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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 147)

Bahamas Cruise Line Offers Free Evacuations For Those Stranded By Hurricane Dorian

Westlake Legal Group 5d71e08f2500007f16064d06 Bahamas Cruise Line Offers Free Evacuations For Those Stranded By Hurricane Dorian

People stranded by Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas will soon be able to board a free ride to safety. 

The Grand Celebration cruise liner will shuttle food and water supplies, volunteers, first responders and evacuees to Grand Bahama Island on Thursday evening.

The Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line told CNN it would offer Bahamians a free journey back to Florida on Friday provided they have proper documents. The Palm Beach Post reported that anyone with a valid passport or visa would be allowed to evacuate on the ship.

“We felt like we had to do this for the people of the Bahamas and the island of Grand Bahama, especially given our history with the island,” CEO Oneil Khosa told CNN.

The cruise ship will reportedly be the first ship allowed to dock at Freeport to deliver personnel and supplies before making the journey back to Florida with evacuees. The boat can carry up to 1,900 people. 

In 2017, the Federal Emergency Management Agency chartered the same ship to assist with Hurricane Irma relief. 

The Royal Caribbean and Norwegian cruise lines are also assisting with relief efforts, delivering provisions and donations to the islands. Both liners will donate at least $1 million to relief efforts, according to news releases.

Bahamas Paradise has requested donations of items, including canned food, water, first-aid kits, hygiene products and mosquito repellant, which can be dropped off at its Florida warehouse in Riviera Beach.

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Robert Mugabe, Veteran President Of Zimbabwe, Dead At 95

Zimbabwe’s longtime president Robert Mugabe has died. He was 95. Mugabe’s death was announced by the office of Zimbabwe’s president.

Mugabe came to power at independence from Britain in 1980, after a guerrilla war ended white-minority rule in then-Rhodesia. He was heralded as a model leader — but that image steadily eroded over time as his leadership became more authoritarian. Democracy, the rule of law and the economy suffered.

The start of a new era

When Robert Mugabe took the oath of office in April 1980, there were high hopes for Africa’s newest nation. He was hailed as a pragmatic African leader.

Representing Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Charles echoed a feeling shared around the globe when he said, “Today is a moment of immense historic significance, a rare occasion in lives of nations, where a new and greater beginning is possible, which we must not allow to fail.”

Robert Gabriel Mugabe was born in 1924 in Zvimba, southwest of the capital (which was then called Salisbury, and is now Harare).

Westlake Legal Group 3334476_custom-904b91baefeef300b372a8775c4bf781dacb4b4f-s800-c15 Robert Mugabe, Veteran President Of Zimbabwe, Dead At 95

Mugabe, shown in 1976, was regarded as a hero in his younger days, but over the decades his leadership became increasingly authoritarian. Under his watch, Zimbabwe suffered runaway inflation, mass unemployment and chronic food, water, electricity and fuel shortages Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Keystone/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Robert Mugabe, Veteran President Of Zimbabwe, Dead At 95

Mugabe, shown in 1976, was regarded as a hero in his younger days, but over the decades his leadership became increasingly authoritarian. Under his watch, Zimbabwe suffered runaway inflation, mass unemployment and chronic food, water, electricity and fuel shortages

Keystone/Getty Images

Educated by Jesuit priests, he became a teacher before joining the liberation struggle. Mugabe, the intellectual — with his many academic degrees — was considered the political leader and the brains behind the guerrilla war, and was imprisoned for 11 years.

Mugabe preached a message of harmony and promised to pursue a policy of inclusion for all Zimbabweans. In 1980, he said, “The phase we are entering, the phase of independence should be regarded as a phase conferring upon all of us — the people of Zimbabwe — whether we are black or white — full sovereignty, full democratic rights.”

From optimism to violence

Fast-forward 20 years and the flowering of an opposition movement. Mugabe tasted defeat for the first time in 2000, in a referendum on constitutional reform. The situation soured.

That same year, he encouraged the often violent seizure of thousands of flourishing, white-owned industrial farms. Gone was Zimbabwe’s reputation as the breadbasket of southern Africa.

Mugabe blamed the nation’s woes on the British and Zimbabwe’s white farmers, who openly supported the new opposition Movement for Democratic Change, the MDC party.

“The MDC opposition, formed at the behest of Britain in 1999, is now on an evil crusade of dividing our people on political lines,” Mugabe said at the time, “as they continue to fan and sponsor heinous acts of political violence, targeting innocent citizens.”

But pro-Mugabe political thugs were accused of muzzling the opposition, using brutal tactics. Criticized for rigging earlier votes, the president lost the first round of elections in 2008. But, before the second round, Mugabe’s militants — and loyalists within the security services — unleashed a wave of violence, leaving an estimated 200 people dead.

The opposition leader, Morgan Tsvangirai, pulled out of the runoff, and Mugabe cruised to victory. But he ruled over a diminished Zimbabwe. The U.S. and the European Union had already imposed sanctions on his inner circle. Mugabe tore into then-British prime minister, Tony Blair.

“We belong to this continent, Africa. We don’t mind having and bearing sanctions banning us from Europe. We are not Europeans,” Mugabe said. “We have not asked for any inch of Europe. … So, Blair — keep your England and let me keep my Zimbabwe.”

Westlake Legal Group ap157982150204_custom-d0dc2a0e375a1585f1b09d0c1cd44721fdd178fd-s1100-c15 Robert Mugabe, Veteran President Of Zimbabwe, Dead At 95

Robert Mugabe, shown at Zimbabwe’s 34th annual independence celebrations in 2014, led the nation from its independence in 1980 until 2017. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Robert Mugabe, Veteran President Of Zimbabwe, Dead At 95

Robert Mugabe, shown at Zimbabwe’s 34th annual independence celebrations in 2014, led the nation from its independence in 1980 until 2017.

Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP

A tarnished legacy

Under Mugabe’s watch, Zimbabwe suffered runaway inflation, mass unemployment and chronic food, water, electricity and fuel shortages. Hospitals stopped functioning. Forced into a power-sharing deal, Mugabe remained president while his political foe, Tsvangirai, became prime minister in a testy political marriage.

Reflecting on his legacy, in an interview with South Africa’s Dali Tambo in 2013, Mugabe remained defiant and unrepentant.

“If people say you are a dictator … they are saying this merely to tarnish you and diminish and demean your status,” he said. “My people still need me and when people still need you to lead them, it’s not time, sir, doesn’t matter how old you are, to say goodbye.”

Mugabe did not yield to his critics, says veteran Zimbabwean journalist and commentator Cris Chinaka.

“The legacy of Mugabe’s life will be one of a leader with so much, but [who] missed so many opportunities,” he says. “One who opened up so much but never used the knowledge he had for his own people — a national leader who ruined his own country.”

Many Zimbabweans remember the brutal campaign by Mugabe’s forces to crush an armed uprising in Matabeleland soon after independence, or him goading the security forces decades later to “bash” the political opposition, because his political adversaries deserved “to be bashed.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

San Francisco’s branding of NRA as terror organization panned by Washington Post, LA Times

Westlake Legal Group wayne-lapierre San Francisco's branding of NRA as terror organization panned by Washington Post, LA Times fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/terror fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson bd54de5b-3245-59a1-95bc-00669554b5e3 article

Two columnists on opposite coasts didn’t mince words Thursday in disagreeing with a San Francisco Board of Supervisors resolution labeling the National Rifle Association a domestic terrorist organization.

Los Angeles Times columnist Michael McGough said the label may be good politics but is “irresponsible.”

“It’s not the business of a county board of supervisors to designate terror organizations,” he wrote, adding that it’s also a First Amendment concern if officials try to blacklist contractors who work with the NRA.

“It’s not the business of a county board of supervisors to designate terror organizations.”

— Michael McGough, Los Angeles Times columnist

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICIALS BRAND NRA A ‘DOMESTIC TERRORIST ORGANIZATION’

Washington Post columnist Henry Olsen called the resolution “McCarthyism: pure and simple.”

“Words matter,” he wrote, “and there are few words that stigmatize a person faster than calling him or her a terrorist.”

He said that for the NRA is be a terrorist organization, it would have to “intentionally encourage and support the use of violent attacks on U.S. citizens with the intent of creating general fear so as to force submission to its political agenda.”

“The NRA clearly does not do that,” he said, sarcastically adding, “Congratulations, average NRA member: Your $30 one-year membership makes you a terrorist.”

He called the resolution “slanderous” and “harmful” and said it worsens the already toxic political environment.

He wrote that Republicans are often asked to call out outrageous comments made by those on the right and now liberals must do the same.

“Democrats should immediately denounce the San Francisco board for its insulting and unconstitutional resolution,” he said in closing.

“Democrats should immediately denounce the San Francisco board for its insulting and unconstitutional resolution.”

— Henry Olsen, Washington Post columnist

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The board passed the resolution Tuesday, urging the federal government to do the same after a recent spate of mass shootings across the country.

Westlake Legal Group wayne-lapierre San Francisco's branding of NRA as terror organization panned by Washington Post, LA Times fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/terror fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson bd54de5b-3245-59a1-95bc-00669554b5e3 article   Westlake Legal Group wayne-lapierre San Francisco's branding of NRA as terror organization panned by Washington Post, LA Times fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/terror fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Brie Stimson bd54de5b-3245-59a1-95bc-00669554b5e3 article

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Laura Ingraham: Democrats’ policy proposals prove they are ‘control freaks’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083917738001_6083918226001-vs Laura Ingraham: Democrats' policy proposals prove they are 'control freaks' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 014280f0-a100-5a64-8beb-bab518275999

Laura Ingraham called Democrats “control freaks” Thursday night, saying the policies they’ve proposed this week — in particular at Wednesday night’s CNN climate change town hall — show just that.

“We see that liberals are no longer determined to raise your standard of living. They are determined to control nearly every aspect of your life,” Ingraham said on “The Ingraham Angle.”

“Liberals are no longer determined to raise your standard of living. They are determined to control nearly every aspect of your life.”

— Laura Ingraham

KAMALA HARRIS SAYS SHE SUPPORTS PLASTIC STRAW BAN DURING CNN CLIMATE CHANGE MARATHON

Ingraham put forth that if Democrats instate any item on their climate change agenda, America would suffer. She ripped Democrats for pushing against America’s energy independence, saying their plans would hurt the middle class and poor by affecting gas prices.

“If Democrats have their way and they follow the U.N.’s lead, all Americans could be paying a hell of a lot more,” Ingraham said. “And of course the rich, though, they wouldn’t really feel that gas prices … Middle America will feel it all.”

Ingraham added, “These Democrat control freaks, they don’t want you to be independent. They want you to be dependent on the crumbs that the government doles out.”

“These Democrat control freaks, they don’t want you to be independent. They want you to be dependent on the crumbs that the government doles out.”

— Laura Ingraham

The Fox News host also took aim at Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders for supporting taxpayer-funded programs to administer abortions in developing countries and give women access to birth control — in order to deal with population growth.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“State-planned families, a modified one-child policy. Got it,” Ingraham said in response to Sanders.

“No sacrifice is too great as long as it’s mostly on the shoulders the poor and the middle class. And liberals have the gall … to call Trump a tyrant.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083917738001_6083918226001-vs Laura Ingraham: Democrats' policy proposals prove they are 'control freaks' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 014280f0-a100-5a64-8beb-bab518275999   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083917738001_6083918226001-vs Laura Ingraham: Democrats' policy proposals prove they are 'control freaks' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 014280f0-a100-5a64-8beb-bab518275999

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Sarah Sanders plans memoir about her time as Trump’s press secretary; release set for late 2020

Former White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders is writing a memoir reflecting on her two-year tenure working for the Trump administration that is expected to be released in the fall of 2020, her publisher, St. Martin’s Press, announced Thursday.

The book, which has yet to receive a title, will be about “the most dramatic and challenging moments” during her time in the White House and will address “the media, family, faith, and performing an all-consuming and highly visible job while raising her young family,” according to a news release.

FOX NEWS SIGNS SARAH HUCKABEE SANDERS TO PROVIDE POLITICAL COMMENTARY

Westlake Legal Group red-hen-sanders-2 Sarah Sanders plans memoir about her time as Trump's press secretary; release set for late 2020 fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/arkansas fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/sarah-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 4eab9a8b-6cfd-5982-b99e-b5921cc5438b

Sarah Sanders is seen in the White House briefing room during her former role as White House press secretary, June 14, 2018. (Associated Press)

“From Arkansas to the White House and back, I’m excited to tell my story about the challenges of being a working mom at the highest level of American politics, and my role in the historic fight raging between the Trump administration and its critics for the future of our country,” Sanders said in a statement.

“From Arkansas to the White House and back, I’m excited to tell my story about the challenges of being a working mom at the highest level of American politics, and my role in the historic fight raging between the Trump administration and its critics for the future of our country.”

— Sarah Sanders, former White House press secretary

George White, editor-in-chief of St. Martin’s Press, added that the book “will offer a truly unique perspective on the most important issues, events, and both public and behind-the-scenes conversations inside the White House.”

Sanders worked on Trump’s presidential campaign before succeeding Sean Spicer as White House press secretary in July 2017. During her tenure, she was known for her contentious relationship with the Whites House press corps and eventually ended the decades-old tradition of formal daily White House press briefings, instead arranging for Trump to address reporters himself, the New York Times reported.

She stepped down from the role in June, and Stephanie Grisham was named to take her place. Announcing her departure, Trump tweeted that Sanders was “a very special person with extraordinary talents.” “We’ve been through a lot together. She’s tough and she’s good,” Trump said on stage at a separate White House event. Trump also called her a “warrior” and encouraged her to run for governor in Arkansas in 2022, a position once held by her father, Mike Huckabee.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Sanders launched a campaign-style website in August that features a lengthy bio and photos of her with President Trump but has yet to officially announce a bid for governor, Politico reported. She joined Fox News as a contributor this month.

Westlake Legal Group sarah-sanders Sarah Sanders plans memoir about her time as Trump's press secretary; release set for late 2020 fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/arkansas fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/sarah-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 4eab9a8b-6cfd-5982-b99e-b5921cc5438b   Westlake Legal Group sarah-sanders Sarah Sanders plans memoir about her time as Trump's press secretary; release set for late 2020 fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/arkansas fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/sarah-sanders fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 4eab9a8b-6cfd-5982-b99e-b5921cc5438b

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Biden Defends Attending Fundraiser Co-Hosted By Founder Of Fossil Fuel Company

Westlake Legal Group 5d71d70e3b0000ea55d01af5 Biden Defends Attending Fundraiser Co-Hosted By Founder Of Fossil Fuel Company

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden defended his decision to attend a fundraiser Thursday co-hosted by a founder of a liquefied natural gas company, saying he was still committed to the No Fossil Fuel Money Pledge despite criticisms from environmental groups.

“I just want to be very clear to everyone here: I am committed to not raising money from fossil fuel executives, and I am not doing that tonight,” Biden told a group of donors at the event in Manhattan on Thursday evening, according to a pool report. “Climate change presents an existential threat, and it is real .… I’m so tired of having a president who picks fiction over science.” 

The former vice president’s comments came a day after he was asked by an audience member during CNN’s climate change town hall event about his scheduled appearance, which was first reported by CNBC and The Intercept.

The fundraiser was co-hosted by Andrew Goldman, the co-founder of a Houston-based natural gas company called Western LNG. Goldman no longer has any day-to-day responsibilities at the company but is listed on Western LNG’s leadership page. He also co-founded an investment group that funded projects related to “natural resources and energy,” in part.

Goldman has close ties to the Biden campaign and was an adviser to the candidate when he was in the Senate.

“What I was told by my staff is he did not have any responsibility relating to the company,” Biden said Wednesday when asked about his ties to Goldman. “He was not on the board, he was not involved at all in the operation of the company at all. But if that turns out to be true, I will not in any way accept his help. We check every single contribution.”

Biden signed the fossil fuel pledge in June, promising not to accept any campaign contributions over $200 from PACs, lobbyists or fossil fuel executives named by the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The Biden campaign aggressively defended itself after the question made the rounds on social media, saying the characterization was “factually incorrect” and that he hadn’t violated the pledge. Biden’s team did not immediately respond to a request for comment on his remarks Thursday.

But, as HuffPost’s Chris D’Angelo noted this week, the argument about what constitutes an “executive” is largely semantic. The Sunrise Movement, a youth-led coalition of environmental activists who helped garner support for the Green New Deal, said Biden’s engagement with Goldman “clearly violates the spirit” of the pledge. 

The fundraiser on Thursday drew a small contingent of protesters who chanted “No fossil fuel money!” and “Hey hey, hey, Joe, fracked gas has got to go.”

Climate change has become one of the key issues of the 2020 presidential race, and many of the Democratic candidates have unveiled detailed, trillion-dollar plans to address the crisis should they unseat President Donald Trump. Biden initially faced criticism amid reports that he was planning to unveil a “middle ground” approach to the issue but responded with his own policy based on the Green New Deal that would decarbonize the U.S. economy by 2050.

Biden’s plan only addresses fossil fuels in vague terms, but he has received a B+ rating from Greenpeace and support from 350 Action and Data for Progress for his stance on climate issues.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

CNN’s Don Lemon defends importance of ‘Sharpiegate’ coverage: ‘This is a news story’

Westlake Legal Group Don-Lemon-Chris-Cuomo-CNN CNN's Don Lemon defends importance of 'Sharpiegate' coverage: 'This is a news story' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 09edc6cd-aa16-56e4-8bd5-155a7ea7b82d

CNN anchor Don Lemon offered a passionate defense of what he had referred to as “Sharpiegate,” the controversy of the Hurricane Dorian map President Trump presented in the White House that included a marking near Alabama on a map of the storm’s projected path.

Trump has been criticized for tweeting Sunday morning that Alabama was among the states expected to be affected by the hurricane. Forecasts at the time from the National Weather Service, however, projected that the state would be spared.

The president has since doubled down both on Twitter and in the White House, where he had a map displayed showing the trajectory of Dorian with an extension drawn with a black Sharpie so that it included a portion of Alabama.

CNN BLAMING TRUMP? ON-SCREEN GRAPHIC SAYS PRESIDENT DEFENDED DORIAN MAP ‘AS PEOPLE DIE’

On CNN, Lemon defended the heightened attention the controversy has gotten.

“You know, I hear the president’s apologists saying, ‘Oh, it’s petty. You shouldn’t be focusing on it.’ No, this is a news story,” Lemon began. “This is the president of the United States and if you can’t trust what’s coming out of the president of the United States’ mouth, then where are we? Who are we, especially as journalists? Why wouldn’t we cover that? You’re supposed to be able to trust the president. … Accurate information should be coming from the highest office in the land instead of doubling down on what, quite frankly, is not the truth.”

Lemon’s colleague Chris Cuomo piled on the president, insisting the “bar” for credibility from the White House is low and that Trump has “put himself first” over all other considerations as he performs his duties.

Cuomo then blasted White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham for going after CNN over a botched graphic in which the network mislabeled Alabama as “Mississippi.”

Cuomo said there was “irony” in Grisham pointing out a CNN flub when her boss is a “gaffe machine.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Here’s the thing… nobody’s perfect. No organization is perfect. When we make a mistake, what do we do? We say ‘We made a mistake, we’re sorry’ and we correct it.” Lemon responded. “Simple as that. That is the big difference. If you’re the president of the United States … ‘I made a mistake… my bad. There’s a lot going on… let’s move on.’ We would not be talking about it right now.”

Westlake Legal Group Don-Lemon-Chris-Cuomo-CNN CNN's Don Lemon defends importance of 'Sharpiegate' coverage: 'This is a news story' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 09edc6cd-aa16-56e4-8bd5-155a7ea7b82d   Westlake Legal Group Don-Lemon-Chris-Cuomo-CNN CNN's Don Lemon defends importance of 'Sharpiegate' coverage: 'This is a news story' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 09edc6cd-aa16-56e4-8bd5-155a7ea7b82d

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Biden Defends Attending Fundraiser Co-Hosted By Founder Of Fossil Fuel Company

Westlake Legal Group 5d71d70e3b0000ea55d01af5 Biden Defends Attending Fundraiser Co-Hosted By Founder Of Fossil Fuel Company

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden defended his decision to attend a fundraiser Thursday co-hosted by a founder of a liquefied natural gas company, saying he was still committed to the No Fossil Fuel Money Pledge despite criticisms from environmental groups.

“I just want to be very clear to everyone here: I am committed to not raising money from fossil fuel executives, and I am not doing that tonight,” Biden told a group of donors at the event in Manhattan on Thursday evening, according to a pool report. “Climate change presents an existential threat, and it is real .… I’m so tired of having a president who picks fiction over science.” 

The former vice president’s comments came a day after he was asked by an audience member during CNN’s climate change town hall event about his scheduled appearance, which was first reported by CNBC and The Intercept.

The fundraiser was co-hosted by Andrew Goldman, the co-founder of a Houston-based natural gas company called Western LNG. Goldman no longer has any day-to-day responsibilities at the company but is listed on Western LNG’s leadership page. He also co-founded an investment group that funded projects related to “natural resources and energy,” in part.

Goldman has close ties to the Biden campaign and was an adviser to the candidate when he was in the Senate.

“What I was told by my staff is he did not have any responsibility relating to the company,” Biden said Wednesday when asked about his ties to Goldman. “He was not on the board, he was not involved at all in the operation of the company at all. But if that turns out to be true, I will not in any way accept his help. We check every single contribution.”

Biden signed the fossil fuel pledge in June, promising not to accept any campaign contributions over $200 from PACs, lobbyists or fossil fuel executives named by the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The Biden campaign aggressively defended itself after the question made the rounds on social media, saying the characterization was “factually incorrect” and that he hadn’t violated the pledge. Biden’s team did not immediately respond to a request for comment on his remarks Thursday.

But, as HuffPost’s Chris D’Angelo noted this week, the argument about what constitutes an “executive” is largely semantic. The Sunrise Movement, a youth-led coalition of environmental activists who helped garner support for the Green New Deal, said Biden’s engagement with Goldman “clearly violates the spirit” of the pledge. 

The fundraiser on Thursday drew a small contingent of protesters who chanted “No fossil fuel money!” and “Hey hey, hey, Joe, fracked gas has got to go.”

Climate change has become one of the key issues of the 2020 presidential race, and many of the Democratic candidates have unveiled detailed, trillion-dollar plans to address the crisis should they unseat President Donald Trump. Biden initially faced criticism amid reports that he was planning to unveil a “middle ground” approach to the issue but responded with his own policy based on the Green New Deal that would decarbonize the U.S. economy by 2050.

Biden’s plan only addresses fossil fuels in vague terms, but he has received a B+ rating from Greenpeace and support from 350 Action and Data for Progress for his stance on climate issues.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

American Airlines mechanic charged with trying to sabotage Miami flight amid labor dispute

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close American Airlines mechanic charged with trying to sabotage Miami flight amid labor dispute

American Airlines gives a peek into its new process to clean and restock its planes so you can depart on time. Sean Logan, The Republic | azcentral.com

American Airlines’ nasty labor dispute with its mechanics escalated from major summer travel annoyance to scary situation Thursday when a mechanic was arrested for allegedly trying to sabotage a July flight with 150 people on board.

Abdul-Majeed Marouf Ahmed Alani, a mechanic at American’s Miami hub, was charged with “willfully damaging, destroying, disabling, or wrecking an aircraft” in a criminal complaint filed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida in Miami.

The tampering was discovered after American pilots got an error message on Flight 2834 from Miami to Nassau, Bahamas, on July 17 and aborted takeoff. The plane was taken out of service.

Surveillance footage shows Alani at the gate before the flight and the complaint says he deliberately obstructed the ADM (air data module) system using a dark, Styrofoam-type material.

Alani told law enforcement officials he was “upset at the stalled contract dispute between the union workers and American Airlines, and that this dispute had affected him financially.”

Alani said he did not intend to harm the plane or passengers. He said he tampered with the plane to cause a flight delay or cancellation in hopes of earning overtime, the complaint says.

American Airlines spokesman Ross Feinstein issued this statement late Thursday in response to the criminal complaint: 

“On July 17, flight 2834 from Miami to Nassau, Bahamas, returned to the gate due to a maintenance issue. Passengers boarded a new aircraft which then re-departed for Nassau. At American we have an unwavering commitment to the safety and security of our customers and team members and we are taking this matter very seriously. At the time of the incident, the aircraft was taken out of service, maintenance was performed and after an inspection to ensure it was safe the aircraft was returned to service. American immediately notified federal law enforcement who took over the investigation with our full cooperation.”

American filed a lawsuit in May against its mechanics unions, saying a concerted work slowdown caused thousands of flight cancellations and delays. 

The lawsuit was filed in federal court in Texas against the Transport Workers Union of America, AFL-CIO and International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (TWU). The two sides have been in contract talks since 2015 following the American-US Airways merger.

American said mechanics were unlawfully engaging in a slowdown to gain leverage in negotiations. The lawsuit said they were taking an “inordinately long time to repair aircraft” and refusing to work overtime. 

“The odds of this being random as opposed to concerted activity is less than one-in-one billion,” the lawsuit says.

The airline received a preliminary injunction and a permanent injunction against the union, but executives have said some work actions continue. The two sides are due to resume contract negotiations in mid-September under the oversight of the National Mediation Board.

American President Robert Isom on Wednesday acknowledged the airline’s mass cancellations at an investor conference in Boston and said a leader with the mechanics’ union warned him it was going to be a “long, hot summer.”

“He was right. They delivered on that,” Isom said.

In May: American Airlines blames mechanics for 2,200 flight delays, cancellations

‘We kind of couldn’t believe it:’ American passenger recounts 21-hour delay as airline struggles

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Hurricane Dorian Death Toll In Bahamas Rises To 30 As Aid Begins To Land

Westlake Legal Group 5d71d2273b0000e255d01098 Hurricane Dorian Death Toll In Bahamas Rises To 30 As Aid Begins To Land

ABACO, Bahamas (AP) — Carrying possessions in plastic bags, some weary Bahamians whose homes were smashed by Hurricane Dorian waited Thursday for a flight out of the disaster zone as an international humanitarian effort to help the Caribbean country gained momentum. The death toll rose to 30.

A few hundred people gathered at the partly flooded Leonard M. Thompson airport on Abaco island in hopes of getting a seat on one of the small planes picking up the most vulnerable survivors, including the sick and the elderly. However, the evacuation was slow and there was frustration for some who said they had nowhere to go after the Category 5 hurricane tore through the area, shattering whole neighborhoods.

“They told us that the babies, the pregnant people and the elderly people were supposed to be first preference,” said Lukya Thompson, a 23-year-old bartender. But many were still waiting, she said.

Despite hardship and uncertainty, those at the airport were mostly calm. The Bahamian health ministry said helicopters and boats were on the way to help people in affected areas, though warned of delays because of severe flooding and limited access.

At least 30 people died in the hurricane and the number could be “significantly higher,” Bahamian health minister Duane Sands told The Associated Press in a telephone interview Thursday night. The victims are from Abaco and Grand Bahama islands and include some who had been injured and flown to New Providence island, he said.

The hurricane hit Abaco on Sunday and then hovered over Grand Bahama for a day and a half.

On Thursday, emergency officials fanned out across stricken areas to track down people who were missing or in distress. Crews began clearing streets and setting up aid distribution centers.

The United Nations announced the purchase of eight tons of ready-to-eat meals and said it will provide satellite communications equipment and airlift storage units, generators and prefab offices to set up logistics hubs. U.N. humanitarian chief Mark Lowcock said about 70,000 people “are in immediate need of life-saving assistance” on Grand Bahama and Abaco.

A British Royal Navy ship docked at Abaco and distributed supplies to hurricane survivors. On Grand Bahama, a Royal Caribbean cruise ship dropped off 10,000 meals, 10,000 bottles of water and more than 180 generators, as well as diapers and flashlights.

American Airlines said it flew a Boeing 737 from Miami to Nassau to drop off 14,000 pounds of relief supplies. The airline is also giving frequent-flyer points to customers who donate at least $25 to the Red Cross.

Troops from the Rhode Island National Guard will be heading to the Bahamas to help. The Guard will mobilize three C-130J cargo aircraft that will depart from the Quonset Air National Guard Base on Friday, state officials said.

Some dazed survivors of Hurricane Dorian made their way back to a shantytown where they used to live, hoping to gather up some of their soggy belongings.

The community was known as The Mudd — or “Da Mudd,” as it’s often pronounced — and it was built by thousands of Haitian migrants over decades. It was razed in a matter of hours by Dorian, which reduced it to piles of splintered plywood and two-by-fours 4 and 5 feet deep, spread over an area equal to several football fields.

A helicopter buzzed overhead as people picked through the debris, avoiding a body that lay tangled underneath a tree branch next to twisted sheets of corrugated metal, its hands stretched toward the sky. It was one of at least nine bodies that people said they had seen in the area.

“Ain’t nobody come to get them,” said Cardot Ked, a 43-year-old carpenter from Haiti who has lived 25 years in Abaco. “If we could get to the next island, that’s the best thing we can do.”

Ked was one of thousands of desperate people seeking help in Dorian’s aftermath. With winds of 185 mph (295 kph), the hurricane obliterated houses on the Bahamas’ Abaco and Grand Bahama islands.

Crews in Grand Bahama worked to reopen the airport and used heavy equipment to pick up branches and palm fronds. Lines formed outside gas stations and grocery stores.

“People will be out of jobs for months,” 67-year-old woodcarver Gordon Higgs lamented. “They’ll be homeless, no food. Nothing.”

Total property losses, not including infrastructure and autos, could reach $7 billion, the firm Karen Clark & Co. estimated.

On Thursday, medical officials moved hundreds of people left homeless by the storm out of the main hospital in Abaco to shelters in schools and other government buildings. Some were angry at being asked to leave, or at not being allowed to freely enter to visit hurt relatives, and a shouting match erupted at the main door between a small group of hurricane victims and Bahamas marines.

Abaco and Grand Bahama islands are known for their marinas, golf courses and all-inclusive resorts and are home to many fishermen, laborers and hotel workers.

At the Leonard M. Thompson airport, Rashad Reckley, a 30-year-old saxophonist, played the Bob Marley song “Three Little Birds” for people who had lost their homes.

“I want to lift up everybody’s spirits after all the tragedy that happened,” said Reckley, who said he had exhausted his repertoire after playing for hours.

“They want me to play more,” Reckley said. “But I can’t think of songs to play.”

Associated Press writers Danica Coto in San Juan, Puerto Rico; Marko Alvarez in Freeport, Bahamas; and Kelli Kennedy in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, contributed to this report.

For more of AP’s coverage of Hurricane Dorian, go to: https://apnews.com/Hurricanes

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