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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 16)

Andrew Yang vows mass pardon to all imprisoned for nonviolent marijuana offenses

Westlake Legal Group AP19173684995969 Andrew Yang vows mass pardon to all imprisoned for nonviolent marijuana offenses fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc fa79548c-6096-5445-a5fc-65162e4eb932 article Alex Pappas

Entrepreneur and Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang told a crowd in New Hampshire on Friday that he would pardon every prison inmate convicted of non-violent marijuana offenses if he was elected.

The longshot candidate – who has never served in political office but has a loyal following of supporters who call themselves the “Yang Gang,” made the comments during an event in Concord hosted by the ACLU of New Hampshire.

WITH HELP OF ‘YANG GANG,’ ANDREW YANG ELBOWS HIS WAY TO DEM DEBATE STAGE

“I’m going to mass pardon everyone who is in jail for nonviolent marijuana-related offenses,” Yang said.

“Americans now recognize just how broken our mass incarceration system is and how much progress we need to make,” Yang said during his remarks.

The presidential candidate has called for legalizing marijuana across the country, writing on his website, “We need to resolve the ambiguity and legalize marijuana at the federal level. This would improve safety, social equity, and generate tens of billions of dollars in new revenue based on legal cannabis businesses.”

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The New York City entrepreneur – once the longest of long-shots for the White House – has surged in polling and in the number of contributors to his campaign in recent months. Earlier this month, he became the ninth candidate to reach the thresholds needed to qualify for the third and four rounds of Democratic presidential primary debates, which will be held next month and in October.

Fox News’ Rob DiRienzo and Paul Steinhauser contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19173684995969-e1561654527981 Andrew Yang vows mass pardon to all imprisoned for nonviolent marijuana offenses fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc fa79548c-6096-5445-a5fc-65162e4eb932 article Alex Pappas   Westlake Legal Group AP19173684995969-e1561654527981 Andrew Yang vows mass pardon to all imprisoned for nonviolent marijuana offenses fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox news fnc/politics fnc fa79548c-6096-5445-a5fc-65162e4eb932 article Alex Pappas

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Child found dead inside vehicle parked at New Jersey train station lot

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Child found dead inside vehicle parked at New Jersey train station lot

Authorities investigate the the death of a child found inside a vehicle in the parking lot of the PATCO Lindenwold Station on Friday, August 16, 2019. Chris LaChall/Courier-Post, Cherry Hill Courier-Post

LINDENWOLD, N.J. – Authorities are investigating the death of a child found inside a locked vehicle Friday afternoon in the parking lot of the train station, authorities say.

The child could not be resuscitated by first responders and was taken to a nearby hospital, the transit authority PATCO said in a news release late Friday afternoon.

PATCO President John Hanson said the baby was inside the car for an unknown number of hours and police were trying to locate the vehicle owner.

“The incident is in the very early stages of its investigation and no further information is being released at this time,” said Alexandra McVeigh, spokeswoman for the Camden County Prosecutor’s Office.

Tragic trend: In the first six days of August, five children have died in hot cars

High temperatures Friday afternoon reached the upper 80s in the area. The PATCO Hi-Speedline operates daily service between Lindenwold in South Jersey and Center City Philadelphia.

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Trump Administration Asks Supreme Court To Legalize Firing Transgender Workers

Westlake Legal Group 5d5733cb2400006100b8fdff Trump Administration Asks Supreme Court To Legalize Firing Transgender Workers

The Trump administration is asking the Supreme Court to set a legal precedent that would make it OK for an employer to fire a person for being transgender.

In a brief filed Friday, the Justice Department argued that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 only protects workers from discrimination based on their “biological sex.”

“Title VII does not prohibit discrimination against transgender persons based on their transgender status,” the Justice Department wrote. “It simply does not speak to discrimination because of an individual’s gender identity or a disconnect between an individual’s gender identity and the individual’s sex.”

The Supreme Court agreed earlier this year to hear three cases that look at whether Title VII, the federal civil rights law that prohibits workplace discrimination, applies to LGBTQ workers.

Friday’s brief pertains to one of the lawsuits, R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, in which a transgender woman was fired after she transitioned.

Aimee Stephens had reportedly presented as a man when she began working at R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes in Michigan in 2007. The company’s owner, Thomas Rost, fired her six years later, when she announced her plans to transition.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit ruled that Stephens’ firing was discriminatory. 

“The unrefuted facts show that the Funeral Home fired Stephens because she refused to abide by her employer’s stereotypical conception of her sex,” the court wrote in a 49-page decision.

“Discrimination against employees, either because of their failure to conform to sex stereotypes or their transgender and transitioning status, is illegal under Title VII,” the court said. “It is analytically impossible to fire an employee based on that employee’s status as a transgender person without being motivated, at least in part, by the employee’s sex.”

But the Justice Department argued on Friday that “the ordinary public meaning of ‘sex’ was biological sex” when the Civil Rights Act passed in 1964.

“It did not encompass transgender status, which Stephens and the Sixth Circuit describe as a disconnect between an individual’s biological sex and gender identity,” DOJ lawyers wrote. “In the particular context of Title VII — legislation originally designed to eliminate employment discrimination against racial and other minorities — it was especially clear that the prohibition on discrimination because of ‘sex’ referred to unequal treatment of men and women in the workplace.” 

Chase Strangio, a staff attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union, which is representing Stephens in her suit, argued that the case has implications beyond the trans community.

“People don’t realize that the stakes are extending not just the trans and LGB communities, but every person who departs from sex stereotypes: Women who want to wear pants in the workplace, men who want more childbearing responsibilities. Those protections are also in peril with the arguments advanced by the Trump administration, presented at the Supreme Court,” Strangio told HuffPost.

He added: “There isn’t a coherent way to carve out LGBT people without changing the standard that exists under the law.”

The Supreme Court is also looking at two cases of employees fired over their sexual orientation: In Altitude Express Inc. v. Zarda, Long Island skydiving instructor Don Zarda was fired after he told a client he was gay. Last year, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit ruled that Zarda’s firing was discriminatory. But the 11th Circuit, in a similar case, Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia, ruled that precedent suggested Title VII did not protect against discrimination based on sexual orientation.

The Department of Justice is expected to file briefs on both cases next week.

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Trump Administration Asks Supreme Court To Legalize Firing Transgender Workers

Westlake Legal Group 5d5733cb2400006100b8fdff Trump Administration Asks Supreme Court To Legalize Firing Transgender Workers

The Trump administration is asking the Supreme Court to set a legal precedent that would make it OK for an employer to fire a person for being transgender.

In a brief filed Friday, the Justice Department argued that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 only protects workers from discrimination based on their “biological sex.”

“Title VII does not prohibit discrimination against transgender persons based on their transgender status,” the Justice Department wrote. “It simply does not speak to discrimination because of an individual’s gender identity or a disconnect between an individual’s gender identity and the individual’s sex.”

The Supreme Court agreed earlier this year to hear three cases that look at whether Title VII, the federal civil rights law that prohibits workplace discrimination, applies to LGBTQ workers.

Friday’s brief pertains to one of the lawsuits, R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, in which a transgender woman was fired after she transitioned.

Aimee Stephens had reportedly presented as a man when she began working at R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes in Michigan in 2007. The company’s owner, Thomas Rost, fired her six years later, when she announced her plans to transition.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit ruled that Stephens’ firing was discriminatory. 

“The unrefuted facts show that the Funeral Home fired Stephens because she refused to abide by her employer’s stereotypical conception of her sex,” the court wrote in a 49-page decision.

“Discrimination against employees, either because of their failure to conform to sex stereotypes or their transgender and transitioning status, is illegal under Title VII,” the court said. “It is analytically impossible to fire an employee based on that employee’s status as a transgender person without being motivated, at least in part, by the employee’s sex.”

But the Justice Department argued on Friday that “the ordinary public meaning of ‘sex’ was biological sex” when the Civil Rights Act passed in 1964.

“It did not encompass transgender status, which Stephens and the Sixth Circuit describe as a disconnect between an individual’s biological sex and gender identity,” DOJ lawyers wrote. “In the particular context of Title VII — legislation originally designed to eliminate employment discrimination against racial and other minorities — it was especially clear that the prohibition on discrimination because of ‘sex’ referred to unequal treatment of men and women in the workplace.” 

Chase Strangio, a staff attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union, which is representing Stephens in her suit, argued that the case has implications beyond the trans community.

“People don’t realize that the stakes are extending not just the trans and LGB communities, but every person who departs from sex stereotypes: Women who want to wear pants in the workplace, men who want more childbearing responsibilities. Those protections are also in peril with the arguments advanced by the Trump administration, presented at the Supreme Court,” Strangio told HuffPost.

He added: “There isn’t a coherent way to carve out LGBT people without changing the standard that exists under the law.”

The Supreme Court is also looking at two cases of employees fired over their sexual orientation: In Altitude Express Inc. v. Zarda, Long Island skydiving instructor Don Zarda was fired after he told a client he was gay. Last year, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit ruled that Zarda’s firing was discriminatory. But the 11th Circuit, in a similar case, Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia, ruled that precedent suggested Title VII did not protect against discrimination based on sexual orientation.

The Department of Justice is expected to file briefs on both cases next week.

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Trump Doubles Down on Effort to Push Jewish Voters to G.O.P.

WASHINGTON — By pushing Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel into barring an official visit by the first two Muslim women in Congress, President Trump is doubling down on a strategy aimed at dividing the Democratic Party and pushing some Jewish voters into the arms of Republicans.

But people in both parties warn that over the long term, the president could further erode bipartisan support for Israel, which has long relied on the United States as its most important ally.

In the run-up to his 2020 re-election campaign, Mr. Trump has spent months attacking the two freshman Democrats, Representatives Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ilhan Omar of Minnesota — who are part of a liberal foursome that has dubbed itself “the squad” — roiling the Democratic Party as he seeks to paint Republicans as Israel’s only true friend in Washington.

He has also marched in lock step with Mr. Netanyahu, who faces legislative elections in a few weeks. Mr. Netanyahu’s hard-line settlement policies and rigid bond with ultra-Orthodox Jews have also alienated Democrats, including many American Jews, posing a threat to the bipartisanship that has been fundamental to the two countries’ relationship since Israel’s founding in 1948.

If Israel becomes a partisan issue in the United States, advocates warn that there could be negative consequences for both countries. Israel’s security would be severely undermined without the political, economic and military support that flows from bipartisan backing in Washington. And if Israel is weakened, so too is the United States’ position in the Middle East, which is always stronger when both parties are behind it.

“You have a situation where Netanyahu is relying on Trump to help him in his re-election, and Trump is expecting Netanyahu to reciprocate,” said Martin Indyk, a former ambassador to Israel under President Bill Clinton. “Part of Trump’s election strategy is to paint the squad as the face of the Democratic Party and argue that because they are critical of Israel, therefore the Democratic Party is anti-Israel.”

In a string of Twitter posts on Friday evening, Mr. Trump said just that, writing that Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar “are fast becoming the face of the Democrat Party” and that Ms. Tlaib had behaved “obnoxiously” toward Israel.

The bond between Israel and the United States has long been rooted in what Aaron David Miller, a veteran Middle East negotiator for both Republican and Democratic administrations, calls “a confluence of interests and values,” such as free speech and an open society. The cancellation of the congresswomen’s trip, he said, raised questions about those shared values.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_152608935_22bd3ed6-543d-4804-9e3b-839936b98015-articleLarge Trump Doubles Down on Effort to Push Jewish Voters to G.O.P. United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J tlaib, rashida Republican Party Omar, Ilhan Netanyahu, Benjamin Jews and Judaism Israel Democratic Party Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) American Israel Public Affairs Committee

President Trump and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel at the White House in March. The two leaders have a close relationship.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar both support the boycott Israel movement and had planned a four-day fact-finding tour that was largely centered around examining the condition of Palestinians under Israeli occupation.

Tensions deepened on Friday, when Ms. Tlaib rejected an offer by Israel to allow her to visit her grandmother, who lives on the West Bank, on humanitarian grounds, switching course after she had agreed in writing not to “promote boycotts against Israel” during her trip. Ms. Tlaib’s reversal under pressure drew criticism from Mr. Trump, who said on Twitter that she had “grandstanded.”

“There is a perception, right or wrong, true or untrue, that the Netanyahu administration and the Trump administration are working hand in glove,” said Mark Mellman, president of Democratic Majority for Israel, a nonprofit that works to ensure that the Democratic Party remains pro-Israel.

Israel’s stance, Mr. Mellman said, has made his task harder. “In our hyperpartisan world, the friend of my enemy is my enemy, and to the extent that Democrats look at Trump as the enemy, if they see Israel or the Netanyahu administration as operating hand in glove, that gives them real pause.”

Mr. Netanyahu made clear his affinity for the Republican Party long before Mr. Trump moved into the White House. His relations with former President Barack Obama were so strained that in 2015, in a rare breach of protocol, he circumvented the White House in accepting an invitation to address the Republican-led Congress. Representative Nancy Pelosi, then the Democratic leader, called the address an “insult” to the United States, and dozens of Democrats skipped it.

With Mr. Trump in office, the Netanyahu-Republican alliance has only strengthened. Mr. Trump’s policies, including moving the American embassy to Jerusalem and recognizing Israel’s sovereignty over the Golan Heights (where Mr. Netanyahu named a new town after Mr. Trump in June, erecting a sign with his name in gold block letters), have made him more popular in Israel than he is at home. When the president pushed Mr. Netanyahu to bar entry to Ms. Omar and Ms. Tlaib, he was effectively calling in a favor.

Even the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, the powerful and assiduously bipartisan pro-Israel lobbying group known as AIPAC, has split with the Netanyahu government on its decision. AIPAC typically backs Israel no matter who is in power, but its view is that while presidents and prime ministers come and go, support for Israel in Congress is essential.

“What is the one mantra of the pro-Israel organizations for 30, 40 years?” asked William Kristol, a conservative critic of Mr. Trump who fought Mr. Obama’s policies toward Israel. “It’s congressional support. Presidents have their own views, but Congress is the core. So to pick a fight with members of Congress, which is going to force half of Congress to rally to their defense, is really foolish.”

While support for Israel among congressional Democrats remains strong, polls show that support has long been slipping among Democratic voters. A survey last year by the Pew Research Center found the partisan divide in support for Israel was at its widest in four decades, with 79 percent of Republicans sympathizing with Israel in its dispute with the Palestinians, versus 27 percent of Democrats.

That is evident on the presidential campaign trail, where Democrats once vied to see who could be the most supportive of Israel. Now, some are vying to see who can be the most critical. Beto O’Rourke, the former Texas congressman, recently called Mr. Netanyahu a “racist.” Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont accused the Netanyahu government of “racism” and proposed using American aid to Israel as leverage to change its policies.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi at the AIPAC conference in Washington in March. The pro-Israel lobbying group split with the Netanyahu government on its decision to bar an official visit from two Democratic members of Congress.CreditJose Luis Magana/Associated Press

Matt Brooks, executive director of the Republican Jewish Coalition, which aims to woo Jews to the Republican Party, said it was wrong to lay the dwindling Democratic support at the feet of Mr. Trump and Mr. Netanyahu.

“When you have a leading Democratic presidential candidate like Bernie Sanders who can call the prime minister of Israel a racist and nobody says anything, you tell me who’s responsible for it,” Mr. Brooks said. “We have a president who is the most pro-Israel president ever in history.”

Traveling to Israel is a rite of passage for members of Congress, especially freshmen. Representative Kevin McCarthy, the Republican leader, and Representative Steny Hoyer, the Democratic leader, held a joint news conference in Jerusalem on Sunday, along with dozens of members, in a show of bipartisan support.

“We understand the importance of this relationship,” Mr. McCarthy said then. “We understand undeniably the bond that has to be maintained, and you have that support in the House.”

Both men urged then that Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar be allowed to visit. When Israel refused, citing what officials viewed as the congresswomen’s one-sided itinerary, Mr. McCarthy issued a careful statement on Twitter saying they should have come with their colleagues, and that it was “unfortunate that a few freshmen members declined to join this opportunity to hear from all sides.”

As Mr. Trump and his fellow Republicans have sought to portray themselves as the only party for American Jews, Democrats in Congress have gone to great lengths this year to show their support for the Jewish state and to isolate Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar.

Last month, the House overwhelmingly passed a resolution condemning the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement against Israel, known as B.D.S. After Ms. Omar criticized AIPAC in remarks that were widely construed as anti-Semitic, Democratic leaders called on her to apologize — she did — and the House later passed a resolution condemning hatred of any kind.

But the Israeli government’s decision to bar the two women has strong supporters of Israel like Representative Josh Gottheimer, Democrat of New Jersey and no fan of Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar, taking issue with the Jewish state. Mr. Gottheimer, a centrist, called Israel’s decision “a serious, strategic mistake.”

Mr. Trump and Mr. Netanyahu have also helped turn Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar into victims in the eyes of the liberal left. That has energized the progressive wing of the Democratic Party, which is already deeply critical of the Netanyahu administration, and thrust Israel policy into the center of the 2020 electoral debate.

“Trump and Netanyahu are enabling one another to make Republicans the go-to party on Israel and Democrats the devil, eroding the bipartisanship that is so critical to the U.S.-Israel special bond,” said Mr. Miller, the former Middle East negotiator. “It is not yet fatal. But a few more years of the Trump-Netanyahu experience and it may well be.”

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Trump suggests ‘setup’ after Tlaib rejects Israel’s invite: ‘Israel acted appropriately!’

Westlake Legal Group Netanyahu-split Trump suggests 'setup' after Tlaib rejects Israel's invite: 'Israel acted appropriately!' Sam Dorman fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 69bf0955-4440-55d0-9a97-2f69d0fc4253

President Trump suggested Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., may have tried to set up the Israeli government after she backed away from her stated intention to visit her grandmother in the Middle East nation.

“Israel was very respectful & nice to Rep. Rashida Tlaib, allowing her permission to visit her ‘grandmother,'” Trump tweeted.

“As soon as she was granted permission, she grandstanded & loudly proclaimed she would not visit Israel. Could this possibly have been a setup? Israel acted appropriately!”

It’s unclear why Trump put the word “grandmother” in quotes.

CALIFORNIA CONGRESSMAN ON ISRAEL-‘SQUAD’ CONTROVERSY: THIS IS WHAT THE PRESIDENT WANTS US TO FOCUS ON?

Tlaib initially asked about visiting her grandmother in the country after Israel’s government denied entry to her and Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu pointed to the pair’s itinerary — which stated they were visiting “Palestine” rather than “Israel” — as evidence that they were intent on using their visit to bolster a push for a boycott of his nation.

When Tlaib initially requested the visit to her grandmother, she pledged not to “promote any boycotts against Israel.” But she subsequently tweeted that visiting her grandmother under those conditions would go against her beliefs.

That prompted criticism from Interior Minister Aryeh Deri, who tweeted that Tlaib apparently hated Israel more than she loved her grandmother.

SHAPIRO: PELOSI COMMITTED ‘GREAT SIN’ BY PUTTING ‘RADICAL,’ ‘NASTY’ OMAR ON FOREIGN RELATIONS COMMITTEE

Trump has long been critical of Tlaib and several of her fellow progressive congresswomen. On Tuesday, he appeared to prompt Israel’s decision to ban Tlaib and Omar, calling them out for anti-Israel sentiments.

Also on Friday, Trump tweeted that their colleague, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., was angry because Omar and Tlaib were stealing the spotlight.

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“Like it or not, Tlaib and Omar are fast becoming the face of the Democrat Party. Cortez (AOC) is fuming, not happy about this!” he tweeted.

Westlake Legal Group Netanyahu-split Trump suggests 'setup' after Tlaib rejects Israel's invite: 'Israel acted appropriately!' Sam Dorman fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 69bf0955-4440-55d0-9a97-2f69d0fc4253   Westlake Legal Group Netanyahu-split Trump suggests 'setup' after Tlaib rejects Israel's invite: 'Israel acted appropriately!' Sam Dorman fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 69bf0955-4440-55d0-9a97-2f69d0fc4253

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DOJ files brief with Supreme Court opposing workplace discrimination claims by transgender workers

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6065697263001_6065695532001-vs DOJ files brief with Supreme Court opposing workplace discrimination claims by transgender workers Shannon Bream fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox news fnc/politics fnc c5e57bdb-387a-5df6-b077-9ab7cde985df Bill Mears article

The Justice Department is signaling its opposition to providing federal protections for transgender employees who claim workplace discrimination.

In a brief filed Friday at the Supreme Court, the Trump administration is opposing the position taken by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which had been supporting a transgender employee in her lawsuit against a Michigan funeral home.

LINDSEY GRAHAM SLAMS DEM COLLEAGUES FOR BRAZEN WARNING TO SUPREME COURT

The justices will hear a pair of arguments Oct. 8 on whether the federal Civil Rights Act’s Title VII laws permit LGBTQ workers to sue for job discrimination. Federal courts have been divided on whether such protections apply, even though Congress did not specially mention that class of individuals when the law was passed more than five decades ago.

The cases involve challenges by gay men in Georgia and New York, and a separate case involving a Detroit-area funeral home that terminated a longtime employee after she began transitioning. Aimee Stephens first took her complaint to the EEOC, which ruled in her favor, as did a federal appeals court in Cincinnati.

The funeral home has argued in part that Congress was not thinking about transgender people when it included sex discrimination in Title VII.

In its filing with the high court on Friday, the Justice Department said the dispute is over the limits of the definition of “sex.”

“A transgender plaintiff therefore cannot prevail in a Title VII suit simply by showing that an employer relied on sex stereotypes,” said the administration.

The plaintiff must show that the employer treated similarly situated members of the opposite sex more favorably.

“Like any other plaintiff, a transgender person may use evidence of sex stereotyping in making that showing,” the DOJ wrote. “But the individual’s transgender status does not alter the legal standard.   Here, Harris Homes did not discriminate against Stephens based on sex stereotypes in violation of Title VII.  It terminated Stephens for refusing to comply with Harris Homes’ sex-specific dress code.”

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Sources told Fox News that the Justice Department had been trying for weeks to get the EEOC to change its official position and support the new brief, but that a majority of commission members had refused.

It sets up an unusual dynamic of potentially having two federal entities opposing one another in court. It was unclear whether the EEOC would clarify its own legal position with the Supreme Court.

The Trump administration’s position is a setback for LGBTQ rights. Officials are also asking for courts to allow enforcement of its ban on transgender people joining the U.S. military to proceed.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6065697263001_6065695532001-vs DOJ files brief with Supreme Court opposing workplace discrimination claims by transgender workers Shannon Bream fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox news fnc/politics fnc c5e57bdb-387a-5df6-b077-9ab7cde985df Bill Mears article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6065697263001_6065695532001-vs DOJ files brief with Supreme Court opposing workplace discrimination claims by transgender workers Shannon Bream fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox news fnc/politics fnc c5e57bdb-387a-5df6-b077-9ab7cde985df Bill Mears article

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New York Post columnist: Public ‘too quick to damn masculinity’ because of ‘mutation’ of #MeToo, feminism

Westlake Legal Group splir-perino New York Post columnist: Public 'too quick to damn masculinity' because of 'mutation' of #MeToo, feminism fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/crime fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc dff31dcf-4abd-5d67-938c-25a8c4c8d221 Charles Creitz article

The public is often too quick to criticize classic masculine traits while ignoring their “chivalrous” actions in tense situations, according to Miranda Devine.

In her recent New York Post column, Devine laid out cases in which the “noble side” of masculinity is often glossed over, as the writer told Dana Perino Friday on “The Daily Briefing.”

“I think we so quick to damn masculinity, and unfortunately, this sort of offshoot fo the feminism movement, this sort of mutation of the #MeToo movement, has conspired to tell boys and young men that their masculinity, their very essence, is somehow toxic — is malign and diseased,” she said.

“Every time we have these stories of mayhem and bloodshed … you see men rushing in to save the weak, to save women, save children.”

SYDNEY STABBING VICTIM IDENTIFIED AS SEX WORKER WHO REPORTEDLY SAW SUSPECT BEFORE RAMPAGE

In her column, the Australian columnist pointed to brave actions by men during a recent stabbing attack in Sydney and the actions of a bouncer during the Dayton, Ohio, shooting.

She said the bouncer, Jeremy Ganger, stood “at a door and ushered everyone in, and he was injured in the process but he protected others.” Ganger suffered a leg wound in the attack.

More from media

In Australia on Tuesday, a 21-year-old man allegedly stabbed a 24-year-old woman to death, then went on a public rampage before being confronted by a group of civilians.

Those who intervened pinned him to the ground with a milk crate until authorities were able to arrest him. New South Wales Police Superintendent Gavin Wood said it appeared that the attack was unprovoked.

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In her Post column, Devine described the phenomenon of men rushing toward danger as, “the chivalry instinct.”

“We always are quick to point to the dark side of masculinity when violence is committed, but too often we overlook the feats of bravery by men who combat it,” she wrote.

Fox News’ Travis Fedschun contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group splir-perino New York Post columnist: Public 'too quick to damn masculinity' because of 'mutation' of #MeToo, feminism fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/crime fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc dff31dcf-4abd-5d67-938c-25a8c4c8d221 Charles Creitz article   Westlake Legal Group splir-perino New York Post columnist: Public 'too quick to damn masculinity' because of 'mutation' of #MeToo, feminism fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/crime fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc dff31dcf-4abd-5d67-938c-25a8c4c8d221 Charles Creitz article

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Cathay Pacific C.E.O.’s Resignation Shows China’s Looming Power Over Hong Kong Unrest

Westlake Legal Group 16cathay-1-facebookJumbo Cathay Pacific C.E.O.’s Resignation Shows China’s Looming Power Over Hong Kong Unrest Hong Kong Hogg, Rupert China Cathay Pacific Airways

HONG KONG — The chief executive of Cathay Pacific Airways, one of Hong Kong’s best-known international brands, stepped down on Friday after a storm of criticism from the Chinese government over its employees’ participation in street protests that have seized the territory in recent months.

The resignation is a sign that China appears willing to put pressure on Hong Kong’s highest-profile businesses to show how serious it is about quelling the unrest, which it has described as “close to terrorism.” Paramilitary forces were seen gathering this week in Shenzhen, across the border from Hong Kong, as the demonstrations grew increasingly violent.

Companies are now working to show that they side with China and the territory’s leaders — and against the protesters. Beijing may increasingly demand that they show they mean it.

In a filing with Hong Kong’s stock exchange late Friday, Cathay said its chief executive, Rupert Hogg, was resigning effective Monday “to take responsibility as a leader of the company in view of recent events.”

Mr. Hogg acknowledged, in an email to employees, that Cathay’s reputation and brand had come under immense pressure, “particularly in the all-important market of mainland China.”

“Could we have managed things differently? In hindsight, ‘Yes,’” Mr. Hogg wrote, without elaborating. He could not be reached for comment.

Mr. Hogg was ousted a week after the Chinese government demanded that Cathay workers who participated in the demonstrations be barred from flying to mainland China, and days after the airline’s leaders met with government officials in Beijing.

The conflict began after demonstrators protested a proposed law that would have allowed the local government to extradite criminal suspects to mainland China, where the Communist Party controls the courts. The movement has broadened into demands that local leaders resign and that residents be allowed to vote in free elections.

Recently, the protests have become more chaotic, culminating this week in demonstrations at the city’s airport that snarled traffic and raised questions about Hong Kong’s future.

Big businesses have tried to reassure the Chinese government that they condemn the mayhem and support Hong Kong’s Beijing-approved leaders. Jardine Matheson, the Hong Kong conglomerate that owns the Mandarin Oriental luxury hotel chain, said Thursday that it “strongly supported” the local government and that the violence had “seriously threatened the well-being of our community.”

On Friday, Hong Kong’s richest man, the property tycoon Li Ka-shing, bought cryptic full-page ads in several local newspapers, using literary language to call for an end to the unrest.

Hours later came the news of Mr. Hogg’s resignation, an abrupt end to a career that spread over two decades at Cathay.

Mr. Hogg began working for the airline’s parent company in 1986, and ascended to chief executive two years ago. As this summer’s antigovernment demonstrations intensified in Hong Kong, a semiautonomous region of China, he found himself in an increasingly precarious position.

Cathay’s shake-up underlines the mounting economic pressures for Hong Kong. Forecasters have predicted that the protests, on top of the trade war between the United States and China, will weigh on Hong Kong’s growth. Tourism has declined, and the Hong Kong stock market is down.

Mainland China has huge economic heft in the city. Once largely dominated by local tycoons and companies that can trace their history back to the Opium Wars of the 19th century, the city’s economy now depends heavily on money from the mainland. Chinese buyers have sent property prices soaring, and mainland developers often outbid local rivals for choice patches of land in a city where attractive plots are scarce.

Like multinationals, many Hong Kong companies also do significant business in the mainland. Foreign firms have often rushed to make sure they do not offend Chinese consumers, who are often goaded into outrage by state-run media. Several luxury brands recently apologized for making T-shirts that suggested that Hong Kong and other territories were not part of China.

“If Hong Kong companies are primarily keeping the consumer in mind, they’re going to compare the seven million people in Hong Kong to the 1.4 billion people in China. That’s a huge difference,” said Scott Kennedy, a senior adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, who studies Chinese economic policy.

“In some ways, they’re damned if they do, damned if they don’t,” he added. “There’s so much pressure from consumers, protesters, Beijing, Washington, their board that it’s impossible to satisfy everybody.”

Cathay Pacific became the target of mainland China’s ire after one of the airline’s pilots was arrested late last month in Hong Kong and charged with rioting. In a matter of days, the airline began sending mixed signals about employees’ actions.

On Aug. 7, the company’s chairman, John Slosar, said at a news conference that employees’ political views were not a concern.

“We certainly wouldn’t dream of telling them what they have to think about something,” he said. “They’re all adults. They’re all service professionals. We respect them greatly.”

Around the same time, Cathay said it would investigate accusations that its employees had leaked the travel information for a Hong Kong police soccer team. In the past week, Cathay has fired four workers for misconduct related to the demonstrations. Mr. Hogg also warned employees against taking part in protests that the Hong Kong authorities had not approved.

Chinese state news outlets have continued to criticize the airline’s leadership, and Cathay’s shares have traded at multiyear lows.

China’s big state-run companies appeared to be putting their own pressure on the airline. Bloomberg News reported that China Citic and China Resources, two conglomerates controlled by Beijing, have forbidden employees to fly Cathay for business.

Cathay also has ties to the Chinese government. Air China, which is controlled by a state-run entity, has a significant stake in the airline.

As online outrage was building, China’s aviation regulator imposed what it described as safety measures on Cathay Pacific last week. It ordered the airline to bar employees who “support or take part in illegal protests, violent actions or overly radical behavior” from doing any work involving flights to mainland China. It also required that the company submit information about all crew members who fly to or above the mainland to the authorities for approval.

Mr. Hogg said in a message to employees last Saturday that the airline would comply with the new requirements. But the early reaction from Chinese state news outlets was that the airline’s measures were too little, too late.

As this week began, Merlin Swire, the chairman of Swire Pacific, a conglomerate in Hong Kong and Cathay’s largest shareholder, met in Beijing with the deputy head of China’s air safety regulator. Swire Pacific declined to say what had been discussed, and the Chinese aviation authority did not reply to a faxed request for comment.

A day later, Cathay and Swire Pacific issued nearly identical statements condemning “all illegal activities and violent behavior” and expressing support for “a strong and respected rule of law.” On Wednesday, the airline said it had fired two pilots for violating the terms of their contracts.

Mr. Hogg’s resignation was first reported by China Central Television, the official state broadcaster, minutes before Cathay Pacific issued its news release or posted its notice to the Hong Kong exchange.

The airline said he would be replaced by Augustus Tang, a director of John Swire & Sons (H.K.) Limited, the holding company of Swire Pacific. Cathay’s chief customer and commercial officer, Paul Loo, will be replaced as well, the company said.

Mr. Slosar, Cathay’s chairman, said in a statement that the airline was committed to the principle of “one country, two systems,” the phrase used in both Hong Kong and China to describe the unusual relationship between the two.

“We are confident,” Mr. Slosar said, “that Hong Kong will have a great future.”

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U.S. Customs system shutdown causes major delays at airports nationwide

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close U.S. Customs system shutdown causes major delays at airports nationwide

Travelers around the country are facing major delays at airports after the U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s computer system went down nationwide Friday.

“CBP is experiencing a temporary outage with its processing systems at various air ports of entry & is taking immediate action to address the technology disruption,” the agency tweeted Friday. “CBP officers continue to process international travelers using alternative procedures until systems are back online.”

John F. Kennedy International Airport confirmed on Twitter that they are affected by CBP’s “system shutdown nationwide,” requiring agents to process travelers manually until the computers come back online. 

Related: Facial recognition scanners are already at some US airports. Here’s what to know

Dulles International Airport is also experiencing delays, Micah Lillard, a spokesperson from the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, confirmed to USA TODAY . 

“We learned at about 3:30 p.m. EDT that Customs and Border Protection was experiencing a nationwide computer issue affecting their ability to process arriving international passengers, including at Dulles,” Lillard said in a statement. 

Los Angeles International Airport shared a similar advisory to passengers: “@CBP systems are experiencing an issue which appears to be impacting multiple airports including LAX. Officers are processing passengers manually so please check with your airline for the latest status of any flight impacts. More details as they become available.”

LAX said it’s is deploying a team to “help direct guests and provide other assistance” in the customs area. 

CBP did not immediately respond to USA TODAY’s request for comment.  

The international travel checklist: What to do before showing up at the airport

Frustrated passengers shared footage of massive crowds stalled in the customs lines on social media.

“Landed at JFK and machines are down at customs check point…I’m in the global entry line and the regular line has several hundred if not thousands in it,” @Baird_S said. 

User @BradPierce7 added, “JFK Airport Customs. Great work.”

User @PatriotAndiH said she’s been waiting at Dulles for “two hours and counting!”

“Stuck at Dulles customs system down,” she added. “All US passport holders just waiting…. What happened to the old fashioned stamp?”

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