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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 146)

Trump’s Other Personal Lawyer: Close to the Right, but Far From Giuliani

WASHINGTON — Jay Sekulow is a real lawyer, and he plays one on TV.

Mr. Sekulow, the coordinator of President Trump’s personal legal team, does not have an office in the White House. He is best known as a prodigious fund-raiser on evangelical television and a litigator for the Christian right, not for handling criminal prosecutions or executive power disputes. In 2016, Mr. Sekulow said he voted for Hillary Clinton, according to people close to him.

Yet with the House Judiciary Committee set to begin impeachment hearings on Wednesday and Mr. Trump enmeshed in legal battles on other fronts — like his tax returns, claims of immunity from prosecution and elements of his immigration and health care policies — Mr. Sekulow has emerged as one of Mr. Trump’s most trusted advisers and loyal defenders in the news media.

Operating under the name Constitutional Litigation & Advocacy Group from a co-working space in a Pennsylvania Avenue office building, Mr. Sekulow, 63, coordinates the efforts of eight outside lawyers enlisted to help Mr. Trump. He is in regular touch with the White House counsel, Pat A. Cipollone, and speaks frequently with the president.

A long list of lawyers have cycled tumultuously in and out of Mr. Trump’s orbit over the past three years: Donald F. McGahn II, his first White House counsel; Ty Cobb and John M. Dowd, who represented him in the early stages of the special counsel’s investigation; and Emmet T. Flood, who saw Mr. Trump through the completion of the Mueller report. Then there is Rudolph W. Giuliani, like Mr. Sekulow a personal lawyer for Mr. Trump, whose aggressive digging for political dirt in Ukraine has put him under federal investigation and led to the president facing a House impeachment inquiry.

But Mr. Sekulow has hung on.

He was recommended by the erstwhile Trump adviser Stephen K. Bannon to help guide Mr. Trump’s legal response to the investigation by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III. Like Mr. Giuliani, he has New York roots and spent decades as a pugilistic advocate on television, in Mr. Sekulow’s case in a natty on-air uniform of bespoke suit and three-corner silk pocket square.

Unlike Mr. Giuliani, he has avoided messy public conflicts that upstage his client, and he reflects the embattled president’s reliance on evangelical Christians, a crucial political constituency. He declined to be interviewed on the record for this article.

“Jay is not a criminal lawyer, and he’s not even a checks-and-balances constitutional lawyer,” said Paul Rosenzweig, who was senior counsel to Ken Starr for the Whitewater investigation during the Clinton administration. “The substantive background he has is not a particularly good fit for any of those tasks. But he’s been at it for two years, so maybe he’s got more experience in defending this president than anybody.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group 00dc-sekulow2-articleLarge Trump’s Other Personal Lawyer: Close to the Right, but Far From Giuliani United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Trump Tax Returns Sekulow, Jay Alan Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Religion-State Relations Religion and Belief Mercer University Jews for Jesus Evangelical Movement Christians and Christianity

Mr. Sekulow, left, in 2003 outside the Supreme Court, where he won a string of religious liberty cases.Credit…Dennis Cook/Associated Press

Mr. Sekulow was born in Brooklyn and grew up an observant Jew, first on Long Island and later in Atlanta, where his father, a clothing buyer, moved the family to take a job at a department store.

Mr. Sekulow attended Atlanta Baptist College, today known as Mercer University. It was around that time, he has said, that he became a Christian, in part because of the influence of a college friend, Glenn Borders, who led him through an exploration of the Bible. He would go on to be active in Jews for Jesus, an organization of evangelical believers of Jewish ancestry.

In a first-person biography on the Jews for Jesus website, he wrote that during his reading of the Old and New Testaments, “my suspicion that Jesus might really be the messiah was confirmed.” At a later gathering, “they invited people who wanted to commit their life to Jesus to come up the aisle to meet with them at the front of the church,” Mr. Sekulow wrote. “I responded to that invitation.”

After graduating from law school at Mercer, Mr. Sekulow worked briefly at the Internal Revenue Service, then opened a law firm in Atlanta with a few Mercer classmates and his brother Gary. Working a network of contacts, including a local pastor, Mr. Sekulow swiftly moved from routine real estate closings and wills to a business renovating and flipping historic properties, at the time a popular tax shelter for the wealthy.

The venture imploded in 1986, a development Mr. Sekulow omits from his Jews for Jesus biography. Mr. Sekulow; his brother Gary; his father, Stanley; his law partner Stuart Roth; and their business associates were sued for fraud and securities violations. They declared bankruptcy, leaving a trail of unpaid debts.

Within a year of his bankruptcy, Mr. Sekulow reinvented himself as a litigator for the Christian right. As general counsel for Jews for Jesus, he argued before the Supreme Court and won a 9-to-0 victory in 1987, successfully making the case that by banning Jews for Jesus from distributing pamphlets at Los Angeles International Airport, the Board of Airport Commissioners violated the group’s First Amendment rights.

Within months Mr. Sekulow founded his own faith-based advocacy group, Christian Advocates Serving Evangelism, or CASE, to meet, Mr. Sekulow wrote, “a growing need to challenge the state’s infringement upon the right of Christians to proclaim the gospel” in “parks, school campuses at every level, malls, street corners and, of course, airports.”

Mr. Sekulow won a string of Supreme Court cases in the early and mid-1990s by arguing that bans on various forms of religious expression in public places violated the practitioners’ right to free speech.

His legal successes impressed the televangelists Janice Crouch and Paul Crouch Sr., founders of Trinity Broadcasting Network and icons of what is commonly called prosperity gospel, the belief that following God yields wealth and health. Many mainstream Christians consider the theology heretical.

Mr. Sekulow appeared on the rhinestone-clad couple’s “Praise the Lord” TV show, where they solicited “love gifts” for the young lawyer they called “our little Jew” and “our little David,” battling the Goliath of the secular state.

The Crouches gave Mr. Sekulow his own show, broadcast from a mock courtroom in a TBN studio in Mobile, Ala., and produced by their son, Paul Crouch Jr.

“We got him launched,” the younger Mr. Crouch, who has since left TBN, said in an interview.

Mr. Sekulow still appears on TBN, which carries his show and hawks his books, like “Unholy Alliance,” whose blurb says it “exposes the attempts by fundamentalist Muslims to destroy our legal system and liberties.” Paul Crouch Jr. has also asked Mr. Sekulow to appear in “Trump 2024,” an election-year Christian documentary about Mr. Trump that assumes a second term.

In 1990, the televangelist Pat Robertson, a close friend of the Crouches, hired Mr. Sekulow as chief counsel for the American Center for Law & Justice, a group founded in opposition to the American Civil Liberties Union.

Over three decades, CASE and the A.C.L.J., funded by donations Mr. Sekulow solicits on TV and through telemarketers, have channeled tens of millions of dollars to the Sekulow family and their affiliated businesses, financing homes in Washington, Tennessee and France; private jet travel; and a chauffeur.

Over the years, several news outlets have investigated the groups and their payments to Mr. Sekulow and his wife, sons, brother, sister-in-law, niece and nephew. In 2017, The Guardian, citing documents, published an article saying that between 2000 and 2017 CASE has “steered more than $60 million to Sekulow, his family and their businesses,” including for property, production services and a private jet lease.

The same day, The Washington Post published an investigation of the organizations’ tax records, finding that between 2011 and 2015 the interconnected charities paid $5.5 million in compensation directly to Mr. Sekulow and five family members, another $7.5 million to “businesses owned by Mr. Sekulow and his sister-in-law for producing and consulting on TV, movie and radio shows, including his weekday program, ‘Jay Sekulow Live!,’” and $21 million to a law firm co-owned by Mr. Sekulow: Constitutional Litigation & Advocacy Group.

“CASE and A.C.L.J. comply with all rules and regulations of the Internal Revenue Service,” the law and justice center said in a statement to The New York Times. “We have independent auditors and two independent tax law firms, and we’re in good standing in all 50 states.”

During the Obama administration Mr. Sekulow continued his work at the center, fighting against the Affordable Care Act and defending an Operation Rescue activist sued over “undercover” videos filmed at a Planned Parenthood clinic. During the recession, the group used telemarketers to solicit “sacrificial gifts” from struggling people by phone, according to the Guardian article.

Mr. Robertson said in an interview that if Mr. Sekulow were being “compensated as an attorney for the work that he does, he would be making in the seven-figure range.” Unlike Mr. Giuliani, Mr. Sekulow is paid for representing Mr. Trump; Mr. Sekulow’s son Jordan and Mr. Roth are also on the Trump payroll.

Every weekday Mr. Sekulow takes to the Christian airwaves, amplifying White House talking points and raising money for the A.C.L.J. Last month he and his son worked to impugn the impeachment inquiry’s “alleged whistle-blower,” casting him as part of an Obama administration “chain of deep staters.” As witnesses testified before the House Intelligence Committee, his show promoted its “exclusive live analysis of Adam Schiff’s phony, lacking-due-process” hearings.

After a federal appeals court again rejected Mr. Trump’s efforts to shield his tax returns from New York criminal investigators last month, Mr. Sekulow vowed to take the battle to the Supreme Court, telling CBS News that the president’s claims of legal immunity even from murder “go to the heart of our republic.”

Whether he will argue the case himself before the Supreme Court has not yet been decided.

Charlie Savage contributed reporting.

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Mariah Carey’s ‘All I Want For Christmas Is You’ deemed most annoying Christmas song by UK poll

Westlake Legal Group Mariah-Carey-AP Mariah Carey's 'All I Want For Christmas Is You' deemed most annoying Christmas song by UK poll Variety fox-news/special/occasions/holiday fox-news/person/mariah-carey fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc Chris Willman article 72371814-c193-54c0-b455-945bc38f2fbe

As radio stations everywhere turn to an all-Christmas format, what song would listeners most like to jingle all the way to oblivion? That question remains unsettled in America, but over in the UK, a poll has singled out Mariah Carey’s “All I Want for Christmas Is You” as the most annoying holiday song ever.

The mobile phone company Huawei conducted the survey. Perhaps Carey’s song topping the poll is not surprising; the 1994 single is ubiquitous enough, worldwide, that it would probably come in near the top of any survey of favorite songs, too. But clearly it is not without its polarizing factors to many Brits who dread the music of December.

The rest of the UK’s most annoying list is decidedly Brit-centric, with the Band-Aid charity song “Do They Know It’s Christmas?” coming in at No. 2. A couple of holiday songs from British rock stars of the 1970s, Wizzard’s “I Wish It Could Be Christmas Everyday” and Slade’s “Merry Xmas Everybody” are in the Nos. 3-4 positions. Do the English even realize how uniquely fortunate they are to have that Wizzard song all over the airwaves every December? Apparently they do not.

CALYPSO SINGER IRVING BURGIE, WRITER OF ‘DAY-O’ AND OTHER HARRY BELAFONTE KITS, DIES AT 95

Wham!’s “Last Christmas,” which surely would top any more scientific poll, lands at No. 5.

One of the greatest Christmas songs of all time, “Fairytale of New York” by the Pogues with Kirsty MacColl, inexplicably comes in at No. 6, although it’s probably difficult to overestimate how many more thousands of times the British have been subjected to this ode to drunken dysfunction than Americans have.

At No. 7, perhaps the least expected choice, from a U.S. point of view, is the Tom Jones and Cerys Matthews version of “Baby, It’s Cold Outside,” a single that has been inescapable overseas since its 1999 release but has gotten virtually zero airplay, ever, in the States. Given the ongoing controversy in the U.S. about the song itself, it seems safe to say that the recordings that Americans are more familiar with (like Dean Martin’s) would be contenders if a similar survey were conducted here.

The No. 8-10 picks return the poll to territory more familiar to American listeners: the Jackson 5’s “Santa Claus is Coming to Town,” Eartha Kitt’s “Santa Baby” and the Andrews Sisters’ “Jingle Bells.”

THE WEEKND DROPS ANOTHER NEW SONG, ‘BLINDING LIGHTS,’ APPEARS ON COLBERT NEXT WEEK

That Paul McCartney’s “Wonderful Christmastime” was even bigger in the UK than in America yet does not appear anywhere in the top 10 throws the veracity of the poll further into question.

One thing Mariah Carey’s “All I Want for Christmas Is You” has going against it — or for it, depending on your point of view — in this poll is the fact that it’s the last original holiday song to have really become a Christmas standard; nothing in the 21st century can really be said to have joined the popular canon. Perhaps that makes it more vulnerable to boomers who might consider Carey’s song an irritating jingle-come-lately in a pantheon in which practically everything else has been grandfathered in, although there are probably just as many from that generation that cherish it for its debt to the Phil Spector Christmas sound.

There’s more annoyance or delight where that came from. Carey’s 1994 “Merry Christmas” album, from which the megahit derives, has been reissued this fall in a 25th anniversary deluxe edition with a bonus disc that includes remixes, a new recording of “Sugar Plum Fairy” and previously unreleased live tracks from the singer’s ’94 performance at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City.

Curiously, due probably to a number of peculiarities about chart rules at the time, Carey’s song never reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100; the highest it’s ever gotten there is No. 3, a position attained just last year. Carey released a duet version with Justin Bieber in 2011. The song has been covered live or in performance by artists including Kelly Clarkson, My Chemical Romance, Michael Buble, Fifth Harmony, Lady Antebellum, Cee Lo Green, Ariana Grande, Idina Menzel, She & Him, LeAnn Rimes and Ingrid Michaelson.

JUDY COLLINS GETS SUITE ON ‘WINTER STORIES,’ A NOT SO CHRISTMAS-Y SEASONAL ALBUM

Clearly UK music fans are not taking their cues from the Guardian, which this year ran its own subjective list of the most annoying holiday songs of all time and only placed Carey’s at No. 20. They had “Do They Know It’s Christmas?” in second place. The newspaper’s No. 1 pick: Bing Crosby and David Bowie’s “Little Drummer Boy/Peace on Earth.”

The full survey results for Britain’s most annoying Christmas song:

  1. “All I Want for Christmas Is You” – Mariah Carey
  2. “Do They Know It’s Christmas?” – Band Aid
  3. “I Wish It Could Be Christmas Everyday” – Wizzard
  4. “Merry Xmas Everybody” – Slade
  5. “Last Christmas” – Wham!
  6. “Fairytale of New York” – The Pogues and Kirsty MacColl
  7. “Baby It’s Cold Outside” – Tom Jones & Cerys Matthews
  8. “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” – Jackson 5
  9. “Santa Baby” – Eartha Kitt
  10. “Jingle Bells” – Andrews Sisters
Westlake Legal Group Mariah-Carey-AP Mariah Carey's 'All I Want For Christmas Is You' deemed most annoying Christmas song by UK poll Variety fox-news/special/occasions/holiday fox-news/person/mariah-carey fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc Chris Willman article 72371814-c193-54c0-b455-945bc38f2fbe   Westlake Legal Group Mariah-Carey-AP Mariah Carey's 'All I Want For Christmas Is You' deemed most annoying Christmas song by UK poll Variety fox-news/special/occasions/holiday fox-news/person/mariah-carey fox-news/lifestyle/occasions/christmas fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc Chris Willman article 72371814-c193-54c0-b455-945bc38f2fbe

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Trump downsizes U.S. contribution to NATO, helps Russian agenda

Westlake Legal Group jPYv1J4AujKEB_4bBqXpwVj0W_RYsE3RQ0M5ht6Caac Trump downsizes U.S. contribution to NATO, helps Russian agenda r/politics

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With Brutal Crackdown, Iran Convulsed by Worst Unrest in 40 Years

Westlake Legal Group XXIRAN-PROTESTS-01-facebookJumbo With Brutal Crackdown, Iran Convulsed by Worst Unrest in 40 Years Rouhani, Hassan Khamenei, Ali Iran Embargoes and Sanctions Demonstrations, Protests and Riots

Iran is experiencing its deadliest political unrest since the Islamic Revolution 40 years ago, with at least 180 people killed — and possibly hundreds more — as angry protests have been smothered in a government crackdown of unbridled force.

It began two weeks ago with an abrupt increase of at least 50 percent in gasoline prices. Within 72 hours, outraged demonstrators in cities large and small were calling for an end to the Islamic Republic’s government and the downfall of its leaders.

In many places, security forces responded by opening fire on unarmed protesters, largely unemployed or low-income young men between the ages of 19 and 26, according to witness accounts and videos. In the southwest city of Mahshahr alone, witnesses and medical personnel said, Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps members surrounded, shot and killed 40 to 100 demonstrators — mostly unarmed young men — in a sugar cane field where they had sought refuge.

“The recent use of lethal force against people throughout the country is unprecedented, even for the Islamic Republic and its record of violence,” said Omid Memarian, the deputy director at the Center for Human Rights in Iran, a New York-based group.

Altogether, from 180 to 450 people, and possibly more, were killed in four days of intense violence after the gasoline price increase was announced on Nov. 15, with at least 2,000 wounded and 7,000 detained, according to international rights organizations, opposition groups and local journalists.

The last enormous wave of protests in Iran — in 2009 after a contested election, which was also met with a deadly crackdown — left 72 people dead over a much longer period of about 10 months.

Only now, nearly two weeks after the protests were crushed — and largely obscured by an internet blackout in the country that was lifted recently — have details corroborating the scope of killings and destruction started to dribble out.

The latest outbursts not only revealed staggering levels of frustration with Iran’s leaders, but also underscored the serious economic and political challenges facing them, from the Trump administration’s onerous sanctions on the country to the growing resentment toward Iran by neighbors in an increasingly unstable Middle East.

The gas price increase, which was announced as most Iranians had gone to bed, came as Iran is struggling to fill a yawning budget gap. The Trump administration sanctions, mostly notably their tight restrictions on exports of Iran’s oil, are a big reason for the shortfall. The sanctions are meant to pressure Iran into renegotiating the 2015 nuclear agreement between Iran and major world powers, which President Trump abandoned, calling it too weak.

Most of the nationwide unrest seemed concentrated in neighborhoods and cities populated by low-income and working-class families, suggesting this was an uprising born in the historically loyal power base of Iran’s post-revolutionary hierarchy.

Many Iranians, stupefied and embittered, have directed their hostility directly at the supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who called the crackdown a justified response to a plot by Iran’s enemies at home and abroad.

The killings prompted a provocative warning from Mir Hussein Moussavi, an opposition leader and former presidential candidate whose 2009 election loss set off peaceful demonstrations that Ayatollah Khamenei also suppressed by force.

In a statement posted Saturday on an opposition website, Mr. Moussavi, who has been under house arrest since 2011 and seldom speaks publicly, blamed the supreme leader for the killings. He compared them to an infamous 1978 massacre by government forces that led to the downfall of Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi a year later, at the hands of the Islamic revolutionaries who now rule the country.

“The killers of the year 1978 were the representatives of a nonreligious regime and the agents and shooters of November 2019 are the representatives of a religious government,” he said. “Then the commander in chief was the shah and today, here, the supreme leader with absolute authority.”

The authorities have declined to specify casualties and arrests and have denounced unofficial figures on the national death toll as speculative. But the nation’s interior minister, Abdolreza Rahmani Fazli, has cited widespread unrest around the country.

On state media, he said that protests had erupted in 29 out of 31 provinces and 50 military bases had been attacked, which if true suggested a level of coordination absent in the earlier protests. The property damage also included 731 banks, 140 public spaces, nine religious centers, 70 gasoline stations, 307 vehicles, 183 police cars, 1,076 motorcycles and 34 ambulances, the interior minister said.

The worst violence documented so far happened in the city of Mahshahr and its suburbs, with a population of 120,000 people in Iran’s southwest Khuzestan Province — a region with an ethnic Arab majority that has a long history of unrest and opposition to the central government. Mahshahr is adjacent to the nation’s largest industrial petrochemical complex and serves as a gateway to Bandar Imam, a major port.

The New York Times interviewed six residents of the city, including a protest leader who had witnessed the violence; a reporter based in the city who works for Iranian media, and had investigated the violence but was banned from reporting it; and a nurse at the hospital where casualties were treated.

They each provided similar accounts of how the Revolutionary Guards deployed a large force to Mahshahr on Monday, Nov. 18, to crush the protests. All spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of retribution by the Guards.

For three days, according to these residents, protesters had successfully gained control of most of Mahshahr and its suburbs, blocking the main road to the city and the adjacent industrial petrochemical complex. Iran’s interior minister confirmed that the protesters had gotten control over Mahshahr and its roads in a televised interview last week, but the Iranian government did not respond to specific questions in recent days about the mass killings in the city.

Local security forces and riot police officers had attempted to disperse the crowd and open the roads, but failed, residents said. Several clashes between protesters and security forces erupted between Saturday evening and Monday morning before the Guards were dispatched there.

When the Guards arrived near the entrance to a suburb, Shahrak Chamran, populated by low-income ethnic Arabs, they immediately shot without warning at dozens of men blocking the intersection, killing several on the spot, according to the residents interviewed by phone.

The residents said the other protesters scrambled to a nearby sugar cane field, and that one of them, apparently armed with an AK-47, fired back. The Guards immediately encircled the men and responded with machine gun fire, killing as many as 100 people, the residents said.

The Guards piled the dead onto the back of a truck and departed, the residents said, and relatives of the wounded then transported them to Memko Hospital.

One of the residents, a 24-year-old unemployed college graduate in chemistry who had helped organize the protests blocking the roads, said he had been less than a mile away from the mass shooting and that his best friend, also 24, and a 32-year-old cousin were among the dead.

He said they both had been shot in the chest and their bodies were returned to the families five days later, only after they had signed paperwork promising not to hold funerals or memorial services and not to give interviews to media.

The young protest organizer said he, too, was shot in the ribs on Nov. 19, the day after the mass shooting, when the Guards stormed with tanks into his neighborhood, Shahrak Taleghani, among the poorest suburbs of Mahshahr.

He said a gun battle erupted for hours between the Guards and ethnic Arab residents, who traditionally keep guns for hunting at home. Iranian state media and witnesses reported that a senior Guards commander had been killed in a Mahshahr clash. Video on Twitter suggests tanks had been deployed there.

A 32-year-old nurse in Mahshahr reached by the phone said she had tended to the wounded at the hospital and that most had sustained gunshot wounds to the head and chest.

She described chaotic scenes at the hospital, with families rushing to bring in the casualties, including a 21 year old who was to be married but could not be saved. “‘Give me back my son!,’” the nurse quoted his sobbing mother as saying. “‘It’s his wedding in two weeks!’”

The nurse said security forces stationed at the hospital arrested some of the wounded protesters after their conditions had stabilized. She said some relatives, fearing arrest themselves, dropped wounded love ones at the hospital and fled, covering their faces.

On Nov. 25, a week after it happened, the city’s representative in Parliament, Mohamad Golmordai, vented outrage in a blunt moment of searing antigovernment criticism that was broadcast on Iranian state television and captured in photos and videos uploaded to the internet.

“What have you done that the undignified Shah did not do?” Mr. Golmordai screamed from the Parliament floor, as a scuffle broke out between him and other lawmakers, including one who grabbed him by the throat.

The local reporter in Mahshahr said the total number of people killed in three days of unrest in the area had reached 130, including those killed in the field.

“This regime has pushed people toward violence,” said Yousef Alsarkhi, 29, a political activist from Khuzestan who migrated to the Netherlands four years ago. “The more they repress, the more aggressive and angry people get.”

Political analysts said the protests appeared to have delivered a severe blow to President Hassan Rouhani, a relative moderate in Iran’s political spectrum, all but guaranteeing that hard-liners would win upcoming parliamentary elections and the presidency in two years.

The tough response to the protests also appeared to signal a hardening rift between Iran’s leaders and sizable segments of the population of 83 million.

“The government’s response was uncompromising, brutal and rapid,” said Henry Rome, an Iran analyst at the Eurasia Group, a political risk consultancy in Washington. Still, he said, the protests also had “demonstrated that many Iranians are not afraid to take to the streets.”

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Klobuchar hints she’ll vote to convict Trump if impeachment trial reaches Senate

Westlake Legal Group trump-Amy-Klobuchar Klobuchar hints she'll vote to convict Trump if impeachment trial reaches Senate Nick Givas fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/media fnc article 46a31f6f-5c47-5ee6-82d5-06608d48d2e9

2020 presidential hopeful Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., will likely vote to convict President Trump if his impeachment inquiry moves to the Senate for a trial, she said during a Sunday television interview.

Klobuchar appeared on CNN’s “State of the Union,” where host Dana Bash asked her if she would consider acquiting Trump, based on the current crop of evidence.

“At this point, I don’t see that,” the Minnesota Democrat replied. “But I’m someone that wants to look at every single count. I’ve made very clear — I think this is impeachable conduct.”

She said Democrats should be ashamed of themselves if they fail to stop Trump’s reelection bid, and urged the party to embrace a bigger tent of constituents.

KLOBUCHAR CLAIMS WARREN’S HEALTH CARE PLAN WOULD KICK 149 MILLION AMERICANS OFF OF THEIR CURRENT INSURANCE

“If Donald Trump gets elected, shame on us,” Klobuchar said. “We need to bring our party together and bring with us independents and moderate Republicans, just like I’ve done in all my races where I’ve run in suburbs, rural and suburban areas.”

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She also said her fellow 2020 candidates have not appealed to suburban voters and claimed she is the only one who can bridge the gap, and come up with enough votes to beat the president.

“We need to put someone at the head of the ticket that can actually bring people with us. And I am the only one on the debate stage that has led a ticket over and over again where I have brought in suburbs, rural areas and urban areas in a big, big way,” Klobuchar said.

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“And every time I’ve led a ticket, we flipped the statehouse in my state. And I could do the same nationally. I think that matters,” she added. “I think that experience of winning and knowing how to build that coalition matters. And that is the argument I’m going to keep making.”

Westlake Legal Group trump-Amy-Klobuchar Klobuchar hints she'll vote to convict Trump if impeachment trial reaches Senate Nick Givas fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/media fnc article 46a31f6f-5c47-5ee6-82d5-06608d48d2e9   Westlake Legal Group trump-Amy-Klobuchar Klobuchar hints she'll vote to convict Trump if impeachment trial reaches Senate Nick Givas fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox news fnc/media fnc article 46a31f6f-5c47-5ee6-82d5-06608d48d2e9

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Trump’s Trade Deal Steals a Page From Democrats’ Playbook

Westlake Legal Group 00DC-USMCA1-facebookJumbo Trump’s Trade Deal Steals a Page From Democrats’ Playbook Wages and Salaries United States Politics and Government United States Trump, Donald J Organized Labor North American Free Trade Agreement Mexico Labor and Jobs International Trade and World Market House of Representatives Democratic Party Canada

WASHINGTON — House Democrats return to Washington on Monday facing a difficult choice: Should they hand President Trump a victory in the midst of a heated impeachment battle or walk away from one of the most progressive trade pacts ever negotiated by either party?

The Trump administration agreed with Canada and Mexico on revisions to the North American Free Trade Agreement one year ago, but the deal still needs the approval of Congress. A handshake agreement with the administration in the coming days would give the Democratic caucus a tangible accomplishment on an issue that has animated its base. It could also give Democrats a chance to lock in long-sought policy changes to a trade pact they criticize as prioritizing corporations over workers, laying the groundwork for future trade agreements.

Those factors have coaxed Democrats to the table at an improbable moment, when Washington is split by partisan fights and deeply divided over an impeachment inquiry. After months of talks, including through the Thanksgiving break, both sides say they’re in the final phase of negotiations. But Democrats insist the administration must make more changes to the labor, environmental and other provisions before Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California will bring legislation implementing the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement to a vote.

“By any standard, what we’ve already negotiated is substantially better than NAFTA,” said Representative Richard E. Neal of Massachusetts, who is heading the Democratic group negotiating with the administration. “Labor enforcement, in my judgment, is the last hurdle.”

The deal presents a dilemma for Democrats because it contains measures they have supported for years, from requiring more of a car’s parts to be made in North America to rolling back a special system of arbitration for corporations and strengthening Mexican labor unions.

In borrowing from the Democrats’ playbook, the revised pact reflects Mr. Trump’s populist trade approach — one that has blurred party lines and appealed to many of the blue-collar workers Democrats once counted among their base. It also reflects a broader backlash to more traditional free trade deals, which have been criticized for hollowing out American manufacturing and eliminating jobs.

“Taken as a whole, it looks more like an agreement that would’ve been negotiated under the Obama administration,” said Senator Rob Portman, Republican of Ohio and a former trade representative during the George W. Bush administration, who supports the pact. “There are some aspects to it that Democrats have been calling for, for decades.”

In fact, it goes so far to the left of traditional Republican views on trade that some congressional Republicans only grudgingly support it — or may vote against the final deal.

Senator Patrick J. Toomey of Pennsylvania, one of the most ardent Republican critics of the deal, has called the pact “a complete departure from the free trade agreements we’ve pursued through our history” and urged fellow Republicans to vote it down.

“If we adopt this agreement, it will be the first time that I know of in the history of the Republic that we will agree to a new trade agreement that is designed to diminish trade,” Mr. Toomey said at a hearing in July, sitting next to a large red sign that said: “NAFTA > U.S.M.C.A.”

Still, most Republicans have supported the pact and urged rapid action. If the deal is not approved soon, proponents fear it could become the target of more frequent attacks by Democratic presidential candidates, making it even more difficult for Democrats in Congress to vote for the pact.

Mr. Trump has spent weeks accusing Ms. Pelosi of being “grossly incompetent” and prioritizing impeachment over a trade deal that could benefit workers. “She’s incapable of moving it,” Mr. Trump said last week, warning that a “great trade deal for the farmers, manufacturers, workers of all types, including unions” could fall apart if the Democrats don’t take action.

While long demonized by Mr. Trump, Democrats and labor unions, NAFTA has become critical to companies and consumers across North America, guiding commerce around the continent for a quarter century. Entire industries have grown up around the trade agreement, which allows goods like cars, avocados and textiles to flow tariff free among Canada, Mexico and the United States.

But Mr. Trump and other critics have blamed the deal for encouraging companies to move their factories to Mexico. The president has routinely called NAFTA the “worst trade deal ever made” and promised during his campaign that he would rewrite it in America’s favor — or scrap it altogether.

The revised pact took over a year of rancorous talks to complete, resulting in a complex 2,082-page agreement covering a wide range of topics. While much of it simply updates NAFTA for the 21st century, it also contains changes intended to encourage manufacturing in the United States, including by raising how much of a car must be made in North America to qualify for zero tariffs.

The new agreement requires at least 70 percent of an automaker’s steel and aluminum to be bought in North America, which could help boost United States metal production. And 40 to 45 percent of a car’s content must be made by workers earning an average wage of $16 an hour. That $16 floor is an effort to force auto companies to either raise low wages in Mexico or hire more workers in the United States and Canada, an outcome Democrats have long supported.

It also rolls back a special system of arbitration for corporations that the Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren has criticized as allowing companies to bypass the American legal system and Trump administration officials describe as an incentive for companies to send their factories abroad.

The pact also includes, at least on paper, provisions that aim to do away with sham Mexican labor unions that have done little to help workers by requiring every company in Mexico to seek worker approval of collective bargaining agreements by secret ballot in the next four years.

Some Democrats are skeptical that the Mexican government will allocate the necessary funds to ensure that companies are complying with these changes. But if the rules are enforced, Democrats say they may help stem the flow of jobs to Mexico and put American workers on a more equal footing.

Several sticking points remain, including a provision that offers an advanced class of drugs 10 years of protection from cheaper alternatives, which Democratic lawmakers say would lock in high drug prices.

Other Democratic proposals aim to add teeth to the pact’s labor and environmental provisions. Democrats want to reverse a change made by the Trump administration that they say essentially guts NAFTA’s enforcement system. They are also arguing for additional resources that would allow customs officials to inspect factories or stop goods at the border if companies violate labor rules.

Mr. Neal told reporters late last month that he believed House Democrats could soon work out their differences with Robert Lighthizer, Mr. Trump’s trade representative.

Ms. Pelosi, who has continued to suggest that she wants to “get to yes” on the deal, responded to Mr. Trump’s rebuke last week by saying that she needed to see the administration’s commitments in writing before moving forward.

The agreement still has skeptics, including labor leaders and others on the left.

“Unless Donald Trump agrees to add stronger labor and environmental standards and enforcement, and secures progress on labor reforms in Mexico, NAFTA job outsourcing will continue,” said Lori Wallach, the director of Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch. “And the Big Pharma giveaways Trump added must go: They make U.S.M.C.A. worse than NAFTA.”

But Democrats say that if the additional changes they are seeking get made, the deal would be more progressive than the original NAFTA and the Trans-Pacific Partnership — both of which were negotiated by Democratic administrations. Mr. Trump pulled the United States out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership within days of taking office.

Jesús Seade, Mexico’s chief negotiator for the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, said many tweaks Democrats want are “improvements.”

“If the amendments suggested are acceptable improvements, then there’s no reason we should not be shaking hands next week,” he said on Friday, after meeting with Canadian officials.

Some congressional Republicans, who generally oppose unions and believe the deal’s new rules could burden auto companies, have been taken aback by how far the administration has gone to woo Democrats.

At a private lunch on June 11 at the Capitol, Republican senators peppered Vice President Mike Pence with questions about why the administration was not lobbying Democrats harder to back the deal. Mr. Pence claimed that it already had the support of 80 Democrats, a high number that caught some Republicans by surprise, according to a person familiar with the meeting who spoke on condition of anonymity.

“What’s in it for Pelosi?” asked Senator Ben Sasse, Republican of Nebraska.

Mr. Pence responded that the pact had the most aggressive labor and automotive standards ever put in a trade agreement — an admission for some Republicans in the room that it was the worst trade agreement they had been asked to support.

Jennifer Hillman, a trade expert at the Council on Foreign Relations, said many of Mr. Lighthizer and Mr. Trump’s views on trade “are basically borrowing what Democrats have said for many, many years.”

“To the extent that Trump gained votes in the industrial Midwest, it was by espousing Democratic trade ideas,” she said.

Throughout the negotiations, Mr. Lighthizer has kept up a steady dialogue with labor unions like the United Steelworkers and Democrats like Ms. Pelosi, Mr. Neal and Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio. At times, Mr. Lighthizer appeared more at odds with congressional Republicans and traditional allies like the Chamber of Commerce, who he said should give up “a little bit of the sugar” that had sweetened trade agreements for multinational corporations.

“If you can get some labor unions on board, Democrats on board, mainstream Republicans on board, I think you can get big numbers,” Mr. Lighthizer said in January 2018. “If you do, that’s going to change the way all of us look at these kind of deals.”

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Pro-Trump model Elizabeth Pipko talks politics: Girls ‘can do anything they want to’

Elizabeth Pipko has opened up about her conservative political views.

The former model, 24, spoke with Fox News about working with people who aren’t afraid of her views.

“I’m really excited that someone was able to put political views aside and see me as someone who is much more than just what the media wants people to think a conservative woman can be,” she said.

MODEL ELIZABETH PIPKO DOUBLES DOWN ON EFFORTS TO ENCOURAGE JEWS TO LEAVE DEMOCRATIC PARTY WITH EXODUS MOVEMENT

Westlake Legal Group Pipko-1 Pro-Trump model Elizabeth Pipko talks politics: Girls 'can do anything they want to' Nate Day fox-news/style-and-beauty/modeling fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc c34c916f-5a14-5079-9084-a28aa3a8e53e article

Elizabeth Pipko, Founder of The Exodus Movement (Photos by Nayo Martinez For QP Mag)

Pipko became a professional model at just 17, which she stuck with for four years.

In January of this year, Pipko revealed on “Fox & Friends” that she is in favor of President Trump, saying she “couldn’t tell anyone” about her alignment for fear of it derailing her career.

Pipko explained that she worked full time on Trump’s 2016 campaign.

“I think it was just time for me to defend myself, my choice for supporting the president, defend all the millions of Americans who also support him as well as defend the president because I don’t think enough people are doing that,” Pipko said of announcing her support.

“(Trump) made me feel I had a voice and I was appreciated by someone and I never felt that way in politics before,” she said. “I just thought it was time I got involved and showed other young people that it was important for our country and for our future.”

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Pipko posing for QPmag in 2019 (Photos by Nayo Martinez For QP Mag)

MODEL HID TRUMP SUPPORT OUT OF FEAR IT WOULD KILL HER CAREER: ‘I COULDN’T TELL ANYONE’

Now, Pipko has transitioned away from modeling and into political activism, having founded The Exodus Movement, an organization that encourages Jewish individuals to abandon left-leaning policial views.

“[The Exodus Movement is] hoping to inspire Jews, and I think all people actually, to vote with their conscience and their beliefs and not with any fears whatsoever,” Pipko told Fox News. “I think the further the Democrats shift to the left, the harder it is for any religious person, I think, to align with them.”

She also said she believes that Democrats fail to condemn anti-Semitism and promote the idea that any religious affiliation is wrong.

Westlake Legal Group Pipko-3 Pro-Trump model Elizabeth Pipko talks politics: Girls 'can do anything they want to' Nate Day fox-news/style-and-beauty/modeling fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc c34c916f-5a14-5079-9084-a28aa3a8e53e article

Elizabeth Pipko, 24, left the world of modeling in favor of activism after announcing support for President Trump. (Photos by Nayo Martinez For QP Mag)

“Any time you turn on the TV, you’re told that you’re wrong if you disagree with what [the Democrats are] telling you. You’re told that you’re wrong if you’re religious in any way and I thought it was time to unite those people.”

In addition to working with The Exodus Movement, Pipko is working to inspire young women around the globe.

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“This is about showing young girls that they can do anything they want to do. From modeling to politics and everything in between,” she said.

Westlake Legal Group elizabeth-pipko-NY-POST Pro-Trump model Elizabeth Pipko talks politics: Girls 'can do anything they want to' Nate Day fox-news/style-and-beauty/modeling fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc c34c916f-5a14-5079-9084-a28aa3a8e53e article   Westlake Legal Group elizabeth-pipko-NY-POST Pro-Trump model Elizabeth Pipko talks politics: Girls 'can do anything they want to' Nate Day fox-news/style-and-beauty/modeling fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc c34c916f-5a14-5079-9084-a28aa3a8e53e article

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University graduate Saskia Jones, 23, identified as second London Bridge attack victim

A recent University of Cambridge graduate has been named as the second victim killed in the London Bridge stabbing that left three others injured and the jihadist assailant shot dead by police.

Saskia Jones, 23, was killed along with a fellow University of Cambridge graduate, 25-year-old Jack Merritt, whose death had already been reported by his family following the Friday attack, Metropolitan Police said Sunday in a news release.

NARWHAL TUSK-WIELDING CHEF HELPED SUBDUE LONDON BRIDGE ATTACKER; VICTIM IDENTIFIED

“Saskia was a funny, kind, positive influence at the center of many people’s lives,” her family said. “She had a wonderful sense of mischievous fun and was generous to the point of always wanting to see the best in all people.”

Westlake Legal Group saskia-jones-1 University graduate Saskia Jones, 23, identified as second London Bridge attack victim Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/terrorism fox news fnc/world fnc dae54f1e-083c-5db9-a8ab-7ff7d85fe2e1 article

Jones was named Sunday as the second victim killed in the attack. (Family photo/London’s Metropolitan Police via AP)

Jones’ family described her as having “a great passion for providing invaluable support to victims of criminal injustice, which led her to the point of recently applying for the police graduate recruitment program.” The family said she wanted to specialize in victim support.

Merritt’s family said of their son in Sunday’s news release that he “lived his principles; he believed in redemption and rehabilitation, not revenge, and he always took the side of the underdog.”

Westlake Legal Group jack-merritt-1 University graduate Saskia Jones, 23, identified as second London Bridge attack victim Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/terrorism fox news fnc/world fnc dae54f1e-083c-5db9-a8ab-7ff7d85fe2e1 article

Merritt was identified by his family on Saturday. (Family photo/London’s Metropolitan Police via AP)

They said Merritt “died doing what he loved, surrounded by people he loved and who loved him.”

Jones and Merritt were both involved in the Learning Together program. They were attending an event designed to bring graduate students and prisoners together to study criminology in an effort to reduce stigma and marginalization experienced by many inmates.

Westlake Legal Group saskia-jones-2 University graduate Saskia Jones, 23, identified as second London Bridge attack victim Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/terrorism fox news fnc/world fnc dae54f1e-083c-5db9-a8ab-7ff7d85fe2e1 article

Jones was a graduate of the University of Cambridge. She was a volunteer in a program meant to bring graduate students and prisoners together. (Family photo/London’s Metropolitan Police via AP)

The event was meant to celebrate the program’s fifth year, but was “instead disrupted by an unspeakable criminal act,” university Vice Chancellor Stephen Toope told The Associated Press.

Three others, who have not been named, were wounded in the attack. One of the wounded was identified as a university staff member. Police said one of the three has returned home while the other two remained in stable condition at a hospital.

Westlake Legal Group jack-merritt-3 University graduate Saskia Jones, 23, identified as second London Bridge attack victim Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/terrorism fox news fnc/world fnc dae54f1e-083c-5db9-a8ab-7ff7d85fe2e1 article

Merritt, pictured right, of Cottenham, Cambridgeshire, was a coordinator in the Learning Together program. (Family photo/London’s Metropolitan Police via AP)

The attacker, convicted terrorist Usman Khan who secured an early release from prison, was apparently attending the event and had returned for the afternoon session when he began his stabbing rampage.

BORIS JOHNSON SAYS 74 CONVICTED TERRORISTS RELEASED FROM PRISON WILL HAVE LICENSE CONDITIONS REVIEWED

He was shot dead by police after he was restrained by civilians, including a chef who fought off the attacker with an ornamental 5-foot narwhal tusk and another who brandished a fire extinguisher.

Following the attack, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson argued that the early release of Khan was a “mistake.”

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Johnson told the BBC on Sunday that 74 convicted terrorists released early from prison in the United Kingdom will have their license conditions reviewed.

Fox News’ Robert Gearty and David Aaro and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group saskia-jones-1 University graduate Saskia Jones, 23, identified as second London Bridge attack victim Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/terrorism fox news fnc/world fnc dae54f1e-083c-5db9-a8ab-7ff7d85fe2e1 article   Westlake Legal Group saskia-jones-1 University graduate Saskia Jones, 23, identified as second London Bridge attack victim Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/terrorism fox news fnc/world fnc dae54f1e-083c-5db9-a8ab-7ff7d85fe2e1 article

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MSNBC’s ‘AM Joy’ is ‘deeply sorry’ for using picture of white supremacist instead of former Navy secretary

Westlake Legal Group Richard-Spencer-supremacist-navy MSNBC's 'AM Joy' is 'deeply sorry' for using picture of white supremacist instead of former Navy secretary Nick Givas fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 130d1af8-437b-5eba-9022-2c9faea8f014

MSNBC’s “AM Joy” mistakenly used a picture of white supremacist Richard Spencer during a Sunday segment, about the former secretary of the Navy who shares the same name.

Spencer was fired from his post last Sunday, after a public disagreement with President Trump over the Eddie Gallagher Navy SEAL Trident case. Spencer supported further disciplinary action against Gallagher after he was cleared of war crimes, and moved to have his Trident pin taken away. Trump stepped in and said he would prevent that from happening, which led to Spencer’s removal.

“CORRECTION: Earlier on #AMJoy as we were talking about former Navy secretary Richard Spencer we mistakenly showed the wrong image of white supremacist Richard Spencer,” host Joy Reid tweeted. “We are very, deeply sorry for that mistake.”

Spencer spoke out about his firing on Wednesday for the first time in an op-ed for the Washington Post and wrote that Trump was out of touch with military standards and practices.

“This was a shocking and unprecedented intervention in a low-level review. It was also a reminder that the president has very little understanding of what it means to be in the military, to fight ethically or to be governed by a uniform set of rules and practices,” he wrote.

EX-MSNBC HOST SAYS NETWORK IS ‘SHAMELESS’ IN COVERAGE OF SANDERS, YANG, GABBARD

Gallagher was found not guilty in July, of murder and premeditated murder but was convicted of a lesser charge of posing for a photo with an Islamic State (ISIS) fighter’s corpse during a deployment to Iraq in 2017.

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Spencer ended his article by claiming almost all members of the U.S. armed forces make the right decision, nearly 100 percent of the time, and shouldn’t be judged by the actions of the minority.

“More importantly, Americans need to know that 99.9 percent of our uniformed members always have, always are and always will make the right decision,” he wrote. “Our allies need to know that we remain a force for good, and to please bear with us as we move through this moment in time.”

Fox News’ Melissa Leon contributed to this piece

Westlake Legal Group Richard-Spencer-supremacist-navy MSNBC's 'AM Joy' is 'deeply sorry' for using picture of white supremacist instead of former Navy secretary Nick Givas fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 130d1af8-437b-5eba-9022-2c9faea8f014   Westlake Legal Group Richard-Spencer-supremacist-navy MSNBC's 'AM Joy' is 'deeply sorry' for using picture of white supremacist instead of former Navy secretary Nick Givas fox-news/tech/topics/us-navy fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 130d1af8-437b-5eba-9022-2c9faea8f014

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Fmr. Trump Official Says Gallagher Decision Shows ‘Little To No Understanding’ Of Military

Westlake Legal Group 5de3fe4e2500005827d2ec6a Fmr. Trump Official Says Gallagher Decision Shows ‘Little To No Understanding’ Of Military

A retired Marine colonel and former press secretary for the Department of Homeland Security sharply criticized President Donald Trump on Sunday for meddling in the military’s chain of command “in an unprecedented way” by reinstating the rank of a Navy SEAL who was convicted of a war crime.

Appearing on ABC’s “This Week,” former Col. David Lapan told co-host Martha Raddatz that Trump showed “very little to no understanding of the military that he professes to love” when he defied senior military personnel and reinstated Chief Petty Officer Eddie Gallagher last month. Lapan served as DHS secretary as recently as 2017 and is currently vice president of communications at the Bipartisan Policy Center, a think tank. His biography on the center’s website credits him with over 30 years of military service. 

On Nov. 24, Navy Secretary Richard Spencer was fired after trying to convince Trump not to involve himself in Gallagher’s disciplinary proceedings.  

Gallagher was found guilty of posing for photographs with the corpse of a member of the so-called Islamic State. He was also accused of killing that fighter, as well as shooting at civilians and threatening to kill SEALs who reported him, but he was acquitted of those charges.

Gallagher has become a darling of the conservative movement. Trump has sent several tweets mentioning him by name, and Gallagher has made numerous appearances across right-wing media to tell his story and promote a conservative clothing line. 

Lapan was joined in his “This Week” interview by retired Navy Cmdr. Kirk Lippold and Kyleanne Hunter, a former Marine Corps officer who currently works at the gun control organization Brady. Lippold supported Trump’s involvement in the Gallagher case; Hunter did not.

Watch the full clip from “This Week” below: 

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