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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 161)

Children Left Without Parents, Communities ‘Scared To Death’ After ICE Raids

Westlake Legal Group 5d4bde732400008c17937ad2 Children Left Without Parents, Communities ‘Scared To Death’ After ICE Raids

Several children in Mississippi had nowhere to go on Wednesday after their parents and caretakers were arrested in a series of Immigration and Customs Enforcement raids at seven food processing plants targeting undocumented immigrants. Some 680 people in six cities were apprehended in the massive sting, which federal officials characterized as possibly the largest worksite enforcement operation ever taken in a single state.

It remains unclear how long these families will be separated. 

A number of kids reportedly walked home from school in the afternoon only to be locked out — their loved ones nowhere in sight. Others were picked up by family friends and acquaintances, some of whom brought the kids to their parents’ worksites so the children could wave goodbye to their moms and dads as they were loaded onto buses by federal agents.  

The Washington Post described the helpless tears of a 12-year-old girl named Angie who watched as her mother — her sole caretaker — was loaded onto a bus with dozens of other immigrants in the city of Morton.

“The girl is devastated for her mom,” Elizabeth Iraheta, the family’s landlord who is temporarily caring for Angie, told the paper. “We still don’t know if she will be released. The girl is in bad shape, very sad.”

According to WJTV reporter Alex Love, several children whose parents and caretakers were arrested Wednesday were being housed in a makeshift shelter set up by volunteers at a gym in Forest, Mississippi.

Food and drinks had been donated for the children, Love said, but most of the kids were too upset to eat.

Love shared a photograph of a little girl crying into her hands as her pizza grew cold on a plate in front of her.

An 11-year-old girl named Magdalena told WJTV through tears that she hoped the government would “please show some heart” and release her dad who was arrested. 

“Let my parent be free and everyone else please don’t leave the child with cryness and everything,” she said. 

Schools in impacted communities were reportedly doing their part to ensure that children whose family members were apprehended would not be left alone.

According to The Clarion-Ledger, Tony McGee, the superintendent of the Scott County school district, said teachers and other staff were “on standby” to help kids in need. 

McGee also told the paper that bus drivers in the district had been given strict instructions to ensure that children were met by a parent or guardian when they were dropped off. If they weren’t, drivers were told to take the child back to school.

“We’re going to be here at the school until we make sure that every child is home safe or has a safe place to go,” McGee said Wednesday afternoon.  “We’re going to make sure our kids are taken care of first.”

ICE said that some of those arrested Wednesday will be prosecuted for crimes, some will be promptly deported while others will be released pending hearings before an immigration judge.

A spokesman for the agency told The Clarion-Ledger that the agency would first screen and process the immigrants in its custody before determining who would remain in detention. 

“Not everyone is going to be [permanently] detained,” Bryan Cox told the paper. “You are going to have persons released. ICE makes custody determination on a case-by-case basis based on the totality of their circumstances.” 

Cox, however, did not provide a concrete timeline of how long immigrants, including those with children, could be expected to be detained. He also said he didn’t know how many people detained in the raid had children at home. 

In the case of 12-year-old Angie, an ICE agent told her landlord that the girl’s mother would be released within hours since she was the only caretaker of the child, an American citizen.

The agent said the woman would be “released this afternoon,” per a video obtained by The Washington Post ― but according to the paper, Angie’s mom had not been released as of Wednesday night.  

Wednesday’s ICE raids have been the largest to date under President Donald Trump, who’s pursued a hardline immigration agenda since taking office. According to The New York Times, the operation was the biggest since 2006 when more than 1,200 people were arrested in a multi-state operation targeting a meatpacking company.

Luis Cartagena, a pastor in Morton, told BuzzFeed that the raids had deeply traumatized the Latino community.

“People are terrified,” he said. “They are scared to death.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

In Dayton, 32 seconds that changed everything

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close In Dayton, 32 seconds that changed everything

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CINCINNATI – When people say time is relative, this is what they mean:

A flash of recognition slipped across her face before the woman in a black tank top wrapped her arms around a man’s neck in greeting. Just nine seconds later, the two were fleeing a gunman. It feels as fast as a blink.

Down the road, another pair strolled toward a street light. They paused just after the first gunshot. It took six agonizingly long seconds before the two recognized the sound and started to run.

As police tell it, they were on the scene and had “neutralized” the shooter in 32 seconds. But those seconds felt like an eternity for the people who heard the shots, realized their lives were at stake and scurried for safety.

“It’s kind of like the Earth stood still for a second,” said Erianna Carpenter, who turns 28 later this month. “It was a surreal moment.”

What we know: At least 9 dead, 27 injured in Dayton, Ohio, shooting

Sorting out the precise order of events in the moment a 24-year-old man opened fire on a Dayton, Ohio, street, is all but impossible, even with the help of multiple surveillance videos, cellphone recordings and 911 calls.

That’s because teasing things out by the second is like trying to count raindrops. Thirty-two seconds is too fast to fill your gas tank or reboot your computer or properly brush your teeth.

‘Shocked and devastated’: Family of Dayton mass shooter issues statement

And yet, 32 seconds was enough time for Connor Betts to kill nine people, including his sister. It was enough time for police to surround him, to scream at him to stop, and to fire bullets into his armor-clad body and end the sudden rampage.

The scene in Dayton was as hopping as it gets on a Saturday night in the Ohio town of about 140,000. The diner is one of 66 businesses in the historic Oregon District, a trendy chunk of the city where some of the buildings are 150 years old.

Carpenter, a newly hired cook at 416 Diner (so new she’s still in training), had liked the night’s pace.

“There was nice, consistent business that night – it wasn’t too busy, wasn’t too slow,” she said. “The night was just going so good.”

That good night was ending. The diner closes at 1 a.m.

Carpenter walked out front to pull the diner’s sidewalk sign indoors.

“It was too heavy for me, so my colleague went out and pulled it in a little after 1 – 1:06, maybe 1:05.”

Just as the sign came in, shots rang out. But it’s still summertime, and Independence Day was barely a month earlier. Carpenter assumed the pops were fireworks.

The  416 Diner gets the numeric part of its name from its address on East Fifth Street. To its west, just beyond a narrow strip of outdoor seating, is an ATM. To the east is Newcom’s Tavern.

The gunman came from one building east of that, from a parking lot behind Blind Bob’s.

Because it’s summer in Ohio, and the late-night weather was pleasantly in the mid 60s, people gathered outside on bar patios. The Oregon District Business Association website encourages it, calling it “patio season.”

More surveillance video shows the chaos unfold. At 1:05 a.m., the gunman walked past groups of T-shirt-clad people casually drinking at tables beneath outdoor umbrellas. He wore khaki shorts, a backpack, a face mask, ear protection and a black sweatshirt that bore an apparent song lyric: “No heart to fear, no soul to steal.”

That particular video has no audio, but it’s clear that the first shots were fired almost immediately, as the patrons scurry for cover. Videos that do have audio show the gunman fired a couple of shots, then paused a beat, then fired again and again in brief bursts. Police found 41 spent shell casings on the ground.

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close In Dayton, 32 seconds that changed everything

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley said the quick police response ‘saved literally hundreds of lives.’ Provided by Dayton Police, Cincinnati Enquirer

“We have an active shooter on Fifth Street!”

The male voice was shaken but clear. His was among the first calls made to 911. He couldn’t give the dispatcher who asked a cross street, but he still managed to narrow down the location. “It’s right outside Hole in the Wall,” he said, referring to one of the district’s several bars.

The call recording, released by Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl, helps illuminate the bedlam. The unidentified caller at one point screams, “Get the f— inside!” to people fleeing the gunman on the street.

Nikita Papillion, 23, was already inside when the shooting began. She’d arrived at Newcom’s around 11:30 p.m. where, at her mom’s urging, she was taking a break from her job and her 2-year-old son to unwind.

Her mom gifted her a babysitter and Papillion managed to score a parking spot right outside the club. “I was totally excited,” she said. “The night was going good.”

At 1:05 a.m., she danced in the bar’s colored lights and machine-pumped fog to Cardi B’s pulsing song “Money.” Her sister, 28-year-old Tanycia Leonard, had gone outside for a cigarette.

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Papillion didn’t hear the first shots. The music drowned them out. She kept dancing, oblivious.

Suddenly Leonard rushed in.

“My sister came running through telling everyone they’re shooting,” she said. It took a second for the words to make sense, but Papillion said security guards then barked clear commands: “They’re shooting outside, everybody get the f— out!”

It didn’t make sense to Papillion that they were being herded outside, where a gunman was, but, in her shock, she followed directions. She, Leonard and Tiffany McConnell – the sisters’ 43-year-old godmother – ran toward Papillion’s car parked in that great spot she’d nabbed not two hours earlier.

They saw four bodies on the ground. Two were clearly dead; the other two would be soon. The women reached the car and found another body in front of the bumper.

Other businesses were directing people inside to take cover. The conflicting commands were confusing. People screamed and scattered. Some ran into Carpenter’s diner, begging for help.

“It was just complete chaos out there,” Carpenter said. “People were running into the restaurants, running into the alleys, running everywhere.”

Carpenter saw a woman bleeding on the sidewalk. Good Samaritans gathered to perform CPR on her, but she wasn’t responding.

“We had to just be like, you can stop now, because we just knew,” Carpenter said.

The woman was among the nine killed. The first had been felled at Blind Bob’s, where the rampage began. It’s hard to pinpoint the order of the others. Their bodies were sprawled along sidewalks and in the road spanning just half a block of East Fifth Street.

The victims are: Megan Betts, 22, who was the gunman’s sister; Lois Oglesby, 27; Saeed Saleh, 38; Derrick Fudge, 57; Logan Turner, 30; Nicholas Cumer, 25; Thomas McNichols, 25; Beatrice Curtis, 36; and Monica Brickhouse, 39.

Another 27 people were injured.

As deadly as the rampage was, it could have been worse. The videos make that clear.

The Oregon District is typically safe, in part because there’s strong police presence.

“The Oregon is really kind of a carefree place,” Papillion said. “Going down there, you don’t have to worry about anything. With the security guards at the clubs and the armed officers just there to be cautious, it has always made me feel worry free, always made me feel safe.”

This night was no different. Security guards and cops were there as usual. As soon as the gunshots started, officers who’d been tooling the street to keep watch on the bars sprang into action.

“Multiple shots fired!” an officer screamed into his radio. Another followed: “We got shots fired, we got multiple people down. We’re gonna need multiple medics.”

The dispatcher responded in measured tone: “I got everybody coming to ya.”

The shooting began at 35 seconds past 1:05 a.m., per one surveillance video time stamp. It stopped at 1:06:07.

Where the gunman was stopped is as crucial as when he was stopped. He’d bolted down the street, causing the crowds to scatter. Dozens had run inside of Ned Peppers, a popular bar where the lights are dim and the dance floor packed.

With no civilians left on the street to target, the man turned toward the bar’s front door. Inside, the place was full of huddled, panicked people. If he entered, he could have had 50 more bullets to spray without reloading.

But the police were already in position, their weapons drawn. The gunman rushed toward the bar entrance, and the officers opened fire.

He was shot “multiple times,” Chief Biehl said. A witness photograph shared with The Enquirer shows him face down still in front of the bar, cuffs around his apparently lifeless wrists, bullet wounds visible in his back.

The danger was over, but no one could know that. Dispatch recordings indicate police sought a second shooter, as they’re trained to do, though there rarely is one in mass shootings. Papillion was told she couldn’t go home yet because her car was part of the crime scene. She had to call her babysitter and wait hours before she could hug her son, NyJaire, so hard “I could have broke his ribs.”

Medics continued rushing the critically wounded to nearby hospitals, while the “walking wounded” were sent to a nearby town.

Warning: The video below contains graphic content.

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close In Dayton, 32 seconds that changed everything

Surveillance video shows officers pursuing gunman, Connor Betts in Dayton’s Oregon District and fatally shooting him early Sunday. Provided by Dayton Police Department, Provided by Dayton Police Department

Cellphone videos captured the post-shooting commotion. People walked the streets, some crying, others looking stunned and almost vacant. Rising above the steady hum of screams was an occasional guttural cry for help.

For Carpenter, it was the longest night of her life. In a way, it doesn’t feel like it’s ended. She’s had trouble sleeping in the days since. She’s trying to be proactive and get counseling help straight away because she knows this is the kind of trauma that might never leave.

Her life is forever bifurcated: the path she’s on post-shooting, versus the path that might have been had a 24-year-old man left his gun in the car and chose instead to sit on a patio with a drink.

He made a different choice. It took 32 seconds to change everything.

Follow Amber Hunt on Twitter: @ReporterAmber

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Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/08/08/dayton-ohio-shooting-32-seconds-changed-everything/1951923001/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The Secret History of ‘Easter Eggs’

Westlake Legal Group 00easteregg-tesla2-facebookJumbo-v2 The Secret History of ‘Easter Eggs’ Software Google Inc Computers and the Internet Bezos, Jeffrey P Atari Android (Operating System) Amazon.com Inc

Every car can accelerate, brake and turn. But only the Tesla Model X can put on a three-minute dance performance.

The windows open, the speakers blast a holiday carol, the exterior lights flash in sequence, the front doors open and close, and the gull-wing doors rise, arch and flap to the music.

That roboshow is an Easter egg: an undocumented feature in a tech product, set in motion by a sequence of commands that nobody would hit accidentally.

Over the years, Easter eggs in tech products have largely disappeared (except in video games). Like any other software, Easter eggs, so named for the hunt to find them, cost time and money to design, build and debug. Why would a tech company develop features it can’t advertise or even reveal?

In the beginning, the answer was revenge.

In 1976, Warner Communications bought Atari, the video game maker. The game designer Warren Robinett, then 25, chafed under his new employer.

“There was a culture clash between the New York people and the California people,” Mr. Robinett said. “We wore T-shirts, and had long hair and beards, and came to work whenever we pleased.”

Worst of all, the new bosses had no intention of giving credit to the authors of their games. And so, as an act of civil disobedience, Mr. Robinett built what is generally credited as the first Easter egg into his game “Adventure” — a flashing, colored credits screen that read “Created by Warren Robinett.”

To avoid detection by Atari’s testers, he hid it in a secret “room” of the video game, accessed by a convoluted sequence of steps involving a maze, a bridge and a one-pixel “key” that he called The Dot.

His bid for recognition eventually paid off spectacularly — in Steven Spielberg’s 2018 movie “Ready Player One.” To save his world at the movie’s climax, Parzival, the hero, must play Atari “Adventure” and unlock its Easter egg. “You see, Warren Robinett was proud of Adventure,” Parzival explains as he plays. “That’s why he created the first digital Easter egg!”

These days, Easter eggs are anything but acts of defiance. They are meant to entertain, to lure potential hires, to pay tribute to executives — or to amuse the programmers themselves.

At Google, there is a long tradition of Easter eggs, which have the full support of the company.

“It helps establish software as an art form, following in the footsteps of painters and musicians and craftspeople sneaking little jokes and references into their work for literally centuries,” said Dan Sandler, who works on the Android smartphone software.

Mr. Sandler has built an eggy surprise into every version of Android since 2011. For the current version — Android P — he created a secret painting app.

“One of the themes in the P release was ‘digital well being,’ the idea that you should be able to choose a balance of screen time and non-screen time,” he said. “In my paint app, over time, the strokes you draw fade away to nothing, like a Zen drawing board.” (He notes that you can tap the hourglass to pause the timer, “if you must.”)

There’s no Save command, either. “This is another Zen thing: Don’t cling to your creations,” he said.

In the Google Maps division, the best-known Easter egg appeared on March 10, 2018. It was International Mario Day (Mar10, get it?), celebrating the goofy Italian plumber from Nintendo’s video games.

On that day, the usual blue dot on the map, representing your location as you drive, appeared as Mario in his little go-kart. The project was a collaboration with Nintendo, which supplied the 3-D Mario artwork and audio recordings of Mario’s cheery voice (“Woo hoo! Let’s a-go!”).

CreditCreditBy Google

“To be honest, I wasn’t super excited about the idea,” said Munish Dabas, the Google Maps interface lead. “The last thing we wanted is something we’d get a lot of negative feedback or press about.”

But Mario Maps was a social-media hit. “The only negative feedback I saw was people asking, ‘Why can’t we have this as a permanent feature?’” he said.

Easter eggs have become so entrenched in Google’s culture that two Google Search engineers, Josh Ain and Colin Tincknell, have informally formalized the practice. They give talks for colleagues about creating Easter eggs; maintain an internal email group about Easter eggs (called “Poultry”); and have created software tools that make it “ridiculously easy” for their colleagues to add Easter eggs to Google search results.

(If you’ve seen “Avengers: Endgame,” don’t miss their finest work. Search for “Thanos” and then click the bejeweled gauntlet icon.)

“We focus on how much people are sharing this, how much people are delighted by it,” said Mr. Ain. “And we think it’s good for Google.”

At Amazon, the only known Easter eggs were planted by Amazon’s chief executive and founder, Jeff Bezos.

One is a permanent tribute to David Risher, the man Mr. Bezos charged with transforming the Amazon of 1997 — an online bookstore — into an everything store. That took Mr. Risher five and a half years. At that point, having built Amazon’s stores into a $4 billion enterprise, Mr. Risher decided to move on.

Just before Mr. Risher’s departure, at his final all-company meeting, Mr. Bezos called him up to the stage. The Amazon website appeared on the big screen. Beneath the copyright date on Amazon’s store-directory page, Mr. Bezos had hidden an invisible link. It opens a secret note: “Thank You, David Risher,” it begins. “Your contributions will live forever in the form of an ever-evolving Amazon.com.”

Credit

“And he does his laugh,” Mr. Risher said. “And I’m like, ‘Oh my god! And then we gave each other this huge hug.”

Sometimes, an Easter egg’s target is neither the public nor a cherished employee. It’s prospective hires.

That’s why Matt Mullenweg, co-creator of the WordPress web-creation software, has built so many Easter eggs into his company’s website, Automattic.com.

If, for example, you return to a certain job on the company’s hiring site more than five times, a message appears: “We couldn’t help but notice that you’ve visited this page a few times. Give a shot and apply already!”

Another Easter egg on that site is so hidden, fewer than a dozen people have ever found it, Mr. Mullenweg said. He has hired almost all of them. He prefers not to describe the Easter egg, so it can continue its work as a test for potential applicants.

He is also responsible for the Easter egg that’s hiding 5,274 words into the WordPress Terms of Service page, in a paragraph called “Disclaimer of Warranties.” It says: “If you’re actually reading this, here’s a treat.”

Credit

The link then opens a photograph of beef brisket and a tribute to Memphis Minnie’s, a San Francisco barbecue restaurant. Mr. Mullenweg noted that because he makes this Terms of Service document available to anyone, “this Easter egg has actually been copied into many other companies’ terms of service, without them reading or noticing it.”

As for Tesla’s dancing-car trick: It joins a long list of animated surprises that Tesla drivers can summon.

Tesla’s Romance Mode plays songs such as Berlin’s “Take My Breath Away.”CreditCreditBy Erin Brethauer And Tim Hussin For The New York Times

Those include Romance Mode (the screen in the car displays a crackling fireplace as a mood-setting pop song begins to play); Santa Mode (your car’s icon on the screen becomes a sleigh, snowflakes fall, and the turn signal produces the sound of jingle bells); and what Tesla engineers call Emissions Testing Mode (you, the driver, can trigger the sound of flatulence emerging from any of the car’s seats).

Eventually, Tesla’s engineers made them easier to find: Today, a single screen offers icons to tap for most of them.

But not all. Tesla has confirmed that its cars still contain Easter eggs that nobody has yet discovered.

The hunt continues.

Additional production by Alana Celii

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The Secret History of ‘Easter Eggs’

Westlake Legal Group 00easteregg-tesla2-facebookJumbo-v2 The Secret History of ‘Easter Eggs’ Software Google Inc Computers and the Internet Bezos, Jeffrey P Atari Android (Operating System) Amazon.com Inc

Every car can accelerate, brake and turn. But only the Tesla Model X can put on a three-minute dance performance.

The windows open, the speakers blast a holiday carol, the exterior lights flash in sequence, the front doors open and close, and the gull-wing doors rise, arch and flap to the music.

That roboshow is an Easter egg: an undocumented feature in a tech product, set in motion by a sequence of commands that nobody would hit accidentally.

Over the years, Easter eggs in tech products have largely disappeared (except in video games). Like any other software, Easter eggs, so named for the hunt to find them, cost time and money to design, build and debug. Why would a tech company develop features it can’t advertise or even reveal?

In the beginning, the answer was revenge.

In 1976, Warner Communications bought Atari, the video game maker. The game designer Warren Robinett, then 25, chafed under his new employer.

“There was a culture clash between the New York people and the California people,” Mr. Robinett said. “We wore T-shirts, and had long hair and beards, and came to work whenever we pleased.”

Worst of all, the new bosses had no intention of giving credit to the authors of their games. And so, as an act of civil disobedience, Mr. Robinett built what is generally credited as the first Easter egg into his game “Adventure” — a flashing, colored credits screen that read “Created by Warren Robinett.”

To avoid detection by Atari’s testers, he hid it in a secret “room” of the video game, accessed by a convoluted sequence of steps involving a maze, a bridge and a one-pixel “key” that he called The Dot.

His bid for recognition eventually paid off spectacularly — in Steven Spielberg’s 2018 movie “Ready Player One.” To save his world at the movie’s climax, Parzival, the hero, must play Atari “Adventure” and unlock its Easter egg. “You see, Warren Robinett was proud of Adventure,” Parzival explains as he plays. “That’s why he created the first digital Easter egg!”

These days, Easter eggs are anything but acts of defiance. They are meant to entertain, to lure potential hires, to pay tribute to executives — or to amuse the programmers themselves.

At Google, there is a long tradition of Easter eggs, which have the full support of the company.

“It helps establish software as an art form, following in the footsteps of painters and musicians and craftspeople sneaking little jokes and references into their work for literally centuries,” said Dan Sandler, who works on the Android smartphone software.

Mr. Sandler has built an eggy surprise into every version of Android since 2011. For the current version — Android P — he created a secret painting app.

“One of the themes in the P release was ‘digital well being,’ the idea that you should be able to choose a balance of screen time and non-screen time,” he said. “In my paint app, over time, the strokes you draw fade away to nothing, like a Zen drawing board.” (He notes that you can tap the hourglass to pause the timer, “if you must.”)

There’s no Save command, either. “This is another Zen thing: Don’t cling to your creations,” he said.

In the Google Maps division, the best-known Easter egg appeared on March 10, 2018. It was International Mario Day (Mar10, get it?), celebrating the goofy Italian plumber from Nintendo’s video games.

On that day, the usual blue dot on the map, representing your location as you drive, appeared as Mario in his little go-kart. The project was a collaboration with Nintendo, which supplied the 3-D Mario artwork and audio recordings of Mario’s cheery voice (“Woo hoo! Let’s a-go!”).

CreditCreditBy Google

“To be honest, I wasn’t super excited about the idea,” said Munish Dabas, the Google Maps interface lead. “The last thing we wanted is something we’d get a lot of negative feedback or press about.”

But Mario Maps was a social-media hit. “The only negative feedback I saw was people asking, ‘Why can’t we have this as a permanent feature?’” he said.

Easter eggs have become so entrenched in Google’s culture that two Google Search engineers, Josh Ain and Colin Tincknell, have informally formalized the practice. They give talks for colleagues about creating Easter eggs; maintain an internal email group about Easter eggs (called “Poultry”); and have created software tools that make it “ridiculously easy” for their colleagues to add Easter eggs to Google search results.

(If you’ve seen “Avengers: Endgame,” don’t miss their finest work. Search for “Thanos” and then click the bejeweled gauntlet icon.)

“We focus on how much people are sharing this, how much people are delighted by it,” said Mr. Ain. “And we think it’s good for Google.”

At Amazon, the only known Easter eggs were planted by Amazon’s chief executive and founder, Jeff Bezos.

One is a permanent tribute to David Risher, the man Mr. Bezos charged with transforming the Amazon of 1997 — an online bookstore — into an everything store. That took Mr. Risher five and a half years. At that point, having built Amazon’s stores into a $4 billion enterprise, Mr. Risher decided to move on.

Just before Mr. Risher’s departure, at his final all-company meeting, Mr. Bezos called him up to the stage. The Amazon website appeared on the big screen. Beneath the copyright date on Amazon’s store-directory page, Mr. Bezos had hidden an invisible link. It opens a secret note: “Thank You, David Risher,” it begins. “Your contributions will live forever in the form of an ever-evolving Amazon.com.”

Credit

“And he does his laugh,” Mr. Risher said. “And I’m like, ‘Oh my god! And then we gave each other this huge hug.”

Sometimes, an Easter egg’s target is neither the public nor a cherished employee. It’s prospective hires.

That’s why Matt Mullenweg, co-creator of the WordPress web-creation software, has built so many Easter eggs into his company’s website, Automattic.com.

If, for example, you return to a certain job on the company’s hiring site more than five times, a message appears: “We couldn’t help but notice that you’ve visited this page a few times. Give a shot and apply already!”

Another Easter egg on that site is so hidden, fewer than a dozen people have ever found it, Mr. Mullenweg said. He has hired almost all of them. He prefers not to describe the Easter egg, so it can continue its work as a test for potential applicants.

He is also responsible for the Easter egg that’s hiding 5,274 words into the WordPress Terms of Service page, in a paragraph called “Disclaimer of Warranties.” It says: “If you’re actually reading this, here’s a treat.”

Credit

The link then opens a photograph of beef brisket and a tribute to Memphis Minnie’s, a San Francisco barbecue restaurant. Mr. Mullenweg noted that because he makes this Terms of Service document available to anyone, “this Easter egg has actually been copied into many other companies’ terms of service, without them reading or noticing it.”

As for Tesla’s dancing-car trick: It joins a long list of animated surprises that Tesla drivers can summon.

Tesla’s Romance Mode plays songs such as Berlin’s “Take My Breath Away.”CreditCreditBy Erin Brethauer And Tim Hussin For The New York Times

Those include Romance Mode (the screen in the car displays a crackling fireplace as a mood-setting pop song begins to play); Santa Mode (your car’s icon on the screen becomes a sleigh, snowflakes fall, and the turn signal produces the sound of jingle bells); and what Tesla engineers call Emissions Testing Mode (you, the driver, can trigger the sound of flatulence emerging from any of the car’s seats).

Eventually, Tesla’s engineers made them easier to find: Today, a single screen offers icons to tap for most of them.

But not all. Tesla has confirmed that its cars still contain Easter eggs that nobody has yet discovered.

The hunt continues.

Additional production by Alana Celii

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Mom of El Paso shooting suspect asked police about son's 'AK'-type weapon, lawyer says

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Mom of El Paso shooting suspect asked police about son's 'AK'-type weapon, lawyer says
CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Mom of El Paso shooting suspect asked police about son's 'AK'-type weapon, lawyer says

A survivor of two shootings said she feels anger, sadness and fear as she sees shootings continue to take place in America. USA TODAY

An attorney for the family of the man charged in the El Paso shooting rampage says the man’s mother contacted police weeks before the rampage out of concern that her son had a rifle.

Twenty-two people died and dozens more were injured after a white gunman targeting a Hispanic area opened fire at a Walmart in the border city Saturday.

Dallas attorney Chris Ayres confirmed to the Associated Press that the call was made to police in the suspected shooter’s town of Allen, Texas, a Dallas suburb.

Ayres and fellow attorney R. Jack Ayres told CNN that the shooter’s mother contacted the Allen Police Department to ask about an “AK” type firearm he owned.

The attorneys said the mother was only seeking information and wasn’t motivated by a concern that her son was a threat to anybody. They also said the mother didn’t identify herself or her son in the call.

The lawyers told CNN the mother was concerned about her son’s age, maturity level and lack of experience but was told by a public safety officer that her 21-year-old son was legally allowed to possess the weapon.

Sgt. Jon Felty, Allen police spokesperson, said that he wasn’t aware of such a call and there was no record of it.

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Police say Patrick Crusius drove 580 miles from Allen to El Paso, which is a border city with a high concentration of Latinos, after posting a racist screed online.

Authorities say he surrendered to police with his hands up about a quarter mile from the El Paso Walmart where the attack happened.

He is facing charges of capital murder in state court and may face federal hate-crime charges that could also come with a death sentence if he’s convicted.

Contributing: Associated Press. Follow Adrianna Rodriguez on Twitter: @AdriannaUSAT. 

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An Electric Harley Loses the Growl but Still Aims to Turn Heads

Quiet. Sleek. Unintimidating. The LiveWire is the antithesis of everything Harley-Davidson has ever stood for. And yet, it is undeniably a Harley.

The LiveWire, the first production electric vehicle from Harley, is looking to redefine an industry that has grown complacent in the face of declining sales.

The country’s oldest (116 years) and best-known motorcycle maker, Harley wants “to lead in the electrification of this sport” just as it led with traditional, gas-powered motorcycles more than a century ago, said Matt Levatich, the chief executive.

“We are as a company shifting our mind-set from where our first thought in the morning was ‘We build great motorcycles’ to our first thought having to be ‘We build riders,’” he said.

Arriving at dealers in September, the LiveWire is targeting a new audience for Harley — one that is young, affluent and urban, and eager to adopt new technology. And it’s hoping to do it with a bike that looks and feels as progressive as the company’s new mode of thinking.

Harley, like most other motorcycle companies, is trying to reverse a steep sales decline. It sold 132,868 bikes in the United States last year — down 10 percent from 2017 and 18 percent from 2016. It’s an industry problem. Domestic sales peaked at 1.1 million in 2006 but struggle to reach 500,000 annually now.

“The millennials are getting in too slow, and the baby boomers are leaving too fast,” said Ron Bartels, general manager of Bartels’ Harley-Davidson in Marina del Rey, Calif. “We need a new kind of customer.”

Bartels’ is among the 150 American dealerships, out of Harley-Davidson’s 650, that will carry the LiveWire this year. A hundred dealers in Europe will also sell the bike. All of them must install a DC fast charger and train staff to service electric motorcycles. Mr. Bartels said his shop had presold seven of the eight LiveWires (retail price: $29,799) it would receive this year.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 09wheels-03-articleLarge An Electric Harley Loses the Growl but Still Aims to Turn Heads Zero Motorcycles Inc Motorcycles, Motor Bikes and Motorscooters Harley-Davidson Inc Electric and Hybrid Vehicles

A standard outlet will recharge the LiveWire overnight, and a DC fast charger will take it from empty to 80 percent in 40 minutes.CreditHarley-Davidson

The industry is banking on electrics.

“For so long, we thought of motorcycles as being these raw, fire-breathing vehicles,” said Harlan Flagg, founder of Hollywood Electrics in Los Angeles. “Motorcyclists have done themselves a huge disservice by scaring people away with these ridiculously loud bikes that are obnoxious.”

Their electric cousins are easier to ride than the gas-powered monsters. They have no clutch or gearshift, so riders do not need to coordinate all their extremities to operate the controls. They just twist the grip and go. There’s no hot exhaust pipe to burn a leg. And they project a friendlier, more eco-conscious image. They’re whisper-quiet.

There are hopeful signs for the industry.

While sales are flagging, motorcycle ridership is at an all-time high, according to the Motorcycle Industry Council in Irvine, Calif. Almost 29 million riders swung a leg over a bike at least once in 2018. What’s getting the industry in trouble is that the pre-owned market is three times the size of the market for new bikes, the group says.

Electrics could change that. Almost 70 percent of millennial riders in the council’s survey of owners said they were interested in electric motorcycles. But so far, no Tesla of bikes has emerged.

Zero Motorcycles, based in Scotts Valley, Calif., entered the market in 2008. Hollywood Electrics is its No. 1 dealer globally. Still, the shop has sold just 500 of its bikes over the last decade.

For companies like Zero, which have seen Brammo, Alta Motors and other electric motorcycle start-ups come and go, Harley-Davidson’s entrance into the category provides legitimacy.

“I hope Harley’s serious,” said Sam Paschel, chief executive of Zero Motorcycles.

Mr. Paschel said he was worried that Harley would jump into the market, “stumble and go back to the combustion engine business model they’ve been running.”

Zero is starting to get traction. It has set sales records monthly since 2018, Mr. Paschel said, and is doubling its production staff to keep up with demand.

The LiveWire is aiming at a new audience for Harley — one that is young, affluent and urban, and eager to adopt new technology.CreditHarley-Davidson

Zero’s high-tech SR/F model is feeding that growth. Introduced in March, it offers much of the same performance as Harley’s LiveWire, including cornering, anti-lock brakes, traction control and a top speed well over 100 miles an hour. But it has a lower price tag — $18,995.

Other mainstream manufacturers, including Honda, Yamaha and BMW, have shown electric concept motorcycles, but none are in production.

Electric motorcycles face many of the same market hurdles as electric cars. Buyers must deal with limited range, a lack of charging infrastructure and high prices. There are other deterrents. Most people don’t use motorcycles for primary transportation. Moreover, the young consumers the industry needs are frequently too saddled with student loan debt to afford them.

That’s why analysts are watching Harley-Davidson’s electrification strategy carefully.

“We remain somewhat skeptical,” James Hardiman, a Wedbush Securities analyst, said in a note to investors last month, citing the company’s declining sales. At best, Harley will sell 400 to 1,600 LiveWires in the first year, Mr. Hardiman said. That would add less than a percentage point to the company’s annual sales of 228,000 bikes globally.

The LiveWire is a radical departure for the Milwaukee-based Harley, a brand synonymous with large, expensive, gas-powered, cruiser-style motorcycles that both fans and detractors refer to as “hogs.”

Until a decade ago, it claimed about 50 percent of the United States market. And it dominated motorcycle culture, thanks to hit television shows like “Sons of Anarchy.”

But the market has shifted, and the company gave a small team of engineers seed money to develop a “no-excuses electric Harley-Davidson motorcycle,” Mr. Levatich said.

It wasn’t long before Harley was giving potential customers test rides of the unbranded bike in Tokyo, London and San Francisco and asking, “What would you think if the brand was Harley-Davidson?”

The LiveWire can travel 146 miles in the city or 95 miles in combined city and highway riding on one charge.CreditHarley-Davidson

There was enough positive reaction for the company to build 33 prototypes for a wider test ride program that reached over 30,000 people worldwide.

The LiveWire’s lack of noise is the most noticeable difference from a typical Harley, and the most surprising for a company that filed a sound trademark application in 1994 for its V-twin engine. The LiveWire replaces that engine with a black battery pack stacked atop a silver motor, elevating both to art pieces showcased with the bike’s trellis frame.

When I was riding the bike around Portland, Ore., for a day, it was a relief to be on a Harley and also be able to hear. If a gas-powered Harley growls, the LiveWire purrs its approval with instant torque that accelerates the bike from 0 to 60 m.p.h. in a mere three seconds on its way to a top speed of 110 m.p.h.

And when it’s idle, it lets you know the throttle is still live with a throbbing, yet subtle, heartbeat pulsing the seat.

Per charge, the LiveWire can travel 146 miles in the city, or 95 miles in combined city and highway riding. Those distances are helped by regenerative braking that captures the momentum of the bike when the throttle is released and feeds the energy back to the battery to extend the bike’s range.

Recharging can be done at three speeds. A regular wall outlet using a cord stowed under the seat can provide an overnight charge. Speedier results are possible with a Level 2 charger or a DC fast charger, which take it from empty to 80 percent in 40 minutes.

The LiveWire comes with an app called HD Connect that pairs with riders’ smartphones and can direct them to charging stations or alert them if someone is tampering with their wheels.

As a whole, the LiveWire offers a surprising level of innovation for a company that for so many years succeeded with updates of its classic machines.

Harley says it will bring two to four more electric bikes to market by 2022. Already, it has invested in the pint-size electric motorcycle maker Stacyc and floated two additional electric concepts, including an off-road motorcycle and a mountain bike. They all would push the company into new market categories in an effort to attract not only new motorcycle riders but two-wheeled electric riders of all kinds.

“Our sport is about the ride, and we need to inspire and light a fire under people to continue to enjoy what we enjoy and for more people to give us a look,” Mr. Levatich said. “This technology is intended to do that.”

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NFL Pro Bowl returns to Orlando for 4th straight year

The Pro Bowl will return to Orlando for the fourth straight year and be held one week before the Super Bowl.

The NFL’s all-star game will be an afternoon match at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 26. A week later, the league’s championship game will be played a few hours south in the Miami area.

Fans, players and coaches will vote for the 88 Pro Bowlers, and the game will match the AFC against the NFC.

A weeklong celebration in conjunction with the NFL’s 100th season initiatives also will take place across the Orlando area. Those will include a skills showdown and the league’s flag football championships.

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Pro-Bowl NFL Pro Bowl returns to Orlando for 4th straight year fox-news/sports/nfl fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 5fb7e7ae-aba7-51d7-878e-a668eac02982   Westlake Legal Group NFL-Pro-Bowl NFL Pro Bowl returns to Orlando for 4th straight year fox-news/sports/nfl fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 5fb7e7ae-aba7-51d7-878e-a668eac02982

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Trump Biographer Says There Is ‘No Authenticity’ to President’s Response to Shootings: ‘He Doesn’t Have Capacity for Empathy’

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680 arrested in ICE raids at Mississippi food processing plants

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 680 arrested in ICE raids at Mississippi food processing plants
CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 680 arrested in ICE raids at Mississippi food processing plants

Gov. Phil Bryant on Monday signed into law a measure that would prevent local governments and universities enacting policies that would limit enforcement of and cooperation with federal immigration laws and enforcement. Geoff Pender/The Clarion-Ledger

JACKSON, Mississippi — U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents executed search warrants at food processing plants across Mississippi Wednesday, resulting in the arrest of 680 people. 

They occurred in small towns near Jackson with a workforce made up largely of Latino immigrants, including Bay Springs, Carthage, Canton, Morton, Pelahatchie and Sebastapol. About 600 agents fanned out across the plants involving several companies, surrounding the perimeters to prevent workers from fleeing.

Matthew Albence, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s acting director, told The Associated Press that the raids could be the largest such operation thus far in any single state.

In an emailed statement Wednesday morning, U.S. Attorney Mike Hurst said, “U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations special agents are executing federal search warrants today at multiple locations across the state of Mississippi as part of a coordinated operation with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Mississippi pursuant to ongoing HSI administrative and criminal investigations.”

In a second statement, Hurst said via email, “The execution of federal search warrants today was simply about enforcing the rule of law in our state and throughout our great country.”

Where are Mom and Dad?: School on standby to help children in aftermath of ICE raids

Bryan Cox, ICE spokesperson, said everyone taken into custody and detained Wednesday will be processed but “not everyone is going to be (permanently) detained.”

“You are going to have persons released,” he said. “ICE makes custody determination on a case-by-case basis based on the totality of their circumstances.”

The names of the plants has not been publicly released by ICE officials. However, reporters were on scene at the Koch Foods Inc. processing plant in Morton. Another included the Peco Chicken Processing Plant in Canton.

In an emailed statement, Peco Foods Inc. confirmed raids took place at three of their facilities — Canton, Bay Springs and Sebastopol. The company is “fully cooperating” with authorities, the statement read. 

This story has been corrected since originally published to indicate the warrants were being executed on Wednesday.

‘Dehumanizing’: Jackson mayor slams immigration raids, asks churches to become safe havens

‘Tremendous fear’: El Paso shooting heightens fear of daily life for Latinos in Mississippi

Do you want to stay informed on more topics like this one? Subscribe to the digital Clarion Ledger. 

Contact Sarah Fowler at 601-961-7303 or sfowler@gannett.com. Follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

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NYPD seeking alleged subway pervert after woman’s report

Another New York City subway rider has reported a creepy incident.

This time, a 47-year-old woman claims she fell asleep on a train – only to wake up to find a man had placed his exposed private parts on her shoulder.

The alleged crime happened around 4:20 a.m. Wednesday, according to the New York Daily News.

CONVICTED PEDOPHILE REPORTEDLY BEATEN, DROWNED BY JAIL CELLMATE

When the woman confronted the suspect, he ran off the train at the Union Square station in Manhattan, the report said.

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The New York Police Department has posted a photo of the suspect and has asked for help from the public in finding him.

Westlake Legal Group nyc-subway-generic-2 NYPD seeking alleged subway pervert after woman’s report fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox news fnc/us fnc e15a7966-5207-53f1-b429-3cdca75faf9c Dom Calicchio article   Westlake Legal Group nyc-subway-generic-2 NYPD seeking alleged subway pervert after woman’s report fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox news fnc/us fnc e15a7966-5207-53f1-b429-3cdca75faf9c Dom Calicchio article

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