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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 150)

Advocates Try To Help Migrants Navigate Trump’s Public Charge Rule

Westlake Legal Group ap_19283760164561-71a4e41ec12ffc24401fd5b6ba01650d76f30ec6-s1100-c15 Advocates Try To Help Migrants Navigate Trump's Public Charge Rule

Multiple groups are trying to delay — and ultimately block — the Trump administration’s public charge rule. The new rule makes it more difficult for immigrants to get green cards if it seems they might need public assistance. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Advocates Try To Help Migrants Navigate Trump's Public Charge Rule

Multiple groups are trying to delay — and ultimately block — the Trump administration’s public charge rule. The new rule makes it more difficult for immigrants to get green cards if it seems they might need public assistance.

Patrick Semansky/AP

The Trump administration’s new public charge rule, which makes it more difficult for immigrants to get green cards if it looks like they might need public assistance, is set to go into effect on Oct. 15. Multiple groups, including several states and immigrants’ rights advocates, are in court trying to delay the rule and ultimately block it.

But there’s already widespread confusion over how the rule would work, leading many immigrants to drop benefits unnecessarily. Advocacy groups are now trying to get the message out about what the rule actually requires so people don’t go without needed medical, housing and nutrition assistance.

The administration says the rule is needed to ensure that those who get green cards will be self-sufficient. One factor that immigration officials will consider in deciding whether someone might become a public charge is whether the individual already uses public benefits.

Casa de Maryland, a nonprofit immigrant advocacy group, is among those challenging the new test. Member Monica Camacho Perez is a plaintiff in the case. The 25-year-old Baltimore resident was brought into the country illegally as a child and is now a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipient. Camacho is worried about how the public charge rule might affect her ability to someday become a citizen.

“You never know with this government. Everything can be used against you,” she says.

But like many other people, Camacho is not exactly sure how that would work. For example, she’d like to go to college full time but is reluctant to take out a student loan for fear it will hurt her future immigration status. In fact, under the new rule, student loans aren’t supposed to be held against someone applying for a green card.

Such misunderstandings are widespread. Camacho says she has relatives who have stopped getting food stamps for their children, who are U.S. citizens, even though use of such benefits by their children wouldn’t count.

George Escobar, chief of programs and services at Casa, says about a third of the group’s members have raised concerns about how using benefits such as food stamps and Medicaid might affect their legal status. Many want to drop out of these programs just to be safe. Escobar says he tries to dissuade families from doing so.

“The number of people that are actually being impacted by the public charge rule is actually very limited, but the chilling impact is what’s much more concerning,” he says.

There are some estimates that nationwide, millions of people aren’t getting nutrition and health assistance because they’re so worried. Many live in mixed-status families, which include citizens and noncitizens. In reality, so few noncitizens are eligible for the safety net programs covered by the rule that the number who would be affected is estimated to be in the low tens of thousands.

“What we’re trying to do with our community right now, and what we’ve done, is provide culturally proficient education material, engage people, use every opportunity we can to engage people and educate them about what the public charge rule is and what it is not,” Escobar says.

Casa is part of a national network of groups trying to get the information out. They’ve printed up brochures, conducted training for social service providers and set up multiple websites that provide details on how the rule will work. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services has also provided detailed explanations of the changes.

But efforts to clear up the confusion have been complicated by uncertainty over the fate of the legal challenges and by the administration’s multiple actions to limit both legal and illegal immigration. For example, the White House issued a new order on Oct. 4 that requires foreigners seeking visas to enter the U.S. to show they have health insurance or enough money to cover “reasonably foreseeable medical costs.”

Sonya Schwartz, an attorney with the National Immigration Law Center, says there are a few key points for immigrants to remember.

“I think the first thing that’s really helpful for people to know is that the public charge test does not apply to everyone,” she says, noting that refugees, asylum-seekers and most current green card holders are exempt.

She adds that only benefits used by green card applicants themselves, not those used by family members, are taken into account. The list of benefits considered is also generally limited to food stamps, housing subsidies and cash assistance.

“Medicaid is also on the list, but there are so many exceptions about Medicaid that it doesn’t affect a lot of people. So kids’ use of Medicaid doesn’t count. Use of Medicaid in schools doesn’t count. Emergency Medicaid doesn’t count,” says Schwartz.

Use of school nutrition programs, child care assistance and Medicare are also not supposed to be held against a green card applicant.

Schwartz also points out that use of public benefits alone will not make someone a public charge. She says immigration officials weigh many things in determining whether an immigrant will be able to support themselves, including whether the immigrant earns enough money or can speak English. These are tighter standards than in the past and could mean that use of benefits is the least of an immigrant’s worries.

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Nobel Peace Prize for 2019 awarded to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Nobel Peace Prize for 2019 awarded to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed

Ethiopia Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has won the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize for “for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation, and in particular for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighboring Eritrea.” 

The Nobel committee said during its announcement Friday that the coveted prize was also meant to recognize all the stakeholders working for peace and reconciliation in Ethiopia and in the East and Northeast African regions.

Ahmed clinched a peace deal with Eritrea President Isaias Afwerki last year that ended 20 years of the “no peace, no war” stalemate between the two countries.

According to TIME, at least 70,000 people were killed since the border disputes began in 1998, five years after Eritrea gained independence from Ethiopia.

Nobel literature prizes: Polish novelist Olga Tokarczuk, Austrian author Peter Handke win

Although thousands of political prisoners have been freed since Ahmed took office in April 2018, Ethiopia’s internal issues still divide the country. 

The Nobel committee acknowledged this in its announcement saying that even if much work remains in the unstable country, Ahmed had initiated important reforms that give “many citizens hope for a better life and a brighter future.” 

The African country faces elections next year. 

The Norwegian Nobel Institute said they still haven’t been able to get a hold of the Ethiopian leader.

The committee received nominations for 223 individuals and 78 organizations for the Swedish 9-million kronor, or $918,000, award. The list is kept secret for 50 years.

Last year’s winners were Congolese doctor Denis Mukwege and Yazidi Kurdish activist Nadia Murad for “their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict.”

Although the list can’t be confirmed for another five decades, teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern were also predicted frontrunners for the prize.

President Donald Trump was also nominated for the 2019 prize by U.S. Republican congressional members for his efforts at securing denuclearization on the Korean Peninsula.

Past winners who came under criticism include former U.S. President Barack Obama, who won in 2009 after less than a year in office for his “extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples.” Critics interpreted his win as a political repudiation of George W. Bush’s presidency.

Contributing: Kim Hjelmgaard, USA TODAY; Associated Press. Follow Adrianna Rodriguez on Twitter: @AdriannaUSAT.

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Nobel Peace Prize Goes To Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1158934775-77bde96fec009862a970f24fa04d96c532d7f059-s1100-c15 Nobel Peace Prize Goes To Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed

Prime Minister of Ethiopia, Abiy Ahmed speaks during a news conference on general elections in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in August. Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Nobel Peace Prize Goes To Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed

Prime Minister of Ethiopia, Abiy Ahmed speaks during a news conference on general elections in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in August.

Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Updated at 5:20 a.m. ET

The Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed “for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation” in resolving the border conflict with neighboring Eritrea, the Norwegian Nobel Committee in Oslo said Friday.

Berit Reiss-Andersen, the chairwoman of the five-member committee that made the award, credited Ahmed with a peace initiative aimed at ending two decades of conflict between the two east-African neighbors that began over border disputes in 1998 only a few years after Eritrea gained independence.

“When Abiy Ahmed became prime minster in April 2018, he made it clear he wishes to resume pace talks with Eritrea,” she said. “In close cooperation with the president of Eritrea, Abiy Ahmed quickly worked out the principles for a peace agreement to end the long no peace stalemate between the two countries.

When Ahmed took office, he freed political prisoners and managed in the same year to sign a peace deal with the Eritrean leader, Isaias Afwerki — agreeing in the process to cede disputed land to his country’s erstwhile enemy.

“Peace does not arise from the actions of one party alone,” Reiss-Andersen said. “When Prime Minister Abiy reached out his hand, President Afwerki grasped it, and helped to formalize the peace process between the two countries.”

“Additionally, Abiy Ahmed has sought to mediate between Kenya and Somalia in their protracted conflict over rights to a disputed marine area. There is now hope for a resolution to this conflict,” she said.

“In Sudan, the military regime and the opposition have returned to the negotiating table. On the 17th of August, they released a joint draft of a new constitution intended to secure a peaceful transition to civil rule in the country. Prime Minister Abiy played a key role in the process that led to the agreement,” Reiss-Andersen added.

As NPR’s Eyder Peralta noted in December, “Seemingly overnight, [Ahmed] opened up a democratic space — allowing foes, allies and regular Ethiopians a chance to speak their minds — after decades of authoritarian rule.”

Several names were considered top contenders for this years prize, including Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old Swedish climate activist. German Chancellor Angela Merkel and pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong were also under consideration.

The selection committee consists of five people selected by Norway’s parliament.

Since 1901, there have been 99 Nobel Peace Prizes awarded to individuals and 24 have gone to organizations.

So far this week, 11 Nobel laureates have been named, of whom 10 are men.

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Five feel-good stories from this week you don’t want to miss

Grab the tissues.

Here are some good stories of surprises, inspiration, and giving back that we could all use this week.

1. STOP! IT’S BIRTHDAY TIME!

Community surprises crossing guard for this 80th birthday

Crossing guard Alec Childress got a big surprise Thursday when he showed up to the corner of 9th and Lake streets in Wilmette, Ill., where he greets children with a smile and the phrase, “Peace, I gotcha!”

But after 14 years of doing this job after retiring, the man who always has something to say was left speechless.

“It was awesome!” Childress told Fox News of the community surprise. “All the kids, the parents…It’s beyond comprehension. I told somebody I need to sit down before I fall down.”

Read the full story here.

2. GIVING BACK

Cured patient returns to hospital as employee

Westlake Legal Group back-to-hospita-421587 Five feel-good stories from this week you don't want to miss fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc Caleb Parke article 293e1ed5-5558-5c35-8f10-4a71227660c2

Cancer survivor Katy Payne, 21, has just graduated as a nurse – and is set to work as a children’s nurse at the hospital where she was diagnosed with leukemia aged two. 

A nurse returns to work at the same hospital she was treated for leukemia as a child.

Katy Payne, 21, is a cancer survivor who grew up to become a pediatric nurse, starting her work at Colchester Hospital in Essex, in southeast England, as the newest employee.

“I remember patches of my time in hospital and some of the highs and lows,” Payne told SWNS of her cancer treatment. “The things I experienced have made me stronger, and I have always said I would like to give something back to the hospital, the doctors and the nurses, and everyone that’s been part of my journey.”

Read the full story here.

3. ‘EXCEPTIONAL COMMUNITY’ 

California ‘team of junior detectives’ find missing woman, 97, with dementia

Westlake Legal Group RosevilleKids1 Five feel-good stories from this week you don't want to miss fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc Caleb Parke article 293e1ed5-5558-5c35-8f10-4a71227660c2

The search party that helped located the 97-year-old woman. (City of Roseville, California Police Department)

A group of young neighborhood sleuths surprised the Roseville Police Department when they called 9-1-1 in response to a missing woman’s notice.

Glenneta Belford, 97, who suffers from dementia and is non-verbal, was found just a few hours after police posted her missing online.

Logan Hultman, Kashton Claiborne and Makenna Rogers, who are all 10, and 11-year-old Hope Claiborne set out and eventually found Belford, several hours after she was reported missing, hiding in bushes a few blocks away from their homes.

“This is a great example of our exceptional community coming together to lend a helping hand. This proves a great point, age is just a number and anyone can help out in a time of need,” police said in a Facebook post.

Read the full story here.

4. ‘JUST ANOTHER DAY’

Chick-fil-A employee climbs into storm drain to help customer

Westlake Legal Group shauna-hill-chick-fil-a Five feel-good stories from this week you don't want to miss fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc Caleb Parke article 293e1ed5-5558-5c35-8f10-4a71227660c2

Chick-fil-A has been voted America’s favorite, cleanest and most polite fast-food chain — and now, it might have clinched another victory as the most helpful.

Shauna Hall was visiting the restaurant in Stafford, Va., last week with her son, but as soon as Hall got out of her van, she dropped her iPhone into a storm drain and she was especially upset because she “just paid off” the phone and had purchased a new Otterbox phone case only days before.

Seth, a Chick-fil-A employee, offered to help.

“Not only did he slice his finger and was filthy from laying on the ground and climbing in the hole, I find out he had actually just gotten off shift and was still willing to help me,” Hall said. “Service with a smile. Just another day at Chick-fil-A.”

Read the full story here.

5. FAITH ON THE FIELD

Students across the nation celebrate faith on football fields

Over 250,000 students participated in the Fellowship of Christian Athletes’ student-led “Fields of Faith” event, tackling tough issues like suicide and depression and giving students the opportunity to “open up their life to Christ.”

Julianna Braniecki, president of the FCA chapter at her university, Huddle at Hofstra, shared on “Fox & Friends” Thursday how students had speakers, musicians (including rappers), and student testimonies during the “Fields of Faith” events.

“Last night at Hofstra, we had the pleasure of hosting our first Fields of Faith event…It was really a powerful experience,” she added. “My faith is something that is very important to me, and through my experience with FCA, that has greatly increased that and grown in my love for Christ.”

Read the full story here.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE GOOD NEWS!

Westlake Legal Group AlecChildress Five feel-good stories from this week you don't want to miss fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc Caleb Parke article 293e1ed5-5558-5c35-8f10-4a71227660c2   Westlake Legal Group AlecChildress Five feel-good stories from this week you don't want to miss fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/faith-values fnc Caleb Parke article 293e1ed5-5558-5c35-8f10-4a71227660c2

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Today on Fox News, Oct. 11, 2019

STAY TUNED

On Fox News:

Fox & Friends, 6 a.m. ET:  Special guests include: Tom Homan, former acting director of ICE; Judge Jeanine Pirro, host of “Justice with Judge Jeanine”; Kurt Knutsson, “The Cyber Guy”; Matthew Whitaker, former acting attorney general

On Fox Business:

Mornings with Maria, 6 a.m. ET: John Negroponte, the first-ever director of National Intelligence

Varney & Co., 9 a.m. ET: Dennis Rodman, NBA Hall of Famer

On Fox News Radio:

The Fox News Rundown podcast: “Bret Baier Does the Impeachment Math” – The Democrats continue to charge ahead with their inquiry and putting pressure on the President by subpoenaing more members of his administration. At the same time, a new Fox News poll shows 51 percent want the president impeached and removed from office. But does that mean the impeachment math is starting to swing in the Democrat’s favor?  Bret Baier, host of “Special Report,” weighs in on the latest Fox News polls and the impact of the impeachment inquiry and the Syria situation on the 2020  election.

Also on the Rundown: More than two million Americans are now believed to be dealing with some sort of opioid addiction. In a new three-part documentary streaming on Fox Nation called “America’s Opioid Conspiracy  – Pills, Payoffs and Pain”, Fox News contributor and practicing physician Nicole Saphier takes a look at how this crisis began and got so bad. She joins the podcast to discuss the film and why she thinks pharmaceutical companies have made the opioid epidemic worse by misleading both doctors and patients about their powerful drugs.

Don’t miss the good news with Fox’s Tonya J. Powers. Plus, commentary by Fox News contributor and the host of “Reality Check” on Fox Nation, David Webb.

Want the Fox News Rundown sent straight to your mobile device? Subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher.

The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: Donald Trump, Jr.; U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.;  Ken Cuccinelli, acting director of the Citizenship and Immigration Services; Geraldo Rivera, Fox News correspondent-at-large; Shannon Bream, host of “Fox News @ Night”; Chris Wallace, host of “Fox News Sunday”; retired Navy Adm. James Stavridis, operating executive with the Carlyle Group.

Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News, Oct. 11, 2019 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc d02aa859-c65e-59d2-9b92-f0b34e03c668 article   Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News, Oct. 11, 2019 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc d02aa859-c65e-59d2-9b92-f0b34e03c668 article

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Trump Belittles Beyoncé, Jay-Z, Bruce Springsteen And Invokes Fans’ Fury

Westlake Legal Group 5da0383d2100003d07accef0 Trump Belittles Beyoncé, Jay-Z, Bruce Springsteen And Invokes Fans’ Fury

Trump bragged about the size of the crowds he attracted during the 2016 campaign and mocked his then-Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, who had a series of high-profile musicians perform at her events.

“I didn’t need Beyoncé and Jay-Z,” said Trump. “And I didn’t need little Bruce Springsteen and all of these people.”

Trump then claimed, without offering any evidence, that musicians like Springsteen would sing two songs at Clinton’s rallies before leaving and taking most of the crowd, while “she is still talking in front of the same lousy crowd.”

The three artists haven’t responded publicly to Trump’s comments.

Springsteen has previously said Trump is “deeply damaged at his core,” but predicted he’ll win reelection in 2020.

Jay-Z has called Trump a “superbug.”

Trump’s comments were condemned on Twitter, where one person backed Beyoncé by saying said “it’s time to get in impeachment formation” and another showed support for Springsteen by telling Trump “you’re President of the United States but you’ll NEVER be The Boss.”

Democratic 2020 presidential candidate Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) also chimed in:

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Impeachment support rising, but most Republicans still staunchly opposed

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093823032001_6093828259001-vs Impeachment support rising, but most Republicans still staunchly opposed Howard Kurtz fox-news/politics fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc article 6972458f-d345-53fc-9bce-6a1f6cf53996

Is the impeachment battle starting to seriously scratch Donald Trump’s Teflon?

The media are going haywire over a new Fox News poll showing that a bare majority of those surveyed, 51 percent, now say they want the president impeached and removed from office.

Another 4 percent say Trump should be impeached by the House but not convicted by the Senate, while 40 percent oppose impeachment altogether.

“FOX SHOCK,” the Drudge headline screamed in red.

HOW HARVEY WEINSTEIN PRESSURED NBC OVER MATT LAUER’S ALLEGED MISCONDUCT

In reality, the Fox survey is not that different from other recent polls on the subject. But some media types like to say “even Fox” has found such-and-such, as if it’s a survey of the network’s viewers rather than a widely respected professional polling operation.

One of those who is displeased, not surprisingly, is Trump.

“From the day I announced I was running for President, I have NEVER had a good @FoxNews Poll,” he tweeted. “Whoever their Pollster is, they suck. But @FoxNews is also much different than it used to be in the good old days.” He went on to name some of his least favorite network figures–Andrew Napolitano, Shep Smith, Donna Brazile–but added: “Oh well, I’m President!”

But there’s the thing, when you drill down on the poll: It reflects the same old partisan chasm that has defined Trump’s tenure since the inauguration.

Eighty-five percent of Democrats support impeachment and removal; independents are split, in favor, 39 to 36 percent; and just 13 percent of Republicans back impeaching and expelling Trump from office.

Now, it may be noteworthy that more than one in 10 Republicans want Trump gone. But if you’re a Republican senator, and the country is almost evenly split on impeachment, and the vast majority of your party opposes it, you’re not exactly under withering pressure to abandon your president.

SUBSCRIBE TO HOWIE’S MEDIA BUZZMETER PODCAST, A RIFF OF THE DAY’S HOTTEST STORIES

Some Democrats have wanted to impeach Trump forever. The survey showed support among Dems 9 points higher than those who believed the president asking Ukraine’s leader to investigate the Bidens is an impeachable offense.

And overall in the Fox poll, the president’s approval drifted down only a couple of points, to 43 percent.

In defying the House demands for testimony and documents as illegitimate and unconstitutional, the president is trying to change the conversation, to turn impeachment into a process story. If that drags on, with the inevitable court battles, many people may dismiss the whole mess as the usual Beltway bickering. Trump would obviously rather be talking about how the dreaded Democrats are treating him unfairly than whether it was improper for him to ask a foreign leader to help dig up dirt on one of his political rivals.

But Trump isn’t the only one unhappy with his media coverage. Turns out the Biden campaign is really angry with the New York Times.

In a blistering letter to Executive Editor Dean Baquet, Biden’s deputy campaign manager says the paper has played a key role in spreading a “baseless conspiracy theory” about the former VP—namely, the allegations about profiteering by Hunter Biden that are at the heart of the impeachment saga.

The letter, obtained by CNN, says the Times is actively participating in “a smear campaign,” that had previously been relegated to the likes of Breitbart and Russian propaganda. That is, until the Times’ Ken Vogel reported on the allegations.

His May story, a straightforward account of Hunter Biden’s business dealings in Ukraine, is headlined “Biden Faces Conflict of Interest Questions that are Being Promoted By Trump and Allies.”

A Times statement said an op-ed by “Clinton Cash” author Peter Schweizer, which fueled the Biden team’s resentment, “makes an argument that nonpartisan government watchdogs would make, arguing in favor of a law that would prohibit self-dealing by those with government connections. Our coverage of the Biden campaign and Hunter Biden has been fair and accurate.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Are the Biden people seriously suggesting that a journalistic exploring of what the Bidens did, even if it involves no criminal wrongdoing, is out of bounds for the newspaper, as is a conservative op-ed?

Rather than having his staff fire off letters, Biden should sit down with reporters (from the Times or elsewhere) and make the case why he thinks the allegations are unfair.

The Fox poll, after all, contains a flashing red light. While 69 percent of those surveyed find Trump’s dealings with Ukraine’s leader extremely, very or somewhat troubling, 62 percent say the same about his allegations against Biden and his son’s business dealings in Ukraine and China.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093823032001_6093828259001-vs Impeachment support rising, but most Republicans still staunchly opposed Howard Kurtz fox-news/politics fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc article 6972458f-d345-53fc-9bce-6a1f6cf53996   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093823032001_6093828259001-vs Impeachment support rising, but most Republicans still staunchly opposed Howard Kurtz fox-news/politics fox-news/columns/media-buzz fox news fnc/media fnc article 6972458f-d345-53fc-9bce-6a1f6cf53996

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New Jersey man allegedly threatened farmers who denied him sex with animals

A New Jersey man was arrested for asking local farmers permission to have sex with their animals — and then threatening the farmers and damaging their cars when refused, a report said.

Richard Decker, 31, began sending the messages to Sussex County farms and horse stables in 2018, asking the animal caregivers if he could have sex with their cows and horses, the New Jersey Herald reported.

When he was rejected by the farmers, Decker allegedly sent threats and placed homemade metal spikes on their driveways to damage their tires, according to the report.

In one case, he threatened to beat a farmer’s wife with a wooden stick when denied permission.

Several of the property owners reported their tires had been damaged by the spikes.

Decker was arrested in Vernon Township on Oct. 3 after police searched his home.

Click here for more from NYPost.com

Westlake Legal Group sd New Jersey man allegedly threatened farmers who denied him sex with animals New York Post fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc article 3b88ab46-c367-5a82-b592-f66321f4f72e   Westlake Legal Group sd New Jersey man allegedly threatened farmers who denied him sex with animals New York Post fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc article 3b88ab46-c367-5a82-b592-f66321f4f72e

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‘Trump watch party’ reinstated at Michigan restaurant after RNC chair Ronna McDaniel’s tweet rallies the troops: report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6093545198001_6093543754001-vs 'Trump watch party’ reinstated at Michigan restaurant after RNC chair Ronna McDaniel's tweet rallies the troops: report fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/food-drink fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 3ec4be94-79d4-52ef-b31b-98248b5078f7

Management at a Buffalo Wild Wings restaurant in Michigan had a sudden change of heart this week after initially canceling a plan by local Republicans to hold a “Trump watch party” at the location because of unspecified “complaints.”

Perhaps helping speed the reversal: Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel of the Republican National Committee – a former chairwoman of the Michigan Republican Party whose grandfather was a Michigan governor – learned the event had been called off and alerted her 376,000 Twitter followers.

TRUMP BELITTLES BIDENS WITH GRAPHIC LANGUAGE AT MINNEAPOLIS RALLY, AS CHAOS UNFOLDS OUTSIDE ARENA

“Just learned @BWWings cancelled a Michigan viewing party for @realDonaldTrump’s rally,” McDaniel wrote in a since-delated post, according to the Washington Examiner. ” … tell them the left’s cancel culture has gone too far.”

Soon the restaurant’s location in Howell, Mich., and the corporate office in Minneapolis were receiving calls and messages from Republicans, the Examiner wrote — and officials decided to allow the Trump watch party to proceed.

A representative for the chain later told the Examiner that the cancellation had been “based on a misunderstanding.”

“The group has in fact previously hosted events at the restaurant without incident,” the statement said. “The franchise owner apologizes for the misunderstanding.”

McDaniel later tweeted a “thank you” message to the chain.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Thank you @BBWings for letting the watch party proceed as planned,” McDaniel wrote, “and thank you to everyone who expressed their support for @realDonaldTrump!

Howell is about 55 miles northwest of Detroit.

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Netflix Goes All Out to Wow Children as Streaming Wars Intensify

Westlake Legal Group 10NETFLIXKIDS-01-facebookJumbo Netflix Goes All Out to Wow Children as Streaming Wars Intensify Web-Original Programming Sarandos, Ted Netflix Inc Families and Family Life Animated Films

LOS ANGELES — Walk the halls of Netflix Animation, spread across three buildings in the heart of Hollywood, and a cheeky question may cross your mind: Is anyone left at Disney Channel headquarters?

Chris Nee, the force behind “Doc McStuffins,” the groundbreaking Disney Channel series, decamped for Netflix in December. She followed Alex Hirsch, a cartoon whiz who created “Gravity Falls” for Disney. Naketha Mattocks, a former executive at the Disney Channel, where she helped steer the popular “Descendants” movies, now heads up Netflix’s family film unit. She is working with Kenny Ortega, a veritable Disney legend known for shepherding the blockbuster “High School Musical” franchise.

“That he has chosen to make Netflix his creative home to work on both feature films and series is thrilling,” Netflix’s chief content officer, Ted Sarandos, crowed in April about Mr. Ortega.

Netflix has been a force in children’s entertainment for years, its usefulness as a digital babysitter helping it grow into a streaming behemoth with 152 million subscribers worldwide. But it now faces the biggest competitive threat in its history: Disney, the company that has supplied much of Netflix’s most popular programming for children and families, is determined to be a streaming giant in its own right.

Disney Plus, a streaming service that arrives on Nov. 12, will offer a colossal array of shows and films, including 7,500 episodes of old Disney-branded TV shows, 25 original series, Marvel movies, National Geographic specials, 30 seasons of “The Simpsons” and the entire Disney-Pixar-Lucasfilm library. At $7 a month, Disney Plus will be cheaper than Netflix, which charges $13 for its standard plan.

And Disney will no longer license its content to Netflix. Disney Channel shows like “Sofia the First” and Pixar movies like “Coco” will disappear gradually from Netflix as their contracts end and reappear on Disney Plus.

Netflix is reacting accordingly.

It has quietly amassed an army of children and family creators and executives who have been stockpiling counterattack content. Sanjay Patel, a longtime Pixar animator, has a series in the works for Netflix called “Ghee Happy,” about pint-size Hindu deities who meet at day care. “Nobody can skip childhood, not even the gods,” he said with a grin from his office, down the hall from Ms. Nee, who has five children’s series — five — in the pipeline.

“If you start looking at what people watch and why — the ways that people build habits and build trust — shows and movies for children and families are incredibly important to us,” Mr. Sarandos said in an interview.

Original animated movies include “Klaus,” a holiday adventure directed by Sergio Pablos (“Despicable Me”), and an epic called “Jacob and the Sea Beast” from Chris Williams (“Moana”). Glen Keane, a former Disney animator whose credits include Ariel in “The Little Mermaid,” is holed up at Netflix directing a feature-length musical called “Over the Moon” that is based on Chinese mythology.

“Creative decisions here aren’t made by committee,” Mr. Keane said.

Netflix has other new children’s entertainment competitors. Apple Plus ($5 a month) arrives on Nov. 1 and will offer animated series like “Snoopy in Space.” HBO Max, the coming app from WarnerMedia, announced a deal with “Sesame Street” last week that will bring, for the first time, most of the show’s five-decade library to streaming — more than 4,500 episodes. New “Sesame Street” episodes will also be on HBO Max nine months before their PBS run.

Families are valuable streaming customers, analysts say, because they are reliable, paying month after month instead of “churning” in and out based on what is available. Children’s entertainment also comes with a potentially enormous bonus prize: sales of related merchandise. Netflix has started to explore consumer products; “Super Monsters,” a Netflix show about preschool witches and werewolves, has its own line of Halloween costumes.

About 60 percent of Netflix’s global audience watches the service’s content for children and families on a monthly basis, according to Melissa Cobb, Netflix’s animation chief. (She came from DreamWorks Animation, where she produced the “Kung Fu Panda” series.) DreamWorks, which is part of NBCUniversal, supplies Netflix’s most popular cartoon series, “The Boss Baby: Back in Business.” Ms. Cobb also found a surprise global hit in “Mighty Little Bheem,” which is produced by Green Gold Animation, based in India, an important expansion market for Netflix.

Netflix’s rise has come at the expense of cable outlets like Cartoon Network, which shed 29 percent of its audience from 2016 to 2018, and Nickelodeon, down 23 percent over the same period, according to research by MoffettNathanson. Nickelodeon recently agreed to produce a pair of animated movies for Netflix, including one based on Nickelodeon’s “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” franchise. An expansion of that deal has been discussed by the companies.

The money that Netflix is showering on children and family producers has disrupted this often-overlooked corner of Hollywood. Halle Stanford, president of television at the Jim Henson Company, said Netflix pushed to make one project, “The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance,” even grander in scale than she had hoped, supersizing the budget in the process.

“I suddenly had a gatekeeper willing to take a creative risk — 90 sets, 180 puppets,” Ms. Stanford said of the series, which arrived on Netflix in August. “Trust me, most buyers start talking about maybe three sets and eight puppets.”

In total, Netflix has spent billions on its children and family push. It recently bought the rights to animated series based on NBCUniversal’s “Jurassic Park” and “Fast and Furious” franchises. And it has snapped up rights to the “Chronicles of Narnia” and “Baby-Sitters Club” books and made a deal with Roald Dahl’s widow to “reimagine and extend” classics like “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.”

“In partnership with the estate, we are building out these worlds — exploring what’s beyond the page — which is something that hasn’t happened before,” Ms. Cobb said.

Most of the Netflix’s original programming for children and families has only recently started to roll out. The service’s first animated movie, “Klaus,” will debut on Nov. 15, a few days after Netflix serves up “Green Eggs and Ham,” an animated series based on the 1960 Dr. Seuss book. “Tall Girl,” released in September, was the first of eight live-action “clean teen” movies coming from Ms. Mattocks, the family film executive. “We want to tell stories that actually feel meaningful and relevant to today’s kids and teens and that don’t talk down to them,” Ms. Mattocks said.

“Tall Girl,” about an ostracized high school student, was viewed by more than 40 million Netflix accounts over its first four weeks, enough to rank as the service’s No. 1 movie globally over that time, according a Netflix spokeswoman. To count as a “view,” at least 70 percent of the movie must be streamed; no independently verified viewing data is available.

Netflix, of course, has lots of challenges as it tries to hold its own against the likes of Disney. The biggest is quality control. Serving up consistently well-crafted content at the speed Netflix is moving is almost impossible. “Tall Girl,” for instance, got weak reviews.

Netflix also has a lot of executives involved, increasing the potential for disorder behind the scenes. Ms. Cobb handles animation. Ms. Mattocks has live-action teen movies. Brandon Riegg, vice president of nonfiction series, oversees family-focused reality shows like the baking-focused “Nailed It!” and a coming gardening competition series called “The Big Flower Fight.” (Think topiary carving.) Jane Wiseman, Netflix’s sitcom chief, has been put in charge of live-action children’s comedies.

And Brian Wright, vice president of original series, will continue to focus on “event” family series, including Netflix’s “Lost in Space” remake, which returns for a second season in December.

“We’re delivering more of those family must-see moments — we’re good at them, but we want to be great,” Mr. Wright said. “That is where this entire push comes from.”

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