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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 157)

Napolitano ‘surprised’ by remarks from Kavanaugh accuser’s lawyer, says matter could warrant investigation

Westlake Legal Group ford-napolitano-kavanaugh-AP-FOX Napolitano 'surprised' by remarks from Kavanaugh accuser's lawyer, says matter could warrant investigation Nick Givas fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/judiciary/confirmation-of-judge-kavanaugh fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 960c7290-24e7-57c8-96bc-de0e87264337

Fox News senior judicial analyst Judge Andrew Napolitano called Dr. Christine Blasey Ford a “credible witness,” following the release of a video showing her lawyer claiming Ford had political motivations with her accusations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Napolitano was asked on “America’s Newsroom” Thursday to weigh in on comments from Ford’s lawyer, Debra Katz, saying Ford may have come forward with her accusations to undermine Kavanaugh’s future rulings on abortion.

“This statement that is attributed to her lawyer… appears to be a violation of the attorney/client privilege,” he said. “Why would she be saying this now and do we care what the motivation was for [Ford’s] allegations… She was a credible witness. He was a very credible witness. Neither of them changed anybody’s mind apparently, and he was confirmed.

“So did she make these allegations up because they really happened… or did she make these allegations [up] because she wanted to undermine his credibility in some future vote.”

JUSTICE KAVANAUGH SPOTTED SPENDING DOWNTIME TAKING PART IN RUNNING RACE

Katz claimed Ford was motivated by Kavanaugh’s beliefs on abortion and was concerned about him diminishing the precedent of Roe v. Wade.

“He will always have an asterisk next to his name,” she said while speaking at the University of Baltimore’s 11th Feminist Legal Theory Conference in April.

“When he takes a scalpel to Roe v. Wade, we will know who he is — we know his character and we know what motivates him. And that is important. It is important that we know, and that was part of what motivated Christine,” Katz continued.

Napolitano said he was “surprised” by Katz’s remarks and claimed the Department of Justice might end up investigating the situation.

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“This is a very prominent and well-respected lawyer with very defined political views. I’m quite surprised that she would talk about the motivations of her client,” he said.

“That information cannot be used against the client… What’s the worst-case scenario here — did she make this whole story up? That would be perjury and probably conspiracy,” Napolitano added. “Others might have been involved. Does the Justice Department want to investigate this? Or is this just a lawyer saying ‘you know, we lost this, he is on the court. We don’t like him.'”

Westlake Legal Group ford-napolitano-kavanaugh-AP-FOX Napolitano 'surprised' by remarks from Kavanaugh accuser's lawyer, says matter could warrant investigation Nick Givas fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/judiciary/confirmation-of-judge-kavanaugh fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 960c7290-24e7-57c8-96bc-de0e87264337   Westlake Legal Group ford-napolitano-kavanaugh-AP-FOX Napolitano 'surprised' by remarks from Kavanaugh accuser's lawyer, says matter could warrant investigation Nick Givas fox-news/shows/americas-newsroom fox-news/politics/judiciary/confirmation-of-judge-kavanaugh fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 960c7290-24e7-57c8-96bc-de0e87264337

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Hurricane Dorian Rakes The Carolinas As It Moves Up The Coast

Westlake Legal Group 5d713430240000fb1775f8cf Hurricane Dorian Rakes The Carolinas As It Moves Up The Coast

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Hurricane Dorian raked the Carolina coast with howling, window-rattling winds and sideways rain Thursday, spinning off tornadoes and knocking out power to more than 200,000 homes and businesses as it pushed northward toward the dangerously exposed Outer Banks.

Leaving at least 20 people dead in its wake in the Bahamas, Dorian swept past Florida on Wednesday at a relatively safe distance, grazed Georgia overnight, and then began hugging the South Carolina-North Carolina coastline with more serious effects.

As of midday, it was a Category 2, blowing at 110 mph (177 kph) — a far cry from the Category 5 that mauled the Bahamas, but still dangerous. More than 1 million people were warned to leave in the Carolinas, and a round of evacuations was ordered in coast Virginia as the storm drew closer.

“Get to safety and stay there,” North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said. “This won’t be a brush-by. Whether it comes ashore or not, the eye of the storm will be close enough to cause extensive damage in North Carolina.”

At least four deaths in the Southeast were reported, all involving men in Florida and North Carolina who died in falls or by electrocution while trimming trees, putting up storm shutters or otherwise getting ready for the hurricane.

The National Hurricane Center’s projected track showed Dorian passing near or over North Carolina’s Outer Banks early Friday, lashing the thin line of islands that stick out from the U.S. coast like a boxer’s chin. Dorian was then expected to peel away from the shoreline.

“I think we’re in for a great big mess,” said 61-year-old Leslie Lanier, who decided to stay behind and boarded up her home and bookstore on Ocracoke Island on the Outer Banks, making sure to move the volumes 5 to 6 feet off the ground.

“We are thinking maybe we should have moved the books higher because of storm surge,” Lanier said. “But we’re kind of to the point where we can’t do much more.”

The National Hurricane Center forecast as much as 15 inches of rain for the coastal Carolinas, with flash-flooding likely.

In Charleston, South Carolina, a historic port city of handsome antebellum homes on a peninsula that is prone to flooding even from ordinary storms, Dorian toppled some 150 trees, swamped roads and brought down power lines, officials said, but the flooding and wind weren’t nearly as bad as feared.

Walking along Charleston’s stone battery, college student Zachary Johnson sounded almost disappointed that Dorian hadn’t done more.

“I mean, it’d be terrible if it did, don’t get me wrong. I don’t know — I’m just waiting for something crazy to happen, I guess,” said Johnson, 24.

Dorian apparently spun off at least one tornado in North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, damaging several homes, and another twister touched down in the beach town of Emerald Isle, North Carolina, mangling and overturning several trailer homes in a jumble of sheet metal. No immediate injuries were reported.

In coastal Wilmington, North Carolina, just above the South Carolina line, heavy rain fell horizontally, trees bent in the wind and traffic lights swayed as the hurricane drew near.

At 2 p.m. EDT, Dorian was just offshore Cape Romain, South Carolina, about 60 miles (95 kilometers) south of Myrtle Beach, moving north at 8 mph (13 kph). Hurricane-force winds extended about 60 miles (95 kilometers) from its center.

By midday, coastal residents in Georgia and some South Carolina counties were allowed to return home after the storm had passed, but the threat was worsening to the north in Virginia Beach, Virginia, where officials told beachside residents to leave.

Hundreds of shelter animals from coastal South Carolina arrived in Delaware ahead of the storm. The News Journal of Wilmington, Delaware, said 200 were airlifted from shelters in danger of flooding. About 150 more were expected to arrive via land.

In an assault that began over Labor Day weekend, Dorian pounded the Bahamas with Category 5 winds up to 185 mph (295 kph), obliterating entire neighborhoods and triggering a humanitarian crisis. As it closed in on the Eastern Seaboard, Navy ships were ordered to ride out the storm at sea, and military aircraft were moved inland.

Florida and Georgia, where about 2 million people had been warned to clear out, were mostly spared since Dorian stayed offshore.

Mayor Jason Buelterman of Tybee Island, Georgia, said the beach community of 3,000 people came through it without flooding, and the lone highway linking the island to Savannah on the mainland remained open throughout the night.

“If the worst that comes out of this is people blame others for calling evacuations, then that’s wonderful,” he said.

Tybee Islander Bruce Pevey went outside to take photos of unscathed homes to text to neighbors who evacuated. The storm, he said, turned out to be “a bunch of nothing.”

Associated Press reporters Russ Bynum in Tybee Island, Georgia; Gary Robertson in Raleigh, North Carolina; Jeffrey Collins in Carolina Beach, North Carolina; Jay Reeves in Birmingham, Alabama; Ben Finley in Norfolk, Virginia; and Seth Borenstein in Washington contributed to this report.

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Hurricane Dorian, Now Category 2 Storm, Rakes Carolina Coastline

Westlake Legal Group 5d713430240000fb1775f8cf Hurricane Dorian, Now Category 2 Storm, Rakes Carolina Coastline

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Hurricane Dorian raked the Carolina coast with howling, window-rattling winds and sideways rain Thursday, spinning off tornadoes and knocking out power to more than 200,000 homes and businesses as it pushed northward toward the dangerously exposed Outer Banks.

Leaving at least 20 people dead in its wake in the Bahamas, Dorian swept past Florida on Wednesday at a relatively safe distance, grazed Georgia overnight, and then began hugging the South Carolina-North Carolina coastline with more serious effects.

As of midday, it was a Category 2, blowing at 110 mph (177 kph) — a far cry from the Category 5 that mauled the Bahamas, but still dangerous. More than 1 million people were warned to leave in the Carolinas, and a round of evacuations was ordered in coast Virginia as the storm drew closer.

“Get to safety and stay there,” North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said. “This won’t be a brush-by. Whether it comes ashore or not, the eye of the storm will be close enough to cause extensive damage in North Carolina.”

At least four deaths in the Southeast were reported, all involving men in Florida and North Carolina who died in falls or by electrocution while trimming trees, putting up storm shutters or otherwise getting ready for the hurricane.

The National Hurricane Center’s projected track showed Dorian passing near or over North Carolina’s Outer Banks early Friday, lashing the thin line of islands that stick out from the U.S. coast like a boxer’s chin. Dorian was then expected to peel away from the shoreline.

“I think we’re in for a great big mess,” said 61-year-old Leslie Lanier, who decided to stay behind and boarded up her home and bookstore on Ocracoke Island on the Outer Banks, making sure to move the volumes 5 to 6 feet off the ground.

“We are thinking maybe we should have moved the books higher because of storm surge,” Lanier said. “But we’re kind of to the point where we can’t do much more.”

The National Hurricane Center forecast as much as 15 inches of rain for the coastal Carolinas, with flash-flooding likely.

In Charleston, South Carolina, a historic port city of handsome antebellum homes on a peninsula that is prone to flooding even from ordinary storms, Dorian toppled some 150 trees, swamped roads and brought down power lines, officials said, but the flooding and wind weren’t nearly as bad as feared.

Walking along Charleston’s stone battery, college student Zachary Johnson sounded almost disappointed that Dorian hadn’t done more.

“I mean, it’d be terrible if it did, don’t get me wrong. I don’t know — I’m just waiting for something crazy to happen, I guess,” said Johnson, 24.

Dorian apparently spun off at least one tornado in North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, damaging several homes, and another twister touched down in the beach town of Emerald Isle, North Carolina, mangling and overturning several trailer homes in a jumble of sheet metal. No immediate injuries were reported.

In coastal Wilmington, North Carolina, just above the South Carolina line, heavy rain fell horizontally, trees bent in the wind and traffic lights swayed as the hurricane drew near.

At 2 p.m. EDT, Dorian was just offshore Cape Romain, South Carolina, about 60 miles (95 kilometers) south of Myrtle Beach, moving north at 8 mph (13 kph). Hurricane-force winds extended about 60 miles (95 kilometers) from its center.

By midday, coastal residents in Georgia and some South Carolina counties were allowed to return home after the storm had passed, but the threat was worsening to the north in Virginia Beach, Virginia, where officials told beachside residents to leave.

Hundreds of shelter animals from coastal South Carolina arrived in Delaware ahead of the storm. The News Journal of Wilmington, Delaware, said 200 were airlifted from shelters in danger of flooding. About 150 more were expected to arrive via land.

In an assault that began over Labor Day weekend, Dorian pounded the Bahamas with Category 5 winds up to 185 mph (295 kph), obliterating entire neighborhoods and triggering a humanitarian crisis. As it closed in on the Eastern Seaboard, Navy ships were ordered to ride out the storm at sea, and military aircraft were moved inland.

Florida and Georgia, where about 2 million people had been warned to clear out, were mostly spared since Dorian stayed offshore.

Mayor Jason Buelterman of Tybee Island, Georgia, said the beach community of 3,000 people came through it without flooding, and the lone highway linking the island to Savannah on the mainland remained open throughout the night.

“If the worst that comes out of this is people blame others for calling evacuations, then that’s wonderful,” he said.

Tybee Islander Bruce Pevey went outside to take photos of unscathed homes to text to neighbors who evacuated. The storm, he said, turned out to be “a bunch of nothing.”

Associated Press reporters Russ Bynum in Tybee Island, Georgia; Gary Robertson in Raleigh, North Carolina; Jeffrey Collins in Carolina Beach, North Carolina; Jay Reeves in Birmingham, Alabama; Ben Finley in Norfolk, Virginia; and Seth Borenstein in Washington contributed to this report.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Michelle Obama Shares School Photo, Asks For Help In Giving ‘Girls A Chance To Learn’

Westlake Legal Group 5d712114240000ee1775f6ab Michelle Obama Shares School Photo, Asks For Help In Giving ‘Girls A Chance To Learn’

Former first lady Michelle Obama shared on Instagram an adorable photograph of herself from her school days in an effort to raise awareness of the “more than 98 million adolescent girls around the world” who are not in school.

“It’s so easy for us to take our education for granted, especially here in the United States,” Obama wrote in the photo caption, adding: “I believe every girl on the planet deserves the same kind of opportunities that I’ve had—a chance to fulfill her potential and pursue her dreams. We know that when we give girls a chance to learn, they’ll seize it.”

In light of International Day of Charity on Thursday, the 55-year-old stressed in her caption that when girls have the opportunity to learn, “our whole world benefits.”

“Girls who go to school have healthier children, higher salaries, lower poverty rates, and they can even help boost their entire nation’s economy,” she wrote.

In addition to asking others to share their own back-to-school photos, she implored followers to join the Girls Opportunity Alliance to “take action for global girls’ education.”

The program, which is run by Obama and former president Barack Obama’s Obama Foundation, has a goal of empowering “adolescent girls around the world through education, allowing them to achieve their full potential and transform their families, communities, and countries,” according to its website.

Obama ended her post with this hopeful message: “The future of our world is only as bright as our girls.” Hear, hear, Michelle.

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New Jersey woman accused of stealing $2G ring, swapping it for a $28G one at Costco

This attempt at a switcheroo didn’t fool the police.

A New Jersey woman was charged with theft this week after allegedly stealing a $2,000 diamond ring from one Costco store and then swapping it for a $28,000 sparkler at another.

NEW YORK JEWELRY STORE HEIST SUSPECTS TRIED TO ESCAPE IN TAXIS – BUT WERE REFUSED PICKUPS, REPORT SAYS

Westlake Legal Group Izaebela-Kolano New Jersey woman accused of stealing $2G ring, swapping it for a $28G one at Costco Greg Norman fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 3fd66f91-f96c-5ec4-8634-783cc9cb3b09

Izaebela Kolano, left, and the $28,000 ring from Costco she is alleged to have stolen. (Clifton Police Department)

Police told Fox 5 NY that Izaebela Kolano walked into a Costco in Clifton on Sunday and asked to view the expensive jewelry. She then handed back what the employee believed was the ring she was allowed to look at and left the store, they added.

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Store managers then determined that the ring Kolano gave back was a $2,000 one swiped from a Costco in Wayne earlier in the day, Fox 5 NY reported.

Clifton police tracked Kolano down at her home in Nutley and found the $28,000 ring buried under a dirt fence along the Passaic River.

Westlake Legal Group Izaebela-Kolano New Jersey woman accused of stealing $2G ring, swapping it for a $28G one at Costco Greg Norman fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 3fd66f91-f96c-5ec4-8634-783cc9cb3b09   Westlake Legal Group Izaebela-Kolano New Jersey woman accused of stealing $2G ring, swapping it for a $28G one at Costco Greg Norman fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 3fd66f91-f96c-5ec4-8634-783cc9cb3b09

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Jim Carrey says what Osama bin Laden did was terrible but he doesn’t hold a candle to Mitch McConnell’

Westlake Legal Group 4fubcJgRghF30KM8ltPu323HWDpD-FtT_XaycoPYD_s Jim Carrey says what Osama bin Laden did was terrible but he doesn't hold a candle to Mitch McConnell' r/politics

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Citizens come together to build custom homes for disabled vets: ‘It’s our way of serving our country’

In an exclusive Fox Nation series, the founder of Building Homes For Heroes sat down with host Lauren Simonetti to discuss why he began the organization and the overwhelming response he received from citizens across the U.S. in their willingness to help those wounded while serving our country.

CEO and founder Andy Pujol explained that it was the September 11th terrorist attacks that fueled his commitment to the cause. After watching on television as the Twin Towers fell, Pujol immediately loaded up his car with socks, T-shirts, and bandages, totaling over a thousand dollars worth of supplies. “I don’t know why but I knew that was my calling on that day,” he said. Through the smoke and debris, he drove as close to the scene as he could get and explained to responding officers that he was there to help. The officers declined his assistance at first, he explained, but Pujol credits his “defiance” for convincing them to lend him gear and allow him onto the scene.

TEAM PATRIOT BANDS TOGETHER WOUNDED VETS TO SERVE OTHERS THROUGH DISASTER RELIEF

“I remember sitting on the rubble looking around at these amazing heroes,” said Pujol.  “There’s a saying from the prophecy of Isaiah:  ‘they shall mount up with wings of an eagle and they shall run, and they shall not grow weary.’ That’s what I thought of those first responders and I knew there and then that I was going to serve my country. There was no doubt in my mind,” he said.

NAVY VETERAN TRAVELS US TO COLLECT STORIES OF FALLEN SERVICE MEMBERS

Pujol joined forces with his neighbor who had a background in construction, and they set out to achieve what seemed like an overly ambitious goal: to build one home for a severely wounded veteran. Pujol raised the necessary funds, and together with a small team, the home was completed after a year in mid-2007.

“I’m going to be honest, we had no idea what the hell we were doing, it was grassroots…we were scrambling,” he said, explaining the many unknown issues that arose throughout the building process.

As time went on, Pujol and his team became experts and their passion soon turned one home into many more, changing the lives of one deserving veteran after another. The most moving part of the whole process said Pujol, is the “homecoming ceremony” that each veteran receives upon their arrival at their new home, which includes military members, police escorts, and an outpouring of community support.

Westlake Legal Group homenation Citizens come together to build custom homes for disabled vets: 'It's our way of serving our country' Yael Halon fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article a328bffc-5d7f-5aa1-94f2-f5078ab01ea9

A home built by Building Homes for Heroes for U.S. Army Sgt Joel Tavera who sustained major head injuries and lost sight in both eyes after an accident during combat.

“The opportunity to give back to those who have given so much to this country is amazing and each and every ceremony never gets old. Every family is different, the children, the parents, seeing their smiles,” said Chad Gottlieb, the head contractor of the organization.

Despite the many challenges that arose throughout the process — such as a halt in donations due to the recession and a cancer diagnosis from the toxic exposure of the 9/11 site, Pujol was determined to turn Building Homes for Heroes into a large scale organization.

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“If the veterans got through this…” Pujol explained, so would he. 15 years after it’s launch, Building Homes for Heroes has built over 170 homes, changing the lives of disabled veterans across the country, with the goal of building 300 homes by 2022. Their small team, many of whom do not take a salary, said they are “overwhelmed every day” and excited about extending the organization to offer more services, such as psychiatric care and financial planning assistance.

“Those heroes are our veterans, those heroes are those that served at 9/11. They went and served their country. They put on those wings, and they ran straight into it and they never grew weary,” said Pujol. “I’m determined to keep going and press on to reach our 200th home, our 500th home…it gives all of us the ability to have that opportunity to serve our country.”

To see more full episodes featuring heartwarming stories of veterans who received their dream homes, visit Fox Nation and watch “Building Homes for Heroes,”  today.

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Westlake Legal Group Wheelchair-House-iStock Citizens come together to build custom homes for disabled vets: 'It's our way of serving our country' Yael Halon fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article a328bffc-5d7f-5aa1-94f2-f5078ab01ea9   Westlake Legal Group Wheelchair-House-iStock Citizens come together to build custom homes for disabled vets: 'It's our way of serving our country' Yael Halon fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article a328bffc-5d7f-5aa1-94f2-f5078ab01ea9

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Former college basketball standout Marshall Plumlee joins US Army Rangers

Westlake Legal Group Marshall-Plumlee-GettyImages-516562058 Former college basketball standout Marshall Plumlee joins US Army Rangers Ryan Gaydos fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/sports/ncaa/duke-blue-devils fox-news/sports/ncaa-bk fox-news/sports/ncaa fox-news/sports/nba fox news fnc/sports fnc article 757dcde7-6197-521b-bad4-c0556f163522

Marshall Plumlee was among the standouts who came out of Duke University, but upon his entrance into the NBA, he did not find much success playing for two different teams in two seasons.

But success for Plumlee, it appears, has come from outside the basketball court.

WOUNDED US SPECIAL FORCES VETERAN HONORED AT YANKEE STADIUM WITH FAMILY BY HIS SIDE

Plumlee became a U.S. Army Ranger last week after graduating from camp. Plumlee’s brother, Miles, congratulated him in an Instagram post, saying “Saying I’m proud isn’t enough… you’re selfless and uncompromising. I love you and it’s a joy to see you happy living your life the way you envision it. So grateful I get to be your big brother.”

Plumlee also posted a picture on Instagram revealing he gave his Ranger Tab to his mother.

NBA LEGEND BOB COUSY GETS MEDAL OF FREEDOM, AND OFFERS AN ASSIST TO PRESIDENT TRUMP

“No one more deserving of pinning my Ranger Tab,” he wrote. “Going from the NBA to the active duty Army and now Ranger School I have to thank my biggest supporter in the transition, my mom. I love you!”

Plumlee, who was in the ROTC during his time at Duke, played four seasons with the Blue Devils. He started all 36 games he played in his senior season.

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He played for the New York Knicks and Milwaukee Bucks from 2016 to 2018 in the NBA. He has two brothers, Mason and Miles, who both currently play in the NBA.

Westlake Legal Group Marshall-Plumlee-GettyImages-516562058 Former college basketball standout Marshall Plumlee joins US Army Rangers Ryan Gaydos fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/sports/ncaa/duke-blue-devils fox-news/sports/ncaa-bk fox-news/sports/ncaa fox-news/sports/nba fox news fnc/sports fnc article 757dcde7-6197-521b-bad4-c0556f163522   Westlake Legal Group Marshall-Plumlee-GettyImages-516562058 Former college basketball standout Marshall Plumlee joins US Army Rangers Ryan Gaydos fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/sports/ncaa/duke-blue-devils fox-news/sports/ncaa-bk fox-news/sports/ncaa fox-news/sports/nba fox news fnc/sports fnc article 757dcde7-6197-521b-bad4-c0556f163522

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Rob Gronkowski reveals when he started to think about retiring from NFL

Westlake Legal Group 112316-nfl-patriots-rob-gronkowski.-6dea0a9112298510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ Rob Gronkowski reveals when he started to think about retiring from NFL Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/rob-gronkowski fox news fnc/sports fnc article 734313bd-4ef5-586c-947f-ba34c430e538

Rob Gronkowski retired from the NFL after winning another Super Bowl title with the New England Patriots and has recently spoken candidly about the devastating effects football had on his body.

Gronkowski appeared in an episode of HBO’s “The Shop: Uninterrupted” this week and revealed when he really started to think about retiring.

NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS 2019 NFL OUTLOOK: SCHEDULE, PLAYERS TO WATCH & MORE

“It was about like two years ago there was a game changer in my life. I was trying to go out to the practices in the summer and I was getting smoked by every rookie. I felt in order to do something bigger in life, in order to get to a higher stage, I felt like I had to get away from the game and focus on my health,” he said.

“I lived the typical party life. I was eating f—— s–- every second. I was just trying to put on weight, I was living that life. At the same time, I was going out and playing f—— football and running people over, getting the f–- ran over.”

WARNING: EXPLETIVE LANGUAGE

Gronkowski has been very open about the injuries he suffered while playing in the NFL for 9 seasons.

ROB GRONKOWSKI REVEALS DEVASTATING EFFECTS OF SUCCESSFUL NFL CAREER

Last week, he told NBC News he had a “centimeter of liquid” in his head at points during his career.

“No lie, I felt my head, I used to have liquid,” the former tight end said. “It used to be thick, like, my head used to be thicker—a centimeter of liquid in some spots. And you’d be like, what the heck? You could put indents in my head.”

While Gronkowski left the door open for a potential return to the football field, he noted that he suffered a severe quad injury against the Los Angeles Rams in the Super Bowl.

“I got done with the game, I could barely walk,” he said. “Now I can barely walk. I’m at the after-party, I sit down and I’m just chilling all day, like the rest of the night until 3 a.m. I try to go to bed, I slept for 5 minutes that night. I couldn’t even think. I was in tears, in my bed, after a Super Bowl victory.”

Gronkowski said he couldn’t sleep for more than 20 minutes. He said two weeks after the Super Bowl, he had to get 200 milliliters of blood drained from his leg. Then a week after that another 500 milliliters and then another 300 milters one more week later, for a total of 1 liter.

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Gronkowski retired in March and, while the speculation has been that he would return to the Patriots at some time, the devastating effects of playing football appear to be weighing heavily on the future Hall of Famer.

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An Army first: Two sisters attain general's rank

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close An Army first: Two sisters attain general's rank

WASHINGTON – Their brother Rus Lodi calls them “leadership junkies.”

If you’re a soldier, you’d better just call them ma’am and salute. 

Maj. Gen. Maria Barrett and younger sister Brig. Gen. Paula Lodi are each accomplished in their own fields. But together they have become became the first two sisters, the Army believes, to attain the general’s rank in the service’s 244-year history.

“Maj. Gen. Maria Barrett and Brig. Gen. Paula Lodi represent the best America has to offer,” said Acting Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy. “However, this comes as no surprise to those who have known them and loved them throughout this extraordinary journey. This is a proud moment for their families and for the Army.”

Fathers and sons have risen to general, including Gen. George Casey, who retired as Chief of Staff of the Army; his father, Maj. Gen. George Casey, Sr., was killed in action in Vietnam. Then there’s the Brooks family. Leo Brooks retired as a brigadier general, and his sons Leo, Jr., and Vincent, went on to become a one- and a four-star general respectively. There is even a wife-and-husband team of three-stars: Laura and James Richardson.

Sisters would have to wait.

The military didn’t officially accept women into its ranks until the Army Nursing Corps was established in 1901. Women, of course, served unofficially before that, some in disguise since the Revolutionary War, according to the U.S. Army Women’s Museum.

The Pentagon and Congress had limited the role of women in combat until opening all fields in 2015.

Since then, more than a dozen women have graduated from the Army’s Ranger School, its proving ground for elite infantry soldiers. Command of combat units is key to ascending to the highest ranks in the military.

Overall, women make up more than 16% of the military’s active-duty force of 1.3 million. Women account for 69 of the 417 generals and admirals.

The sisters’ achievement is a remarkable milestone for women in the military, said Melissa Dalton, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and a former Defense Department official. She put it in the class of retired Army Gen. Ann Dunwoody, the first woman in any service to attain four stars.

“For both men and women increasingly normalizing women in leadership positions matters,” Dalton said. “The fact that it comes from same family is an incredible accomplishment.” 

A Silver Star role model at home

Barrett and Lodi didn’t need to look far for role models. Their father, Ruston, an Italian immigrant, was a World War II veteran and recipient of the Silver Star, although he rarely spoke about his service, his children said. Just as important, Rus Lodi and Barrett said, their father and mother Clara were educators who stressed public service to their five children.

“Both of my parents were school teachers,” Barrett said. “When my mother started having children, she got out, but she continued to be active in the community. So I do think probably underlying everything is that service component to it.”

Rus recalls his kid sisters as the focus of family dinners decades ago in Franklin, Massachusetts, each topping the other’s exploits in sports or school. 

“They were two just beautiful girls growing up,” said Rus, 63. “Maria would do something academically that just blew us away, while Paula was doing something athletically, flipping off a diving board, before anybody else. They have just been a great source of pride and admiration our entire life.”

The sisters shared a bedroom, if not the same interests, growing up. “She was a great athlete,” Barrett said. “I was probably more of a student.”

Barrett, 53, recalls a key reason for joining the Army was largely practical: paying for school. She was interested in joining the foreign service. So, she enrolled in the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) at Tufts University and was commissioned a second lieutenant in 1988.

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A funny thing happened on her way to a career at the State Department. Barrett found the Army a better fit. She had a great battalion commander, found the signal corps and discovered her passion for leading soldiers. Barrett moved steadily up the ranks, commanding at the company, battalion and brigade level. As a two-star general, she commands NETCOM, placing her in charge of managing and defending the Army’s information networks.

“When I talk to younger officers, I tell them the reason I joined is not the reason why I stayed,” Barrett said. “Our democratic experiment, even on its most imperfect day, is worth defending.”

Paula Lodi remembers watching a documentary on the first women at West Point. That sealed it. She was 8, maybe 10 years old, and she announced to her father that she wanted to attend the school. He encouraged her.

“If you’re a little girl, and your father responds positively to something that you want to do with your life,” Paula Lodi said, “you tend to grab ahold of it.”

Instead of West Point, she graduated from the Rutgers University ROTC program. 

“My dad passed away when I was a senior in high school, so I may not have been on the most solid footing after high school,” Lodi said. “And I knew the army was the end state. So I would say going through ROTC, staying focused on that end state was really what kind of pulled me through college.”

She received her commission in the medical services corps and planned to be a dietitian as a civilian. Ten years and out of the service. That was the plan. 

“I don’t know at what point probably four, maybe five years in, it just occurred to me, I absolutely loved what I was doing in the medical service corps,” Lodi said. 

Climbing the ranks in separate fields

Up the ranks she climbed, like her sister, but in a separate field, the medical service corps. She has risen to become deputy chief of staff for operations in the Army’s Surgeon General’s office.

“The fact that we’re sisters, not brothers, I think it’s a huge illustration of how far we’ve come as a service,” said Lodi, 51. 

Gen. James McConville, the Army’s chief of staff and top officer, has taken note of the sisters’ success.

“Maj. Gen. Maria Barrett and Brig. Gen. Paula Lodi are exceptional, proven leaders who’ve distinguished themselves over the course of their careers at various levels of command and during multiple combat tours,” McConville said. “These officers serve in critical career fields and lead organizations essential to the Army mission. Their success showcases how talented people can find multiple pathways to success serving in the Army.”

Neither sister said they started out with the goal to be general officers, and both express pride in the other’s accomplishments.

“I don’t think either one of us told us back in high school when we were both playing soccer together, that this is where we would be 27, 30 years from now,” Barrett said. “I don’t think either one of us would have told you that this is how the story would end.”

Their brother said he isn’t surprised. Over the years, he said, he’s noticed the way his younger sisters were “always talking about leadership, right way of leading, right way of motivation.”

Those were the very lessons their parents stressed, he said. He called Paula’s promotion to general the “closing chapter on a job well done by my parents.”

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“He’ll always be my dad, always be the epitome the perfect example of what man should be.” 52 years after his plane was shot down, his family finally got to say goodbye. Militarykind, USA TODAY

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