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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 142)

Tulsi Gabbard to report for active duty with National Guard for two weeks: report

Presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard will take a two-week hiatus from the campaign trail to report for active duty in Indonesia with the National Guard, the Democrat announced on Monday.

“I’m stepping off of the campaign trail for a couple of weeks and putting on my army uniform to go on a joint training exercise mission in Indonesia,” Gabbard said during an interview with CBS News.

“I love our country. I love being able to serve our country in so many ways including as a soldier,” the U.S. congresswoman said.

“And so while some people are telling me, like gosh this is a terrible time to leave the campaign, can’t you find a way out of it? You know that’s not what this is about.”

GABBARD DENIES FEUD WITH KAMALA HARRIS IS ‘PERSONAL,’ BUT PERSISTS WITH ATTACKS

“I’m not really thinking about how this will impact my campaign. I’m looking forward to being able to fulfill my service and my responsibility,” she added.

Gabbard, 38, is a major in the Hawaii Army National Guard and served in Iraq in 2004. She also completed a tour in Kuwait in 2008, according to Hawaii News Now.

The presidential hopeful is set to depart for Indonesia on Wednesday, where her unit will participate in training exercises that include counterterrorism and disaster response.

Gabbard is one of three Democratic candidates with military experience.

Westlake Legal Group Tulsi-Gabbard-White-THUMB Tulsi Gabbard to report for active duty with National Guard for two weeks: report Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tulsi-gabbard fox news fnc/politics fnc f683a0d7-d655-5ce1-8e1a-8e7ee8855dcf article   Westlake Legal Group Tulsi-Gabbard-White-THUMB Tulsi Gabbard to report for active duty with National Guard for two weeks: report Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/tulsi-gabbard fox news fnc/politics fnc f683a0d7-d655-5ce1-8e1a-8e7ee8855dcf article

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Concha: Media will never apologize for anti-Trump rhetoric because there’s ‘no accountability’

Westlake Legal Group concha1 Concha: Media will never apologize for anti-Trump rhetoric because there's 'no accountability' fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/person/mika-brzezinski fox-news/person/joe-scarborough fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 6ced0d7f-8ba9-55cb-ae1c-613aecfbaab4

Mainstream media pundits who engage in anti-Trump rhetoric will never apologize when they are criticized because there is no system of reprimand, according to media reporter Joe Concha.

Some of the more recent incendiary commentaries included one MSNBC host’s claim that President Trump may want to see more incidents like the mass shooting in El Paso, he  claimnday on “Hannity.”

“Why would they apologize if there’s never any accountability?” The Hill wrighter asked.

“Why would Mika Brzezinski ever apologize for saying the president is actually rooting for mass shootings to happen in this country? Why would Joe Scarborough ever apologize for throwing out a conspiracy theory that the Russians somehow had a hand in the killing of Jeffrey Epstein?”

MSNBC HOST JOE SCARBOROUGH BALKS AT JEFFREY EPSTEIN DEATH: ‘HOW PREDICTABLY… RUSSIAN’

Epstein, a Manhattan financier and convicted sex offender, was found dead in his New York City prison cell over the weekend.

Last week, Brzezinski, an MSNBC host, claimed in the wake of the El Paso shooting that Trump is “inciting racism.”

More from media

“Isn’t it OK to deduce that at this point this is what he wants? He is inciting hatred, inciting violence,” she said.

After Epstein’s death, Scarborough suggested there was some kind of conspiracy behind Epstein’s apparent suicide.

“A guy who had information that would have destroyed rich and powerful men’s lives ends up dead in his jail cell,” Scarborough said on Saturday of the well-connected financier. “How predictably… Russian,” he added.

CLICK TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Scarborough appeared to be alluding to the many mysterious deaths with suspected connections to the Russian government.

“Powerful Democratic and Republican figures breathing a huge sigh of relief—as well as a Harvard professor or two,” he tweeted.

On “Hannity,” Concha added it is unlikely any such rhetoric will see, “accountability.”

“If there’s never any accountability, of course nothing’s going to happen,” he said.

Westlake Legal Group concha1 Concha: Media will never apologize for anti-Trump rhetoric because there's 'no accountability' fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/person/mika-brzezinski fox-news/person/joe-scarborough fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 6ced0d7f-8ba9-55cb-ae1c-613aecfbaab4   Westlake Legal Group concha1 Concha: Media will never apologize for anti-Trump rhetoric because there's 'no accountability' fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/person/mika-brzezinski fox-news/person/joe-scarborough fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 6ced0d7f-8ba9-55cb-ae1c-613aecfbaab4

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Man arrested after gunfire at Chicago hospital for military veterans, cops say

A suspect is in custody after shots were fired outside a 200-bed hospital on Chicago’s West Side that provides care to about 62,000 military veterans, authorities said.

Officials reported that there were no injuries.

Tom Ahern, a police spokesman, said the man began shooting outside the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center Monday afternoon and tried to enter the lobby.

He said security officers apprehended the man near the hospital entrance. Police took the man into custody.

“Nobody was hurt, there was nobody injured, there was nobody hit,” Jeffrey Sallet, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Chicago field office, said, according to Fox 32. “We avoided tragedy here in the city of Chicago today.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Authorities recovered a rifle that the man is believed to have used.

Ahern said investigators haven’t determined what led to the gunfire or who the man might have been targeting.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Click for more from Fox 32.

Westlake Legal Group 59b9300d-Chicago-police Man arrested after gunfire at Chicago hospital for military veterans, cops say Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/crime/chicagos-crime-wave fox news fnc/us fnc article 966ef6e1-35c4-585e-93e1-057f7aff8fd8   Westlake Legal Group 59b9300d-Chicago-police Man arrested after gunfire at Chicago hospital for military veterans, cops say Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/crime/chicagos-crime-wave fox news fnc/us fnc article 966ef6e1-35c4-585e-93e1-057f7aff8fd8

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Man arrested after gunfire at Chicago hospital for military veterans, cops say

A suspect is in custody after shots were fired outside a 200-bed hospital on Chicago’s West Side that provides care to about 62,000 military veterans, authorities said.

Officials reported that there were no injuries.

Tom Ahern, a police spokesman, said the man began shooting outside the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center Monday afternoon and tried to enter the lobby.

He said security officers apprehended the man near the hospital entrance. Police took the man into custody.

“Nobody was hurt, there was nobody injured, there was nobody hit,” Jeffrey Sallet, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Chicago field office, said, according to Fox 32. “We avoided tragedy here in the city of Chicago today.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Authorities recovered a rifle that the man is believed to have used.

Ahern said investigators haven’t determined what led to the gunfire or who the man might have been targeting.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Click for more from Fox 32.

Westlake Legal Group 59b9300d-Chicago-police Man arrested after gunfire at Chicago hospital for military veterans, cops say Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/crime/chicagos-crime-wave fox news fnc/us fnc article 966ef6e1-35c4-585e-93e1-057f7aff8fd8   Westlake Legal Group 59b9300d-Chicago-police Man arrested after gunfire at Chicago hospital for military veterans, cops say Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/crime/chicagos-crime-wave fox news fnc/us fnc article 966ef6e1-35c4-585e-93e1-057f7aff8fd8

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'Texas needs you': Houston Chronicle calls on O'Rourke to end presidential bid, run for Senate

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'Texas needs you': Houston Chronicle calls on O'Rourke to end presidential bid, run for Senate
CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'Texas needs you': Houston Chronicle calls on O'Rourke to end presidential bid, run for Senate

Beto O’Rourke, who was an El Paso congressman for six years, says President Trump’s rhetoric played a role in the El Paso massacre. USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – One of Texas’ largest newspapers over the weekend had a message for former Rep. Beto O’Rourke: Texas needs you.

The Houston Chronicle’s editorial board called Saturday for O’Rourke to drop out of the 2020 presidential race and, instead, run for the Senate again, this time against GOP incumbent Sen. John Cornyn.

The editorial board pointed to a viral moment last week in which O’Rourke criticized the media for its reporting on President Donald Trump’s racist rhetoric. The editorial board wrote that the unscripted moment was a reminder that voters and the board itself “aren’t used to seeing candidates act like real people.”

O’Rourke paused his presidential campaign last week to stay in El Paso, which was the site of an apparently anti-Latino shooting that left at least 22 people dead. Authorities linked the alleged shooter to a manifesto that had anti-immigrant and anti-Latino ideologies. In addition, authorities said the suspect told them he was targeting Mexicans.

More: Kamala Harris hits back at NRA after group criticizes her gun control proposals

“Frankly, it’s made us wish O’Rourke would shift gears, and rather than unpause his presidential campaign, we’d like to see him take a new direction,” the editorial board wrote. “So Beto, if you’re listening: Come home. Drop out of the race for president and come back to Texas to run for senator. The chances of winning the race you’re in now are vanishingly small.

“And Texas needs you,” the board continued.

O’Rourke turned heads last year during the midterm election when he ran for Senate against Sen. Ted Cruz, the other GOP incumbent senator in Texas. O’Rourke garnered national attention while on the campaign trail in 2018 following a viral moment when he passionately supported former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s protest of kneeling during the national anthem.

Cruz won reelection against O’Rourke by less than 3 percentage points, a margin that shocked pundits as Texas has been a deep red state. O’Rourke also flipped several suburbs in Dallas and Houston that usually vote Republican.

When O’Rourke first announced his presidential candidacy in late March, he dominated headlines. At the time, he raised $6.1 million in the first 24 hours of his campaign.

However, he has since slumped in both polling and fundraising. O’Rourke raised only $3.6 million in the second quarter of this year. He will be on the debate stage in September despite falling in polling and fundraising.

‘Not good!’: Donald Trump blames Russia for mysterious ‘Skyfall’ explosion, radiation spike

Notwithstanding the latest plea for him to run for Senate, O’Rourke’s campaign has repeatedly pushed back against past efforts to convince him to switch contests and challenge Cornyn.

In a statement to CNN last week, O’Rourke campaign manager Jen O’Malley Dillon said that following the El Paso shooting, “now more than ever, this country needs the honest leadership Beto continues to demonstrate  — and that is why he [is] running for president.” 

Despite being a native of Texas, O’Rourke is still behind frontrunner Joe Biden in polls in the state. O’Rourke is at 19% compared to Biden at 27.7% in Texas, according to a survey conducted by Emerson College for the Dallas Morning News

The major Democratic candidate running against Cornyn, former Army helicopter pilot MJ Hegar, was at 9.9% in the Democratic primary, according to that survey. She trailed behind the “someone else” option, which was at 19.%. 

More: Donald Trump administration wants to deny green cards to migrants on public assistance

Cornyn is considered vulnerable, with his job approval rating currently at 37%, the survey found. Thirty-one percent disapprove of his job, and 33% said they were neutral or had no opinion.

Lauren Hitt, national director of rapid response for O’Rourke’s campaign, slammed the Houston Chronicle editorial on Monday.

“Really have to admire the logical leap here: Beto, you put Trump on defense on his signature issue. You got under his skin so badly even WH advisors think his El Paso trip was a debacle,” she wrote in a tweet. “You’re leading the Democratic presidential field in TX….so run for Senate”

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'Texas needs you': Houston Chronicle calls on O'Rourke to end presidential bid, run for Senate

Friends and family gathered in Springfield, Ohio on Saturday to mourn Derrick Fudge, one of several people who died in mass shootings last weekend in Dayton, Ohio and El Paso, Texas. AP

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Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/elections/2019/08/12/houston-chronicle-beto-orourke-end-wh-bid-run-senate/1992602001/

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Juan Williams: Trump’s new green card rule aims to ‘punish’ immigrants

Westlake Legal Group Martha-MacCallum-split Juan Williams: Trump's new green card rule aims to 'punish' immigrants fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc e018ff0d-290c-56cd-8aa6-d1a74f27d870 Charles Creitz article

President Trump’s new rule governing the issuance of green cards marks the White House’s latest attempt to punish the immigrant population, according to Juan Williams.

The president has conducted himself in ways that reflect an anti-immigrant sentiment and displeasure at his struggle to complete a wall along the Mexican border, Williams claimed Monday on “The Story.”

“I think this is really about punishing immigrants,” he said.

“I think it is sending a message to the Trump base that he’s anti-immigrant, that he didn’t get the wall. He tried to get merit-based admission to the country into the books and didn’t do so, and so I think this is a way to circumvent that.”

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION BOOSTS ABILITY TO DENY GREEN CARDS TO IMMIGRANTS USING WELFARE PROGRAMS

Earlier Monday, the administration’s acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) explained the purpose of the so-called “public charge” rule.

“The principle driving it is an old American value, and that’s self-sufficiency,” Ken Cuccinelli, a former Virginia attorney general, told Fox News.

More from media

“It’s a core principle — the American Dream itself — and it’s one of the things that distinguishes us, and it’s central to the legal history in the U.S. back into the 1800s,” Cuccinelli, a Republican, added.

Speaking to Martha MacCallum, Williams added the president’s backing of this new rule suggested he’d support curtailing immigration from underprivileged countries.

He said Trump had “a particular interest in halting people who come from low-income countries,” pointing to Latin America, Africa and the Caribbean.

Regarding the new rule, Williams criticized how it marked receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), food stamps and most forms of Medicaid as factors counting against admissibility.

CLICK TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“It is difficult to say to us as Americans… that is a disqualification,” he said.

In his comments to Fox News, Cuccinelli said the rule was not so much about limiting successful applications (noting that President Trump has sworn in more new citizens on an annual basis than were sworn in during the tail end of former President Barack Obama’s administration) as it was about providing clarity to both USCIS staff in charge of enforcing the law, and also to immigrants about what benefits would factor in to a public charge determination.

Fox News’ Martha MacCallum and Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Martha-MacCallum-split Juan Williams: Trump's new green card rule aims to 'punish' immigrants fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc e018ff0d-290c-56cd-8aa6-d1a74f27d870 Charles Creitz article   Westlake Legal Group Martha-MacCallum-split Juan Williams: Trump's new green card rule aims to 'punish' immigrants fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc e018ff0d-290c-56cd-8aa6-d1a74f27d870 Charles Creitz article

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One Of Jeffrey Epstein’s Guards Was A Temp Correctional Officer: Report

Westlake Legal Group 5d5228252200005500f4ef7c One Of Jeffrey Epstein’s Guards Was A Temp Correctional Officer: Report

NEW YORK (AP) — One of Jeffrey Epstein’s guards the night he hanged himself in his federal jail cell wasn’t a regular correctional officer, according to a person familiar with the detention center, which is now under scrutiny for what Attorney General William Barr on Monday called “serious irregularities.”

Epstein, 66, was found Saturday morning in his cell at the Metropolitan Correctional Center, a jail previously renowned for its ability to hold notorious prisoners under extremely tight security.

“I was appalled, and indeed the whole department was, and frankly angry to learn of the MCC’s failure to adequately secure this prisoner,” Barr said at a police conference in New Orleans. “We are now learning of serious irregularities at this facility that are deeply concerning and demand a thorough investigation. The FBI and the office of inspector general are doing just that.”

He added: “We will get to the bottom of what happened and there will be accountability.”

In the days since Epstein’s death while awaiting charges that he sexually abused underage girls, a portrait has begun to emerge of Manhattan’s federal detention center as a chronically understaffed facility that possibly made a series of missteps in handling its most high-profile inmate.

Epstein had been placed on suicide watch after he was found in his cell a little over two weeks ago with bruises on his neck. But he had been taken off that watch at the end of July and returned to the jail’s special housing unit.

There, Epstein was supposed to have been checked on by a guard about every 30 minutes. But investigators have learned those checks weren’t done for several hours before Epstein was found unresponsive, according to a person familiar with the episode. That person was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and also spoke on condition of anonymity.

A second person familiar with operations at the jail said one of the two people guarding Epstein in the hours before he was found with a bedsheet around his neck wasn’t a correctional officer, but a fill-in who had been pressed into service because of staffing shortfalls. That person also wasn’t authorized to disclose information about the investigation and spoke on condition of anonymity.

It wasn’t clear what the substitute’s regular job was, but federal prisons facing shortages of fully trained guards have resorted to having other types of support staff fill in for correctional officers, including clerical workers and teachers.

The news that one of Epstein’s guards wasn’t a correctional officer was first reported by The New York Times.

The manner in which Epstein killed himself has not been announced publicly by government officials. An autopsy was performed Sunday, but New York City Chief Medical Examiner Dr. Barbara Sampson said investigators were awaiting further information. A private pathologist, Dr. Michael Baden, observed the autopsy at the request of Epstein’s lawyers.

The Associated Press does not typically report on details of suicide, but has made an exception because Epstein’s cause of death is pertinent to the ongoing investigations.

The House Judiciary Committee demanded answers from the Bureau of Prisons about Epstein’s death. Committee chairman Jerrold Nadler, a Democrat, and the panel’s top Republican, Georgia Rep. Doug Collins, wrote the bureau’s acting director Monday with several questions about the conditions in the prison, including details on the bureau’s suicide prevention program.

Inmates on suicide watch in federal jails are subjected to 24 hours per day of “direct, continuous observation,” according to U.S. Bureau of Prisons policy. They are also issued tear-resistant clothing to thwart attempts to fashion nooses and are placed in cells that are stripped of furniture or fixtures they could use to kill themselves.

Those watches, though, generally last only 72 hours before someone is either moved into a medical facility or put back into less intensive monitoring.

The jail does have a video surveillance system, but federal standards don’t allow the use of cameras to monitor areas where prisoners are likely to be undressed unless those cameras are monitored only by staff members of the same gender as the inmates. As a practical matter, that means most federal jails nationwide focus cameras on common areas, rather than cell bunks.

Lindsay Hayes, a nationally recognized expert on suicide prevention behind bars, said that cameras are often ineffective because they require a staff member to be dedicated full time to monitoring the video feed 24 hours a day.

“It only takes three to five minutes for someone to hang themselves,” said Hayes, a project director for the National Center on Institutions and Alternatives. “If no one is watching the screen, then the camera is useless. There are a lot of suicides that just end up being recorded.”

On the morning of Epstein’s apparent suicide, guards on his unit were working overtime shifts to make up for staffing shortages, one person familiar with the matter said. The person said one guard was working a fifth straight day of overtime and another was working mandatory overtime.

Epstein’s death cut short a prosecution that could have pulled back the curtain on his activities and his connections to celebrities and presidents, though Barr vowed Monday that the case will continue “against anyone who was complicit with Epstein.”

“Any co-conspirators should not rest easy. The victims deserve justice and they will get it,” he said.

According to police reports obtained by the AP, investigators believed Epstein had a team of recruiters and employees who lined up underage girls for him.

ABC News aired video Monday of FBI agents and police arriving by boat at a private island in the U.S. Virgin Islands where Epstein had an estate.

In a court filing Monday, Epstein’s accusers said that an agreement he negotiated with federal prosecutors in Florida over a decade ago to grant immunity to his possible accomplices should be thrown out now that he is dead. Under that 2008 agreement, Epstein pleaded guilty to prostitution-related state charges and served 13 months behind bars.

At the time of his death, Epstein was being held without bail and faced up to 45 years in prison on federal sex trafficking and conspiracy charges unsealed last month.

Epstein’s death is the latest black eye for the Bureau of Prisons, which was already was under fire over the October beating death of Boston gangster James “Whitey” Bulger at a federal prison in West Virginia. The bureau is part of the Justice Department and falls under the attorney general’s supervision.

Taken together, the two deaths underscore “serious issues surrounding a lack of leadership” within the bureau, said Cameron Lindsay, a former warden who ran three federal lockups, including the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn.

A defense attorney for Epstein, Marc Fernich, also faulted jail officials, saying they “recklessly put Mr. Epstein in harm’s way” and failed to protect him.

Staffing shortages worsened by a partial government shutdown prompted inmates at the New York City jail to stage a hunger strike in January after they were denied family and lawyer visits.

Eight months later, the jail remains so short-staffed that the Bureau of Prisons is offering guards a $10,000 bonus to transfer there from other federal lockups.

In the wake of Epstein’s suicide, union president Eric Young of the American Federation of Government Employees Council of Prison Locals said a Trump administration hiring freeze at the Bureau of Prisons has led to thousands of vacancies and created “dangerous conditions” for prison workers and inmates.

In a statement, Young said that teachers, clerical workers and other support staff are regularly used to fill in for guards, and many guards are regularly forced to work 70- and 80-hour weeks.

Suicide has long been the leading cause of death in U.S. jails overall. In the federal system, suicides are rarer. At least 124 inmates killed themselves while in federal custody between fiscal years 2010 and 2016, according to the most recent statistics available from the Bureau of Prisons.

This story has been corrected to show that O.J. Simpson’s murder trial was in 1995, not 1994.

Sisak reported from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, and Balsamo from Savannah, Georgia. Associated Press writers Curt Anderson, Michael Biesecker, Jennifer Peltz, David Klepper and Larry Neumeister contributed to this report.

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This Day in History: Aug. 12

On this day, Aug. 12 …

1939: The MGM movie musical “The Wizard of Oz,” starring Judy Garland, has its world premiere at the Strand Theater in Oconomowoc, Wis., three days before opening in Hollywood.

Also on this day:

  • 1909: The Indianapolis Motor Speedway, home to the Indianapolis 500, first opens.
  • 1937: President Franklin D. Roosevelt nominates Hugo Black to the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • 1944: During World War II, Joseph P. Kennedy Jr., eldest son of Joseph and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, is killed with his co-pilot when their explosives-laden Navy plane blows up over England.
  • 1953: The Soviet Union conducts a secret test of its first hydrogen bomb.
Westlake Legal Group ibmpcword This Day in History: Aug. 12 fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc b1783a71-e374-542c-8b39-b87e86bb5760 article
  • 1981: IBM introduces its first personal computer, the model 5150, at a press conference in New York.
  • 1985: The world’s worst single-aircraft disaster occurs as a crippled Japan Airlines Boeing 747 on a domestic flight crashes into a mountain, killing 520 people. (Four people survive.)
  • 2004: New Jersey Gov. James E. McGreevey announces his resignation and acknowledges that he’d had an extramarital affair with another man.
Westlake Legal Group whitey-bulger-AP This Day in History: Aug. 12 fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc b1783a71-e374-542c-8b39-b87e86bb5760 article

FILE – This June 23, 2011, file booking photo provided by the U.S. Marshals Service shows James “Whitey” Bulger. Officials with the Federal Bureau of Prisons said Bulger died Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018, in a West Virginia prison after being sentenced in 2013 in Boston to spend the rest of his life in prison. ((U.S. Marshals Service via AP, File))

  • 2013: James “Whitey” Bulger, the feared Boston mob boss who became one of the nation’s most-wanted fugitives, is convicted in a string of 11 killings and dozens of other gangland crimes, many of them committed while he was said to be an FBI informant. (Bulger is sentenced to life; he would be fatally beaten at a West Virginia prison in 2018, hours after being transferred from a facility in Florida.)
  • 2017: A car plows into a crowd of people peacefully protesting a white nationalist rally in the Virginia college town of Charlottesville, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and hurting more than a dozen others. (The attacker, James Alex Fields, wold be sentenced to life in prison on 29 federal hate crime charges, and life plus 419 years on state charges.)
Westlake Legal Group getty-images-wizard-of-oz This Day in History: Aug. 12 fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc b1783a71-e374-542c-8b39-b87e86bb5760 article   Westlake Legal Group getty-images-wizard-of-oz This Day in History: Aug. 12 fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc b1783a71-e374-542c-8b39-b87e86bb5760 article

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Cuccinelli: New Trump green card rule simply gives ‘meaningful effect’ to 140-year-old directive

Westlake Legal Group cuccinellisteyn Cuccinelli: New Trump green card rule simply gives 'meaningful effect' to 140-year-old directive fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/tucker-carlson-tonight fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/executive/law fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 07edc582-ab4f-5eaf-a692-7918ba7ceb20

The White House’s new green card rule strengthens a question asked of immigrants for more than a century, according to the acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), Ken Cuccinelli.

The rule announced earlier Monday strengthened a long-held standard for potential immigrants and green card holders, Cuccinelli said on “Tucker Carlson Tonight.”

“For the last couple of decades, because of the guidance issued after the 1996 version of this law, it’s been ineffective,” he said.

Regarding the policy, host Mark Steyn noted he appeared to be held to the rule’s standard many years ago when he applied for U.S. citizenship from his native Canada.

“The official was deeply concerned,” Steyn said, adding he was self-employed at the time.

“He wanted to ensure I wouldn’t become a charge on the public purse. So, that question was around a while ago. Is it just not being asked anymore?”

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In response, Cuccinelli said Steyn’s experience was not an aberration.

“It’s actually been around for almost 140 years, so it wasn’t new to you,” the former Virginia attorney general said, appearing to reference similar language from the Immigration Act of 1882.

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“We try to avoid having immigrants come through our process… who are likely in the future to become welfare-dependent.”

On Monday, the Trump administration issued a long-awaited rule strengthening the ability of federal officials to deny green cards to immigrants deemed likely to rely on government aid.

The rule was likely to cause significant backlash from Democrats and immigration rights groups, who have warned that it may spook migrants away from claiming the benefits they need, fearing it would lead to them being deemed inadmissible when requesting a green card.

There already have been signs that the rule could significantly reshape who receives permanent residency. Politico reported last week that the State Department has been cracking down on potential public charges — with rejections on such grounds surging to 12,179 in the 2019 fiscal year from 1,033 in fiscal-year 2016.

Fox News’ Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group cuccinellisteyn Cuccinelli: New Trump green card rule simply gives 'meaningful effect' to 140-year-old directive fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/tucker-carlson-tonight fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/executive/law fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 07edc582-ab4f-5eaf-a692-7918ba7ceb20   Westlake Legal Group cuccinellisteyn Cuccinelli: New Trump green card rule simply gives 'meaningful effect' to 140-year-old directive fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/tucker-carlson-tonight fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/executive/law fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 07edc582-ab4f-5eaf-a692-7918ba7ceb20

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Dr. Marc Siegel: Epstein death in NY prison under extremely tight security ‘unusual’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072105716001_6072105193001-vs Dr. Marc Siegel: Epstein death in NY prison under extremely tight security 'unusual' Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox news fnc/media fnc article 3125cebf-97af-578c-84a4-b28949f20e74

Fox News medical contributor Dr. Marc Siegel said the apparent suicide of Jeffrey Epstein shouldn’t have happened in a New York City jail previously renowned for its ability to hold notorious prisoners under extremely tight security.

“It is unusual,” he told guest host Mark Steyn on “Tucker Carlson Tonight.” “Where were the cameras? Where was the observation?”

Safeguards — including cell checks every 30 minutes — were not followed the night before Epstein’s death, The New York Times reported Sunday, citing a law enforcement official familiar with the investigation.

Epstein, 66, had pleaded not guilty to federal sex trafficking and conspiracy charges. His lawyers maintained the charges against him violated a non-prosecution agreement he signed over a decade ago.

JEFFREY EPSTEIN DEAD: TIMELINE OF SEXUAL ABUSE ALLEGATIONS AND RELATED LEGAL CASES

The manner in which Epstein killed himself has not been announced publicly by government officials. An autopsy was performed Sunday, but New York City Chief Medical Examiner Dr. Barbara Sampson said investigators were awaiting further information.

Siegel told Steyn that the number one cause of death in prison is suicide, one out of three prison deaths, and that suicide is highest among sex offenders.

Epstein had been placed on suicide watch after he was found in his cell a little over two weeks ago with bruises on his neck. But he had been taken off that watch at the end of July and returned to the jail’s special housing unit.

Siegel added no “self-respecting” psychiatrist would never take someone him suicide watch, and he found the death odd considering in 40 years the prison facility had only one suicide.

Epstein’s death brings fresh attention to the staffing at Manhattan’s Metropolitan Correctional Center, where shortages worsened by a partial government shutdown prompted inmates to stage a hunger strike in January after they were denied family and lawyer visits.

Eight months later, the lockup remains so short-staffed that the U.S. Bureau of Prisons is offering correctional officers a $10,000 bonus to transfer there from other federal lockups. That’s on top of a so-called “recruitment incentive” that amounts to 10 percent of new guards’ first-year salaries.

Staffing shortfalls are resulting in extreme overtime shifts, in which guards may work up to 16 hours a day.

“It’s a disgusting place,” Siegel said about MCC, calling the prison squalor and full of vermin.

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The 12-story jail had been designed to house 449 inmates when it opened in 1975 near the Brooklyn Bridge. Its population ballooned within two years to 539 inmates, prompting a judge to declare it “unacceptably cramped and oppressive for most healthy inmates.”

Today it holds more than 760 inmates and counts among its former star inhabitants the Mexican drug lord and escape artist Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, Mafia boss John Gotti, several close associates of Osama bin Laden and Wall Street swindler Bernard Madoff.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072105716001_6072105193001-vs Dr. Marc Siegel: Epstein death in NY prison under extremely tight security 'unusual' Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox news fnc/media fnc article 3125cebf-97af-578c-84a4-b28949f20e74   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6072105716001_6072105193001-vs Dr. Marc Siegel: Epstein death in NY prison under extremely tight security 'unusual' Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox news fnc/media fnc article 3125cebf-97af-578c-84a4-b28949f20e74

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