Elaine Swann to offer suggestions on how to cope.

The Los Angeles -based etiquette guru feels hosts should “sequester the debates” on Turkey Day with separate rooms dedicated to political beef.

“She’ll have a room away from the dining table stocked with snacks for people who want to talk politics. She also suggests designating a calm family member as a combination moderator-peacekeeper,” Sewell wrote.

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The etiquette coach also says Thanksgiving hosts need to be prepared to distract guests who get too worked up over political disagreements with games or activities.

“Make sure that in your arsenal as a host you have some family-building activity to get everybody out of it,” Swann told the AP.

When The Associated Press’ verified Twitter account shared the story on Twitter, it was quickly mocked by critics.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6109513626001_6109520834001-vs AP mocked after etiquette coach says Thanksgiving hosts should offer special rooms for impeachment talk, moderators fox-news/special/occasions/thanksgiving fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood article 822ba8f9-8e4d-5e2e-94d5-8283092018dc   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6109513626001_6109520834001-vs AP mocked after etiquette coach says Thanksgiving hosts should offer special rooms for impeachment talk, moderators fox-news/special/occasions/thanksgiving fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood article 822ba8f9-8e4d-5e2e-94d5-8283092018dc

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Trump tweets photo of himself as ‘Rocky’ ahead of more impeachment hearings

Westlake Legal Group AP19331032892232 Trump tweets photo of himself as 'Rocky' ahead of more impeachment hearings Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article a19043f1-bb59-58c3-936d-5944b92ef650

President Trump seemed to declare himself a heavyweight champion in politics on Wednesday, tweeting out a picture of his face superimposed onto one of actor Sylvester Stallone as Rocky.

The tweet, which didn’t include any context, came after polling showed voters souring on impeachment and as House Democrats prepare another round of hearings in the ongoing impeachment inquiry. On Tuesday, Trump denounced Democrats’ inquiry to a packed rally in Florida.

“First it was the Russia hoax,” Trump said. “And now the same maniacs are pushing the deranged … impeachment” narrative.

For the past few months, Trump has been fending off accusations that he sought to influence the 2020 election by pressuring Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden.

The president and Republicans have denied any wrongdoing and repeatedly portrayed Trump as the victim of a partisan attempt to overturn the 2016 election.

TRUMP TEARS INTO IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY, DEFENDS MILITARY PARDONS AT FLORIDA ‘HOMECOMING RALLY’

“It is a Democrat Scam that is going nowhere but, future Presidents should in no way be compromised. What has happened to me should never happen to another President!” Trump tweeted Tuesday.

Trump also tweeted a clip of Fox News host Pete Hegseth reporting on the massive crowd size of Tuesday night’s rally in Florida. During interviews with Hegseth, rally attendees expressed their support for the president.

“I come from a family of Democrats and I just can’t take the swamp anymore,” one attendee said. Another said that he grew up as a Democrat but became a “staunch supporter of Trump.”

HOUSE DEMOCRATS DEFEND IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY

On Twitter, Trump faced a wave of mockery for posting a photo of his face on Rocky’s body. Some knocked his physical appearance, suggesting that he was nowhere near the shape that Rocky was. It also comes as Trump is dismissing rumors he had a health scare after a recent visit to Walter Reed Medical Center.

The photo also seemed to indicate Trump’s mood going into the second round of impeachment hearings, led by the House Judiciary Committee.

Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., the committee’s chair, sent a letter to Trump, apparently welcoming a challenge for the first hearing, which is scheduled for Dec. 4.

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In his invitation to the president, he asked whether “you and your counsel plan to attend the hearing or make a request to question the witness panel.”

Fox News’ Brooke Singman and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19331032892232 Trump tweets photo of himself as 'Rocky' ahead of more impeachment hearings Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article a19043f1-bb59-58c3-936d-5944b92ef650   Westlake Legal Group AP19331032892232 Trump tweets photo of himself as 'Rocky' ahead of more impeachment hearings Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article a19043f1-bb59-58c3-936d-5944b92ef650

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My Hate Affair With Sweet Potatoes

Westlake Legal Group sweet-potato-illo-final-joy_wide-a8eb6d007feec063f88137770790714c6c8e7bb8-s1100-c15 My Hate Affair With Sweet Potatoes
Joy Ho/NPR
Westlake Legal Group  My Hate Affair With Sweet Potatoes

Joy Ho/NPR

Growing up in the 1980s and early ’90s on the Kenyan Coast, I did not have the privilege to choose the foods I could eat. Rather, my parents would serve my siblings and me the food that was in season or that had survived the scorching sun, insect pests and plant diseases — harvested from their farm or purchased at the market.

Most of the time, these food crops included cassava, pumpkin, the “boko boko” banana — and sweet potatoes. Plenty of sweet potatoes.

Sweet potatoes as well as pumpkins and cassava were the go-to breakfast, lunch and dinner food. They were the everyday food whether we liked it or not. Of course, there was only one way they were cooked — and that was by boiling.

Day in day out, we would consume these foods. Ultimately, it got to a point where we could not take sweet potatoes and cassava anymore. And yes, there were times we chose to go hungry rather than eat sweet potatoes. That’s right: We children would rather skip lunch and dinner and go hungry than eat the same old sweet potatoes and cassava.

These experiences with sweet potatoes and cassava while growing up made me hate these foods as an adult. And I am not alone. Many of my family members, including my brother and three sisters, do not love sweet potatoes and cassava at all. As a matter of fact, after we grew up, our parents stopped growing them. No one and I mean no one — had any more appetite for these root vegetables.

My hate for sweet potatoes is still active today. I know it is many people’s favorite food, especially during Thanksgiving, but as for me, I still say NO to sweet potatoes. They remind me of what it’s like to grow up without a balanced diet, without being able to choose what kind of food you’d like to eat each day.

But in a corner of my heart, I do appreciate the sweet potato. I’m grateful that my parents had sweet potatoes to serve us. And maybe one day – say in another ten years or so — I’ll overcome my negative feelings and see what it’s like to eat a luxurious sweet potato side dish – perhaps topped with marshmallows!

Esther Ngumbi is a researcher at the University of Illinois and a New Voices Fellow at the Aspen Institute.

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Who Doesn’t Like Sweet Potatoes? This Kenyan Researcher, For One

Westlake Legal Group sweet-potato-illo-final-joy_wide-a8eb6d007feec063f88137770790714c6c8e7bb8-s1100-c15 Who Doesn't Like Sweet Potatoes? This Kenyan Researcher, For One
Joy Ho/NPR
Westlake Legal Group  Who Doesn't Like Sweet Potatoes? This Kenyan Researcher, For One

Joy Ho/NPR

Growing up in the 1980s and early ’90s on the Kenyan Coast, I did not have the privilege to choose the foods I could eat. Rather, my parents would serve my siblings and me the food that was in season or that had survived the scorching sun, insect pests and plant diseases — harvested from their farm or purchased at the market.

Most of the time, these food crops included cassava, pumpkin, the “boko boko” banana — and sweet potatoes. Plenty of sweet potatoes.

Sweet potatoes as well as pumpkins and cassava were the go-to breakfast, lunch and dinner food. They were the everyday food whether we liked it or not. Of course, there was only one way they were cooked — and that was by boiling.

Day in and day out, we would consume these foods. Ultimately, it got to a point where we could not take sweet potatoes and cassava anymore. And yes, there were times we chose to go hungry rather than eat sweet potatoes. That’s right: We children would rather skip lunch and dinner and go hungry than eat the same old sweet potatoes and cassava.

These experiences with sweet potatoes and cassava while growing up made me hate these foods as an adult. And I am not alone. Many of my family members, including my brother and three sisters, do not love sweet potatoes and cassava at all. As a matter of fact, after we grew up, our parents stopped growing them. No one — and I mean no one — had any more appetite for these root vegetables.

My hate for sweet potatoes is still active today. I know it is many people’s favorite food, especially during Thanksgiving, but as for me, I still say NO to sweet potatoes. They remind me of what it’s like to grow up without a balanced diet, without being able to choose what kind of food you’d like to eat each day.

But in a corner of my heart, I do appreciate the sweet potato. I’m grateful that my parents had sweet potatoes to serve us. And maybe one day – say, in another 10 years or so — I’ll overcome my negative feelings and see what it’s like to eat a luxurious sweet potato side dish – perhaps topped with marshmallows!

Esther Ngumbi is a researcher at the University of Illinois and a New Voices Fellow at the Aspen Institute.

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Girl Scouts say girls don’t ‘owe anyone a hug’ in post about consent, physical affection

The Girl Scouts is reminding its members they don’t “owe anyone a hug” ahead of the holiday season — declaring it could give impressionable children “the wrong idea about consent and physical affection.”

The youth organization for girls published a post online that explains such actions, like giving an uncle a “big hug” or giving an aunt who just gave a child a present a kiss as a thank you, “can set the stage for her questioning whether she ‘owes’ another person any type of physical affection” later in life.

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“The notion of consent may seem very grown-up and like something that doesn’t pertain to children,” Dr. Andrea Bastiani Archibald, the Girl Scouts’ developmental psychologist, said in a statement. “But the lessons girls learn when they’re young about setting physical boundaries and expecting them to be respected last a lifetime, and can influence how she feels about herself and her body as she gets older.”

Bastiani added, “Plus, sadly, we know that some adults prey on children, and teaching your daughter about consent early on can help her understand her rights, know when lines are being crossed, and when to go to you for help.”

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The post urges parents and guardians to “give your girl the space to decide when and how she wants to show affection,” as many children “may naturally want to hug and kiss family members, friends, and neighbors.”

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Allowing children the freedom to decide whether they want to show affection to loved ones during the holiday season “doesn’t give her license to be rude,” however, and children can show affection and thankfulness in other ways that don’t require physical touch, the organization wrote.

Westlake Legal Group hug-istock Girl Scouts say girls don't 'owe anyone a hug' in post about consent, physical affection Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions fox-news/us fox-news/special/occasions/holiday fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/us fnc article 10577aa7-7315-5662-823d-6050b55ffc4c

Girl Scouts says girls don’t “owe anyone a hug,” saying it could give impressionable children “the wrong idea about consent and physical affection.” (iStock)

Reactions to the Girl Scouts’ Facebook post on Monday were positive, with many writing they wish this was general practice when they were kids themselves. One woman wrote: “My grandma was a huge proponent of this thought. Glad we learned early that our bodies are ours.”

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“I ask my kids to say hi/goodbye. It is up to them if they want to provide a hug. And our family knows better than to push it,” another commenter said. “I love this and it definitely applies to all children,” someone else wrote.

Others, however, wrote online that girls do need to give physical attention to family members, saying, “reminder yes she does. It’s called respect, thankfulness, and appreciation for your family” and “Reminder: Until she pays the bills in this house, she will hug her grandparents and she will like it.”

Westlake Legal Group hug-istock Girl Scouts say girls don't 'owe anyone a hug' in post about consent, physical affection Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions fox-news/us fox-news/special/occasions/holiday fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/us fnc article 10577aa7-7315-5662-823d-6050b55ffc4c   Westlake Legal Group hug-istock Girl Scouts say girls don't 'owe anyone a hug' in post about consent, physical affection Nicole Darrah fox-news/us/us-regions fox-news/us fox-news/special/occasions/holiday fox-news/health/healthy-living/childrens-health fox news fnc/us fnc article 10577aa7-7315-5662-823d-6050b55ffc4c

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