web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 155)

25 Baltimore corrections officers indicted, accused of excessive force and gang activity, state attorney says

More than two dozen Baltimore corrections officers were indicted Tuesday on at least 200 charges that they used excessive force on prisoners at state-operated jails in the city, authorities said.

The 25 indicted officers are accused of threatening and assaulting detainees at correctional facilities, as well as tampering with evidence and falsifying documents, said Maryland State Attorney Marlilyn Mosby, whose office secured the indictments.

The charges also include conspiracy to promote and maintain a criminal organization by unlawful means, participation and conspiracy to participate in a criminal gang, and other misconduct charges, according to Fox Baltimore.

TEXAS JUDGE WARNED OVER REFUSAL TO PERFORM SAME-SEX MARRIAGES

Mosby during a news conference said the indictments were the result of a “long-term investigation” after “allegations of force and intimidation.”

Westlake Legal Group mosby 25 Baltimore corrections officers indicted, accused of excessive force and gang activity, state attorney says Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maryland fox-news/topic/baltimore-crime-and-corruption fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e99a242-2ec0-514f-8cc0-9ad4262544fc

Maryland State Attorney Marilyn Mosby spoke during a news conference announcing the indictment of correctional officers. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

She said that “seemingly isolated incidents dating back to 2016″ led to the discovery of “multiple examples of excessive force used against detainees in different facilities, which ultimately led to the discovery of a criminal enterprise,” among other accusations.

Mosby said 21 of the 25 officers were taken into custody on Tuesday. They were members of a tactical unit with a paramilitary command structure and were operating inside four Baltimore detention facilities.

Mosby said the officers used violence and intimidation to “maintain its dominance and its operational territory” inside the jails.

The indicted officers face a total of 236 counts and have been on administrative leave since 2018, when the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services began investigating allegations, according to Maryland Corrections Secretary Robert Green.

MARYLAND MEN JAILED FOR MORE THAN THREE DECADES IN TEEN’S KILLING EXONERATED, RELEASED FROM PRISON 

“This case represents our strong effort to root out people who don’t belong in the field where public safety and rehabilitation is the mission,” Green told reporters. “This is a disturbing case, but it does not represent nor should it cast a shadow on the commitment and integrity of the exceptional correctional professionals in this department.”

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said in a statement that with the latest round of indictments, anti-corruption efforts have led to the convictions of more than 200 officers, inmates and citizen accomplices.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Our correctional officers have one of the most difficult jobs in all of public safety, and we will not let the criminal behavior of the few tarnish the great work of the nearly 5,000 dedicated officers who serve with distinction every single day,” Hogan said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group mosby 25 Baltimore corrections officers indicted, accused of excessive force and gang activity, state attorney says Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maryland fox-news/topic/baltimore-crime-and-corruption fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e99a242-2ec0-514f-8cc0-9ad4262544fc   Westlake Legal Group mosby 25 Baltimore corrections officers indicted, accused of excessive force and gang activity, state attorney says Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maryland fox-news/topic/baltimore-crime-and-corruption fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e99a242-2ec0-514f-8cc0-9ad4262544fc

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Era Ends for Google as Founders Step Aside From a Pillar of Tech

Westlake Legal Group 03google-facebookJumbo Era Ends for Google as Founders Step Aside From a Pillar of Tech Pichai, Sundar Page, Larry Google Inc Brin, Sergey Appointments and Executive Changes Alphabet Inc

SAN FRANCISCO — Larry Page and Sergey Brin, the Stanford graduate students who founded Google over two decades ago, are stepping down from executive roles at Google’s parent company, Alphabet, they announced on Tuesday.

Sundar Pichai, Google’s chief executive, will become the chief of both Google and Alphabet.

The move is an end of an era for Google. Mr. Page and Mr. Brin have personified the company since its founding and have been two of the technology industry’s most influential figures, on a par with the founders of Apple and Microsoft, Steve Jobs and Bill Gates.

Their early work on the Google search engine helped corral an unruly cloud of information on the World Wide Web. And their ideas about how to run an internet company — like offering generous employee perks like free shuttle buses to the office and making rank-and-file employees feel as though they have a stake in the company — became a standard for Silicon Valley.

Mr. Page and Mr. Brin took a lesser role in day-to-day operations in 2015 when they turned Google into Alphabet, a holding company that includes the self-driving car company Waymo under its umbrella.

Since then, they have spent more time overseeing a variety of so-called other bets, like life-extension technology, while Mr. Pichai ran Google and its enormous search and advertising business. The business has continued to grow and Alphabet is among the most valuable companies in the world, but the internet giant is entering one of the most turbulent periods in its history, with antitrust scrutiny, employee walkouts and growing public skepticism of its power.

Mr. Page and Mr. Brin, who are both 46, will remain directors on Alphabet’s board and the company’s two largest individual shareholders. They retain a majority of the company’s voting shares, which will give them effective control over the board and ensure they still have a say over the company’s future.

“Today, in 2019, if the company was a person, it would be a young adult of 21 and it would be time to leave the roost,” the founders wrote in a public letter on Tuesday. “While it has been a tremendous privilege to be deeply involved in the day-to-day management of the company for so long, we believe it’s time to assume the role of proud parents — offering advice and love, but not daily nagging!”

The move confirms the ascendancy of Mr. Pichai, who is 47, as one of tech’s most powerful people. While he has run the core Google business for four years, he has still reported to Mr. Page, Alphabet’s chief executive, and Mr. Brin, its president.

Now he is the sole executive in charge of a company that has giant businesses in search, advertising, maps, smartphone software and online video, as well as a variety of fledgling bets in far-off areas like drone deliveries and internet-beaming balloons.

In recent years, Mr. Page and Mr. Brin seemed to have lost interest in running the company they founded. The reorganization into a holding company was in part intended to address that. While Mr. Pichai took the reins of the often messy business of Google, Mr. Page and Mr. Brin would focus on what were effectively science projects.

Mr. Brin moved his desk for a time to X, the so-called moonshot lab where engineers worked on projects that were likely to fail — but had big potential if they didn’t. Mr. Page was rarely a presence on Google’s campus and was working on long-shot technology problems and personal side projects like his flying-car start-up, Kitty Hawk.

They have largely disappeared from public view, at least as company representatives. Despite being the chief of one of the world’s most valuable public companies, Mr. Page did not speak on Alphabet’s quarterly earnings calls, appear for congressional testimony like other tech executives over the last year, or sit for interviews with journalists.

One of Mr. Brin’s few on-the-record comments to journalists in recent years came at San Francisco International Airport when he was protesting President Trump’s immigration policy. He told reporters he was there as a private citizen.

While Mr. Page and Mr. Brin had been a regular presence at weekly all-staff meetings in Google’s early years, they had all but stopped appearing over the last year.

One of Mr. Page’s last appearances at the company meeting was last year when he apologized to employees for his handling of the departure of Andy Rubin, a former senior executive who received a $90 million payout after the company deemed sexual harassment claims against him credible. In June, Mr. Page surprised investors and employees when he did not attend Alphabet’s shareholder meeting.

In recent years, the freewheeling work culture promoted by Mr. Page and Mr. Brin has run into trouble. Employees have staged public protests over the company’s handling of sexual harassment claims against executives, its treatment of contract workers and its work with the Defense Department, federal border agencies and the Chinese government.

The soft-spoken Mr. Pichai has been reluctant to confront the protests head-on, but he has quietly cracked down on employee unrest. Google has halted the weekly company meetings and placed restrictions on what employees can discuss on message boards.

Though working at Google is becoming more like working at other giant companies, Mr. Page and Mr. Brin’s interests and styles — like focusing on passion projects and math jokes — have become part of Silicon Valley iconography.

While other tech titans like Mr. Jobs and Mr. Gates were known for their sometimes brash and mercurial leadership styles, Mr. Page and Mr. Brin were low-key and cerebral. But not always. Mr. Brin sky-dived for a company event that introduced one of the company’s most disappointing products, the Google Glass wearable device. He was often was spotted riding an elliptical bike to work.

That idiosyncratic style, that “Googliness,” became something company managers were told to look for in applicants.

Mr. Page and Mr. Brin are among the few tech company founders who have walked away from day-to-day roles at the company they created and that made them billionaires. Mr. Gates did something similar when he handed the chief executive role at Microsoft to Steve Ballmer in 2000, during his company’s long antitrust fight with the Justice Department.

While Google is now gearing up for its own antitrust fight, with investigations into its power in Congress, the Justice Department and nearly every state, there are notable differences with Microsoft.

When Mr. Ballmer took over as chief executive there in 2000, the company had just been found to have repeatedly violated the nation’s antitrust laws in a landmark case brought by the Justice Department. Mr. Pichai is still unsure what he faces from regulators and lawmakers. The scrutiny includes Google’s dominant market share in internet search and how it competes with smaller rivals in the digital-ad business.

“For Google, it is still to be determined just what it is facing on the antitrust front,” said David Readerman, a longtime technology analyst and portfolio manager at Endurance Capital Partners. “But that is a clear and present risk.”

In their letter on Tuesday, Mr. Page and Mr. Brin said they would remain committed to the company “for the long term, and will remain actively involved as board members, shareholders and co-founders. In addition, we plan to continue talking with Sundar regularly, especially on topics we’re passionate about!”

Whatever they decide to do, they will have no trouble funding it. Mr. Page is worth about $58.9 billion and Mr. Brin is worth about $56.8 billion, the sixth- and seventh-richest people in the world, according to Forbes.

Steve Lohr contributed reporting from New York.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Kim Petras Has No Time For Westboro Baptist Church’s Transphobia

Westlake Legal Group 5de6d37a1f0000f431df0550 Kim Petras Has No Time For Westboro Baptist Church’s Transphobia

Kim Petras went full-on diva after learning that members of the Westboro Baptist Church, known for its vehement opposition to LGBTQ rights, were staging a protest this past weekend ahead of her concert in Kansas City, Missouri. 

On Saturday, the German-born pop star shared a short video on Instagram that featured snippets of her music videos set to Famous Dex’s 2016 hit, “Hoes Mad.”

Calling the clip her “official statement” on the Westboro Baptist Church picketing her show, Petras wrote, “This is the energy i’m bringing n it should be yours too.”

And when members of the church appeared outside the concert venue on Sunday, Petras went a step further. 

The singer, who is transgender, cheekily appeared on the sidewalk in front of the group, waving the peace sign while striking poses in a high-cut black bodysuit, fishnet tights and high-heeled boots.

Capturing the moment for posterity on Instagram, she wrote, “Update. hoes still mad.” 

The image garnered applause from a clutch of other stars and media personalities, including Demi Lovato, Christian Siriano and Charli XCX. 

“This is holy to me,” YouTube personality, activist and author Tyler Oakley wrote in the comments on Petras’ post. Katy Perry simply branded the singer an “icon.” 

Last month, a photo of Petras was used in four billboards not far from the Westboro Baptist Church’s home base in Topeka, Kansas. The billboards were apparently created as a response to the church’s anti-LGBTQ views.

Though Petras didn’t authorize that use of her image, she told ET Canada that she didn’t have an issue with it.

“I really have no problem outraging people, especially ignorant people, and just kind of shoving it in their face that I exist and that it’s OK,” the 27-year-old said. “I just imagine little gay and trans kids growing up around there and how tough it must be.”

Speaking to HuffPost last year, Petras opened up about her passion for LGBTQ advocacy work, while stressing that she had no interest in using her identity “as a tool.” 

“I’ve never written a song specifically about being transgender. It made me the person I am and that’s a big part of me, but I think music is about your feelings and your fantasies and it goes deeper than your gender or your sexuality,” she said.

“I really fell in love with music and I hope that people can see me for my music and all of the things that I am,” Petras added. 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Josh Brolin Tries ‘Perineum Sunning’ And Burns His ‘Pucker Hole’

Westlake Legal Group 5de6df72250000b23cd2f0df Josh Brolin Tries ‘Perineum Sunning’ And Burns His ‘Pucker Hole’

Actor Josh Brolin has a message for today’s youth: Tanning your taint isn’t a good idea.

The actor learned that hard lesson a few days ago after he engaged in “perineum sunning,” a new trend in which people expose the area between the anus and the sex organs to the sun, according to the New York Post.

One practitioner, who calls herself Metaphysical Meagan, claims that perineum sunning can regulate hormones as well as sleep patterns.

The man who plays Thanos in the Marvel Cinematic Universe saw the Post story and decided to try it out.

It wasn’t such a hot idea, he admitted on Instagram this weekend, and he hopes others don’t make the same mistake:

“Tried this perineum sunning that I’ve been hearing about and my suggestion is DO NOT do it as long as I did.

“My pucker hole is crazy burned and I was going to spend the day shopping with my family and instead I’m icing and using aloe and burn creams because of the severity of the pain.

“I don’t know who the fuck thought of this stupid shit but fuck you nonetheless. Seriously.”

New York-based dermatologist Jeremy Fenton isn’t surprised Brolin feels a little burned by the experience.

“This area is vulnerable for two reasons,” Fenton told Yahoo. “Number one, it is an area that has not received much sun exposure in most people, thus it would be lacking in the body’s normal response to sun exposure that protects it from future sunburn, such as producing pigment. Number two, it is sensitive skin to begin with, so any burn in that area may be more significant and more uncomfortable.”

Fenton warns people who insist on baring their buns to the sun that they could increase their chance of getting a sunburn.

“There is some evidence to suggest that the genitals may be more susceptible to skin cancer than other areas of the body,” Fenton said. “A skin cancer developing in this area may be more difficult to detect because people don’t regularly view this area on themselves.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Key Takeaways From House Intelligence Committee’s Impeachment Report

WASHINGTON — The House Intelligence Committee released a 300-page impeachment report on Tuesday accusing President Trump of trying to enlist Ukraine to help him in the 2020 presidential election and obstructing the congressional inquiry by trying to cover it up.

The committee released the report on the eve of a public hearing in the House Judiciary Committee as the panel begins considering whether to draft articles of impeachment that could lead to a Senate trial and Mr. Trump’s removal from office.

Here are five takeaways from the report.

Westlake Legal Group read-the-document-1575399772992-articleLarge Key Takeaways From House Intelligence Committee’s Impeachment Report Yovanovitch, Marie L Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Schiff, Adam B Presidential Election of 2020 impeachment House Committee on the Judiciary Giuliani, Rudolph W Elections, House of Representatives

Read the House Democrats’ Report on the Impeachment Inquiry

Democrats on three House committees on Tuesday released a report documenting the impeachment case against President Trump.

The “Trump-Ukraine Impeachment Inquiry Report” was a sweeping indictment of Mr. Trump’s behavior, concluding that the president orchestrated a “scheme” to pressure Ukraine to announce investigations into former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and other Democrats, while withholding nearly $400 million in military assistance and a White House meeting.

The report, written in narrative form, laid out the testimony of witnesses who came before the panel in public and private. It asserts that the president’s actions “subverted U.S. foreign policy toward Ukraine and undermined our national security in favor of two politically motivated investigations that would help his presidential re-election campaign.”

The report accuses Mr. Trump of what it calls an “unprecedented campaign of obstruction of this impeachment inquiry,” saying he denied documents to Congress and tried to block State Department diplomats and White House officials from testifying.

The president’s categorical refusal to cooperate with the investigation or comply with demands for documents violated the law, the report said. It accused the president of engaging in “a brazen effort to publicly attack and intimidate” witnesses.

“The damage to our system of checks and balances, and to the balance of power within our three branches of government, will be long-lasting and potentially irrevocable if the president’s ability to stonewall Congress goes unchecked,” the report concluded.

The report stopped short of explicitly calling for the president’s impeachment and removal from office. But Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and the chairman of the Intelligence Committee, made it clear he viewed the document as a road map to impeachment for the House.

“The founding fathers prescribed a remedy for a chief executive who places his personal interests above those of the country: impeachment,” the report said.

Mr. Schiff, in a preface to the report, warned that the clash between the two parties about Mr. Trump’s actions reflects the kind of factionalism that the country’s founders believed would be dangerous to the republic.

“Today, we may be witnessing a collision between the power of a remedy meant to curb presidential misconduct and the power of faction determined to defend against the use of that remedy on a president of the same party,” Mr. Schiff wrote.

The report largely recounts information already made public during testimony from administration officials. But it also indicated that Democrats have collected more raw evidence than previously known, including call records produced by AT&T and Verizon showing a series of phone calls between Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani and his associates and several government officials.

The calls came as Mr. Giuliani was executing a smear campaign against the American ambassador to Ukraine at the time, Marie L. Yovanovitch, and pressing Ukraine to begin investigations that would benefit Mr. Trump. The records show calls between Mr. Giuliani and others, including Representative Devin Nunes of California, the top Republican on the Intelligence Committee.

Speaking with reporters on Tuesday, Mr. Schiff said that the call records showed “considerable coordination among the parties, including the White House — coordination in the smear campaign against Ambassador Yovanovitch.”

Mr. Schiff declined to say whether he believed Mr. Nunes should recuse himself from the remainder of the inquiry, but suggested the records were not flattering.

“It is deeply concerning that at a time that the president of the United States was using the power of his office to dig up dirt on a political rival that there may be evidence that there were members of Congress complicit in that activity,” he said.

The release of the report largely concludes the investigation by the Intelligence Committee and moves the impeachment inquiry into a new phase led by the House Judiciary Committee, which plans to hold its first hearing on Wednesday.

That hearing will include four legal scholars for a discussion about the constitutional standards for impeachment. Representative Jerrold Nadler, Democrat of New York and the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, has said the hearing will also focus on whether Mr. Trump’s behavior rises to the level of those standards.

A second hearing is expected to provide a forum for Intelligence Committee lawyers to formally present their report to the Judiciary Committee members. And a third hearing could offer Mr. Trump or his lawyers the opportunity to defend himself, though the White House counsel has so far indicated that he is unlikely to take part in what they deem an unfair process.

If a majority of the House voted to approve articles of impeachment, which would be drafted by the Judiciary Committee, the president would be impeached. The proceedings would move to the Senate for a trial. Two-thirds of senators would have to vote to convict Mr. Trump to end his presidency.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Pennsylvania teen posts TikTok video moments after car accident with friends

Westlake Legal Group TikTok-App-Phone-iStock Pennsylvania teen posts TikTok video moments after car accident with friends Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox-news/auto fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e8f97153-5b90-58b8-b7d8-27e2d5b37639 article

A Pittsburgh teenager has gone viral after filming and then posting a video of her and friends just moments after the car they were driving in crashed and flipped over.

In the video, originally posted on the social media platform TikTok, Katie Cornetti is seen mouthing the words to an unidentified song as she pans the camera to her friends and the busted windshield.

Days later, Cornetti continued to joke about the accident, in which she and her friends suffered no injuries aside from a bruised lip from her phone hitting her face.

In a separate video, Cornetti and her friend Marissa apparently re-enact them flipping over during the crash.

“Me and Marissa flipping the [sic] over twice and the police thinking we died,” she said.

ISIS USING TIKTOK TO SPREAD PROPAGANDA, EMOJIS AND ALL, REPORT SAYS

TWITTER REWRITES HISTORY WITH HILARIOUS POP CULTURE MEME ‘GONNA TELL MY KIDS’

Cornetti said she decided to record the video, which has been viewed more than 1.6 million times on Twitter, as a way to “cope” with the otherwise terrifying experience.

“While we were sitting there … waiting for the police to come, for some reason in my mind I was like, I should make a TikTok, why not, I have nothing better to do,” Cornetti told Buzzfeed News. “I picked the first song and made a random TikTok.”

“That was the first thing that came to mind… to do that,” she added. “It really was scary… But we decided, let’s do this to get our minds off of it, and honestly it helped a lot.”

Many online, however, didn’t find the viral video to be so funny.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

“It’s all fun and games til the insurance company sees this video,” one Twitter user commented.

“Yeah let’s promote being irresponsible,” another person said.

Another Twitter user added, “This is sad how people will do literally anything to get just a few minutes of exposure. Willing to risk their life.”

“Seriously what’s wrong with people,” another person said.

Still, Cornetti is taking all the negative comments in stride.

“The comments are not really bothering me ’cause who does make a TikTok after a car crash?” she said. “We are perfectly fine, we got really lucky.”

“There was not much we could do to make anything better, so that’s what we decided to do,” Cornetti added. “Literally the week before I got into a small car accident [and] I was freaking out and crying — that was not the best way to cope with anything.”

Cornetti admitted that social media can be distracting, but said, in this case, it helped them “get out of the real world for a second and helped us calm down. I would never have said that before this.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

As for her parents’ reaction to the viral video, she said: “No one’s really mad; we all have it as a joke.”

Westlake Legal Group TikTok-App-Phone-iStock Pennsylvania teen posts TikTok video moments after car accident with friends Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox-news/auto fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e8f97153-5b90-58b8-b7d8-27e2d5b37639 article   Westlake Legal Group TikTok-App-Phone-iStock Pennsylvania teen posts TikTok video moments after car accident with friends Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/pennsylvania fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/entertainment/genres/viral fox-news/auto fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e8f97153-5b90-58b8-b7d8-27e2d5b37639 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Al Green on impeachment support: Martin Luther King ‘didn’t march on Washington because of polls’

Westlake Legal Group al-green-cavuto Al Green on impeachment support: Martin Luther King 'didn't march on Washington because of polls' fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz b6347bea-25fc-5837-925a-4f6f437d076a article

Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, an early proponent of impeaching President Trump, said he hoped more Republican lawmakers would be on board with the current inquiry but added that past leaders didn’t check public polling before acting on their beliefs.

Green told Neil Cavuto on “Your World” the impeachment inquiry could go beyond the allegations involving Ukraine, with congressional leaders looking at possible charges of abuse of power and “obstruction” of the House probe.

Cavuto asked Green for his thoughts on continuing with impeachment despite no House Republican support. The host also referenced votes by Reps. Collin Peterson, D-Minn, and Jeff Van Drew, D-N.J., against the initial impeachment proceeding.

“I would like for it to be bipartisan,” Green responded before adding that he believes the situation shows that “moral imperative trumps political expediency.”

“You do this because Dr. King was right. He said: ‘The time is always right to do that which is right’.”

Green said King did not “wait on polls” to decide whether or not to march on Washington, D.C. in support of civil rights.

“Rosa Parks didn’t take her seat on a bus because of polls,” Green continued, going on to reference Rep. John Lewis’, D-Ga., participation in the 1965 “Bloody Sunday” march in Alabama in favor of African-American voting rights.

“John Lewis didn’t cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge because of polls,” Green said. “We have to do things because it is right, even if it is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular.”

Green also compared Trump to former President Andrew Johnson, a Tennessee Democrat who was impeached in 1868.

“This president is quite similar to that president,” he said. “Andrew Johnson was impeached for his… incitive behavior.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

During the interview, Cavuto asked Green if Trump should be considered to be engaging in obstructive behavior if he deems the House proceedings to be unfair and that of a “kangaroo court.”

“The president is entitled to characterize things as he chooses,” Green responded. “He often mischaracterizes things, and that would be a mischaracterization. I think the House has a duty to do this.”

Westlake Legal Group al-green-cavuto Al Green on impeachment support: Martin Luther King 'didn't march on Washington because of polls' fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz b6347bea-25fc-5837-925a-4f6f437d076a article   Westlake Legal Group al-green-cavuto Al Green on impeachment support: Martin Luther King 'didn't march on Washington because of polls' fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz b6347bea-25fc-5837-925a-4f6f437d076a article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Volatility in Markets Is Back

Westlake Legal Group 03markets-promo-facebookJumbo-v4 Trump Volatility in Markets Is Back Stocks and Bonds International Trade and World Market

After weeks of relative calm and record highs, stocks in the United States fell Tuesday for the third straight day after President Trump’s comments on his China trade war rattled investors and revived some of the market volatility that has become a signature of the dispute between the world’s two largest economies.

Speaking in London, where he was attending a NATO meeting, Mr. Trump hinted that he was ready to wait until after the 2020 election to come to terms with China. During a wide-ranging appearance with Jens Stoltenberg, the NATO secretary general, Mr. Trump tamped down hopes that an agreement would be struck before the end of the year, telling reporters: “I have no deadline, no.”

On Wall Street, the remarks sent stocks lower. After falling more than 1 percent in early trading, the S&P 500 recovered a bit to finish the day down 0.7 percent.

The biggest drop was in energy shares, which are sensitive to the outlook for both the trade war and the slowdown in the global economy. Benchmark prices for American crude oil rose 0.3 percent to $56.10 a barrel.

For much of the last few months, stocks have inched upward, producing solid gains for investors.

The S&P 500 rose 2 percent in October, and 3.4 percent last month, in part because of rising confidence among investors that the Trump administration would want to make progress on the trade fight heading into an election year.

That climb, however, came with little indication that the fundamental outlook for corporate earnings or the economy has improved markedly, leaving stocks vulnerable to a pullback.

In the early days of December, some fear the pullback has arrived. Investors have grown restless about the lack of progress toward the so-called Phase 1 trade deal that was announced in October.

“That narrative of ‘Trump is definitely going to want to move toward resolution because 2020 is 12 months away’ is being questioned,” said Michael Purves, the chief executive at Tallbacken Capital Advisors, a market strategy and research firm.

Now, the looming imposition of an additional 15 percent tariff that the Trump administration planned for Dec. 15 is forcing investors to think hard about whether it’s a good time to take some of this year’s gains off the table.

The S&P 500 remains up more than 23 percent in 2019. Some major American companies have recorded huge gains. In tech, which has been under heavy public and political scrutiny, Apple is up 64 percent and Facebook has surged nearly 52 percent so far this year. The global conglomerate General Electric is also up 51 percent.

The tax scheduled to go into effect this month could be a heavier hit to the economy than previous rounds of tariffs. It would touch a further $160 billion of Chinese goods, including consumer products like smartphones, laptops and footwear. That could weaken what is currently the key pillar of growth for the United States: consumer spending.

Recent updates on other areas of the economy have suggested weakness. On Monday, a key gauge of industrial activity was weaker than expected, showing the sector contracted in November for the fourth consecutive month.

“I think there’s a little bit of a concern that we are just lagging the weakness in the global economy, and maybe we’re slowing down a little now,” said Michael O’Rourke, the chief market strategist at JonesTrading in Stamford, Conn.

In the first two trading days of December, stocks have fallen about 1.5 percent. That sell-off may provoke painful memories for investors. Last year, stocks were hammered by a 9 percent sell-off in December that culminated in a Christmas Eve plunge that nearly marked the end of the decade-old bull market for stocks.

Tuesday’s sell-off struck overseas markets in addition to the United States. France’s CAC 40 fell 1 percent and Britain’s FTSE 100 fell nearly 1.8 percent.

In Asia, China’s currency slipped after Mr. Trump made his remarks.

Investors moved money to the safety of American Treasury bonds, pushing prices up, and yields down. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note finished at 1.71 percent, a sharp drop from the previous day. Falling bond yields typically are seen to reflect declining expectation for economic growth and inflation among investors.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Frothy, toxic foam covers famous beach

A popular beach in India has been knee-deep in frothy, toxic foam for the past few days.

This particular stretch of coast, known as Marina Beach in Chennai, reportedly sees tens of thousands of visitors daily and is the largest urban beach in India.

Although families with children have still been coming to the beach, experts warn that the foam, which forms every monsoon season, can cause skin problems.

“It is definitely not good for people to go into the foam but they just do not understand the risks,” said Pravakar Mishra, a scientist at the National Center for Coastal Research in Chennai who has seen the clouds of foam grow in recent years.

ROYAL DYNASTY FACIAL DEFORMITY KNOWN AS ‘HABSBURG JAW’ WAS CAUSED BY INBREEDING

Westlake Legal Group Toxic-Foam-Getty Frothy, toxic foam covers famous beach fox-news/world/world-regions/india fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 8a01c731-7ba6-5d6d-9d5e-5e5f341c1174

Residents play over foamy discharge, caused by pollutants, as it mixes with the surf at Marina beach in Chennai on December 1, 2019. (Getty Images)

TOXIC FOG BLAMED FOR HIGH MERCURY LEVELS IN MOUNTAIN LIONS

The foam is probably the result of a mixture of washing detergent residue and other waste that gets whipped into a froth by wind and waves during monsoon season.

According to AFP, only 40 percent of Chennai’s wastewater is treated, meaning that the rest of the sewage from the large city washes right into the sea.

Fishermen have also been warned to stay away from the water.

One fisherman told AFP that the value of the fish he catches has dropped to almost nothing.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Air pollution has long been a problem in rapidly-developing India — at times forcing officials to declare a public health emergency in New Delhi, a city with more than 20 million residents.

Westlake Legal Group Toxic-Foam-Getty Frothy, toxic foam covers famous beach fox-news/world/world-regions/india fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 8a01c731-7ba6-5d6d-9d5e-5e5f341c1174   Westlake Legal Group Toxic-Foam-Getty Frothy, toxic foam covers famous beach fox-news/world/world-regions/india fox-news/science/planet-earth/oceans fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 8a01c731-7ba6-5d6d-9d5e-5e5f341c1174

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Gutfeld on ‘existential’ being word of the year

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6112142093001_6112141982001-vs Gutfeld on 'existential' being word of the year Greg Gutfeld fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/shows/the-five/transcript/gregs-monologue fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 55636240-ee46-544d-b64e-5a81e35c0dfa

Dictionary.com has named “existential” its word of the year.

Why? Not because you used it, or because anyone in real life has used it since college. If you said ever said “existential” in college, it meant you weren’t a business major hoping for a real life. By which I mean a grown-up life with taxes, bills and brats.

That word was picked because desk-dwelling media types beat it to death.

‘EXISTENTIAL,’ ‘CLIMATE EMERGENCY’ CHOSEN AS WORDS OF THE YEAR

When they’re faced with good news, they just call Trump an existential threat. In the absence of a physical threat, they push a psychological one.

Just look at the measurable stuff, such as the economy, jobs and terrorism. You see all of the numbers trending positively. That leaves the media with just one option: push things that can’t be measured in order to predict gloom and doom.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR OPINION NEWSLETTER

Remember, none of these smarty pants saw the internet as an existential threat to dictionaries. Or even bothered to look up the word “existential” in a dictionary. Yet., here they are, desperately competing for attention while the whole planet ignores them.

Which is why Oxford Dictionaries picked “climate emergency” as its word of the year, even though it’s two. Oxford said its use reflects the “ethos, mood, or preoccupations of the passing year.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Translation: it’s what rich, elite liberals parrot as they board planes for a holiday in France.

I remember when dictionaries were awesome. They contained words, not the politics of pretentious editors. Now they’re just like every other medium, full of anxious social climbers straining for relevance.

Adapted from Greg Gutfeld’s monologue on “The Five” on Dec. 3, 2019.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY GREG GUTFELD

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6112142093001_6112141982001-vs Gutfeld on 'existential' being word of the year Greg Gutfeld fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/shows/the-five/transcript/gregs-monologue fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 55636240-ee46-544d-b64e-5a81e35c0dfa   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6112142093001_6112141982001-vs Gutfeld on 'existential' being word of the year Greg Gutfeld fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/shows/the-five/transcript/gregs-monologue fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 55636240-ee46-544d-b64e-5a81e35c0dfa

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com