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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 148)

Sanders Won, Klobuchar Surged: What We Learned From New Hampshire

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Bernie Sanders Set the Agenda. But Can He Win on It?

Who Is Kamala Harris? | 2020 Presidential Candidate

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Sanders Won, Klobuchar Surged: What We Learned From New Hampshire

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The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

Westlake Legal Group diabetes-alert-dogs-1_custom-a06f4c0c33260cb1e80b4857ee427bced1a75b2c-s1100-c15 The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

Peggy Gibson sits in her living room with her service dog, Rocky, in West Jefferson, N.C., last November. Gibson says Rocky, a diabetic alert dog, isn’t able to work well in public. Mike Belleme for NPR hide caption

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Mike Belleme for NPR

Westlake Legal Group  The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

Peggy Gibson sits in her living room with her service dog, Rocky, in West Jefferson, N.C., last November. Gibson says Rocky, a diabetic alert dog, isn’t able to work well in public.

Mike Belleme for NPR

It’s a few minutes before services on a Sunday morning at Bethany United Methodist Church in West Jefferson, N.C. The handbell choir warms up and an acolyte lights candles.

Church member Peggy Lynn Gibson walks in with her dog, a stout, cream-colored golden retriever named Rocky. The congregants greet Rocky like an old friend.

“How are you? You’re a sweetheart,” one man says to the dog. “And so are you,” the man tells Gibson.

Pastor Dan Money welcomes the congregation as Rocky, an honorary church member, settles in at Gibson’s feet in a pew near the back.

“We love Rocky, right? And we love Peggy,” Money says from the pulpit on the day NPR visited.

Gibson, a 67-year-old retired nurse, is one of more than a million Americans with Type 1 diabetes, a difficult-to-manage autoimmune disease. People with the disease face a constant struggle to control the amount of sugar in their bloodstream. If it gets too low, it can lead to seizures, loss of consciousness, or death.

And Rocky was there to help. He’s a diabetic alert dog specially trained to smell dangerous changes in someone’s blood sugar and alert them with a paw or a nudge before it becomes a medical emergency, and he was a gift from the church community. A chili lunch, a silent auction, even a concert by local musicians all helped with his $15,000 price tag.

Westlake Legal Group diabetesdog_toned_slide-9d686178875f0a61f4eb771763a4507ebca0f427-s1100-c15 The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

Peggy Gibson (left) guides her diabetic alert dog Rocky outside as she talks with a friend following a church service at Bethany United Methodist Church in West Jefferson, N.C., on July 7, 2019. The congregation helped Gibson raise the money to purchase Rocky. Robert Benincasa/NPR hide caption

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Robert Benincasa/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

Peggy Gibson (left) guides her diabetic alert dog Rocky outside as she talks with a friend following a church service at Bethany United Methodist Church in West Jefferson, N.C., on July 7, 2019. The congregation helped Gibson raise the money to purchase Rocky.

Robert Benincasa/NPR

Back at her home just outside West Jefferson’s picture postcard downtown, Gibson talked about why she sought canine help.

“In these senior years, it became harder to recognize whether my blood sugar was going too high or whether it was going too low. That was partly what prompted me to look into getting a diabetic alert service dog,” she says.

But while Gibson obviously loves Rocky, he doesn’t provide the service she and her neighbors paid for. Unfortunately, that may be par for the course. The diabetic alert dog industry is unstandardized and largely unregulated. And the science on a dog’s ability to reliably sniff out blood sugar changes is, at best, inconclusive.

Hope and hype

Gibson says she was influenced by the online marketing campaign of Diabetic Alert Dogs of America, the Nevada company that sold Rocky.

“They have their stories on there about the dogs they’ve trained and the people they’ve placed them with. And, you know, it [seemed] sound to me,” Gibson says.

If you research diabetic alert dogs, you’ll find a lot of hope for their role in managing Type 1 diabetes. And you’ll find a fair amount of hype.

Television news stories about the dogs often uncritically accept their abilities, using words like “incredible” and “amazing.” In fundraising campaigns, would-be alert dog owners position them as critical solutions to their disease.

NPR reviewed nearly 500 active GoFundMe campaigns that mention “diabetic alert dog.” More than a third used phrases like “lifesaver” or “lifesaving.”

Westlake Legal Group diabetes-alert-dogs-3_custom-5712eaa3c754e1f6a243f43c400a6343f46839fe-s1100-c15 The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

Service dogs in training at Diabetic Alert Dogs of America take part in the JDRF One Walk in Las Vegas. JDRF is a research and advocacy group dedicated to curing Type 1 diabetes. Joe Buglewicz for NPR hide caption

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Joe Buglewicz for NPR

Westlake Legal Group  The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

Service dogs in training at Diabetic Alert Dogs of America take part in the JDRF One Walk in Las Vegas. JDRF is a research and advocacy group dedicated to curing Type 1 diabetes.

Joe Buglewicz for NPR

Dog training companies make similar claims. Several of them have faced lawsuits or complaints recently from consumers who bought diabetic alert dogs that they say don’t work.

In Texas, a group of more than a dozen dog buyers sued a trainer for fraud and won a judgment for $800,000. In Virginia, the attorney general sued a service dog vendor after customer complaints about its dogs, which were marketed as “backed by science” and “100 percent effective.”

The Virginia attorney general claimed that the company, Service Dogs By Warren Retrievers, deceived consumers about the animals’ abilities and cost, in many cases simply selling “a $25,000 pet.” Company lawyer Glen Franklin Koontz tells NPR his client denies the allegations and calls the lawsuit “baseless.” He stands by the “backed by science” claim and adds: “A fully trained dog is 100 percent effective.”

The reason it might take a lawsuit to fight back against perceived or actual shortcomings in an alert dog is that trainers and dogs generally aren’t required by any authority or regulator to perform to any particular standards.

While Rocky was marketed as a “certified” alert dog, the certification came only from the company that sold the dog. Soon after Gibson got Rocky, it was clear to her that he wasn’t cut out to be a service dog in public, especially in the windy high country of North Carolina.

Gibson says Rocky is easily frightened by common noises such as umbrellas opening and motorcycles passing, and can’t work as an alert dog while he’s scared.

“The first day that I had him out on my own, the wind blew up. He got so scared that he couldn’t run fast enough to try to hide,” Gibson says. “It was just pure fear.”

That was in April 2017, right after she had to sign a series of disclaimers as a condition of getting the dog. One document said Rocky “met her expectations as a diabetic alert dog,” even though she had only two days’ experience with him.

Another document said Rocky has a “free will” and wasn’t guaranteed to do what Gibson and her community paid $15,000 for: alert her to blood sugar changes.

“I answered everything because I was so excited that he was there and I was positive,” Gibson says. “I was hoping everything was going to be wonderful and then after the dust settled, everything wasn’t wonderful.”

One paper she signed said Rocky wasn’t guaranteed to “perform any specific action at any specific time.”

The sweeping disclaimer might sound at odds with an expensive purchase that people trust with their lives. But research on alert dogs suggests it might also be a reality check about the abilities of diabetic alert dogs in general.

What the science says

University of Virginia psychologist Linda Gonder-Frederick tracked the performance of 14 diabetic alert dogs in a 2017 study. Before the study, their owners believed the dogs would prove more accurate than their glucose monitor devices. That didn’t happen.

“Overall, they really were not that reliable or accurate,” she says.

Of 14 dogs in the study, only three performed better than statistical chance. That’s similar to what an Oregon researcher reported in 2016. The dogs in that study detected low blood sugar events 36% of the time. They also had false positives. Only 12% of the dogs’ alerts happened during actual low blood sugar events.

Westlake Legal Group diabetes-alert-dogs-4_custom-f028fc39f4a2ebfc0868fff000dfc7b30c7579cb-s1100-c15 The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

Ed Peeples (center) takes part in the JDRF One Walk, which raises money to research Type 1 diabetes, in Las Vegas. Peeples is a co-owner of the company Diabetic Alert Dogs of America. Joe Buglewicz for NPR hide caption

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Joe Buglewicz for NPR

Westlake Legal Group  The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

Ed Peeples (center) takes part in the JDRF One Walk, which raises money to research Type 1 diabetes, in Las Vegas. Peeples is a co-owner of the company Diabetic Alert Dogs of America.

Joe Buglewicz for NPR

Gonder-Frederick says some dog owners overestimate their beloved dogs’ talents, perhaps as they would a favored grandchild.

“People might notice and remember when the dog is accurate much more easily than they would notice or remember when the dog was not accurate,” she says. “You find a person who believes very strongly in their dog, when in fact maybe the dog’s right half the time.”

The psychological process at work, she says, is a kind of confirmation bias.

Her research also contradicted what some believe — or hope — is true: That the dogs can be a good safety net for those who worry about blood sugar dropping as they sleep. Some parents have turned to the dogs to safeguard their children during the night.

“The accuracy just plummeted during the night. Dogs have to sleep too. Obviously, a dog cannot work 24/7,” Gonder-Frederick says.

There’s not too much other research, but what does exist isn’t more encouraging. A study published in 2015 and a 2019 British study did find good performance but involved possible conflicts of interest. Both studies were co-written by the dogs’ trainers or suppliers. Authors of both articles tell NPR the arrangements did not amount to conflicts and didn’t bias the studies.

A trainer’s guarantee

Edwin Peeples, who co-owns Diabetic Alert Dogs of America, says he has trained nearly 700 dogs and more than 9 out of 10 of his clients are satisfied.

He says issues like Gibson’s — where a dog can’t perform well in public — represent the toughest part of training an alert dog, and that he does his best to train the dog to work in the owner’s environment. And for dogs that don’t work out, Peeples says he has a training guarantee.

“They can bring that dog to my doorstep right here in Las Vegas,” Peeples says. “Our response will be: I will do my absolute best to try to fix it, and if I can’t, you get a brand-new dog.”

But Jessica Moye, an Ohio mom with Type 1 diabetes, had a long-running dispute with Peeples and now helps run a Facebook group dedicated to complaints about Peeples’ company. She says the replacement dog guarantee can mean little when there’s a child involved.

Westlake Legal Group diabetes-alert-dogs-5_custom-44afd33416ddaa8245952abcf88dbca7cd7aef19-s1100-c15 The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

Jessica Moye spent $11,000 on Hachi, who Moye says has not been reliable as a diabetic alert dog. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Westlake Legal Group  The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

Jessica Moye spent $11,000 on Hachi, who Moye says has not been reliable as a diabetic alert dog.

Maddie McGarvey for NPR

“The child bonds with the dog, and then they have to choose whether or not to send the dog back and start over again, looking for that lifesaving alert,” Moye says. “Or if they just let their child go on with life with this dog, regardless of the fact that it isn’t working for them.”

Moye got her dog, Hachi, in 2016 and paid Peeples’ company $11,000 for him. Hachi was supposed to paw her if her blood sugar was out of range.

“Hachi was never a reliable alerter. If I got into his face and asked for the paw, sure, he would give me his paw,” Moye says. “But there was never any link to the scent of my breath and whether my blood sugar was high or whether my blood sugar was low.”

Westlake Legal Group diabetes-alert-dogs-6_custom-2bd0779f5ad97c6c2d093c2cf2baa02b2124ed66-s1100-c15 The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

A book from Diabetic Alert Dogs of America sits in the home of Jessica Moye, who purchased her dog Hachi from the company. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Westlake Legal Group  The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

A book from Diabetic Alert Dogs of America sits in the home of Jessica Moye, who purchased her dog Hachi from the company.

Maddie McGarvey for NPR

When Peeples agreed to refund some of her money, it was conditioned on her signing a nondisclosure agreement barring her from discussing the company with others. He says he required the agreement because he didn’t want it publicly known that he was providing a refund. She refused to sign, leaving several thousand dollars on the table.

Now, through the Facebook group, Moye says she’s heard from dozens of Peeples’ clients. Some have struggled with dogs that are too aggressive or have other problems. Some are happy.

A happy paradox

While researchers have found little evidence that dogs can reliably sniff out blood sugar changes, they have encountered a kind of paradox: People who get alert dogs tend to do better with their diabetes.

“They may just be more engaged with their diabetes,” says Gonder-Frederick, the researcher. “They may be checking their blood glucose much more often than they used to. The dog is sort of a pleasant reminder of diabetes.”

Westlake Legal Group diabetes-alert-dogs-7_custom-54eb456c09b65dbbd02c4b196635dff71f8c12c3-s1100-c15 The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

Jessica Moye spends time with Hachi in her yard outside Columbus, Ohio, on Oct. 30. Moye runs a Facebook group dedicated to complaints about the company Diabetic Alert Dogs of America. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Westlake Legal Group  The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

Jessica Moye spends time with Hachi in her yard outside Columbus, Ohio, on Oct. 30. Moye runs a Facebook group dedicated to complaints about the company Diabetic Alert Dogs of America.

Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Sitting at her kitchen table with Rocky at her feet, Gibson says the dog has helped her feel less alone with her disease.

That’s despite the fact that, she says, he doesn’t work well when he’s scared from a thunderstorm or some other noise, and doesn’t alert her to blood-sugar changes at the rate she says the vendor promised – 80 percent of the time. Also, she complains that he was trained to alert her by jumping on her, and she says he’s more than half her weight.

Still, Gibson says: “There will be just times that he’ll come and put his head on my leg and just look up at me, — as if he understands in some way what I’m going through. He’s always there for me.”

But, she says, “I felt sorry that Rocky as an animal was chosen to do a job he wasn’t equipped to do. That’s not fair to the animal. Neither is it fair to me as the recipient of a $15,000 specially trained dog that isn’t capable of doing his job.”

She says she plans to try to retrain Rocky herself, and despite his “guarantee,” she has no plans to send him back.

Huo Jingnan and Cat Schuknecht contributed to this story.

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Disneyland announces increase in ticket prices, passes $200 mark

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-e0a785721d0c442ea81a3551a1711740 Disneyland announces increase in ticket prices, passes $200 mark fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/travel/general/disney fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc Brie Stimson article 9ad65d30-c5fa-5621-8238-6eb5df8ef64e

Disneyland raised ticket prices Tuesday, breaking the $200 mark for some one-day, two-park tickets for the first time, less than a year after the Anaheim, Calif., park opened Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge.

The park also unveiled a new five-tier system, based on peak days and seasons.

For off-peak days, a one-day, one-park ticket will remain at $104 but on weekends or holidays, for example, parkgoers will now have to pay up to five percent more, with prices ranging from $114 to $154 on the busiest days, FOX 11 in Los Angeles reported.

DISNEYLAND HIT CAPACITY ON FRIDAY, STOPPED SELLING TICKETS

Park hopper tickets, which allow guests to spend the day at both Disneyland Park and neighboring California Adventure Park, will now cost up to $209. Guests will also pay more for multi-day passes, which range from $235 for a two-day single park ticket to $415 for a five-day park hopper, according to FOX 11.

The park has raised prices multiple times in the last few years, including just over a year ago before it opened Galaxy’s Edge.

Disney said it started the tier system to keep the park from getting too packed on busy days, however, the Los Angeles Times found the price hikes didn’t shorten wait times.

The park also raised the price for the MaxPass, which allows guests to digitally book FastPass ride reservations, by $5, and their several annual pass types by varying amounts. The cheapest Southern California Select Pass went up by $20 from $399 to $419.

Galaxy’s Edge, which opened in Disneyland last May, was the most ambitious addition to the original park since it opened in 1955. The new 14-acre “land” at Disneyland cost an estimated $1 billion and took several years to complete, according to CNBC.

This summer, Disney also plans to open a new Marvel-themed land inside California Adventure Park.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Disney World also raised prices for annual passholders Tuesday, FOX 11 reported.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-e0a785721d0c442ea81a3551a1711740 Disneyland announces increase in ticket prices, passes $200 mark fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/travel/general/disney fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc Brie Stimson article 9ad65d30-c5fa-5621-8238-6eb5df8ef64e   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-e0a785721d0c442ea81a3551a1711740 Disneyland announces increase in ticket prices, passes $200 mark fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/travel/general/disney fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc Brie Stimson article 9ad65d30-c5fa-5621-8238-6eb5df8ef64e

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Valentine’s Day poll: American’s claim this dinner idea is most underrated

Westlake Legal Group RestaurantRomanticWineIstock Valentine's Day poll: American's claim this dinner idea is most underrated fox-news/food-drink/food/food-trends fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article Alexandra Deabler 884f17f1-a814-5fc0-874e-ef0cff229c9b /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday

Give your partner what they really want this Valentine’s Day: simplicity.

According to an Instacart survey conducted by The Harris Poll, Americans really just want to chill this Feb. 14 — and they’d prefer to eat with their hands. In fact, 45 percent of Americans polled used the phrases “low-key” and “easy” as far as their ideal night.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Of 2,000 Americans polled, a slim majority (51 percent) said they would rather go out for the romantic holiday, while 49 percent wanted to stay in. However, despite the locale, the most desired cuisine remained the same: pizza. Instacart’s survey found that 41 percent of Americans ranked “pizza” among the most underrated Valentine’s Day foods.

But if you’re not into a piping hot New York slice (or one of these regional pizza types), there are plenty of other finger foods your beloved really wants to you make (or order, or take them out for), including fried chicken (20 percent), barbecue (19 percent) or tacos (18 percent).

But aside from savory suppers, Americans are craving sweets. Apparently so much so that 22 percent of those surveyed said they’d prefer an entire meal made of dessert over any other type of dinner.

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If you’re among those staying in on the romantic holiday, make sure you wait for your special someone to get there before you start dinner: 51 percent claimed they would prefer to cook a meal together rather than cook alone, or be cooked for.

Did you mess that up already, too? That’s fine. You can still save the night with an assortment of chocolates, an idea which sees a 1,125-percent increase in search traffic in the week leading up the Valentine’s Day. However, even though 61 percent agree that chocolate sets the mood, you better leave the heart-shaped boxes to Kurt Cobain, because 43 percent describe the lovey-dovey assortments as “the most overrated, stereotypical” gift. Probably best to just stick to these state faves, instead.

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Westlake Legal Group RestaurantRomanticWineIstock Valentine's Day poll: American's claim this dinner idea is most underrated fox-news/food-drink/food/food-trends fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article Alexandra Deabler 884f17f1-a814-5fc0-874e-ef0cff229c9b /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday   Westlake Legal Group RestaurantRomanticWineIstock Valentine's Day poll: American's claim this dinner idea is most underrated fox-news/food-drink/food/food-trends fox news fnc/food-drink fnc article Alexandra Deabler 884f17f1-a814-5fc0-874e-ef0cff229c9b /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday

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Beer Waste Saves Montana Town $1 Million On Water Treatment

Westlake Legal Group 20200124_barley_wastewatertreatmentfacility_havremontana_rachelcramer-a5332d425d7bacbb64214b098a6ec2c8d0effe7a-s1100-c15 Beer Waste Saves Montana Town $1 Million On Water Treatment

The Wastewater Treatment Facility in Havre, Mont., collects the spent barley from a local brewery to feed the plant’s bacteria at the right time in just the right dosage. Rachel Cramer/Yellowstone Public Radio hide caption

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Rachel Cramer/Yellowstone Public Radio

Westlake Legal Group  Beer Waste Saves Montana Town $1 Million On Water Treatment

The Wastewater Treatment Facility in Havre, Mont., collects the spent barley from a local brewery to feed the plant’s bacteria at the right time in just the right dosage.

Rachel Cramer/Yellowstone Public Radio

As America’s craft beer industry continues to boom, the waste it generates can pose challenges for sewer systems. But if it’s used in the right spot, in the right amount, it’s potentially beneficial and can actually save wastewater treatment plants money.

In Bozeman, Mont., the Water Reclamation Facility treats more than 6 million gallons of water every day from sinks, showers, toilets — really anything that goes down a drain. That includes liquid waste from more than 10 breweries in this city of nearly 50,000.

Because it’s rich in yeast, hops and sugar, brewery waste can throw off the microbes that wastewater plants rely on to remove nitrogen and phosphorus. The two nutrients can cause algae blooms in rivers and kill off fish.

“But if we can use [brewery waste] correctly and put it in the right spot, it’s very beneficial to the process,” engineering consultant Coralynn Revis says.

Revis led a pilot project here last summer to try to do just that. Bozeman worked with a local brewery to feed its beer waste to the treatment plant’s bacteria at just the right time in just the right dosage.

“This is super simplified, but like, if they’re eating their french fries, they need a little ketchup with it. So to get the nitrate out, you dose a little carbon, and the bugs are happier,” Revis explained.

She says it worked.

Revis and her team got the idea from a small town about 300 miles to the north near the Canadian border.

On a recent Friday night, the tap room at Triple Dog Brewing in Havre, Mont., population 10,000, is packed.

Three years ago, the town’s wastewater plant manager approached brewery owner Michael Garrity with the idea of using leftover barley from making beer to feed his microbes.

“With my knowledge of brewing and fermentation, I said ‘Why aren’t we doing this? This sounds amazing,'” Garrity says.

If it worked, the little town could potentially avoid having to spend $1 million upgrading its wastewater plant to meet new, more stringent clean water standards.

Westlake Legal Group 20200124_barley_tripledogbrewing_havremontana_rachelcramer_custom-b2d562871c7476a87de68205c79d4b1148158609-s1100-c15 Beer Waste Saves Montana Town $1 Million On Water Treatment

Michael Garrity, owner and brewer of Triple Dog Brewing in Havre, Mont., holds a handful of barley that he’ll use to brew more beer. Rachel Cramer/Yellowstone Public Radio hide caption

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Rachel Cramer/Yellowstone Public Radio

Westlake Legal Group  Beer Waste Saves Montana Town $1 Million On Water Treatment

Michael Garrity, owner and brewer of Triple Dog Brewing in Havre, Mont., holds a handful of barley that he’ll use to brew more beer.

Rachel Cramer/Yellowstone Public Radio

Across town, Drue Newfield, Havre’s wastewater plant manager, walks over to something that looks like a well.

“This is where we apply it,” Newfield says.

For the last three years, Newfield or one of his employees has been dumping one bucket of spent barley from Triple Dog Brewing into the water rushing below every morning.

“The bacteria love it is what I’ve found, and it just disappears by the end,” Newfield says.

The team did a lot of troubleshooting the first two years, but Newfield says they eventually figured out how much spent barley to add and what conditions the bacteria needed to be happy.

Without the free spent barley, the wastewater treatment facility would have had to buy a chemical called alum to do the same thing.

“We know the alum that we saved already is about $16,000 a year for sure. But if that wouldn’t have done it, that’s when an upgrade around the corner would have been, and then if we have to do an upgrade, there’s where you run into the millions,” Newfield says.

The Environmental Protection Agency noticed Havre’s innovative approach and gave it an honorable mention at the end of last year.

“I didn’t go into this for an award. I went into it just because — what do you do to do the best job you can?” Newfield says.

Newfield and Michael Garrity with Triple Dog say they think their partnership is a model that could be replicated elsewhere. Several towns in Montana are interested in trying it, and Newfield says he even got a call from a plant manager in Boston.

But it may not work everywhere. While the Water Reclamation Facility in Bozeman found the chemistry worked, the logistics of transporting the liquid brewery waste there are too expensive for now. If regulations get stricter, the plant may consider this approach in the future.

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‘The Sinner’ star Bill Pullman reflects on his friendship with John Candy: ‘He took me under his wing’

Bill Pullman got his first big break at age 33 and currently has more than 70 films to his name — but the actor is now eager for a good thrill.

The 66-year-old is enjoying new fame as a TV star while appearing on USA Network’s critically acclaimed series titled “The Sinner” alongside Matt Bomer and Jessica Biel. The show, which first premiered in 2017, examines how and why ordinary people commit brutal crimes.

Despite the show’s success, Pullman isn’t afraid to revisit the past. In fact, he admitted that his former castmate and pal John Candy has been on his mind lately. The comedian, who is known for his roles in “Spaceballs,” “Splash” and “Cool Runnings,” passed away in 1994 at age 43 from a heart attack.

Pullman spoke to Fox News about one of his favorite memories involving Candy, whether he would play another American president after “Independence Day” and “1600 Penn,” as well as how Biel, 37, managed to surprise him on set.

RENEE ZELLWEGER PAYS TRIBUTE TO ‘COURAGEOUS MEN AND WOMEN IN UNIFORM’ DURING OSCAR SPEECH

Westlake Legal Group Patti-Gower_Toronto-Star-via-Getty-Images ‘The Sinner’ star Bill Pullman reflects on his friendship with John Candy: ‘He took me under his wing’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/jessica-biel fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/thriller fox-news/entertainment/genres/drama fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6c82be53-9ea9-50af-b42c-a751e09e3977

John Candy (Photo by Patti Gower/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

‘AMERICAN GIGOLO’ STAR CAROLE COOK RECALLS WORKING WITH RICHARD GERE: ‘HE WAS CARRYING THE MOTHER LODE’

Fox News: You must have many, but what’s one memory of John Candy that makes you smile, or has remained vivid in your mind over the years?
Bill Pullman: Yeah, I think of John quite a bit. “Spaceballs” was my second movie, and he had been pretty successful and was so jovial. And I think of him a couple of times. I learned a lot from him and he took me under his wing. But one thing was that he had to sit in the makeup chair because he was Mog [in the film], half-man, half-dog. It took hours in those days.

There were seemingly lots more prosthetic pieces, and he was animated all the way through. I would be in and out and he would be teasing me, but it always reminded me of how important that makeup trailer can be to set the tone of the day, because he set a great tone, even though he had to sit there for a long time.

Fox News: You played an American president twice. Would you consider taking on that role a third time?
Pullman: I do have this unusual history of being president… I did something that was in the science fiction world and then something that was a comedy version of it.

LOU DIAMOND PHILLIPS RECALLS RITCHIE VALENS’ SISTER BREAKING DOWN ON THE SET OF ‘LA BAMBA’

Westlake Legal Group Jordin-Althaus_NBCUniversal-via-Getty-Images ‘The Sinner’ star Bill Pullman reflects on his friendship with John Candy: ‘He took me under his wing’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/jessica-biel fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/thriller fox-news/entertainment/genres/drama fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6c82be53-9ea9-50af-b42c-a751e09e3977

Bill Pullman (center) in “1600 Penn.” (Photo by: Jordin Althaus/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images via Getty Images)

SCORPIONS REVEAL INSPIRATION BEHIND ‘ROCK YOU LIKE A HURRICANE,’ FAVORITE ‘CRAZY’ MOMENT ON STAGE

And I think maybe there’s something about that kind of interior side, of that personal side that is alone. I think of that with Robert Altman’s film on Nixon. That was so interesting. Philip Baker Hall played [President Richard] Nixon and that may be a direction I could see myself going in.

Fox News: You got your first big break in the film industry at age 33. What’s one piece of advice you would give to your younger self?
Pullman: I did end up coming to it late. Late bloomer, 33 when I was first in films, but now my son Louis is an actor, he’s just turned 27, so I get inclined to see if I can offer him any advice. And usually, I find that he’s way ahead of me. He’s figured out things faster than I ever did. But I think for the one thing that I have offered, I think is that sense of you can always remind yourself you’re not just looking to achieve the ordinary. You’re trying to find some angle that makes it somewhat extraordinary.

Fox News: Any chance you and your son might work together in a project either for “The Sinner” or something completely different?
Pullman: Well, Louis and I have done two movies together already. This is so rare, but we were both in “Battle of the Sexes” and “The Ballad of Lefty Brown.” In “The Ballad of Lefty Brown” we had a brief scene together. I really enjoy seeing him on the set and at this point, it’s good that we’re in separate scenes. He’s developing and I think it’s good. At some point we’ll circle back I think.

‘PROJECT BLUE BOOK’ STAR NEAL MCDONOUGH EXPLAINS WHY HE WON’T DO SEX SCENES OR ‘USE THE LORD’S NAME IN VAIN’

Westlake Legal Group USA-Network_4 ‘The Sinner’ star Bill Pullman reflects on his friendship with John Candy: ‘He took me under his wing’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/jessica-biel fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/thriller fox-news/entertainment/genres/drama fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6c82be53-9ea9-50af-b42c-a751e09e3977

Bill Pullman stars in “The Sinner.” (Photo by USA Network)

RICK HARRISON OF ‘PAWN STARS’ REVEALS THE MOST IMPORTANT LESSON HIS FATHER ‘THE OLD MAN’ TAUGHT HIM

Fox News: You have more than 70 films to your name. How do you feel about the fact that “The Sinner,” along with your character, has received so much praise?
Pullman: I’ve been making films and doing theater for a long time, and television, usually a limited series from time to time, but this is my first recurring role in a series. I’m so intrigued. Maybe that’s why I’ve waited so long. They got a character that I really can engage in each season in a lot of ways that are close to my interest in being an actor.

Fox News: What’s it been like working with Matt Bomer?
Pullman: Matt Bomer is a person of interest in this season. He’s a very cordial guy and had a strong part that he had to stay engaged with through a lot of months. I really admire him a lot.

Fox News: What surprised you the most about Jessica Biel?
Pullman: [While filming] there were a few times when she is physically resisting and I was amazed at how athletic she is. I have heard stories about her playing soccer and things like that, and she has a mean kick.

JOELY RICHARDSON SAYS SHE HAD ‘NO IDEA’ NICOLAS CAGE ‘HAD THIS HUGE FAN BASE’: ‘I WAS FASCINATED’

Westlake Legal Group USA-Network_1 ‘The Sinner’ star Bill Pullman reflects on his friendship with John Candy: ‘He took me under his wing’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/jessica-biel fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/thriller fox-news/entertainment/genres/drama fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6c82be53-9ea9-50af-b42c-a751e09e3977

Bill Pullman and Jessica Biel in ‘The Sinner.’ (Photo by USA Network)

‘FACTS OF LIFE’ STAR LISA WHELCHEL EXPLAINS WHY SHE DIDN’T RELEASE MORE MUSIC AFTER HER ’80S SOLO ALBUM

Fox News: You happen to be a fan of noir films. Are there any classic noir films that help you shape your character in “The Sinner”?
Pullman: Yeah, I think I’ve always had some kind of sense of affinity for noir films, the sense that sometimes it’s an individual who seems isolated and sometimes culpable for things that then is trying to sort out some compelling issue. But I think, when I first saw “Double Indemnity,” I think that was an eye-opener to me.

I liked the sense of… Usually, there’s some degree of betrayal involved. And then “Body Heat” was a movie that Larry Kasdan directed that was really intriguing to me, and, of course, “Chinatown.” I think the kind of performances that you see in there are very small, closely observed performances, where there are usually people hiding something, and that interests me.

Fox News: What was the biggest challenge that you faced filming this season?
Pullman: Well this series is interesting. It’s set in a small town in Western New York state, or upstate New York. And somehow we always end up in the woods. This season we shot it in the fall and it gets cold in the woods in the fall. And I’ve learned that there’re all kinds of new things that have batteries in them to keep you warm. You can get a hat that has batteries in it, and you can get socks. I know sportspeople have known this for a long time, but it’s new to me and I was glad that it was invented.

Westlake Legal Group image ‘The Sinner’ star Bill Pullman reflects on his friendship with John Candy: ‘He took me under his wing’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/jessica-biel fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/thriller fox-news/entertainment/genres/drama fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6c82be53-9ea9-50af-b42c-a751e09e3977   Westlake Legal Group image ‘The Sinner’ star Bill Pullman reflects on his friendship with John Candy: ‘He took me under his wing’ Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/person/jessica-biel fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/genres/thriller fox-news/entertainment/genres/drama fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6c82be53-9ea9-50af-b42c-a751e09e3977

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The highest (and lowest) paying cities for babysitters on Valentine’s Day

Valentine’s Day is the holiday that just keeps taking, and taking, and taking.

A lot of people spend the days leading up to Valentine’s Day thinking about how much they’re going to spend on things like dinner, flowers and gifts. For parents, however, there’s at least one more expense they need to worry about: the babysitter.

<img src="https://a57.foxnews.com/static.foxnews.com/foxnews.com/content/uploads/2020/02/640/320/babysitter.jpg?ve=1&tl=1" alt="In a study conducted by Care.com, it was revealed what cities pay the most for babysitters and which pay the least. The results were derived from data collected during 2019’s Valentine’s Day.”>

In a study conducted by <a data-cke-saved-href=”https://www.care.com/c/stories/14837/how-much-does-a-valentines-day-babysitter-cost/” href=”https://www.care.com/c/stories/14837/how-much-does-a-valentines-day-babysitter-cost/” target=”_blank”>Care.com</a>, it was revealed what cities pay the most for babysitters and which pay the least. The results were derived from data collected during 2019’s Valentine’s Day. (iStock)

LOOKING TO SAVE MONEY? CELEBRATE VALENTINE’S DAY ON THE 15TH

Obviously, Valentine’s Day is going to a big night for babysitters, as many parents are looking for a chance to get out of the house for a romantic evening. But when demand goes up, so do prices.

In a study conducted by Care.com reveals which cities pay the most for babysitters — and which pay the least — based on from data collected during Valentine’s Day 2019.

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Babysitters looking to make the most money should look for work in Seattle, where sitters can pull in an average of $19.53 per hour. The rest of the top five cities aren’t surprising, with San Francisco, San Jose and New York all paying around $19 an hour. Surprisingly, Buffalo, NY, actually came in second, paying an average of $19.25 an hour.

On the other end of the spectrum, Jacksonville, Fla., came in at the very bottom, paying only $14.36 an hour.

Also, Las Vegas is a losing bet for babysitters, who can only expect to make $15.7 per hour. Although, given the city’s status as a vacation destination, that’s not surprising — it’s likely that most folks either left the kids home (thus paying a babysitter in another city), or planned a family vacation, and are bringing the kids out with them (or are letting them wander around Las Vegas unsupervised).

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Having trouble finding a babysitter? Don’t worry. You can always take the whole family for a wholesome, discounted dinner at Hooters.

Westlake Legal Group babysitter The highest (and lowest) paying cities for babysitters on Valentine's Day Michael Hollan fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 041f8a52-f619-51f0-9937-7b607fc00f36 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday   Westlake Legal Group babysitter The highest (and lowest) paying cities for babysitters on Valentine's Day Michael Hollan fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 041f8a52-f619-51f0-9937-7b607fc00f36 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/OCCASIONS/Holiday

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Baseball Makes An Early Pitch To Catch The Interest Of Black Players

Westlake Legal Group blackyouthbaseball_ciammachilli_1-768c030ed7da40e33cf6841b355f7d2a47a36565-s1100-c15 Baseball Makes An Early Pitch To Catch The Interest Of Black Players

Kids do calisthenics before starting a baseball clinic in Washington, D.C. Esther Ciammachilli/WAMU hide caption

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Esther Ciammachilli/WAMU

Westlake Legal Group  Baseball Makes An Early Pitch To Catch The Interest Of Black Players

Kids do calisthenics before starting a baseball clinic in Washington, D.C.

Esther Ciammachilli/WAMU

February 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the Negro Leagues, which once provided African-Americans the chance to play professional baseball before the game was integrated.

Now, a century later, African-American participation in baseball is lagging. The number of black Major Leaguers is only 8.4%, according to The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports.

The decline in baseball participation begins long before adulthood, but there are efforts to change that.

On a recent Saturday about two dozen children between the ages of 4 and 8 gathered at a recreation center in Washington, D.C., for a baseball clinic. It’s run by Senatorsss Satchel Paige Little League, which takes its name from the famed Negro Leagues pitcher.

“Baseball is a sport that you need to learn the fundamentals of early in life,” Senatorsss Satchel Paige president Andre Lee. “So, 4-years-old is right about the time you need to learn the game of baseball,” Lee says.

Seven-year-old C.J. Coley and his two younger siblings took part in the clinic. C.J. says he’s a fan of the Washington Nationals and he plays baseball because, “I think it’s a good sport to get your muscles moving. I play every single base.”

The beginning of the decline

C.J. is one of few African-Americans at the clinic and says he wants to be a professional baseball player.

That pleases Antonio Scott, general manager of The D.C. Grays Cal Ripken Collegiate Baseball League. He’s on a mission to keep kids from falling into what he calls “the gap” a time in a child’s life when they begin to lose interest in baseball — often between the ages of 10 and 14.

“At that point, baseball is not as attractive to them anymore because they’re not getting the proper coaching or training or off-season workouts that they should be getting that will keep them active and keep their minds engaged in baseball,” Scott says.

Children are more likely to identify with a sport when they see people who look like them playing it. And that’s one reason why The D.C. Grays partnered with Major League Baseball’s Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities program. Scott says they want older children from their youth academies to work with kids like C.J.

“It’s not only about the baseball on the field side of it, it’s the off-field talks that they can have with those middle school, high school players, too, because they went through what these kids went through,” Scott says.

Westlake Legal Group blackyouthbaseball_ciammachilli_9-dad18dfd0a4253c6c00dd81dc7ed5f23263d5af6-s1100-c15 Baseball Makes An Early Pitch To Catch The Interest Of Black Players

Andre Lee, president of Senators Satchel Paige Little League, talks to the kids after the baseball clinic. Esther Ciammachilli/WAMU hide caption

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Esther Ciammachilli/WAMU

Westlake Legal Group  Baseball Makes An Early Pitch To Catch The Interest Of Black Players

Andre Lee, president of Senators Satchel Paige Little League, talks to the kids after the baseball clinic.

Esther Ciammachilli/WAMU

Keeping kids engaged in baseball increases the chance of them playing the game later in life, says Tony Reagins, executive vice president for baseball development with MLB. But cost can be a barrier for some families. MLB’s youth programs are free and, Reagins says, they provide access to high-level training and competition.

“If the foundation is built correctly, our hope is that not only do these kids get a college education, but they will get to the major league level which will then affect the numbers that you see in terms of the African-American player at the major league level,” Reagins says.

Reagins is quick to tout that African-Americans made up 20% of first round MLB draft picks between 2012-2018 and he’s pleased with that turnout.

The numbers are still low

The number of African-American baseball players continues to decline as children transition from high school to college. There are 10,500 collegiate baseball players currently at Division I schools but only 6% are African-American, according to the NCAA.

Scholarships may be one reason for the low number, says Antonio Scott of the D.C. Grays. A typical college can only offer about 12 baseball scholarships split among 27 players. Compare that to 85 football scholarships per Division I school.

“Nine times out of 10 [players are] going to choose the scholarship that gives them more money or that can cover more expenses in school — their tuition, room and board, books and things like that,” Scott says. “When in baseball, they may be only able to cover just their room and board, or just their tuition. And then this player has to find money that they don’t have to cover the rest of their expenses.”

The money just isn’t there in baseball the way it is in other college sports, Scott says.

For parents like Sandra Coley, C.J.’s mom, college is still too far in the future. Coley says she just wants her kids to play the game and earn an appreciation for it.

“I want them to be able to make an informed decision and I don’t believe that anyone can make an informed decision unless they have some type of information about what they’re making the decision on. So, you can’t say you hate baseball and you’ve never tried it one bit,” Coley says.

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Today on Fox News: Feb. 12, 2020

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On Fox News: 

Fox & Friends, 6 a.m. ET: Special guests include: Kayleigh McEnany, national press secretary for President Trump’s 2020 campaign; New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu; Chris Lewandowski, former Trump 2016 campaign manager; Charles Hurt, Washington Times opinion editor and Fox News contributor, and more.

Fox Business:

Mornings with Maria, 6 a.m. ET: Steve Phelps, NASCAR president

On Fox News Radio:

The Fox News Rundown podcast: “New Hampshire, we have a winner!” – Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., is the winner of Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary. What does this mean for the presidential election moving forward? Fox News national correspondent Jared Halpern recaps the primary with Fox News Radio political analyst Josh Kraushaar and Fox News Radio’s Jessica Rosenthal and Tonya J. Powers.

Also on the Rundown: President Trump has long complained about sanctuary cities and states not helping immigration authorities do their job. Attorney General William Barr on Monday announced a lawsuit against the states of California and New Jersey over their sanctuary policies. Fox News senior judicial analyst Andrew Napolitano joins the Fox News Rundown to discuss whether these policies are actually breaking the law. Plus, Judge Napolitano weighs in over the renewed debate over New York City’s old “stop and frisk” program.

Plus, commentary by Reason.com associate editor Robby Soave.

Want the Fox News Rundown sent straight to your mobile device? Subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher.

The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: U.S. Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C.; Hogan Gidley, White House principal deputy press secretary; Matt Schlapp, chairman of the American Conservative Union, and more.

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Leslie Marshall: 10 takeaways from the New Hampshire Democratic primary

Westlake Legal Group image Leslie Marshall: 10 takeaways from the New Hampshire Democratic primary Leslie Marshall fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 6e903eb9-eec2-5825-8847-d451983a523c

Here are my 10 takeaways from the New Hampshire Democratic primary, which Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., narrowly won with almost 26 percent of the vote, followed closely by former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg in second-place with just over 24 percent, with 87 percent of precincts reporting.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota came in a strong third with almost 20 percent, while Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts trailed at a distant fourth with just over 9 percent. Former Vice President Joe Biden was in fifth place with just over 8 percent. No other candidate managed to reach even 4 percent of the vote.

ONE: Polls can be reliable

Most polls – especially the most recent polls – showed Sanders leading or winning in New Hampshire. The polls were accurate, though Buttigieg came close to scoring an upset.

NEW HAMPSHIRE GIVES KLOBUCHAR MAJOR BOOST, PUTS BIDEN AND WARREN ON 2020 LIFE SUPPORT

 TWO: The fat lady hasn’t sung yet

Entrepreneur Andrew Yang and Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado dropped out of the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, but nine candidates remain in a field that once had over two dozen presidential hopefuls.

While some candidates at the back of the pack have virtually no chance of winning their party’s nomination, I wouldn’t count out Warren and Biden. I agree with their decision to stay in the race.

As Biden said: “It ain’t over man, we’re just getting started.”

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The Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary are important because they are the first two nominating contests. But the two states have small populations with few African-American and Hispanic voters. The next two nominating contests – in Nevada Feb. 22 and South Carolina Feb. 29 – are in states with much more diverse populations, where Biden, in particular, has enjoyed strong support.

Then comes Super Tuesday on March 3, when voters in Alabama, American Samoa, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont and Virginia cast ballots for their choice for the Democratic presidential nominee.

The results in all these states won’t necessarily mirror the results in Iowa and New Hampshire.

But just because Biden is carrying on doesn’t mean he should carry on this campaign the same way. Something has to change.

Biden has to step up his game in the debates and reevaluate why he once topped the polls in Iowa and New Hampshire but then fell flat when voting was held.

The former vice president needs to change it up to get more people to come out and vote for him by getting them more excited about his candidacy. He can’t just count on states like South Carolina with large minority populations.

Significantly, new polling shows former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg’s is picking up support among African-Americans – a constituency that has been strongly supportive of Biden in earlier polls.

THREE: Endorsements matter

I have always maintained that endorsements don’t really do much for campaigns, but boy, was I wrong this time around in New Hampshire. I’m specifically referring to the endorsements Sanders received from Democratic Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan.

The endorsement of the three progressive freshmen congresswomen gave Sanders an important boost that contributed to his New Hampshire victory.

FOUR: The Democratic Party is divided

Among the top five candidates in the New Hampshire Democratic primary, Sanders and Warren competed in the progressive lane, together getting just over 35 percent of the vote.

Buttigieg, Klobuchar and Biden competed for the more moderate vote, and together captured almost 53 percent of the vote.

The remaining vote was split between candidates in the back of the pack.

Bloomberg – spending record amounts of his multibillion-dollar fortune on his campaign – wasn’t on the ballot in Iowa and New Hampshire but is campaigning and advertising heavily in Super Tuesday states.

FIVE: Old school low-tech voting is best

New Hampshire used paper ballots. The primary went off without a hitch and results came in early – quite a contrast to the failure of new technology used to tabulate votes in the Iowa caucuses.

Apps and computers can be hacked and break down. That can’t happen with good old-fashioned paper ballots.

SIX: Warren made a mistake picking a fight with Sanders

Warren was leading in polls in New Hampshire just a few weeks ago. Then she started a feud with Sanders, claiming he had told her in private that a female candidate couldn’t defeat President Trump in the November election – a claim Sanders strongly denied.

The feud appears to have cost Warren votes – exactly the opposite effect she likely expected.

Warren’s poor showing in New Hampshire is especially embarrassing for her because her home state of Massachusetts borders New Hampshire and that should have given her a geographical advantage. Sanders is also from a neighboring state – Vermont.

SEVEN: Delegates count

In the New Hampshire primary, Sanders and Buttigieg each picked up nine delegates to the Democratic National Convention, which Klobuchar picked up six. No other Democratic picked up a single delegate. So while Sanders won slightly more popular votes, the contest was a draw between him and Buttigieg in the delegate count.

EIGHT: There was no surge in voter turnout  

Polling showed that New Hampshire Democratic voters are angry and want the Democratic Party to nominate a candidate who can defeat President Trump in November.

But in Iowa and New Hampshire we didn’t see the record turnout for the Democratic caucuses and primaries that some had forecast.

Democrats will need a strong turnout of anti-Trump voters to have a chance of defeating him in the general election.

NINE: Candidate debates matter

With the exception of Bloomberg, who hasn’t yet qualified for a presidential candidate debate and wasn’t on the ballot in Iowa and New Hampshire, candidates kept of the debate stage have fared poorly and many dropped out before voting in nominating contests began.

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The televised debates give the candidates valuable exposure and boost their status as serious contenders.

Klobuchar had a breakout performance at the Democratic debate last week and that seems to have been a big factor that helped her vault past Biden and Warren in the New Hampshire primary.

TEN: Health care wins again

Health care is a winning issue for Democrats. As President Trump and Republicans seek to constantly undo ObamaCare and have no alternative plan, this is an issue that still is strongly resonating with voters.

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Polling shows that health care, followed by climate change, followed by the desire for a president who can unite our country are the three big concerns of many voters.

In New Hampshire, polls show 6 in 10 voters concerned about health care support a government-sponsored program like Medicare-for-all.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY LESLIE MARSHALL

Westlake Legal Group image Leslie Marshall: 10 takeaways from the New Hampshire Democratic primary Leslie Marshall fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 6e903eb9-eec2-5825-8847-d451983a523c   Westlake Legal Group image Leslie Marshall: 10 takeaways from the New Hampshire Democratic primary Leslie Marshall fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 6e903eb9-eec2-5825-8847-d451983a523c

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