web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 144)

Michael Goodwin: Why are Democrats acting like they have something to hide?

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6094735031001_6094732647001-vs Michael Goodwin: Why are Democrats acting like they have something to hide? New York Post Michael Goodwin fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/jerrold-nadler fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article 67dacb22-9876-593c-9fbb-55565d843f77

With no end in sight to the madness gripping Washington, it is wise to seize on any possible sign of humor to brighten the day. In that spirit, a statement by Reps. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., and Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., qualifies as the mood booster of the week.

Responding to reports that Attorney General William Barr’s investigation into the 2016 spying on Donald Trump’s campaign is now a criminal probe, Schiff and Nad­ler laid down their thumbscrews and emerged from their impeachment dungeon to express outrage. In unison, the twin Trump tormentors declared that partisanship has infected the Justice Department and “the rule of law will suffer new and irreparable damage.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER

Despite stiff competition from two centuries of congressional hypocrisy, that is a first-rate howler. If you can’t laugh at Schiff and Nad­ler accusing anyone else of damaging the rule of law for partisan purposes, you don’t have a sense of humor.

ANDREW MCCARTHY: TRUMP CAN FIGHT IMPEACHMENT WITH THIS DEFENSE AGAINST UKRAINE QUID PRO QUO

They have violated every historic precedent, not to mention simple decency, by conducting their impeachment probe in a secret star chamber. They leak juicy fragments to the media echo chamber, which would be a federal crime for real prosecutors.

Then they squeal and gnash their teeth when the worm starts to turn. Come on, people, this is hilarious!

CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE READING MICHAEL GOODWIN’S COLUMN IN THE NEW YORK POST

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY MICHAEL GOODWIN

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6094735031001_6094732647001-vs Michael Goodwin: Why are Democrats acting like they have something to hide? New York Post Michael Goodwin fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/jerrold-nadler fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article 67dacb22-9876-593c-9fbb-55565d843f77   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6094735031001_6094732647001-vs Michael Goodwin: Why are Democrats acting like they have something to hide? New York Post Michael Goodwin fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/jerrold-nadler fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article 67dacb22-9876-593c-9fbb-55565d843f77

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

EU allows new Brexit extension, UK gets more time to negotiate divorce

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096855450001_6096854100001-vs EU allows new Brexit extension, UK gets more time to negotiate divorce fox-news/world/world-regions/europe/brexit fox news fnc/world fnc article 7594f7ad-21a9-5fe5-a151-0445e9a2b40c

Just days before Britain’s departure from the European Union, the bloc’s president announced an agreement on Monday to grant a new Brexit delay until Jan. 31 of next year.

Donald Tusk said on Twitter “the EU 27 has agreed that it will accept the UK’s request for a Brexit flextension (…). The decision is expected to be formalized through a written procedure.”

Tusk’s announcement came as European Union diplomats met in Brussels to sign off on the new delay to Britain’s departure from the bloc, which had been due in just three days on Oct. 31.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

It is the second time the Brexit deadline has been changed since the 2016 referendum on Britain’s departure from the EU.

The E.U. was expected to grant the 3-month delay as the embattled British Prime Minister Boris Johnson aims for December general election.

Johnson will attempt to convince members of Parliament to formally back the bid on Monday, but he will need the support of two-thirds of the House of Commons. The main opposition Labour Party has said it would support an election once “the threat of a no-deal crash-out is off the table.”‘

Fox News’ Chris Irvine and the Associated Press contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096855450001_6096854100001-vs EU allows new Brexit extension, UK gets more time to negotiate divorce fox-news/world/world-regions/europe/brexit fox news fnc/world fnc article 7594f7ad-21a9-5fe5-a151-0445e9a2b40c   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096855450001_6096854100001-vs EU allows new Brexit extension, UK gets more time to negotiate divorce fox-news/world/world-regions/europe/brexit fox news fnc/world fnc article 7594f7ad-21a9-5fe5-a151-0445e9a2b40c

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

John Oliver Debuts A New NSFW Trump Slogan For ‘Fox & Friends’

Westlake Legal Group 5db6a7172100001e38ad412c John Oliver Debuts A New NSFW Trump Slogan For ‘Fox & Friends’

John Oliver rained on President Donald Trump’s victory party on Sunday, tearing apart his bizarre speech announcing the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

Trump described the U.S. military operation in the “weirdest imaginable way,” Oliver said, then rolled footage of the president’s rambling comments.

“They did a lot of shooting and they did a lot of blasting, even not going through the front door,” Trump said. “If you’re a normal person, you say ‘knock-knock, may I come in?’” 

Trump also described the soldiers entering the compound via a “beautiful big hole” to catch the terrorist mastermind by surprise. 

“What are you doing?” Oliver asked. “Did Trump only just learn how soldiers work?”

The incident highlighted the efforts of America’s Kurdish allies on the ground in Syria, who Trump said provided “some information that turned out to be helpful.” Yet the president has turned his back on those same allies by pulling U.S. troops from Syria and allowing Turkey to attack the Kurds. 

Trump’s biggest supporters were angry over the move, including Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), who called it a “shitshow.” Even the hosts of Trump’s favorite TV show, “Fox & Friends,” turned on him over the move ― or as Oliver called them, “his cheerleaders.” 

“Wow. You know things are bad for Trump when he’s even lost the support of ‘Fox & Friends,’” Oliver said, giving the show a sycophantic new slogan:

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

40 Days, Thousands of Jobs: The G.M. Strike From the Picket Lines

When it began, people rallied in parking lots, their fists thrust in the air.

Nearly 50,000 members of the United Auto Workers had walked off the job across the United States on Sept. 16, the first time a union had declared a nationwide strike against one of the Detroit automakers since 2007, and workers outside the General Motors factory in Flint, Mich., seemed poised for a fight.

“We’ll be out here as long as it takes,” said Chinereye Settle, one of the striking employees.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_161037450_feb3f479-f27e-4aef-bbde-0a7477a694cb-articleLarge 40 Days, Thousands of Jobs: The G.M. Strike From the Picket Lines Wages and Salaries United Automobile Workers Strikes Shutdowns (Institutional) Labor and Jobs General Motors FLINT, Mich.

By the time the strike officially ended on Friday, it had dragged on for 40 days. Some employees started working again on Saturday, and many more are expected back Monday. By the second week of the strike, with little sign of resolution, the once-jubilant workers had started to hunker down, expecting the walkout to last awhile.

Some days there weren’t as many car horns cheering on the workers. Some days the weather was too hot, too wet, too cold, too muddy. Some days strikers preferred to sit rather than stand. Some days it sunk in that rent would be tight or that groceries would need to come from the dollar store. Some days they held their breath anticipating an end, only to accept the reality hours later that nothing had changed.

Striking workers were making do with a $250-a-week subsidy from the union.

“We, in this union, could not be more disappointed with General Motors,” Terry Dittes, the U.A.W.’s lead negotiator with G.M., said in a letter to members in early October. “These negotiations have taken a turn for the worse.”

The physical effects of the shutdown became evident in Flint as the rows of finished vehicles outside the plant dwindled as the days went on.

The strike took a toll on the company. Workers walked out of 34 factories in seven states, halting production in all of those places. It cost G.M. $2 billion in operating profit, by some estimates, and the effects have rippled through the North American auto industry, affecting scores of parts suppliers as well as G.M.’s operations in Canada and Mexico.

The Midwest, where G.M.’s network of plants and suppliers is thickest, was particularly hard hit by ripple effects of the strike. And the economic blow had potential political consequences in a region expected to be a battleground in the 2020 presidential election.

One month after the strike began, on Oct. 16, negotiators with the union and the automaker came to an agreement. News of the deal rippled throughout the picket line.

The tentative accord provided for a series of wage increases and a way for temporary workers, about 7 percent of the work force, to become permanent employees.

The proposal also provided a path for all workers to reach the new top wage of $32 an hour, ending a two-tier system that set a lower range for those hired after 2007. Each U.A.W. worker would also be paid a bonus of $11,000.

All that was left was a vote by the union members to accept the terms. But even that was not a sure thing.

After more than a week of voting, with some local branches voting to reject, the news poured in that the contract had passed. U.A.W. members popped champagne, lit cigars and embraced one another. They talked of how they both started and finished the 40 days of the strike together.

At the Flint plant, which has about 4,800 hourly workers, members of U.A.W. Local 598 backed the contract, with 61 percent of the votes in favor and 39 percent against.

Later, after the initial celebration of the contract’s passage had died down, the same group, now subdued, sat around one last fire as the sun set over the plant.

Huey Harris, 59, began shaking out tarps and picking up discarded cans. He has worked for G.M. for 19 years but just this year transferred to the Flint plant from the now-shuttered Lordstown, Ohio, facility. His wife still lives in Ohio, while Mr. Harris stays with a cousin in Flint.

Even though the strike ended before his scheduled four-hour picketing shift that started at 7 p.m., he still showed up. “It’s my turn to be out here and somebody has to help clean up,” he said.

Neal E. Boudette contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Leader’s Death Will Damage ISIS, but Not Destroy It

Before the death of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the Islamic State had decentralized, allowing followers and franchises to carry out its violent ideology on their own.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_163404780_b778f013-5ba5-425e-9ce3-319a2563c56a-articleLarge Leader’s Death Will Damage ISIS, but Not Destroy It United States Defense and Military Forces Terrorism Syria Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) Baghdadi, Abu Bakr al-

Youths in Najaf, Iraq, watching news on Sunday about the death of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the Islamic State leader. Credit…Alaa Al-Marjani/Reuters

Oct. 27, 2019

He had been hunted for more than a decade, and the organization he had built was designed partly on the assumption this day would come.

The violent death of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of the Islamic State, in a raid by United States forces announced Sunday by President Trump, is a significant blow to the world’s most fearsome terrorist group. But analysts said it was unlikely to freeze attempts by Islamic State franchises and sympathizers around the world to sow mayhem and fear in the name of their extremist ideology.

Under Mr. al-Baghdadi, the Islamic State largely ran on its own. While he demanded fealty and built a cult of personality around himself — followers considered him the leader of Muslims worldwide — he was obsessed with security and is known to have given subordinates considerable latitude to act autonomously. Numerous references in Islamic State propaganda offer reminders that its leaders may come and go, but the movement remains.

After all, the founder of the Islamic State and two successors were killed before Mr. al-Baghdadi became its leader and vastly expanded the group’s sway in the Middle East and beyond.

And in his final years, Mr. al-Baghdadi stuck to such strict safety measures that he was believed to have been surrounded by a small circle of direct contacts, including wives and children and a few trusted associates. He limited communications with the outside world, according to American and Iraqi intelligence officials, which meant his organization operated with sparing input from him, lessening the practical effects of his demise.

“For sure it is important, but we know from what we have seen from other organizations that getting rid of the leader does not get rid of the organization,” said Hassan Abu Hanieh, a Jordanian expert on extremist groups. “ISIS has created a new structure that is less centralized, and it will continue, even without al-Baghdadi.”

Just in the past year, the group has claimed responsibility for deadly attacks in Afghanistan including a mosque bombing that killed more than 70 people and a wedding blast that killed 63; a shooting at a Christmas market in Strasbourg France, that killed five people; a Cathedral bombing by an Islamic State affiliate in the Philippines that killed 22 people; a string of bombings in Sri Lanka that killed more than 250 people; and other attacks in Russia, Egypt, Australia and elsewhere.

Omar Abu Layla, a Syrian who heads an activist news network called Deir Ezzour 24, said he expected Mr. al-Baghdadi’s death would demoralize some followers, while enraging others who would seek to avenge him.

“Some of the cells in Europe and the West could try to carry out attacks to show that ‘Even without al-Baghdadi, we will continue,’” he said.

Mr. Trump’s triumphal announcement that Mr. al-Baghdadi “died like a dog” in northern Syria’s Idlib Province came as the Islamic State had shown signs of reconstituting in remnants of its self-proclaimed caliphate, which once spanned a swath of Syria and Iraq before it was destroyed by American-led forces in March.

But even as the military campaign chipped away at the Islamic State’s caliphate, the group was branching out, founding and supporting new franchises and cultivating relationships in Afghanistan, Libya, the Philippines, the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt, Nigeria and elsewhere.

While the branches followed its ideology, they largely operated independently, plotting attacks on local security forces, seizing control of territory or parts of cities and battling other extremist groups for resources. Most were seen primarily as threats to their own countries or their neighbors, but United States officials worried that some franchises, like those in Afghanistan or Libya, could oversee attacks in the West.

Although the Islamic State may now be a shadow of its former self, a recent report by an inspector general for the American-led operation against it estimated that the organization still has between 14,000 and 18,000 members in Iraq and Syria, including up to 3,000 foreigners. But the report noted that estimates varied widely and that the group maintained an extensive worldwide social media effort to recruit new fighters.

As the Islamic State moved away from a centralized command structure to a more diffuse model, it also intensified calls on operatives acting alone or in small groups to plan and execute their own attacks, which were then amplified by the organization’s media network.

Under this strategy, anyone, anywhere, could act in the group’s name. That multiplied the Islamic State’s lethality by remotely inspiring attacks, carried out by disciples who had never set foot in a training camp. They were responsible for deadly assaults ranging from a shooting at an office party in San Bernardino, Calif. to a rampage by a van driver in Barcelona, Spain.

While little is known about how Mr. al-Baghdadi spent his last months, he appeared in a video released in April, sitting cross-legged on a cushion with an assault rifle by his side and praising the Sri Lanka church bombers.

In a voice message released last month, he praised the “soldiers of the caliphate” for fighting despite the group’s losses.

“They are still attacking their enemy and they did not run away, and they were not weakened by what afflicted them, nor did they make peace with their enemies,” he said, according to a translation by the SITE Intelligence Group, which monitors extremist messaging on the internet. “The wheel of attrition is running smoothly, by the grace of Allah, and on a daily basis and on different fronts.”

The Islamic State itself did not immediately comment on Mr. al-Baghdadi’s fate, and terrorism experts said his death could set off a succession struggle among subordinates. American drone strikes and air raids have decimated the group’s top ranks, and it was not immediately clear who could possibly replace him.

“There are few publicly well-recognized candidates to potentially replace al-Baghdadi,” said Evan F. Kohlmann, who tracks militant websites at the New York security consulting firm Flashpoint Global Partners.

Less than a day after Mr. al-Baghdadi was killed, one of his potential successors, Abu Hassan al-Muhajir, who had been the Islamic State’s spokesman, was killed in a strike further east, according to Mazlum Abdi, the head of a Kurdish-led Syrian militia. United States officials could not immediately confirm Mr. al-Muhajir had been killed.

The Islamic State has repeatedly reconstituted itself after its leaders were killed. In 2006, the United States killed Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the head of a predecessor group to the Islamic State, and in 2010, it worked with Iraq to kill the head of the Islamic State of Iraq, paving the way for Mr. al-Baghdadi’s ascension and the creation of the Islamic State in 2013.

Al Qaeda, an Islamic State rival, also survived the killing of founder Osama bin Laden in 2011. Its operations also have become more diffuse in recent years, with affiliates in different countries operating somewhat independently.

The Islamic State has typically taken hold in dysfunctional societies, where war, sectarianism and the absence of state structures have created fertile ground for its message among some Sunni Muslims.

Analysts caution that while the group was largely defeated militarily in Iraq and Syria, few of the issues that fueled its emergence have been addressed.

New waves of protests against government corruption are shaking Iraq, and the government has made only limited progress in rebuilding towns and cities destroyed in the effort to oust the jihadists.

And President Trump’s decision to withdraw at least some United States troops from northeastern Syria set off new violence there and raised fears about the security of Islamic State prisoners held in makeshift prisons and camps run by Kurdish-led forces.

“This raid will not eliminate the debate about the president’s decision to withdraw our forces from Syria,” said Dan Hoffman, a former C.I.A. officer. “This raid for sure is a great success. We removed a key terrorist leader from the battlefield. But there are a lot of ISIS terrorists enjoying ungoverned space in the region, ISIS decision making is decentralized, and al- Baghdadi will have a successor.”

The group’s franchises and affiliates also remain active elsewhere.

In Iraq, current and former counterterrorism generals, intelligence officials and strategists said that Mr. al-Baghdadi’s death would not fundamentally cripple the group, which is already reasserting itself in the country’s northeast.

“It is not the end, but the beginning of a new era, a new age under a new name of a new kind of terrorism,” said Maj. Gen. Ismail Almahalawi, a veteran of fighting the Islamic State and its predecessors.

Several times a week, the Iraqi authorities receive reports of attacks on villages and local mayors, Iraqi security officials said. Recently an entire village fled after Islamic State fighters threatened it. And many mayors have been killed in the last year for refusing to cooperate with Islamic State cells.

In Afghanistan, an Islamic State offshoot has expanded in the country’s east since its formation in 2015. Despite repeated American-led offensives and the dropping of the United States’ largest conventional bomb in 2017, the group has attracted more than 2,000 recruits.

In Nigeria, an affiliation with the Islamic State has reinvigorated a branch of the group previously known as Boko Haram, and American officials now rank it as one of the biggest extremist threats in Africa.

In Libya, a civil war has allowed Islamic State fighters to regroup in the country’s southern desert. This month, the American military said it had carried out four drone strikes in the area from a base in Niger to disrupt its resurgence, killing 43 Islamic State fighters.

“We saw a regeneration of the ISIS capability,” Col. Chris Karns, a spokesman for the United States military’s Africa command, told Voice of America on Friday. He said the United States did not want Libya to “become a laboratory for ISIS.”

Reporting was contributed by David D. Kirkpatrick, Thomas Gibbons-Neff, Eric Schmitt, Mujib Mashal and Julian Barnes.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Watergate Hotel’s new ‘Arrested at Watergate’ package includes drinks with police who responded to break-in

The Watergate Hotel is fully embracing its scandalous history with a new guest package.

The hotel — the same one at the center of the infamous scandal of the same name — is now offering guests the chance to book its “Arrested at the Watergate” experience, which includes sharing a whiskey flight with the arresting officers who arrived on the scene of a break-in at the Watergate complex in 1972.

PHOTO: BASKET-SHAPED BUILDING TO BECOME LUXURY HOTEL

The package also includes a stay at the hotel’s “Scandal Room,” which was recreated at the site of the hotel room where Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy attempted to orchestrate a break-in of the Democratic National Convention’s headquarters.

Westlake Legal Group 41 Watergate Hotel's new 'Arrested at Watergate' package includes drinks with police who responded to break-in Michael Bartiromo fox-news/travel/general/hotels fox news fnc/travel fnc article 92d5b267-143e-5db1-b03b-5234d3b49c95

The package also includes a stay at the hotel’s “Scandal Room,” which was recreated at the site of the hotel room where Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy attempted to orchestrate a break-in of the Democratic National Convention’s headquarters. (Debbie Johnsen)

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

Before it reopened for bookings in 2017, the “Scandal Room” was conceptualized and designed with the help of Lyn Paolo, the costume designer for the hit ABC series “Scandal.” The room currently boasts furnishings from the 1960s and ‘70s, as well as framed memorabilia for Watergate buffs to pore over.

Westlake Legal Group 19 Watergate Hotel's new 'Arrested at Watergate' package includes drinks with police who responded to break-in Michael Bartiromo fox-news/travel/general/hotels fox news fnc/travel fnc article 92d5b267-143e-5db1-b03b-5234d3b49c95

The Scandal Room was designed by “Scandal” costume designer Lyn Paolo, and furnished with pieces that allude to its infamous past. (Debbie Johnsen)

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

Guests who book the new “Arrested at Watergate” package will also be treated to drinks with John Barrett and Paul Leeper, the plainclothes D.C. police officers who responded to the burglary.

“Getting to know John and Paul has been a great bonus — they have some crazy stories to share!” a representative for the hotel told Fox News.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Bookings for the scandal room can be made online. Those wishing to experience the “Arrested at Watergate” package are instructed to call the hotel’s reservations team.

“Stay in the room where it happened and get the whole story,” reads the hotel’s website. “$2,500 per night.”

Westlake Legal Group WatergatePRNewsfotoTheWatergateHotel Watergate Hotel's new 'Arrested at Watergate' package includes drinks with police who responded to break-in Michael Bartiromo fox-news/travel/general/hotels fox news fnc/travel fnc article 92d5b267-143e-5db1-b03b-5234d3b49c95   Westlake Legal Group WatergatePRNewsfotoTheWatergateHotel Watergate Hotel's new 'Arrested at Watergate' package includes drinks with police who responded to break-in Michael Bartiromo fox-news/travel/general/hotels fox news fnc/travel fnc article 92d5b267-143e-5db1-b03b-5234d3b49c95

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Liz Peek: Trump reveals Al-Baghdadi’s death — Terror fight’s big win still can’t get liberal media’s approval

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6098242930001_6098244053001-vs Liz Peek: Trump reveals Al-Baghdadi's death -- Terror fight's big win still can't get liberal media's approval Liz Peek fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 960dbd16-4713-5f70-b614-0f9cda5bd625

President Trump announced Sunday that U.S. special operations forces have killed Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the “world’s number one terrorist,” and “the founder and leader of ISIS.” Surely that is cause for celebration. Especially since in recent days New York Democrat Senator Chuck Schumer, among others, have publicly fretted that the president’s recent effort to move our troops out of Syria would likely lead to a revival of that vicious terror organization.

But no, not even a clear win in the fight against Islamic terror registers approval from the liberal media. Hours later, the Washington Post altered their initial obituary, which described al-Baghdadi as ”Islamic State’s terrorist-in-chief,” to call him an “austere religious scholar at helm of Islamic State.” Sure, because heaven forbid the Trump administration actually gets rid of a bad guy and makes the world a little safer.

Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee and others took to Twitter to deride Democrats and the media for dismissing the killing of the terrorist “as no big deal” and whining that they were not informed in advance. That was their response.

DAN GAINOR: IMPEACH TRUMP? HECK, THE LEFT AND MEDIA WANT TO OVERTURN THE ENTIRE PRESIDENCY

This is, of course, only the most recent example of how shamefully the liberal media treats President Trump. His supporters are sick of it, and so is he.

Last week, President Trump canceled the White House subscriptions to The New York Times and The Washington Post, and encouraged other federal agencies to follow suit. It was small; it was petty. But, after three years of taking a relentless pounding from the liberal media, it must have felt good. Thousands of other fed-up Americans have done the very same thing.

The reaction of the liberal press was predictable – astonishment and outrage. How dare he? One incensed person likened the president to Mussolini; Vanity Fair’s headline called him “Angry Little Man.”

Maureen Dowd, in the Times, blasted the “snowflake” president for not being an ardent Times reader (unlike President Obama) and confidently predicted he’ll “sneak back,” unable to stay away.

Here’s the thing Ms. Dowd – you need Trump more than he needs you. We wonder what will become of the Times, and the Post, after President Trump leaves office. The half of the country offended by your offensive treatment of the man they voted for have moved on; they get their news from other sources now, sources that maybe deliver the news more fairly.

Those clicks you love from your admirers will dwindle post-Trump. As you point out in your column, it is what you describe as Trump’s terrible behavior that sells papers. The stories cited daily in the Times as “most read” are mainly attacks on the president.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR OPINION NEWSLETTER

Trump’s exasperation with the liberal media is entirely understandable, and defensible. They have been relentless in their scathing criticism of his every word and deed from the moment he decided to run for president. Not a day goes by that the Times, for example, doesn’t lash out in the most vitriolic fashion.

Why should his White House support such an organization? Why should the taxpayers who elected Donald Trump?

More from Opinion

Trump is not the only one disgusted with the media. Gallup has tracked opinion about the press over time; the most recent summary shows 28 percent of the country has no confidence at all in the mass media – a record. Another 30 percent said they had “not very much confidence” that the media was reporting the news accurately and fairly. Moreover, 42 percent of those surveyed thought the national news was too liberal, against only 13 percent who saw it as too conservative.

Remember that the Times’ publisher was so embarrassed to have completely missed the biggest political story of recent times – Trump’s victory – that he penned a sort of “mea culpa,” acknowledging the goof but also excusing it as the result of an “erratic and unpredictable election.”

He recommitted the paper to its “fundamental mission,” which he described as reporting “America and the world honestly … striving always to understand and reflect all political perspectives.” What nonsense. The Times makes zero effort to understand and certainly has never reflected the views of those who elected President Trump. I doubt there’s a single writer on their payroll who voted for Trump.
 
Their antagonism of the liberal media costs the country dearly.

Paul Krugman’s unceasing, erroneous columns talking down the economy (“Here Comes the Trump Slump,” “The Day the Trump Boom Died”) dampen optimism. Consumer sentiment has mainly, thankfully, sailed right past the ominous whisperings of the economist most notorious for predicting that Trump’s election would ignite a stock market crash. But, the collective doom-and-gloom spread by Krugman and his colleagues does not move the economy, or the country, forward.

The liberal press has harped relentlessly on the bad news and refused to herald good tidings, such as the positive impact of the GOP tax cuts. The campaign against the tax overhaul began even before the bill was written, with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer badmouthing it as a handout to the wealthy and the liberal press falling in line. So successful, and so damaging was the concerted coverage of the tax bill that most Americans believed their taxes had actually gone up, even as the vast majority of the country actually saw them drop.

Even the Times had to admit (eventually) that taxes fell for most Americans. They credited the confusion to “a sustained — and misleading — effort by liberal opponents of the law to brand it as a broad middle-class tax increase.”

So, the liberal media lied about the tax bill, thus blunting the optimism it might have generated.  
 
It is also not helpful that the liberal media chooses to disparage the president every time he meets with another head of state. China’s President Xi Jinping may be trying to stall on a trade deal; some have speculated that he expects the president to lose in 2020 and has decided to wait him out. Wonder where he got that idea?
 
The president is wrong to call the liberal media the “enemy of the people,” but he is not wrong that their coverage of his administration is biased. It is also often wrong. They were wrong about Trump in 2016, they were wrong about the Brexit vote, and they were wrong about the Trump team colluding with Russia.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The liberal media is powerful; they could use that power to good effect. For instance, if the press aggressively backed Trump’s call for trade reforms from China, and used their influence to bring Americans aboard, it might speed an agreement. Or, if they are concerned about the plight of American farmers as they pretend to be, they might pressure House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to move the U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade deal to a vote.

Media elites tell us that the country is badly polarized. They are correct, but they are not helping.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM LIZ PEEK

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6098242930001_6098244053001-vs Liz Peek: Trump reveals Al-Baghdadi's death -- Terror fight's big win still can't get liberal media's approval Liz Peek fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 960dbd16-4713-5f70-b614-0f9cda5bd625   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6098242930001_6098244053001-vs Liz Peek: Trump reveals Al-Baghdadi's death -- Terror fight's big win still can't get liberal media's approval Liz Peek fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 960dbd16-4713-5f70-b614-0f9cda5bd625

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

40 Days, Thousands of Jobs: The G.M. Strike From the Picket Lines

When it began, people rallied in parking lots, their fists thrust in the air.

Nearly 50,000 members of the United Auto Workers had walked off the job across the United States on Sept. 16, the first time a union had declared a nationwide strike against one of the Detroit automakers since 2007, and workers outside the General Motors factory in Flint, Mich., seemed poised for a fight.

“We’ll be out here as long as it takes,” said Chinereye Settle, one of the striking employees.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_161037450_feb3f479-f27e-4aef-bbde-0a7477a694cb-articleLarge 40 Days, Thousands of Jobs: The G.M. Strike From the Picket Lines Wages and Salaries United Automobile Workers Strikes Shutdowns (Institutional) Labor and Jobs General Motors FLINT, Mich.

By the time the strike officially ended on Friday, it had dragged on for 40 days. Some employees started working again on Saturday, and many more are expected back Monday. By the second week of the strike, with little sign of resolution, the once-jubilant workers had started to hunker down, expecting the walkout to last awhile.

Some days there weren’t as many car horns cheering on the workers. Some days the weather was too hot, too wet, too cold, too muddy. Some days strikers preferred to sit rather than stand. Some days it sunk in that rent would be tight or that groceries would need to come from the dollar store. Some days they held their breath anticipating an end, only to accept the reality hours later that nothing had changed.

Striking workers were making do with a $250-a-week subsidy from the union.

“We, in this union, could not be more disappointed with General Motors,” Terry Dittes, the U.A.W.’s lead negotiator with G.M., said in a letter to members in early October. “These negotiations have taken a turn for the worse.”

The physical effects of the shutdown became evident in Flint as the rows of finished vehicles outside the plant dwindled as the days went on.

The strike took a toll on the company. Workers walked out of 34 factories in seven states, halting production in all of those places. It cost G.M. $2 billion in operating profit, by some estimates, and the effects have rippled through the North American auto industry, affecting scores of parts suppliers as well as G.M.’s operations in Canada and Mexico.

The Midwest, where G.M.’s network of plants and suppliers is thickest, was particularly hard hit by ripple effects of the strike. And the economic blow had potential political consequences in a region expected to be a battleground in the 2020 presidential election.

One month after the strike began, on Oct. 16, negotiators with the union and the automaker came to an agreement. News of the deal rippled throughout the picket line.

The tentative accord provided for a series of wage increases and a way for temporary workers, about 7 percent of the work force, to become permanent employees.

The proposal also provided a path for all workers to reach the new top wage of $32 an hour, ending a two-tier system that set a lower range for those hired after 2007. Each U.A.W. worker would also be paid a bonus of $11,000.

All that was left was a vote by the union members to accept the terms. But even that was not a sure thing.

After more than a week of voting, with some local branches voting to reject, the news poured in that the contract had passed. U.A.W. members popped champagne, lit cigars and embraced one another. They talked of how they both started and finished the 40 days of the strike together.

At the Flint plant, which has about 4,800 hourly workers, members of U.A.W. Local 598 backed the contract, with 61 percent of the votes in favor and 39 percent against.

Later, after the initial celebration of the contract’s passage had died down, the same group, now subdued, sat around one last fire as the sun set over the plant.

Huey Harris, 59, began shaking out tarps and picking up discarded cans. He has worked for G.M. for 19 years but just this year transferred to the Flint plant from the now-shuttered Lordstown, Ohio, facility. His wife still lives in Ohio, while Mr. Harris stays with a cousin in Flint.

Even though the strike ended before his scheduled four-hour picketing shift that started at 7 p.m., he still showed up. “It’s my turn to be out here and somebody has to help clean up,” he said.

Neal E. Boudette contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Today on Fox News, Oct. 28, 2019

STAY TUNED

On Fox News: 

Fox & Friends, 6 a.m. ET: Karl Rove, former White House deputy chief of staff under President George W. Bush; Steve Bannon, former White House chief strategist under President Trump; Rob O’Neill, retired Navy SEAL and member of the team that killed Usama bin Laden.

On Fox Business:

Mornings with Maria, 6 a.m. ET: Tom Bevan, co-founder and president of RealClearPolitics

On Fox News Radio:

The Fox News Rundown podcast: ” ‘Died Like A Coward’: What ISIS Leader’s Death Means for the War on Terror’ “ – President Trump officially announced on Sunday the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi during a U.S. military operation in Northwest Syria. This comes after the president has been heavily criticized by Democrats and Republicans for pulling U.S. troops from the region. What will this big development mean for the war on terror and Trump’s strategy in the region? Fox News correspondent Lucas Tomlinson and Gen. Jack Keane, chairman of the Institute for the Study of War and Fox News senior strategic analyst weigh in.

Also on the Rundown: The ongoing impeachment inquiry of President Trump has created a bitter battle in Washington. But if you think things are bad now, wait until you hear the story of Andrew Johnson, who was the first president to be impeached. Historian David O. Stewart explains why our 17th president was almost thrown out of office and why times were more turbulent then than they are now. Plus, commentary by Deroy Murdock, contributing editor with National Review and Fox News contributor.

Want the Fox News Rundown sent straight to your mobile device? Subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher.

The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: Special guests include: Steve Bannon, former White House chief strategist under President Trump; Michael Goodwin, New York Post columnist; Bret Baier, host of “Special Report” and more.

Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News, Oct. 28, 2019 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 0a05ff03-f60d-5a0b-8254-8612267a10bf   Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News, Oct. 28, 2019 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 0a05ff03-f60d-5a0b-8254-8612267a10bf

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Chinese Investment Pits Wall Street Against Washington

Westlake Legal Group 00DC-CHINAMONEY-facebookJumbo Chinese Investment Pits Wall Street Against Washington ZTE Corp United States Economy Trump, Donald J Stocks and Bonds Shaheen, Jeanne Securities and Exchange Commission Securities and Commodities Violations Rubio, Marco Romney, Mitt Pensions and Retirement Plans New York State Common Retirement Fund MSCI Inc Morgan Stanley Law and Legislation International Trade and World Market Human Rights and Human Rights Violations Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Co Ltd Government Employees Gillibrand, Kirsten E Gazprom China Mobile Ltd China Communications Construction Co China California Public Employees Retirement System BlackRock Inc

WASHINGTON — The rivalry between the United States and China has spread to a fight over financial ties between the countries, pitting Washington security hawks against Wall Street investors.

Members of Congress and the Trump administration are warning that Chinese companies are raising money from American investors and stock exchanges for purposes that run counter to American interests. To help curb the flow of dollars into China, they have turned their sights on an unlikely target: their own retirement fund.

The Thrift Savings Plan is the retirement savings vehicle for federal government employees, including lawmakers, White House officials and members of the military. Beginning next year, the fund is scheduled to switch to a different mix of investments that would increase its exposure to China and other emerging markets. Lawmakers and some in the Trump administration are trying to stop that move, saying the change would pump federal workers’ savings into companies that could undermine American national security or have been sanctioned by the United States.

Last Tuesday, a bipartisan group of senators sent a letter to the plan’s governing board urging it to reverse its decision.

“For China, this is the greatest free lunch program for capital they’ve ever known, because they’re able to penetrate the investment portfolios of scores of millions of Americans in basically one shot,” said Roger Robinson, the president of the consulting firm RWR Advisory Group, which has distributed research on the subject to lawmakers and members of the Trump administration.

The push to forestall more investment in China is part of a broader effort by some officials in Washington to separate ties between the world’s two largest economies. It is also another indication that President Trump’s conflict with China will persist, even if the United States signs a limited trade deal with Beijing later this year.

Some China critics are pressing Mr. Trump to go beyond the tariffs he has already imposed and erect larger barriers between the two countries, including restrictions on the flow of technology and investment.

In recent months, officials have been making more frequent calls to re-examine China’s presence in the stock portfolios of American investors. Administration officials, including members of the National Security Council, have begun pressing the Securities and Exchange Commission to increase scrutiny of Chinese firms, which have long skirted the auditing and disclosure requirements of American stock exchanges, putting investors at risk. Chinese law restricts the company documentation that auditors can transfer out of the country, limiting their visibility to American regulators.

Policymakers are considering more stringent proposals. In June, a bipartisan group of senators introduced legislation that would delist foreign firms that do not comply with American financial regulators for a period of three years.

Another area of concern is the decision by companies that compile major stock indexes to include more firms that are listed on Chinese exchanges. While investors can’t put money directly into an index, they can invest in a fund that mirrors an index’s particular basket of securities.

As global stock markets have steadily trended upward in recent years, more investors have turned to passive investing, in which a fund simply mirrors a major index, rather than active investing, in which fund managers try to pick certain stocks to outperform the market.

And as China’s economy has continued to grow, index providers have increased the weighting of Chinese stocks. The move has been a win for Beijing, funneling money into the Chinese market and helping to enhance the international profile of its companies and its currency, the renminbi.

Like many retirement vehicles, the Thrift Savings Plan, which manages $600 billion of savings by millions of federal government employees, offers participants the option of investing in an index fund.

The plan, which is similar to a 401(k), gives federal workers the option to invest in a fund with international exposure. If they do, their savings go to a fund featuring the same securities as a popular index developed by Morgan Stanley.

Currently, the fund mirrors an index with stocks solely from developed countries, called the MSCI Europe, Australasia, Far East Index. But on the advice of an outside consultant, Aon Hewitt, the board decided to shift those investments to better diversify its portfolio and obtain a higher return. In mid-2020, the fund is to begin mirroring Morgan Stanley’s MSCI All Country World ex-U.S.A. Index, which includes shares of more than 2,000 companies from dozens of developed and emerging countries, including China.

Mr. Trump’s advisers have joined Democrats and Republicans in Congress in expressing concerns about the planned change. They say it will funnel the savings of Americans into some companies that have murky financial records, or pursue activities that run counter to America’s national interest.

Senators Marco Rubio, Republican of Florida, and Jeanne Shaheen, Democrat from New Hampshire, sent a letter last week to the body that manages the plan, the Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board, urging it to reverse a decision that they said would invest retirement funds in companies “that assist in the Chinese government’s military activities, espionage, and human rights abuses, as well as many other Chinese companies that lack basic financial transparency.”

The letter, which was also signed by Kirsten Gillibrand, a Democratic senator from New York, as well as the Republican senators Mitt Romney of Utah, Josh Hawley of Missouri and Rick Scott of Florida, said, “It is our responsibility to these public servants to ensure that the investment of their retirement savings does not undermine the American interests for which they serve.”

A spokeswoman for Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board said it was reviewing the letter and had invited the consultant, Aon Hewitt, to review its previous recommendations at a meeting on Monday.

One company in the new index that the senators have pointed to is Hikvision, a Chinese manufacturer of video surveillance products that the United States placed on a blacklist earlier this month. The Trump administration says the company has provided surveillance equipment that aided China in a campaign targeting a Muslim minority, including in constructing large internment camps in the autonomous region of Xinjiang.

The MSCI All Country World ex U.S.A. Index also includes AviChina Industry & Technology Company Ltd., a subsidiary of China’s state-owned manufacturer of aircraft and airborne weapons, which manufactured planes and missiles that were the centerpiece of a military parade in Beijing earlier this month. Also included in the index is China Mobile, which is blocked from providing international services in the United States; ZTE, which the United States fined last year for violating sanctions on Iran and North Korea; and China Communications Construction Company, which is reportedly involved in island building in the South China Sea.

The index also includes Russian companies that have been sanctioned over Russia’s intervention in Ukraine, cyberespionage and other issues. A December 2018 report by RWR Advisory Group found that five of the 11 Russian constituents of the index had been sanctioned by the Treasury Department, including the Russian gas companies Gazprom and Novatek.

Richard V. Spencer, secretary of the Navy, said in a Wall Street Journal op-ed article last week that the savings of members of the military should not be “unwittingly helping to underwrite the threats China and Russia pose to their lives.” Mr. Spencer said the board must reverse its decision “for the good of the country and those who serve it.”

Business leaders and Wall Street executives have started pushing back, saying efforts to restrict investment constitute government interference and could destabilize financial markets. When policymakers begin to pull the threads of financial connections between the United States and China, it’s not clear how much they will unwind, they say.

“There are certainly reasons why the U.S. should be concerned about various things China is doing and the rivalry it presents,” said Patrick Chovanec, chief strategist at the investment advisory firm Silvercrest Asset Management. “But by the same token, they’re the second-biggest economy in the world. If you push them off a cliff, you better make sure you’re not handcuffed to them.”

Reversing the decision could cost federal employees who are saving for retirement. China is now home to more companies in the global Fortune 500 than the United States. And while China’s growth has slowed sharply in recent years, its economy is still expanding at about 6 percent annually, roughly three times as fast as the United States’.

Fast-growing economies tend to be favorable for stock investing, suggesting that investors could be giving up some gains if they’re blocked from the Chinese markets. In an analysis for the Thrift Retirement Board, Aon Hewitt found that $1 invested in the securities on the new index would have returned $3.28 after 23 years, while $1 invested in the securities of the original index would have returned $3.05.

“At the end of the day, stock investing is about being exposed to growth,” said Lisa Shalett, chief investment officer at Morgan Stanley Wealth Management. “That is where the growth is.”

— Alan Rappeport contributed reporting. Matt Phillips contributed from New York.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com