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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 145)

‘Innocent, but Implicated’: Wuhan Native Is in Limbo During Epidemic

Westlake Legal Group 00life-wuhannative-1-facebookJumbo ‘Innocent, but Implicated’: Wuhan Native Is in Limbo During Epidemic Wuhan (China) Hainan Island (China) Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

GUANGZHOU, China — For Julie Zhong, this Chinese New Year was supposed to be a time of transition.

The 24-year-old native of Wuhan, China, had gone to celebrate the holiday with her family on the southern island of Hainan. After the three-week trip, she was going to move to Shanghai and take up a new job with the Canadian Consulate there.

Then the outbreak happened.

After an initial visit by local officials in Hainan to take the family members’ temperature, they began a self-imposed quarantine for 14 days. Daily life slowed down and focused on rituals like cooking and games of mahjong as they waited out their isolation in an apartment near the beach.

Hainan, a fast-developing holiday island that sits off China’s southern coast in the South China Sea, is sometimes called China’s Hawaii. Ms. Zhong’s family travels there regularly in hopes that the warmer climate will strengthen the health of her grandparents.

Each evening, her grandparents watched the television for updates on the epidemic. The family also shared news on WeChat, a popular messaging app. When the self-imposed quarantine was over, Ms. Zhong went to the beach with family members for exercise. The weather was cold and the ocean was gray. Still wearing masks, they stayed just 15 minutes before heading back to the apartment.

If the weather improved, she said, she would head back to the beach for fresh air. She was sanguine about her situation. Many people from Wuhan, the epicenter of the new coronavirus outbreak, have fared worse under a countrywide campaign to identify and isolate anyone who has recently been to the city. Officials simply call her family to check on them.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 5, 2020

    • Where has the virus spread?
      You can track its movement with this map.
    • How is the United States being affected?
      There have been at least a dozen cases. American citizens and permanent residents who fly to the United States from China are now subject to a two-week quarantine.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      Several countries, including the United States, have discouraged travel to China, and several airlines have canceled flights. Many travelers have been left in limbo while looking to change or cancel bookings.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands is the most important thing you can do.

Signs of the epidemic have followed them from Wuhan. Two cases at a nearby fresh food market caused it to be shut down. The local government sent vegetables, chicken, duck and fish to her neighborhood to make up for shortages, though the supplies disappeared quickly. Now they shop at a small supermarket by their building.

With draconian measures spreading across the country and some cities going under lockdown, her parents were worried that Shanghai might close off to outsiders, and suggested she leave early for the city. She is supposed to start work on Feb. 17.

She quickly ran into a problem: No hotel there would take her without a quarantine. She received curt declines from two she called. Even though she was long through her quarantine period, she was told that people from Hubei were not welcome. One hotel that said it had rooms for people from Wuhan required a fresh 14-day quarantine.

“I’m innocent, but implicated,” she said. “It makes me really angry.”

“Why are we being scapegoated for something that others did wrong?” she added. “If the knife doesn’t cut your own body, then you don’t know the pain.”

More broadly, she said, such prejudices and anger aimed at those from Wuhan were misplaced. Policies and their enforcement, not people, deserved the anger.

“Is it the fault of people from Wuhan? It’s not. If it comes from eating wild meat, then the problem is the government didn’t control it well enough,” she says, referring to the food market where the illness is thought to have originated. “You can’t just dump everything on the heads of those from Wuhan.”

“People should try to step into our shoes, everyone needs to have more empathy,” she said.

For Ms. Zhong, a solution came through the kindness of an acquaintance. As she was scrolling through the Facebook-style newsfeed on WeChat, she saw a post from a man she had met while taking the LSATs in China. It was an open offer to take in a person or two from Wuhan who might be struggling to find a place to stay in Shanghai.

“It was very lucky,” she says.

While Ms. Zhong now has a place to stay, she is still not certain that all will go smoothly. With word that local policies on people from Wuhan continue to be inconsistent, she knows it is possible she may still have to sit in quarantine once she gets to Shanghai.

To help, the local government in Hainan gave her a slip of paper attesting that she had passed quarantine. Still, she said she was taking a fatalistic approach.

“The policy execution doesn’t make sense,” she said. “If you’re not obedient, you will be kicked out and banned. There’s not a lot of equality between people and the authorities. What else are you going to do?”

“My current thinking is that it doesn’t matter,” she added. “If they want to quarantine me, they can quarantine me.”

Lin Qiqing contributed research.

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Antarctica appears to have broken a heat record

Westlake Legal Group AP20038812357769 Antarctica appears to have broken a heat record fox-news/world/environment/climate-change fox-news/world/environment fox-news/weather fnc/science fnc d7325c96-b4a0-50f6-8176-9b7e0cb2aede CHRISTINA LARSON Associated Press article

WASHINGTON — The temperature in northern Antarctica hit nearly 65 degrees (18.3 degrees Celsius), a likely heat record on the continent best known for snow, ice and penguins.

The reading was taken Thursday at an Argentine research base and still needs to be verified by the World Meteorological Organization.

WORLD’S LARGEST ICEBERG THE SIZE OF DELAWARE IS STREAMING TOWARD OPEN WATER AND COULD ENDANGER SHIPPING VESSELS

“Everything we have seen thus far indicates a likely legitimate record,” Randall Cerveny, who researches records for the organization, said in a statement. He added that he is waiting for full data to confirm.

The research base, called Esperanza, sits on a peninsula that juts up toward the southern tip of South America. The peninsula has warmed significantly over the past half century — almost 5.4 degrees (3 C), according to the World Meteorological Organization.

Cerveny said the unusually high temperature was likely due, in the short term, to a rapid warming of air coming down from a mountain slope.

The previous record of 63.5 degrees (17.5 C) was set in March 2015.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Climate change is heating up Antarctica and the Arctic — the Earth’s polar regions — faster than other regions of the planet.

The Arctic is warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the globe, according to an annual report published in December by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. There is no similar yearly report for Antarctica.

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Westlake Legal Group AP20038812357769 Antarctica appears to have broken a heat record fox-news/world/environment/climate-change fox-news/world/environment fox-news/weather fnc/science fnc d7325c96-b4a0-50f6-8176-9b7e0cb2aede CHRISTINA LARSON Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group AP20038812357769 Antarctica appears to have broken a heat record fox-news/world/environment/climate-change fox-news/world/environment fox-news/weather fnc/science fnc d7325c96-b4a0-50f6-8176-9b7e0cb2aede CHRISTINA LARSON Associated Press article

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Ben Shapiro: Bernie Sanders is unstoppable — even if Democrats won’t admit it

Westlake Legal Group image Ben Shapiro: Bernie Sanders is unstoppable -- even if Democrats won't admit it fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate Ben Shapiro article 3c5682c2-d0d5-5ad4-9880-21d981678259

There is no doubt that Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., is now the leading Democratic presidential candidate. That’s not because his ideas are overwhelmingly popular — a majority of Americans approve of capitalism, while less than 1 in 5 like socialism; few Americans are on board with total nationalization of health care, even if many like the idea of universal health care; most Americans do not approve of Sanders’ anti-American ideology with regard to foreign policy.

But nobody in the Democratic Party can stop Bernie.

There’s a reason for this: The Democratic Party has fed off the energy of Sanders’ ideology hoping that, eventually, the voters would come to their senses. Leading candidates have echoed Sanders’ talking points. Sen. Elizabeth Warren adopted and then abandoned Medicare for All, and former Vice President Joe Biden mirrored Sanders’ Howard Zinn historical perspective. Those who have attempted to siphon off Sanders’ base and approximate his authenticity have failed dramatically.

DEROY MURDOCK: DEMOCRATS, TRUMP IS GIVING AMERICA THE ECONOMY YOU CLAIM TO WANT – BE HONEST AND SAY THANKS

Instead, Sanders continues to resonate with the base. After all, if you’re going to go with an anti-Constitution, anti-free market, intersectionality-based perspective, why water it down with insincerity?

Sanders brags about the fact that his ideology has never changed. He’s right.

Back in 1976, he suggested that he favored “the public ownership of utilities, banks and major industries.” He sounded off for decades on the glories of communist Cuba and the Soviet Union; he basked in the joys of bread lines, saying: “In other countries, people don’t line up for food. The rich get the food, and the poor starve to death.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER

Sanders trots out campaign surrogates who openly claim that the United States is rooted in genocide and racism, and that the American system must be fundamentally remade.

This is radical stuff. But radicals have passion. And politicians of the Democratic Party are unwilling to quell that passion — not when they believe they can capture it and turn it against President Donald Trump.

This is the mirror image of the Republican problem with Trump in 2016: Trump ran on a platform of bashing the Iraq War and America’s intelligence agencies, blasting free trade, pledging to avoid entitlement program reforms and slamming the door on immigration.

Instead of fighting those elements, Republicans decided to tinge their own campaigns with those attitudes and then assume Trump would collapse under the weight of his own personality flaws. That never happened.

More from Opinion

Democrats seem to be waiting for another collapse that simply isn’t coming. Sanders isn’t going anywhere. His floor is high, and his ceiling remains low — just like Trump. Electability problems aren’t going to dissuade his supporters, who believe — correctly — that inauthenticity provides its own electoral issues.

There was another path. Some Democrat could have completely and utterly rejected Sanders’ perspective on the world. Some Democrat could have rejected Sanders’ view that America has been a nefarious force in the world; some Democrat could have argued that America isn’t perfect but that it has always been great; some Democrat could have talked about the wonders of the free market while arguing for greater strictures on it. After all, the majority of Democrats count themselves as patriots who don’t despise the free market.

But no Democrat was willing to stand up to the Sanders base. They were too greedy for its energy and too optimistic that the energy was transferable.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

It wasn’t. And so the Democratic Party has been captured by an ideology foreign to it — the ideology of Noam Chomsky infused directly into the bloodstream of a party that once touted former President John F. Kennedy.

Partisanship is a hell of a drug.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM BEN SHAPIRO

Westlake Legal Group image Ben Shapiro: Bernie Sanders is unstoppable -- even if Democrats won't admit it fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate Ben Shapiro article 3c5682c2-d0d5-5ad4-9880-21d981678259   Westlake Legal Group image Ben Shapiro: Bernie Sanders is unstoppable -- even if Democrats won't admit it fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc Creators Syndicate Ben Shapiro article 3c5682c2-d0d5-5ad4-9880-21d981678259

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Coronavirus Live Updates: An American Dies of the Virus in Wuhan, China

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168557835_b994a463-f896-4aed-a6e9-2935541d1097-articleLarge Coronavirus Live Updates: An American Dies of the Virus in Wuhan, China Wuhan (China) Hubei Province (China) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

Medical workers on Friday at a convention center in Wuhan, China, that has been turned into a makeshift hospital.Credit…Cnsphoto, via Reuters

A United States citizen has died from the new coronavirus in Wuhan, China, in what appeared to be the first death of an American from the outbreak.

Few details about the American, who died on Thursday, were immediately available. The person was around 60 years old and died at Jinyintan Hospital in Wuhan, according to the United States Embassy in Beijing. Two people familiar with the matter said the person was a woman and had underlying health conditions.

“We offer our sincerest condolences to the family on their loss,” said a spokesman for the embassy. “Out of respect for the family’s privacy, we have no further comment.”

Japan also said on Saturday that one of its citizens had died in a Wuhan hospital, from what was suspected to be a case of the coronavirus. But the Japanese Foreign Ministry said that based on information it had received from the Chinese authorities, it could not confirm whether the man, who was in his 60s, had been infected with the virus. The ministry said the cause of death was viral pneumonia.

Chinese car and auto-parts factories may stay closed longer than expected because of the coronavirus, increasing the chances that assembly lines in Asia, Europe and the United States could grind to a halt because of shortages of components.

Several automakers including BMW, PSA and Toyota have delayed restarting their assembly lines in China by another week, and others appear likely to follow suit. Even a relatively brief interruption in the flow of parts and materials could have far-reaching effects, analysts said.

The shutdowns at Chinese factories have hit automakers from several angles. The virus is already causing them to lose sales in China, the world’s largest car market by far. If they are forced to shut down factories outside of China because of parts shortages, as Hyundai has already done in South Korea, they could also lose sales in other regions.

The blow to the auto industry, which employs eight million people worldwide, comes at a time when output from the world’s factories is already sagging. It is likely to amplify the human and economic cost of the outbreak.

The Chinese government has announced a temporary name for the coronavirus, ordering the local authorities and state news media to adopt it. In English, it will be called NCP, for novel coronavirus pneumonia, the national health commission said on Saturday.

A final, official name will eventually be chosen by the International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses. The organization has submitted a name to a scientific journal for publication and hopes to reveal it within days, the BBC reported.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 5, 2020

    • Where has the virus spread?
      You can track its movement with this map.
    • How is the United States being affected?
      There have been at least a dozen cases. American citizens and permanent residents who fly to the United States from China are now subject to a two-week quarantine.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      Several countries, including the United States, have discouraged travel to China, and several airlines have canceled flights. Many travelers have been left in limbo while looking to change or cancel bookings.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands is the most important thing you can do.

The naming of viruses is a complicated matter that involves both science and public relations. Past names, like the Spanish flu or Rift Valley fever, have been seen as contributing to the stigmatization of countries or regions. In 2015, the World Health Organization issued new guidelines, after the choice of the name for Middle East respiratory syndrome was criticized.

Those guidelines recommend not using place names (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Chagas disease), animal names (swine flu, equine encephalitis), cultural or occupational references (Legionnaires’ disease) or words that induce fear (unknown, death, fatal, epidemic).

The W.H.O. has recommended its own temporary name for the new coronavirus: 2019-nCoV acute respiratory disease, or 2019-nCoV. But the name is difficult to pronounce, and has been less popular than “coronavirus,” which describes a larger category of viruses.

One concern is that a place name like “China coronavirus” or “Wuhan coronavirus” could fuel discrimination. “We thought it was very important to put out an interim name so that no location was associated with the name,” Maria van Kerkhove, a W.H.O epidemiologist, told the body’s executive board on Friday.

Hangzhou, a Chinese city with a population of 10 million, said it would temporarily ban the sale of flu and cough medicine at pharmacies, in an effort to compel people who might be sick to see a doctor.

In a statement, which was issued at midnight Friday and took effect immediately, the local government said the policy was created to “strengthen the supervision of those with fevers and coughs.”

To stop the spread of the coronavirus, the Chinese authorities have taken increasingly draconian measures to curb travel, impose social distancing and track those who might be sick. Several cities in the eastern province of Zhejiang, including some sections of Hangzhou, have set limits on how often people can leave their houses, generally allowing one person to leave every few days to buy groceries. Paper passports have been printed to keep tabs on residents.

As such restrictions have increased, so have people’s fears about being suspected to have the virus. Some have complained that hotels set up for quarantines do little to separate people who are already sick from those who have no symptoms, but who are from an area that experienced an outbreak. In recent weeks, several articles in Chinese news media have told of people who used medicine to suppress coronavirus symptoms in order to get through the country’s now ubiquitous fever-screening checkpoints.

Online, many people vented frustration about Hangzhou’s ban on medicine sales, though some said it was a good way to identify cases of the coronavirus that otherwise might not surface.

“Good, I strongly support this,” wrote one user, calling for the elimination of “every possible loophole that could spread the virus.”

Some wondered what those with chronic illnesses were supposed to do if they couldn’t get medicine they needed to relieve their symptoms. Others worried that the policy would speed the spread of the virus by forcing many more people to go to hospitals, where some carriers of the virus would likely be. Many have been alarmed by images from Wuhan of packed hospital waiting areas.

“Going to the hospital for a regular cold?” wrote one skeptical user. “What if you go to the hospital and get infected?”

Hong Kong had already suffered through months of political protests. Its economy is shrinking, and mistrust divides its people from its leaders.

Now the coronavirus is dealing Hong Kong, Asia’s financial capital, another devastating blow. Airlines are cutting service. Schools are closed. Panicked residents are hoarding rice, face masks and — in the latest run — toilet paper.

In the air is a new emotion for a city where the glimmering skyline once seemed to promise riches and opportunity: fear.

“We don’t know when it will end or how much worse it will get,” said Amber Suen, a flight attendant with Cathay Pacific, the beleaguered Hong Kong airline that on Wednesday asked its 27,000 employees to take three-week unpaid furloughs to save money.

The new coronavirus, which has killed hundreds and sickened thousands in mainland China, has been much less prevalent in Hong Kong. One person has died and at least 25 have been infected, mostly while traveling in the mainland. Its hospitals are respected around the world.

The world is not drawing a distinction, however, in part because the city has tightened but not fully closed the border with the mainland.

The multinational companies that helped make the city global are restricting travel there. Some are advising or requiring returning employees to quarantine themselves. And getting to Hong Kong is becoming increasingly difficult. Virgin Australia joined United Airlines and American Airlines in cutting service. Italy has suspended flights from Hong Kong, while the Philippines and Taiwan are requiring arrivals to go into quarantine.

Westlake Legal Group china-coronavirus-contain-promo-1580431440996-articleLarge-v7 Coronavirus Live Updates: An American Dies of the Virus in Wuhan, China Wuhan (China) Hubei Province (China) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

How Bad Will the Coronavirus Outbreak Get? Here Are 6 Key Factors

Here’s what early research says about how the pathogen behaves and the factors that will determine whether it can be contained.

The death toll and the number of infections have grown again, according to official data released early Saturday.

Across China, 86 new deaths and 3,399 new cases emerged in the previous 24 hours, the national health authorities said.

The new figures brought the total number of deaths in China to at least 722. And the total number of confirmed cases rose to 34,546.

Most of the newly reported deaths, 81, occurred in Hubei Province, the heart of the outbreak.

Many doctors believe that deaths and infections in China are undercounted because hospitals and laboratories are under severe strain to test for the virus.

China’s ruling Communist Party sent two senior officials to Wuhan to reinforce efforts to bring the coronavirus outbreak under control, amid rising public anger over the handling of the crisis.

State media reported on Saturday that a deputy head of the National Health Commission, Weng Hesheng, and the general secretary of the Central Political and Legal Affairs Commission, Chen Yixin, would take charge of the fight to contain the epidemic in Hubei Province, where Wuhan is situated.

It was not immediately clear if the appointments amounted to a reshuffling of the provincial and city leadership or were simply an effort to reinforce officials on the front line. Still, it appeared to be an acknowledgment that the authorities in Wuhan have been overwhelmed as deaths and infections continue to soar.

Mr. Chen was previously party secretary in Wuhan and deputy party secretary for the entire province. Mr. Weng has held a variety of positions overseeing public health and family planning in the city of Tianjin and, since 2016, on the national level.

The appointments came a day after the State Supervisory Committee, a powerful anticorruption body, announced that it would send a team to investigate the circumstances surrounding the death of a Wuhan doctor, Li Wenliang. Dr. Li was punished by health officials and the police for privately warning colleagues in December about the mysterious new illness that was appearing in Wuhan’s hospitals.

It is rare for the party to react directly to public pressure, but Dr. Li’s death provoked such an outpouring of public anger and grief that it appeared to force the party’s hand.

Travelers to Asia, even to countries far from the epicenter of the virus in China, are beginning to reconsider their plans.

Hard data on cancellations is scarce, as airlines, hotels and travel boards say they do not yet have numbers or will not share them. But tour operators, travel insurance brokers and airline employees say they are facing growing numbers of customers changing their plans.

Brian Fitzgerald, president of Overseas Adventure Travel, a company providing group tours to travelers mostly over 50, said it encountered cancellations to China through April in the wake of the outbreak’s announcement. But this week, he said, tourists scheduled to go to Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam were reconsidering as well.

January data from April Travel Protection, an insurance provider, which tracks residents in the United States traveling to every country in the world, shows that claims with an Asian country in the itinerary more than doubled compared to January 2019.

More than 20 international carriers have suspended or restricted routes that ended in Wuhan and other major Chinese cities, including Beijing, Hong Kong and Shanghai.

With an intense flu season in full swing, hundreds of thousands of coughing and feverish patients have already overwhelmed emergency rooms around the United States. Now, hospitals are bracing for a potential spread of coronavirus that could bring another surge of patients.

So far, only a dozen people in the United States have become infected with the coronavirus, but an outbreak could severely strain the nation’s hospitals.

“We’re talking about the possibility of a double flu pandemic,” in which a second wave starts before the first is over, said Dr. Eric Toner, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

Public health experts are also closely watching reserves of vital medical supplies and medications, many of which are made in China. Some hospitals in the United States are already “critically low” on respirator masks, according to Premier Inc., which secures medical supplies and equipment on behalf of hospitals and health systems.

“All the hospitals are taxed with a large flu season and other bugs,” said Dr. Mark Jarrett, the chief quality officer for Northwell Health, which operates 23 hospitals across Long Island and elsewhere in New York. About 400 patients are coming to its emergency rooms each day with flulike symptoms.

“Everybody is at maximum capacity,” Dr. Jarrett said.

Reporting and research were contributed by Raymond Zhong, Jack Ewing, Steven Lee Myers, Claire Fu, Paul Mozur, Motoko Rich, Hisako Ueno, Alexandra Stevenson, Austin Ramzy, Tiffany May, Emily Palmer, Reed Abelson and Katie Thomas.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Death of American Fuels Concern Over China’s Approach to Coronavirus

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168528051_3934385e-72cf-48c2-b804-566543bbe511-articleLarge Death of American Fuels Concern Over China’s Approach to Coronavirus Wuhan (China) Viruses United States International Relations Evacuations and Evacuees Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Waiting for a bus on a nearly empty street in Beijing’s central business district on Friday.Credit…Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

SHANGHAI — A United States citizen died from the coronavirus in Wuhan, China, American officials said on Saturday. It was the first known American death from the illness, and was likely to escalate diplomatic tensions over Beijing’s response to the epidemic.

Few details about the American, who died on Thursday, were immediately available. According to the United States Embassy in Beijing, the person was around 60 years old and died at Jinyintan Hospital in Wuhan, the inland metropolis at the center of the epidemic. Two people familiar with the matter said the person was a woman and had underlying health conditions.

The United States government has been evacuating many of its diplomats and other citizens from Wuhan, which the Chinese authorities have locked down in an effort to contain the spread of the virus. It could not immediately be learned whether the American who died had tried to leave the city on any of the flights organized by the State Department.

“We offer our sincerest condolences to the family on their loss,” said a spokesman for the United States Embassy in Beijing. “Out of respect for the family’s privacy, we have no further comment.”

Word of the death emerged as frustrations about Beijing’s handling of the epidemic, which has already provoked outrage and criticism within China, were beginning to emerge at the diplomatic level as well. The virus has killed at least 700 people in China, sickened 34,000 more and spread across the globe.

For more than a month, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have been offering to send a team of experts to China to observe the outbreak and help if possible. But no invitation has come.

The World Health Organization, which made a similar offer about two weeks ago, appeared to be facing the same cold shoulder, though a spokeswoman said it was just “sorting out arrangements.”

Current and former health officials and diplomats said they believed the reluctance came from China’s top leaders, who do not want the world to think they need outside help.

Within China, public discontent about the government’s response to the crisis reached an extraordinary new peak on Friday after the death of Dr. Li Wenliang, who had warned his colleagues early on about the new virus but was reprimanded for spreading rumors.

  • What do you need to know? Start here.

    Updated Feb. 5, 2020

    • Where has the virus spread?
      You can track its movement with this map.
    • How is the United States being affected?
      There have been at least a dozen cases. American citizens and permanent residents who fly to the United States from China are now subject to a two-week quarantine.
    • What if I’m traveling?
      Several countries, including the United States, have discouraged travel to China, and several airlines have canceled flights. Many travelers have been left in limbo while looking to change or cancel bookings.
    • How do I keep myself and others safe?
      Washing your hands is the most important thing you can do.

After Dr. Li’s death, grieving internet users posted messages expressing anger about the way he had been treated and even demanding freedom of speech — unheard-of in China’s authoritarian political system.

Communist Party officials said on Friday that they would send a team from the powerful anticorruption committee to investigate the circumstances surrounding Dr. Li’s death. Chinese state news media also reported on Saturday that the government was sending two senior officials to Wuhan to reinforce efforts to bring the outbreak under control.

It was not immediately clear if the appointments on Saturday amounted to a reshuffling of the local leadership or were simply an effort to reinforce officials on the front line. Still, it appeared to be an acknowledgment that the authorities in Wuhan had been overwhelmed.

Japan also said on Saturday that one of its citizens had died in a Wuhan hospital from a suspected case of the coronavirus. But the Japanese Foreign Ministry said that based on information it received from the Chinese authorities, it could not confirm whether the man, who was in his 60s, had been infected with the new virus. The ministry called the cause of death viral pneumonia.

As the new coronavirus spreads, China is confronting a growing sense of isolation — a stark reversal for the country after decades of economic and diplomatic integration with the rest of the world. Many countries, including the United States, have placed entry restrictions on travelers from China. Airlines have canceled flights. Fears of the virus have fueled anti-Chinese racism in some parts of the world.

Chinese officials have criticized the United States both for evacuating Americans from China and for imposing travel curbs, saying that such moves would spread panic. On Friday, President Trump and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo each appeared to be trying to ease tensions.

Mr. Pompeo said that the United States was prepared to spend up to $100 million in existing funds to help China and other countries fight the epidemic. Mr. Pompeo also said that the State Department had helped transport about 18 tons of donated medical supplies, including masks, gowns and gauze, to the people of China in the past week.

Mr. Trump praised China’s handling of the crisis on a phone call with China’s top leader, Xi Jinping, on Friday. And in a pair of Twitter posts, Mr. Trump said Mr. Xi was leading “what will be a very successful operation.”

But other American officials have quietly voiced concerns about China’s response to the epidemic. And the confirmation on Friday that repeated offers of help to China had been ignored only deepened the sense of worry.

Alex Azar, the United States secretary of health and human services, said at a news briefing on Friday that he had recently reiterated the C.D.C. offer to his Chinese counterpart, Dr. Ma Xiaowei.

Asked about the holdup, Mr. Azar said: “It’s up to the Chinese. We continue to expect fully that President Xi will accept our offer. We’re ready and willing and able to go.”

Motoko Rich and Hisako Ueno contributed reporting from Tokyo, and Steven Lee Myers from Beijing. Claire Fu contributed research.

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Jeff Sessions Was ‘Trump Before Trump.’ Will Alabama Voters Remember?

Westlake Legal Group merlin_167654064_45fe2826-8e60-4bcd-864e-5f274ececbb0-facebookJumbo Jeff Sessions Was ‘Trump Before Trump.’ Will Alabama Voters Remember? Voting and Voters United States Politics and Government Tuberville, Tommy Trump, Donald J Sessions, Jefferson B III Senate Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Republican Party Moore, Roy S Elections, Senate Conservatism (US Politics) Byrne, Bradley Alabama

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — It was another era, in another Republican Party. Jeff Sessions was a backbench senator from Alabama who defied the Republican president and doomed a bipartisan immigration bill with claims it would let terrorists and child molesters pour across the border.

Donald J. Trump was working on the seventh season of his reality TV show “The Apprentice” and was still registered in New York State as a Democrat.

Thirteen years later, after serving a brief and tormented tenure as President Trump’s attorney general, Mr. Sessions wants his old job in the Senate back.

But he is vexed by a bitter irony as he competes against several other Republicans in a March 3 primary. The Jeff Sessions of the past, who became a beloved figure on the right and helped fuel a populist brush fire that challenged Republicans over the very issues that are now at the heart of Mr. Trump’s nationalist agenda, is a distant memory for many Alabama voters.

Ask Republicans today what they think of Mr. Sessions, who represented Alabama in the Senate for 20 years, and many of the same belittling adjectives that Mr. Trump has hurled at his former attorney general come spilling out.

“He was weak,” said Stasia Madej, the owner of a women’s clothing boutique in Huntsville. She was in between bites of her barbecue dinner on a recent weeknight at a Republican candidates’ forum where four of Mr. Sessions’s opponents were speaking.

“I was hoping he’d be here tonight so we could hear answers to all of the questions we want to ask. I have doubts since he recused himself,” added Ms. Madej, who declared, “I love Trump,” as she started in on Mr. Sessions.

The episode to which Ms. Madej was referring may be the one act in Mr. Sessions’s long career that tips his Senate run in Alabama: his recusal from the Justice Department’s investigation into the Trump campaign’s dealings with Russia in 2016. That prompted the appointment of Robert S. Mueller as special counsel and enraged Mr. Trump, who continued his public taunts and insults of the former attorney general — “VERY weak” and his “biggest mistake” as president — long after he forced him out in November 2018.

Mr. Sessions’s predicament says a lot about a Republican Party that Mr. Trump has turned into a vessel for his own political security, held together not by shared beliefs but instead by fealty to him. No one was more of an evangelist for the ideas Mr. Trump ran on than Mr. Sessions. Yet his political fate is now threatened because the president has declared him disloyal.

“We live in a time now when if you don’t fall on your sword for the president, you’re done,” said John Castorani, a candidate for Congress from the Mobile area and a self-described moderate Republican, who said Mr. Sessions did the right thing by recusing himself. “I was proud to be from Alabama — for a moment,” added Mr. Castorani, a 27-year-old veteran and former intelligence officer.

“When we criticize Trump, we are no longer patriots, we are country-hating liberal hacks,” he said. “I’m not going to fall on my sword for him. And if that keeps me from getting elected, I’m O.K.,” he said.

The negative effect of Mr. Trump’s barrage against Mr. Sessions became clear in interviews with 20 Alabama voters. Most brought up the recusal with no prompting. Many said they held it against their former senator, though some admired him for sticking to his principles. And even those who couldn’t recall what exactly Mr. Sessions did had heard enough to understand that whatever happened was bad for the president.

“I know he did something that made the president mad,” said Susan Woodman, a retired speech therapist who came away from the Huntsville event undecided but impressed with one of Mr. Sessions’s rivals, Tommy Tuberville, a former Auburn University football coach.

Mr. Tuberville introduced himself to the audience by saying his biggest reason for wanting to serve in Washington was “to help Donald Trump” — be it on trade or foreign policy or fighting political correctness in schools that he complained teach “climate change, diversity and all that crap.”

All of the candidates have pledged in no uncertain terms to help Mr. Trump and his agenda if elected. Mr. Sessions’s bet is that he can claim something more convincing: He was on board with that agenda first.

“I have a certain authenticity on this that I will acknowledge I don’t think others have,” Mr. Sessions said in an interview at a “Pork & Politics” mixer in Mobile recently. Referring to his opponents, he said there was a difference “between demagoguery and honest advocacy for the American people’s interests.”

“They’re good people,” he added of his rivals. “I just don’t think any of those candidates understand the significance historically of the issues that we are talking about.”

The last time Mr. Sessions ran for Senate, in 2014, he was considered so unbeatable that no one ran against him on either ticket, Republican or Democratic. He was famous for railing against Wall Street bankers and Silicon Valley executives as villains from a Tom Wolfe novel, calling them “masters of the universe” who were putting “the parochial demands of a few powerful C.E.O.s ahead of an entire nation’s hopes.”

During the Obama administration he opposed fellow Republicans who wanted to negotiate new agreements to lower barriers to trade, saying in 2015, “I think we are at a point in history where we cannot afford to lose a single job in this country to unfair trading practices.”

He also broke with his party on Social Security and Medicare spending, favoring an approach that would avoid the steep cuts that party leaders like Paul D. Ryan had supported as a matter of fiscal responsibility.

Working in Mr. Sessions’s office at the time as his communications director was Stephen Miller, now the White House adviser most associated with Mr. Trump’s hard-line approach to immigration.

In February 2016, when most of Mr. Sessions’s colleagues still considered Mr. Trump a joke, he became the first senator to endorse him for president.

There is a depth to Mr. Sessions’s early bond with Mr. Trump that none of his rivals can challenge. Mr. Tuberville has never held political office. Representative Bradley Byrne, who represents a district in southern Alabama, won his seat in 2013 after beating a Tea Party insurgent, thanks in large part to a flood of money from major corporations like Pfizer, Caterpillar and AT&T. After the “Access Hollywood” tape came out a month before the 2016 election, Mr. Byrne called on Mr. Trump to step aside for Mike Pence.

Lately, Mr. Byrne has wrapped himself in the president’s agenda. At the Huntsville forum, his campaign literature fanned out on the tables declared, “We can trust Bradley to stand with President Trump.” He managed to insert Mr. Trump’s name into almost every answer he gave that night, starting with his introduction to the crowd: “I’m a Christian. I’m a conservative,” he said. “And I vote with President Trump 97 percent of the time.”

So far, polls show Mr. Sessions leading Mr. Byrne, Mr. Tuberville and a third opponent, Roy S. Moore, the former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court whose campaign for Senate in 2017 unraveled amid accusations that he had forced himself on teenage girls, costing Republicans the seat.

Mr. Trump has been uncharacteristically quiet about this year’s race. Should Mr. Sessions prevail in the primary next month but not win an outright majority, a runoff election would not happen for several weeks. And that prospect makes Mr. Sessions’s allies nervous because of the ample time it would allow the president to call off his cease-fire.

Though Mr. Trump is famous for disregarding advice, he has heeded warnings so far from numerous advisers about attacking the former attorney general. According to several people familiar with the conversations, his aides have pointed out that any attempt to interfere could backfire, as it did in 2017 when Mr. Trump backed two candidates in Alabama who lost: Luther Strange, who lost in the primary to Mr. Moore, and then Mr. Moore.

With the exception of a few influential conservatives — including Fox News’s Tucker Carlson, who in an interview last year with the Huntsville radio host Jeff Poor said that “Sessions was Trump long before Trump,” and Laura Ingraham, who in 2014 said Mr. Sessions should be president — most Republicans seem to have conveniently forgotten Mr. Sessions’s contributions to Trumpism. Mr. Carlson and Ms. Ingraham remain fans. And since Mr. Sessions announced his campaign in November on Mr. Carlson’s show, he has been on their prime-time Fox programs a total of nine times.

When the Sessions campaign released a list of 11 former Senate colleagues who were endorsing him, they were all people who were safe from the reprisals and attacks from the president that most Republicans fear. None are running for re-election this year; two are retiring; two others are in their mid-80s; and one, Johnny Isakson of Georgia, already left the Senate at the end of last year because of health issues.

Though Mr. Sessions said he had not spoken to the president since he left the Justice Department over a year ago, preserving the themes of the 2016 Trump campaign inside a party that was often hostile to them is a major reason he wants to be in the Senate.

Asked whether he believed there were a lot of Republicans who would revert to the party orthodoxy on trade and immigration once Mr. Trump is out of office, he said: “That’s my concern. I think there are a number of them that are kind of looking for that wave to go away. And they’ll go back to business as usual.”

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Sen. Tom Cotton: Eliminating coronavirus requires Chinese Communist Party to make big changes

Westlake Legal Group Coronavirus-montage-thumb Sen. Tom Cotton: Eliminating coronavirus requires Chinese Communist Party to make big changes Tom Cotton fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world fox-news/opinion fox-news/newsedge/health fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 15c7a296-0047-5d71-8aef-787fc0b74f2e

China has been hobbled by the mysterious coronavirus that emerged in the central city of Wuhan late last year. The ruling Chinese Communist Party is now taking aggressive measures to regain control of the situation.

Nearly 60 million Chinese live under quarantine – more than the combined population of our entire West Coast. Videos filmed in Hubei province, the epicenter of the outbreak, show convoys of tanker trucks fogging empty streets with disinfectant. More disturbing videos show yellow body bags stacking up at Chinese hospitals.

Official Chinese tallies of the toll taken by the coronavirus as of Friday were more than 34,000 infections in that nation and 722 deaths. However, shortages of test kits and other resources indicate the real numbers are much higher, amid widespread reports that the sick are being turned away unexamined from hospitals.

CORONAVIRUS DEATHS IN CHINA GROW TO 722, MORE THAN 34,500 CASES REPORTED

One study estimated that coronavirus was “growing exponentially” in large Chinese cities, with more than 75,000 infected patients in Wuhan alone. That study’s projections went up to Jan. 25, when official figures claimed there were just over 2,000 cases in all of China.

We still have a chance to prevent coronavirus from becoming an epidemic in America, and even a narrow shot at heading off a global pandemic. Achieving this will require drastic changes from the Chinese Communist Party, whose secrecy and paranoia are responsible for the rapid growth of this epidemic.

The Chinese Communist Party must cooperate with the world and permit the free transmission of information among ordinary Chinese on the front lines of the disease.

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In the early weeks of the outbreak in Wuhan, Chinese authorities worked harder to suppress information about coronavirus than to fight the outbreak. When doctors started to discuss strange cases of pneumonia appearing in their clinics, the official response was to punish them.

One brave doctor, Li Wenliang, who warned his colleagues to wear protective clothing, was harassed by local police, attacked by state media, and forced to renounce his supposed “false statements.” He was reported to have died of coronavirus this week.

The Chinese Communist Party has now acknowledged that these doctors were right, but its policy of censorship and secrecy is little changed. Half-truths and falsehoods about coronavirus linger in official narratives long after they’re debunked, such as the claims that the disease originated at an exotic animal market or can’t be transmitted via human-to-human contact.

The Chinese Communist Party has been forced to abandon these claims in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

When Chinese Internet users flooded social media sites with indignation following the death of Dr. Li, their calls for freedom of speech were scrubbed from the Internet by censors. And the man who filmed body bags at a Chinese hospital was arrested and interrogated by police officers pretending to be hospital workers.

The central authorities, under the control of Chairman Xi Jinping, explicitly prioritize political security over fighting the epidemic, with grievous consequences for us all.

China’s coordination with the outside world has been little better. Chinese scientists only released the genome of coronavirus, which is essential to finding a vaccine, in mid-January – six weeks after the start of the outbreak.

And China has rejected repeated American offers to send teams of scientists and doctors to Wuhan. As the U.S. government took prudent measures to protect American citizens – including the announcement of travel restrictions late last week – Beijing issued propagandistic coverage that blamed our country for “spreading fear” about the outbreak.

The desire of public officials to downplay serious outbreaks of disease is a frequent historical occurrence – and it’s almost always deadly. Officials may hope by their actions to prevent panic, serious economic disruption, or political instability. But measures to suppress the truth about epidemics typically fail in their objectives, while hastening the spread of disease.

This human frailty, exacerbated by the suffocating dynamics of authoritarian regimes, was illustrated in the Chinese Communist Party’s disastrous response to SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) in 2003. In the early weeks of that epidemic, the Communist Party claimed falsely that the outbreak in Guangdong Province was under “effective control.”

Yet the disease was still spreading, and secrecy within the Chinese Communist Party itself delayed the government’s response. An early internal report on the disease went unread for three days because it was labeled “top secret.”

Rivalry between the military and political factions of the Chinese Community Party hindered its response yet further. The Communist Party only responded strongly to the SARS outbreak after weeks of growing panic, disruptions and death. It started by firing its top health ministers.

China is now learning anew the consequences of wishful thinking and secrecy when facing a deadly illness. The disastrous spread of coronavirus will surely take a toll on the party’s credibility in the eyes of the Chinese people – as it should.

But the Chinese government is still the central actor in this drama, and it can still play a constructive role in mitigating harm to the world from this coronavirus.

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First, China must cooperate with world health authorities to combat the disease and allow international experts – including teams from the United States – to work and conduct research at the center of the epidemic in Hubei province.

Outside experts are most likely to provide the impartial analysis necessary to respond to coronavirus because only they are free from conflicts of interest and fear of censorship. The American offer to send medical experts and scientists to Wuhan still stands.

Second, the Chinese Communist Party must give the Chinese people more freedom to speak their minds and share information about the disease, however damaging or distressing to the regime.

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This is essential for scientists, doctors and first responders, who must be free to speak candidly and creatively to identify problems in the government’s response and test solutions. But this is also important for ordinary Chinese, who become more suspicious of their government and less likely to obey its edicts the more they think it is hiding the full extent of the epidemic.

It’s worth noting that the Chinese government already has laws on the books that prohibit “concealing, misreporting, or delaying” evidence of infectious disease epidemics. To fight coronavirus, it ought to apply this very sensible lesson to itself as well.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY SEN. TOM COTTON

Westlake Legal Group Coronavirus-montage-thumb Sen. Tom Cotton: Eliminating coronavirus requires Chinese Communist Party to make big changes Tom Cotton fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world fox-news/opinion fox-news/newsedge/health fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 15c7a296-0047-5d71-8aef-787fc0b74f2e   Westlake Legal Group Coronavirus-montage-thumb Sen. Tom Cotton: Eliminating coronavirus requires Chinese Communist Party to make big changes Tom Cotton fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world fox-news/opinion fox-news/newsedge/health fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 15c7a296-0047-5d71-8aef-787fc0b74f2e

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Ex-Obama Photographer Highlights Trump’s Vindictiveness With Old Prank Snap

Westlake Legal Group 5e3e80a6220000ca0e23ec08 Ex-Obama Photographer Highlights Trump’s Vindictiveness With Old Prank Snap

Former White House photographer Pete Souza has imagined the vindictive way President Donald Trump would respond to a prank that was once pulled on his predecessor, former President Barack Obama.

In a photo from 2010 that Souza shared to Instagram on Friday, a man gave Obama bunny ears. Obama “laughed out loud” when he first saw the picture taken at Peggy Sue’s Cafe in Monroe City, Missouri, said Souza.

The shutterbug, who also documented Ronald Reagan’s time in the White House, predicted Trump would have had a very different reaction, however.

“I’m sure if this guy did this today to IMpotus, the Attorney General would be ordered to investigate his background and the IRS would audit his tax returns,” he wrote.

Souza’s post came amid what pundits have described as the “Friday night massacre” ― Trump’s dismissal of European Union Ambassador Gordon Sondland and Lt. Colonel Alexander Vindman, the top National Security Council official on Ukraine, in seeming revenge after they testified against him during the House’s impeachment probe into the Ukraine scandal.

The photographer frequently shares images he took during the Obama era to throw shade at Trump. On Wednesday, he mocked the president for snubbing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s (D-Calif.) handshake at the State of the Union.

“How hard is this?” he captioned this picture of Obama and then-GOP Speaker John Boehner before the 2011 address:

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Trump’s purging everyone he thinks is disloyal. He was never going to learn from impeachment.

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Westminster Dog Show: Everything to know about the 2020 competition

They’ve all worked their tails off, but only one can be crowned top dog at the Westminster Kennel Club (WKC) Dog Show.

The 144th annual canine competition will take place from Feb. 8 – 11 in New York City, as over 2,600 dogs from 49 states and 19 countries, representing 204 breeds, battle for the top spot in the Hound, Toy, Sporting, Non-sporting, Herding, Working and Terrier divisions, WKC Dog Show national spokesperson and FOX Sports analyst Gail Miller Bisher told Fox News.

Ahead of the event, Miller Bisher discussed the history of America’s longest continuously-held dog show, the misconceptions about the competition, and just what the judges are looking for in determining this year’s “Best in Show” champ.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1097911354 Westminster Dog Show: Everything to know about the 2020 competition Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 7d93b312-860b-5059-88f6-405154512a36

Bichons Frises gather in the judging ring during the Daytime Session in the Breed Judging across the Hound, Toy, Non-Sporting and Herding groups at the 143rd Annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Pier 92/94 in New York City on February 11, 2019.  (Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images)

MINNESOTA WOMAN SPOTS MISSING DOG’S FACE PRINTED ON BEER CAN

FOX NEWS: What can fans expect from the Dog Show this year?

GAIL MILLER BISHER: We have a new breed in the ring, as the Azawakh joins the Hound group. It will be the Azawakh’s first time showing at Westminster, as the breed is new to the American Kennel Club (AKC.) Six dogs are entered, and one will win best of breed, then continue on to that advanced competition on the green carpet at Madison Square Garden for the first time ever. It’s exciting for the Azawakh!

Westlake Legal Group iStock-533256317 Westminster Dog Show: Everything to know about the 2020 competition Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 7d93b312-860b-5059-88f6-405154512a36

Pictured are three young Azawakh dogs. The breed will compete for the first time ever at theWestminster Kennel Club Dog Show in New York City this year. (iStock)

FOX: How many dogs are competing this year?

GMB: There are over 2,600 in the Dog Show from 49 states and 19 countries. All must be American champions in order to show. Our largest entry in terms of states is from California – there are well over 200 entries, coming all the way across the country to Manhattan, to compete.

FOX: What is something people may not know about the competition?

GMB: There was a third day added this year, with prejudging on Sunday for the first time at Pier 94. It’s a good thing because families can come on the weekend and see all the dogs.

[In addition to the signature WKC Dog Show events on Monday and Tuesday at Madison Square Garden, the organization’s Masters Agility Championship will be held on Saturday and the Masters Obedience Championship will be held on Sunday.]

Westlake Legal Group WireFoxTerrierWKCWinnerKing-Lev-RadinPacific-PressLightRocket-via-Getty-Images Westminster Dog Show: Everything to know about the 2020 competition Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 7d93b312-860b-5059-88f6-405154512a36

NEW YORK, UNITED STATES – 2019/02/13: Wire fox terrier named King won Best in show during 143rd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.  (Photo by Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Many people also don’t know that we’re a benched dog show. Since the first show was held in 1877, it’s aimed to be a public education event. Say, if you love beagles, the public is welcome to go and meet the breeders, owners and handlers, to really learn more about the dog. Probably as soon as they’re done competing, people are welcome to go visit the dog, touch them, ask questions and talk to the dog’s team about the breed, maybe if they’re looking to see if that dog would work with their lifestyle. People think that because they’re show dogs, they can’t approach them!

We have CEO’s, teachers, postal workers and many more – so many different people involved in the dog breeding, owning and handling world.

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Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1129031952 Westminster Dog Show: Everything to know about the 2020 competition Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 7d93b312-860b-5059-88f6-405154512a36

The Pekingese ‘Pequest Primrose’ and trainer compete during the Toy Group judging at the 143rd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden on February 11, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Sarah Stier/Getty Images) (Photo by Sarah Stier/Getty Images)

FOX: What is a common misconception about how the dogs are judged?

GMB: One thing that we always try to explain is that there’s a written standard, per breed, as the dog’s form follows their original function. These are purpose-bred dogs, many bred to work in some capacity originally. Things like their shape, coat texture and temperaments are based on that original purpose, and explains all the elements of their ideal.

Our judges learn, study and judge for many, many years – it’s very experienced dog show judges coming to Westminster. Say if you had two very different dogs like German Shepherds vs. Corgis, you’re going to be judging whether it’s closer to that ideal German Shepheard or Corgi. It’s much more detailed than people think. It’s not a beauty contest at all! There’s history involved, there’s science involved – there is a lot more to it.

Westlake Legal Group westminster-dog-show-2019 Westminster Dog Show: Everything to know about the 2020 competition Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 7d93b312-860b-5059-88f6-405154512a36

A Kerry Blue Terrier hugs its handler while competing in Best of Terrier group at the 143rd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019. The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, first held in 1877, is America’s second-longest continuously held sporting event, behind only the Kentucky Derby. (David Williams/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

FOX: People often forget that these aren’t just show dogs, these are people’s pets.

GMB: Oftentimes, people in this sport are two or three generations deep. I’m second generation, my parents did breeding, showing, judging – often times it’s a family affair, because these dogs live in your house. It’s part of your life, part of the family! If you’re used to that and you love the dogs, it’s a lifestyle, almost.

When I first had my daughter, my dogs were always right there, and I think that’s telling of the sport in general. People love it, love trying to preserve the breeds and its special features, to make sure the next generation is healthy and sound, continues and doesn’t fade away.

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Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1129267786 Westminster Dog Show: Everything to know about the 2020 competition Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 7d93b312-860b-5059-88f6-405154512a36

The Australian Terrier ‘Bacon’ and handler compete during Terrier Group judging at the 143rd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden on February 12, 2019 in New York City. (Sarah Stier/Getty Images)

FOX: What are you most looking forward to this year?

GMB: We try to make the show better every year. With the Azawakh joining, the breeders who put so much into going through the AKC process [of accreditation] can finally enjoy the moment. The best thing [for competitors] is being able to talk and explain things – at its core, that’s what a dog show really is.

It’s an evaluation of breeding stock – what the dogs should be used for, and how they can best produce the next generation. At the core of it, it’s all about the love of dogs. People are coming cross-country, from Canada, investing time, money and energy into this, they’ve been dedicated. This is one of the largest celebrations of dogs you will find.

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Watch the 144th WKC Dog show on the WKC website, WKC app and Fox Sports app from Feb. 8 – 11. Select group competitions, followed by the Best in Show competition, will be held on Tuesday night from 7:30 pm to 11:00 pm EST and streamed live on FS1.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1129031952 Westminster Dog Show: Everything to know about the 2020 competition Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 7d93b312-860b-5059-88f6-405154512a36   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1129031952 Westminster Dog Show: Everything to know about the 2020 competition Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 7d93b312-860b-5059-88f6-405154512a36

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