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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 166)

U.S.-China Trade Talks to Resume, but New Tariffs Could Complicate Them

Westlake Legal Group 04chinatrade-facebookJumbo U.S.-China Trade Talks to Resume, but New Tariffs Could Complicate Them United States International Relations United States Trump, Donald J Politics and Government Mnuchin, Steven T Liu He (1952- ) Lighthizer, Robert E International Trade and World Market Economic Conditions and Trends Customs (Tariff) China

SHANGHAI — The United States and China will hold trade talks in Washington early next month, officials from both countries said on Thursday, but new tariffs will make it difficult to find a way to end their economic clash.

Liu He, a top Chinese economic official and Beijing’s top trade negotiator, will travel to Washington in early October, state media said. Mr. Liu spoke on Thursday morning with Robert E. Lighthizer, the United States trade representative, and Steven Mnuchin, the United States Treasury secretary. Mr. Lighthizer’s office said that deputy-level meetings would take place ahead of the talks.

If held as scheduled, the talks would take place after new American tariffs kick in, which could make it difficult for the two sides to reach a deal. President Trump has said he would raise tariffs to 30 percent from the current 25 percent on $250 billion in Chinese goods. Those tariffs cover everything from cars to aircraft parts.

On Sunday, Washington began charging a 15 percent tax on more than $100 billion worth of Chinese imports. Beijing retaliated with its own increased tariffs. Both countries plan to impose still more tariffs in December, barring a breakthrough in talks.

Already, pessimism had been growing on both sides of the Pacific Ocean about the possibility of a trade deal before the United States presidential elections next year. The mounting tariffs have rattled global markets and set off fears over world economic growth.

Businesses in both the United States and China have begun to express concern about a trade war that has dragged on for more than a year. American manufacturing activity contracted for the first time in three years because of slowing export orders amid the trade dispute, data showed on Wednesday.

Chinese factory activity, meanwhile, contracted for three months this summer before ticking back up slightly in data released this week. Its manufacturing sector has suffered layoffs and factory shutdowns from the trade war and as its economy grows at its slowest pace in three decades.

“When I speak to C.E.O.s of leading Chinese and global companies, everyone is fretting about what the latest escalations mean for their businesses in the short term, and more worrisome, for their long-term strategy and investment plans,” said Fred Hu, founder of the investment firm Primavera Capital Group and former head of Goldman Sachs’s greater China business.

The two sides show little sign of backing down, however. Mr. Trump has gambled that China’s softening economy will put pressure on Beijing’s leaders to back down. Speaking with reporters on Wednesday, Mr. Trump cited the country’s slowdown, which he called, inaccurately, “the worst year they’ve had in 57 years.”

“And they want to make a deal,” Mr. Trump said. “We’ll see what happens.”

For their part, China’s leaders believe their own efforts to quell China’s dependence on debt are mostly responsible for the slowdown, and that they could reverse course if needed to bolster growth.

Next month’s talks would be the 13th time that senior-level trade negotiators have met. American negotiators traveled to Shanghai in July to meet briefly with their Chinese counterparts and left with an agreement to meet again in Washington on Sept. 1.

But the plans were disrupted when, one day after negotiators returned home, Mr. Trump said the United States would impose a 10 percent tariff on $300 billion worth of Chinese goods on Sept. 1, once again escalating trade tensions.

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Fighting Back Tears, Winston Churchill’s Grandson Exits Politics and Chides Boris Johnson

Westlake Legal Group 04brexit-soames-facebookJumbo Fighting Back Tears, Winston Churchill’s Grandson Exits Politics and Chides Boris Johnson sexual harassment Politics and Government Legislatures and Parliaments Johnson, Boris Great Britain Withdrawal from EU (Brexit) Great Britain Farage, Nigel (1964- ) European Union Europe Conservative Party (Great Britain) Churchill, Winston Leonard Spencer Brexit Party (Great Britain)

LONDON — Rising to speak before a half-empty House of Commons on Wednesday, Nicholas Soames, the grandson of Winston Churchill, choked up, fighting back tears.

Mr. Soames, 71, has served in Parliament for 37 years and is a popular figure, known to have a lively sense of humor. But he now was announcing his decision to retire from politics, a day after Prime Minister Boris Johnson had expelled him from the Conservative Party. He had joined a group of 21 Tory rebels who defied Mr. Johnson on Tuesday night by voting against legislation that would pave the way toward blocking a no-deal Brexit.

“I’m truly very sad that it should end in this way,” Mr. Soames said. “It is my most fervent hope that this house will rediscover the spirit of compromise, humility and understanding that will enable us finally to push ahead with the vital work in the interests of the whole country that has inevitably had to be so sadly neglected whilst we have devoted so much time to wrestling with Brexit.”

If Brexit is shaking the foundations of party politics in Britain, the expulsion and resignation of Mr. Soames is a moment that not long ago would have been unimaginable. It is especially searing given that Mr. Johnson, who cast him aside, considers Churchill one of his greatest heroes, and has written a biography of Britain’s wartime leader.

Mr. Soames, whose mother was Mr. Churchill’s youngest child, said he had voted against the Tory government three times in his 37 years but that this was the first time he had “the whip removed,” meaning he will no longer be allowed to represent his party in Parliament.

“I have been told by the chief whip, who is my friend and who I like very much, that it will be his sad duty to write to me tomorrow to tell me I have had the whip removed after 37 years as a Conservative member of Parliament,” he said Tuesday night in an interview with the BBC. “That’s fortunes of war. I knew what I was doing.”

Determined to deliver Brexit on Oct. 31 “come what may,” Mr. Johnson has become increasingly ruthless, exacerbating existing frictions within his party over Britain’s exit from the European Union. Since taking office in July, Mr. Johnson has purged cabinet ministers and ordered a five-week suspension of parliament as a tactic to limit its ability to challenge his plan to leave the European bloc with or without a deal.

But lawmakers struck back on Tuesday, aided by the Tory rebels, by wresting control of the Brexit agenda in a parliamentary vote. Next they are pushing through legislation to prevent a no-deal Brexit.

Mr. Soames said he thought the purge was part of a plan by Mr. Johnson to wage a general election as the candidate for the pro-Brexit crowd, to blunt the challenge of the Brexit Party of Nigel Farage.

“It is a pity — a great pity — that this has in my view all been planned,” Mr. Soames said. “This is exactly what they wanted, and they will try to have a general election which is what they wanted.”

The ousted, or, in technical terms, the deselected lawmakers are free to stand for Parliament as independent candidates in the next general election, but Mr. Soames said he would not.

From the outset of his political career, Mr. Soames was confronted with the shadow of his grandfather but managed to create his own space.

In 1952, when Mr. Soames was 5, he was oblivious to his grandfather’s significance. He told the Guardian newspaper that he had walked into Mr. Churchill’s bedroom one day and asked, “Is it true, grandpapa, that you are the greatest man in the world?”

“Yes, I am,” Mr. Churchill replied. “Now bugger off.”

Mr. Soames, who was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II for his services in politics, is also known to be brash. Guy Woodward, a journalist who interviewed him about his passion for wine, described the experience as bruising. “The Tory grandee doesn’t so much talk at you as through you, barely pausing for respite,” Mr. Woodward wrote in The Decanter Journal.

The Tory veteran, who has been married twice and has three children, has been accused of being one of the most sexist lawmakers in Parliament. In the book “Women in Parliament — The New Suffragettes,” at least six women accused Mr. Soames of verbal sexual harassment. Others accused him of making cupping gestures with his hands, suggestive of female breasts, the Independent newspaper reported.

Mr. Soames has dismissed the allegations as “nonsense” and “fiction” that had been made up to sell the book.

For his part, Mr. Johnson has repeatedly spoken of his deep admiration for Mr. Churchill’s leadership and marked the 50th anniversary of his death in 2014 by publishing a biography, “The Churchill Factor: How One Man Made History.”

In his introduction he wrote: “When I was growing up there was no doubt about it. Churchill was quite the greatest statesman that Britain had ever produced. From a very early age I had a pretty clear idea of what he had done: he had led my country to victory against all the odds and against one of the most disgusting tyrannies the world has seen.”

It turns out that deselection is another thing that Mr. Soames now has in common with his grandfather. Churchill himself was deselected in 1904 in an argument over free trade. Politically, he did recover.

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U.S.-China Trade Talks to Resume, but New Tariffs Could Complicate Them

Westlake Legal Group 04chinatrade-facebookJumbo U.S.-China Trade Talks to Resume, but New Tariffs Could Complicate Them United States International Relations United States Trump, Donald J Politics and Government Mnuchin, Steven T Liu He (1952- ) Lighthizer, Robert E International Trade and World Market Economic Conditions and Trends Customs (Tariff) China

SHANGHAI — The United States and China will hold trade talks in Washington early next month, officials from both countries said on Thursday, but new tariffs will make it difficult to find a way to end their economic clash.

Liu He, a top Chinese economic official and Beijing’s top trade negotiator, will travel to Washington in early October, state media said. Mr. Liu spoke on Thursday morning with Robert E. Lighthizer, the United States trade representative, and Steven Mnuchin, the United States Treasury secretary. Mr. Lighthizer’s office said that deputy-level meetings would take place ahead of the talks.

If held as scheduled, the talks would take place after new American tariffs kick in, which could make it difficult for the two sides to reach a deal. President Trump has said he would raise tariffs to 30 percent from the current 25 percent on $250 billion in Chinese goods. Those tariffs cover everything from cars to aircraft parts.

On Sunday, Washington began charging a 15 percent tax on more than $100 billion worth of Chinese imports. Beijing retaliated with its own increased tariffs. Both countries plan to impose still more tariffs in December, barring a breakthrough in talks.

Already, pessimism had been growing on both sides of the Pacific Ocean about the possibility of a trade deal before the United States presidential elections next year. The mounting tariffs have rattled global markets and set off fears over world economic growth.

Businesses in both the United States and China have begun to express concern about a trade war that has dragged on for more than a year. American manufacturing activity contracted for the first time in three years because of slowing export orders amid the trade dispute, data showed on Wednesday.

Chinese factory activity, meanwhile, contracted for three months this summer before ticking back up slightly in data released this week. Its manufacturing sector has suffered layoffs and factory shutdowns from the trade war and as its economy grows at its slowest pace in three decades.

“When I speak to C.E.O.s of leading Chinese and global companies, everyone is fretting about what the latest escalations mean for their businesses in the short term, and more worrisome, for their long-term strategy and investment plans,” said Fred Hu, founder of the investment firm Primavera Capital Group and former head of Goldman Sachs’s greater China business.

The two sides show little sign of backing down, however. Mr. Trump has gambled that China’s softening economy will put pressure on Beijing’s leaders to back down. Speaking with reporters on Wednesday, Mr. Trump cited the country’s slowdown, which he called, inaccurately, “the worst year they’ve had in 57 years.”

“And they want to make a deal,” Mr. Trump said. “We’ll see what happens.”

For their part, China’s leaders believe their own efforts to quell China’s dependence on debt are mostly responsible for the slowdown, and that they could reverse course if needed to bolster growth.

Next month’s talks would be the 13th time that senior-level trade negotiators have met. American negotiators traveled to Shanghai in July to meet briefly with their Chinese counterparts and left with an agreement to meet again in Washington on Sept. 1.

But the plans were disrupted when, one day after negotiators returned home, Mr. Trump said the United States would impose a 10 percent tariff on $300 billion worth of Chinese goods on Sept. 1, once again escalating trade tensions.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Biden says he will rethink fundraiser hosted by fossil fuel company co-founder

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Biden says he will rethink fundraiser hosted by fossil fuel company co-founder

On the second night of the second Democratic primary debate, Joe Biden was center stage, and took the brunt of challenger attacks. Biden was prepped. USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — Former Vice President Joe Biden and his campaign pushed back against the suggestion at a CNN climate change forum Wednesday that he’s breaking a pledge to reject campaign contributions from the fossil fuel industry with his plans to participate in a fundraiser hosted by the co-founder of a Houston-based natural gas producer.

Biden is set to attend a fundraiser in New York Thursday hosted by Andrew Goldman, who helped co-found the company Western LNG.

Goldman, who previously worked a senior adviser to Biden while he served in the Senate, was an original investor in Western LNG, according to the Biden campaign. But Goldman currently works as managing director for New York-based investment firm Hildred Capital Partners.

The issue arose after Biden was questioned at a CNN climate town hall Wednesday by an audience member about Goldman.

More: CNN announces Democratic lineup, other details of 7-hour, live climate town hall event

“I know that you signed the No Fossil Fuel Money pledge, but I have to ask: How can we trust you to hold these corporations and executive accountable for their crimes against humanity, when we know tomorrow, you are holding a high dollar fundraiser hosted by Andrew Goldman, a fossil fuel executive?” said Isaac Larkin, who CNN identified as a backer of Biden rival Sen. Bernie Sanders.

“He’s not a fossil fuel executive,” Biden responded. 

CNN anchor Anderson Cooper, who was moderating Biden’s segment, noted following Larkin’s question that Western LNG’s biggest project is a floating facility for natural gas off the northern coast of British Columbia designed to provide Canadian gas to markets in northeast Asia. Cooper, near the end of the question-and-answer session, clarified that Goldman had no day-to-day involvement in Western LNG.

Biden followed by saying he “didn’t realize he does that” regarding Goldman’s role in the fossil fuel company.

“If you look at the SEC filings, he’s not listed as one of those executives.” Biden added. “I’ve kept that pledge. Period.”

Biden was a signer of the No Fossil Fuel Money Pledge. He was one of atleast 18 candidates to pledge not to take campaign contributions from the fossil fuel industry.

Symone Sanders, a senior adviser to Biden, tweeted that Goldman is “not involved in the day to day operation. He’s not on the board of the company (Western LNG), nor the board of the portfolio company.”

A July 2018 filing with the British Columbia Utilities Commission lists Goldman as part of the “senior management personnel involved with” Western LNG.  

“Are you going to look at that fundraiser tomorrow night?” Cooper asked Biden.

When asked if he was going to look at the fundraiser tomorrow, Biden answered, ”I’m going to look at what you just told me and find out if that’s accurate. Yes.”

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/elections/2019/09/04/joe-biden-questioned-fundraisers-fossil-fuel-ties/2216831001/

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Trump Insists He Was Right About Hurricane Dorian Heading for Alabama

WASHINGTON — When President Trump displayed a large map of Hurricane Dorian’s path in the Oval Office on Wednesday, it was hard to miss a black line that appeared to have been drawn to extend the storm’s possible path into the state of Alabama.

That might have been intended to bolster Mr. Trump’s claim on Sunday when he tweeted that “in addition to Florida — South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama, will most likely be hit (much) harder than anticipated.”

Never mind that the Alabama office of the National Weather Service quickly responded to Mr. Trump’s original claim by insisting that “Alabama will NOT see any impacts from #Dorian.”

“We repeat, no impacts from Hurricane #Dorian will be felt across Alabama,” the office tweeted. “The system will remain too far east.”

So did Mr. Trump — who frequently uses black Sharpie pens to sign legislation — add the mark to justify his unfounded claim about the dangers faced by residents of the Cotton State?

Or did someone else in his administration clumsily modify the map so that it would appear to back up the president?

The black line on the map was drawn to look like the top of the so-called cone of uncertainty that is familiar to weather watchers. The line curved through the southwest corner of Georgia and the southeast corner of Alabama, and into the Gulf of Mexico.

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security said that he was unclear what the black line on the map was referring to and that he needed to gather additional information. He later referred questions about the map to the White House.

Asked about the marking on the map, Mr. Trump told reporters that he did not know how it got there. “I don’t know,” he said on Wednesday while insisting that his assertion about the dangers that Alabama faced had been right all along.

“We had many models, each line being a model, and they were going directly through. And in all cases, Alabama was hit, if not lightly, then in some cases, pretty hard,” Mr. Trump said.

“They actually gave that a 95 percent chance probability,” he said. “It turned out that that was not what happened. It made the right turn up the coast. But Alabama was going to be hit very hard, along with Georgia. But under the current, they won’t be.”

The president did not say where he got that information, which is directly contradicted by days of reports from the National Weather Service and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, neither of which publicly reported any threat to Alabama from the hurricane.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 04dc-trumpmap2-articleLarge Trump Insists He Was Right About Hurricane Dorian Heading for Alabama United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Hurricane Dorian (2019) Alabama

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security said that he was unclear what the black line on the map was referring to.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

Governors in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia have declared emergencies as Dorian grew into a monster storm in the Atlantic. Alabama’s governor did not.

But Stephanie Grisham, the White House press secretary, on Wednesday released an internal map that she said Mr. Trump was shown on Sunday as he traveled from Camp David back to the White House.

The map provided by the White House shows the impact of Dorian touching parts of Georgia and a small corner of Alabama, much like the black line that was drawn on the larger map Mr. Trump displayed in the Oval Office.

“I just know that Alabama was in the original forecast,” Mr. Trump said on Wednesday. “They thought it would get it as a piece of it.”

Later in the day, Mr. Trump tweeted a map from the South Florida Water Management District that he said supported his contention that Dorian had been heading for Alabama.

“This was the originally projected path of the Hurricane in its early stages,” he said. “As you can see, almost all models predicted it to go through Florida also hitting Georgia and Alabama. I accept the Fake News apologies!”

However, the map came with a warning that information from the National Hurricane Center and local emergency officials superseded it: “If anything on this graphic causes confusion, ignore the entire product.”

Mr. Trump also responded on Wednesday to reports that he had suggested to Vice President Mike Pence that he stay at one of Mr. Trump’s resorts while on an trip to meet with top officials in Ireland.

Mr. Pence’s decision to stay at the Trump International Golf Links & Hotel in Doonbeg drew criticism because it meant that the vice president was more than two hours away from Dublin, where his official meetings were being held.

Mr. Pence has family roots in Doonbeg, and Marc Short, the vice president’s chief of staff, told reporters on Tuesday that it was the president who suggested his hotel when he heard that Mr. Pence was traveling to Ireland.

“It’s like when we went through the trip, it’s like, ‘Well, he’s going to Doonbeg because that’s where the Pence family is from,’” Mr. Short said. “It’s like, ‘Well, you should stay at my place.’”

But on Wednesday, Mr. Trump denied that.

“I had no involvement, other than it’s a great place,” Mr. Trump said, adding: “I heard he was going there, but it wasn’t my idea for Mike to go there. Mike went there because his family’s there. That’s my understanding of it.”

Mr. Trump said he did not suggest that Mr. Pence stay at his property.

“I don’t suggest anything,” he insisted.

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Sanders admits there’ll be ‘some pain’ and ‘uncomfortable’ changes with his climate change plan

Westlake Legal Group Bernie-for-ice-cream Sanders admits there'll be 'some pain' and 'uncomfortable' changes with his climate change plan Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/us/environment/climate-change fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 87359535-59c7-5cbc-9bbd-18af279dc9cf

Sen. Bernie Sanders, the 2020 hopeful, spoke frankly on Wednesday about his climate change plan, warning Americans that there will be “some pain” and “uncomfortable’ changes in order to save the planet.

Appearing in the CNN climate change marathon, Sanders was asked what is the “greatest personal sacrifice” he is asking of Americans to address climate change.

“We’re going to have to change the nature of many of the things we’re doing right now,” Sanders began.

KAMALA HARRIS SAYS SHE SUPPORTS PLASTIC STRAW BAN DURING CNN CLIMATE CHANGE MARATHON

The Vermont lawmaker then pointed to products like cars with an “internal-combustion engine” and “old-fashioned” lightbulbs and how he would hope to encourage those who use them to move towards a more energy-efficient product.

He also called to end “factory farming” because it is “a danger to the environment” and promoted “family-based agriculture.”

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“There will be a transition and there will be some pain there,” Sanders continued. “There’s going to be change and we’re going to have to ask people to understand that we’ve got to make those changes now even though they’re going to be a little uncomfortable for the sake of future generations.”

Sanders, a major advocate of the ultra-progressive Green New Deal, released his own climate change plan that has a price tag of $16 trillion.

Westlake Legal Group Bernie-for-ice-cream Sanders admits there'll be 'some pain' and 'uncomfortable' changes with his climate change plan Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/us/environment/climate-change fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 87359535-59c7-5cbc-9bbd-18af279dc9cf   Westlake Legal Group Bernie-for-ice-cream Sanders admits there'll be 'some pain' and 'uncomfortable' changes with his climate change plan Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/us/environment/climate-change fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/bernie-sanders fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 87359535-59c7-5cbc-9bbd-18af279dc9cf

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Nunes files $9.9M suit against firm behind Steele dossier, saying it tried to obstruct Russia probe

Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., filed a $9.9 million federal conspiracy lawsuit on Wednesday alleging that the opposition research firm behind the anti-Trump Steele dossier coordinated with another group to file several fraudulent and harassing ethics complaints intended to derail his investigation.

The complaint in the Eastern District of Virginia, which named Fusion GPS founder Glenn Simpson and the nonprofit Campaign for Accountability (CfA), said the “smear” tactics kicked into action shortly after Simpson “lied” in his closed-door testimony before the House Intelligence Committee in November 2017, as well as before the Senate Judiciary Committee in August 2017.

Fusion GPS and CfA’s “racketeering activities,” Nunes alleged, were “part of a joint and systematic effort to intimidate, harass, threaten, influence, interfere with, impede, and ultimately to derail” Republican investigators.

The lawsuit was the latest in a string of filings by Nunes this year, including a $250 million defamation complaint that named Twitter as a defendant and a $150 million complaint against the news organization McClatchy. Courts have not yet ruled on the merits of those complaints.

“I was often smeared,” Nunes told Fox News’ “Hannity” on Wednesday night. “And now, what we know is, there’s a link between those who were doing the smearing and Fusion GPS.”

Nunes added: “When we were investigating Fusion GPS, they were actively involved in working to smear me to obstruct justice, to derail our investigation — and so, I’m gonna hold these guys accountable, and this is just one of many steps we’re gonna continue to take.”

Westlake Legal Group devin_nunes_030717 Nunes files $9.9M suit against firm behind Steele dossier, saying it tried to obstruct Russia probe Gregg Re fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/person/devin-nunes fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox-news/news-events/fusion-gps fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/politics fnc Catherine Herridge article 239c1aaf-4a21-55c1-b68d-d96fcd960cc7

(Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., sued Fusion GPS and its founder, alleging a RICO conspiracy. (AP, File))

In his latest lawsuit, Nunes noted that in October 2017, he authorized subpoenas to compel Simpson and his associates to testify before congressional investigators and provide related documents concerning Fusion GPS’ “nefarious activities,” including its role in creating the Steele dossier.

“The bank records produced by Fusion GPS revealed that the Clinton campaign, the DNC and Perkins Coie paid for Fusion GPS’ anti-Trump research,” Nunes’ complaint stated.

Nunes, then the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, was looking into the intelligence community’s reliance on the unverified dossier, which the FBI had cited in a surveillance warrant to monitor former Trump aide Carter Page.

NUNES SENDS CRIMINAL REFERRAL NOTIFICATIONS TO BARR, ALLEGING SEVERAL ‘POTENTIAL VIOLATIONS’ IN RUSSIA PROBE

Simpson lied in his congressional testimony the next month, Nunes alleged, by claiming he did not meet with DOJ official Bruce Ohr until after the 2016 election. Ohr, however, testified that he met with Simpson in August 2016.

Additionally, Nunes said Simpson lied in August 2017 testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Fox News reported last year that when asked by the panel whether that work continued after the 2016 election, Simpson responded: “I had no client after the election.”

Then-Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, however, challenged that answer in a letter to committee colleague Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del. “As we now know, that was extremely misleading, if not an outright lie,” he wrote.

Worried there would be criminal referrals arising from the apparent falsehoods, Nunes claimed, Fusion GPS sprang into action.

“Fearing a criminal referral for his false statements to the FBI and DOJ, for lying to Congress and the Senate, and for obstructing the House Intelligence Committee in its Russia investigation, the Defendants directly and aggressively retaliated against Plaintiff, employing the same or similar means and methods as Fusion GPS and Simpson have employed multiple times in the past to smear the opposition,” Nunes’ filing stated.

“In furtherance of their conspiracy, the Defendants, acting in concert and with others, filed fraudulent and retaliatory ‘ethics’ complaints against Plaintiff that were solely designed to harass and intimidate Plaintiff, to undermine his Russia investigation, and to protect Simpson, Fusion GPS and others from criminal referrals,” Nunes alleged.

NUNES FILES $150M SUIT AGAINST MCCLATCHY, AGAIN SUES MAIR, ALLEGING CONSPIRACY TO DERAIL PROBES

The complaint alleged that CfA, at Fusion GPS’ direction, faxed a fraudulent complaint against Nunes to the Office of Congressional Ethics (OCE) in January 2018. According to the filing, which cited reporting by The Daily Caller, the CfA paid Fusion GPS over $140,000 in 2018 for unspecified “research.”

Then, in March 2018, CfA was said to have faxed another ethics complaint, this time one that “falsely accused” Nunes of leaking to the media “private text messages between Senator Mark Warner and Adam Waldman, a lawyer connected to [British ex-spy Christopher] Steele, in which Senator Warner tried to arrange a meeting with Steele.”

A third ethics complaint faxed that July alleged that Nunes had “violated federal law and House ethics rules by failing to include information on his personal financial disclosure forms and accepting an impermissible gift.”

Westlake Legal Group Glenn-Simpson Nunes files $9.9M suit against firm behind Steele dossier, saying it tried to obstruct Russia probe Gregg Re fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/person/devin-nunes fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox-news/news-events/fusion-gps fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/politics fnc Catherine Herridge article 239c1aaf-4a21-55c1-b68d-d96fcd960cc7

Glenn R. Simpson, co-founder of the research firm Fusion GPS, in November 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

That same day, the Swamp Accountability Project, run by political operative Liz Mair, also sought an investigation of Nunes. Nunes’ complaint alleged that Fusion GPS “recruited additional bad actors” including Mair, but provided no evidence.

NUNES SUES TWITTER, LIZ MAIR, OTHERS, SEEKING $250M IN DAMAGES FOR ALLEGED DEFAMATION

Mair was not named as a defendant in Wednesday’s lawsuit. Nunes has named Mair in two other lawsuits this year.

Neither CfA nor Fusion GPS immediately responded to Fox News’ requests for comment. Mair, reached by Fox News, declined comment.

At either CfA or Fusion GPS’ direction, Nunes asserted, Democratic operative Michael Seeley requested emails under the California Public Records Act that Nunes’ wife, an elementary school teacher, had received.

“Seeley published Elizabeth Nunes’ emails online and included the names and email addresses of numerous school administrators and teachers, resulting in extensive harassment of these innocent, hard-working citizens of Tulare County, including hateful accusations that they teach bigotry and racism,” the complaint stated. “In fact, the school was so concerned about security problems resulting from this situation that it adopted enhanced security measures.”

In 2017, Nunes was forced to step aside from the Russia probe after an ethics complaint alleged he had wrongfully disclosed classified materials. Nunes was cleared in December 2017.

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Nunes’ suit sought treble damages and attorney’s fees.

“Fusion GPS, Simpson and Steele fraudulently developed the ‘Steele Dossier’ and disseminated it to U.S. Government officials and the press as if the salacious accusations were true,” Nunes’ complaint concluded. “Defendants’ corrupt acts of racketeering are part of their regular way of doing business. That way of doing business must end here and now.”

Westlake Legal Group Nunes041719 Nunes files $9.9M suit against firm behind Steele dossier, saying it tried to obstruct Russia probe Gregg Re fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/person/devin-nunes fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox-news/news-events/fusion-gps fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/politics fnc Catherine Herridge article 239c1aaf-4a21-55c1-b68d-d96fcd960cc7   Westlake Legal Group Nunes041719 Nunes files $9.9M suit against firm behind Steele dossier, saying it tried to obstruct Russia probe Gregg Re fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/person/devin-nunes fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox-news/news-events/fusion-gps fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/politics fnc Catherine Herridge article 239c1aaf-4a21-55c1-b68d-d96fcd960cc7

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Minnesota woman, 62, killed by black bear in Canada

Canadian officials have identified a Minnesota woman killed by a black bear on a secluded island in Ontario over the weekend.

Catherine Steatt-Mueller, 62, was staying with her parents on Red Pine Island in Rainy Lake for a family reunion when the bear killed her Sunday, Ontario Provincial Police said.

Mueller, of Maple Plain, 21 miles east of Minneapolis, went outside around 6 p.m. when she heard her dogs barking, investigators said. One of the dogs returned to the cabin but Mueller did not.

Westlake Legal Group Black-Bear-1 Minnesota woman, 62, killed by black bear in Canada Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/canada fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/world fnc article 349281a7-5b9a-50c0-a350-d7a5fddd4eb2

A Minnesota woman was killed by a black bear while on a Canadian island over the weekend. (iStock, File)

GREAT WHITE SHARK SPOTTED OFF MASSACHUSETTS COAST FEEDING ON DEAD WHALE CARCASS

Her parents called the police.

Officers searched the heavily wooded area about 10 miles from the Canadian-U.S. border. They eventually found a young black bear standing over Mueller’s body and shot it dead.

Two other young bears were found acting aggressively in a nearby bush, Ontario Provincial Police Constable Jim Davis told the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

No one witnessed the attack, police said, so it was unclear what provoked the bear, if anything.

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“Attacks of this nature are extremely rare and our hearts go out to the family and friends of the victim,” a spokesperson for the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry told the paper.

The bear will be taken to the University of Guelph in Ontario for a necropsy, the ministry said.

Westlake Legal Group Black-Bear-1 Minnesota woman, 62, killed by black bear in Canada Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/canada fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/world fnc article 349281a7-5b9a-50c0-a350-d7a5fddd4eb2   Westlake Legal Group Black-Bear-1 Minnesota woman, 62, killed by black bear in Canada Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/canada fox-news/world/world-regions/americas fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/minnesota fox-news/science/wild-nature/mammals fox news fnc/world fnc article 349281a7-5b9a-50c0-a350-d7a5fddd4eb2

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Military projects in 23 states and 19 countries will be stalled or canceled to pay for it.

Westlake Legal Group 5d7069662500008d000467a3 Military projects in 23 states and 19 countries will be stalled or canceled to pay for it.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon will cut funding from military projects like schools, target ranges and maintenance facilities to pay for the construction of 175 miles of fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border, diverting a total $3.6 billion to President Donald Trump‘s long-promised barrier.

Projects in 23 states, 19 countries and three U.S. territories would be stalled or killed by the plan, though just $1.1 billion in cuts would strike the continental U.S., according to a list released Wednesday by the Pentagon. Almost $700 million would come from projects in U.S. territories, with another $1.8 billion coming from projects on overseas bases.

Trump’s move would take the biggest step yet in delivering on his promise to build a wall to block immigrants from entering the country illegally. But it may come at the expense of projects that the Pentagon acknowledged may be difficult to fund anew. Capitol Hill Democrats, outraged over Trump’s use of an emergency order for the wall, promised they won’t approve money to revive them.

A senior defense official told reporters the Pentagon is having conversations with members of Congress to urge them to restore the funding. The official agreed that the department has “a lot of work ahead of us,” considering that Congress has given no guarantee it will provide money for the defunded projects. The official was not authorized to discuss the details publicly so spoke on condition of anonymity.

In addition, new stretches of fencing proposed along the Rio Grande and through a wildlife refuge in Arizona promise to ignite legal battles that could delay the wall projects as well.

The military base projects facing the chopping block tend to address less urgent needs like new parking at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, and a variety of small arms ranges at bases in Wisconsin and Oklahoma. But a “cyber ops facility” in Hampton, Virginia, and the expansion of a missile defense field at Fort Greeley, Alaska, face the ax, too.

Trump has so far succeeded in building replacement barriers within the 654 miles of fencing built during the Obama and Bush administrations. The funding shift will allow for about 115 miles of new pedestrian fencing in areas where there isn’t any now.

“The wall is being built. It’s going up rapidly,” Trump said Wednesday. “And we think by the end of next year, which will be sometime right after the election actually, but we think we’re going to have close to 500 miles of wall, which will be complete.”

New stretches of fencing are sure to spark legal battles with angry landowners and environmentalists. The Pentagon plan also fuels the persistent controversy between the Trump administration and Congress over immigration policies and the funding of the border wall.

“It doesn’t take any input from the local communities. It will take away from the private property rights,” said Rep. Henry Cuellar, D-Texas. “We are going to do everything we can to stop the president.”

Cuellar suggested Democrats will look at a must-pass funding bill this month — required to prevent a government shutdown Oct. 1 — to try to take on Trump. But a more likely venue for the battle could be ongoing House-Senate negotiations over the annual Pentagon policy measure.

Lawmakers who refused earlier this year to approve nearly $6 billion for the wall must now decide if they will restore the projects that are being used to provide the money.

“To pay for his xenophobic border wall boondoggle, President Trump is about to weaken our national security by stealing billions of dollars from our military,” said Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., who chairs a key military construction panel. “The House of Representatives will not backfill any projects he steals from today.”

One of the Senate’s most endangered Republicans in the 2020 election, Arizona Sen. Martha McSally, reported that her state is getting nicked for just $30 million from a project that was being delayed anyway. Georgia, where two potentially competitive Senate races loom next year, would be spared entirely, though powerful Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., himself facing re-election, would lose a $63 million middle school at Fort Campbell.

“We need to secure our border and protect our military; we can and should do both,” McSally said. “I went to the mat to fight for Arizona projects and succeeded.”

Elaine McCusker, the Pentagon comptroller, said the now-unfunded projects are not being canceled. Instead, the Pentagon is saying the military projects are being “deferred.”

Congress approved $1.375 billion for wall construction in this year’s budget, same as the previous year and far less than the $5.7 billion that the White House sought. Trump grudgingly accepted the money to end a 35-day government shutdown in February but simultaneously declared a national emergency to take money from other government accounts, identifying up to $8.1 billion for wall construction.

The transferred funds include $600 million from the Treasury Department’s asset forfeiture fund, $2.5 billion from Defense Department counterdrug activities and now the $3.6 billion pot for military housing construction announced Tuesday.

The Pentagon reviewed the list of military projects and said none that provided housing or critical infrastructure for troops would be affected, in the wake of recent scandals over poor living quarters for service members in several parts of the country. Defense officials also said they would focus on projects set to begin in 2020 and beyond, with the hope that the money could eventually be restored by Congress.

The government will spend the military housing money on 11 wall projects in California, Arizona and Texas, the administration said in a filing Tuesday in a lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union. The most expensive is for 52 miles (84 kilometers) in Laredo, Texas, at a cost of $1.27 billion.

The Laredo project and one in El Centro, California, are on private property, which would require purchase or confiscation, according to the court filing. Two projects in Arizona are on land overseen by the Navy and will be the first to be built, no earlier than Oct. 3. Seven are at least partly on federal land overseen by the Interior Department, including a 31-mile stretch through the Cabezza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge in Arizona, a major wilderness area.

The 175 miles (282 kilometers) covered by the Pentagon funding represents just a fraction of the 1,954-mile (3,145-kilometer) U.S.-Mexico border.

Associated Press writer Elliot Spagat in San Diego contributed to this report.

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Florida intruder kills man before neighbor shoots him, reports say

Westlake Legal Group PBSO-patrol-car Florida intruder kills man before neighbor shoots him, reports say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc article 10448410-1daa-5069-a027-abd2add4b67c

A man in Florida accused of fatally shooting another man — inside a home he was burglarizing — was shot by a neighbor as he tried to get away, according to reports.

Javier Medina-Tamayo, 20, allegedly shot 38-year-old Enrique Blanco on Saturday night after he and his fiancée woke up to the sound of a loud noise coming from the living room of their Royal Palm Beach home. Blanco went to check it out when the fiancée reported hearing another loud noise, then saw him fall to the ground, according to WPLG, which cited a Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office probable cause affidavit.

HURRICANE DORIAN WAVES WASH COCAINE BRICK UP ON FLORIDA BEACH, POLICE SAY

Blanco reportedly said, “They shot me.”

The man’s fiancée, Shakira, then saw a masked gunman enter the kitchen with a gun pointed at her, the station reported, adding that she screamed and begged the suspect not to kill her as she ran out the front door.

ORLANDO MAN WHO LOST 25 PERCENT OF SKIN TO FLESH-EATING BACTERIA HAS DIED

A neighbor reportedly heard the commotion, grabbed his gun and went outside to see the gunman getting away on a bicycle. The neighbor then yelled at Medina-Tamayo, who allegedly started shooting at the neighbor. Deputies said the neighbor returned fire, hitting Medina-Tamayo in the leg, WPLG reports.

When deputies arrived to the South Florida home, they found a man dead on the kitchen floor and Medina-Tamayo in the middle of the street with a gunshot wound to his leg, the station reported.

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Medina-Tamayo was taken to a hospital in West Palm Beach, where detectives found the dead man’s wallet, two gold bracelets and a gold watch from his pockets, deputies said. Medina-Tamayo reportedly denied any involvement in the crime.

Medina-Tamayo faced several charges including first-degree murder, occupied burglary with a firearm, home invasion robbery with a firearm, shooting into an occupied building and wearing a mask during the commission of a felony.

Westlake Legal Group PBSO-patrol-car Florida intruder kills man before neighbor shoots him, reports say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc article 10448410-1daa-5069-a027-abd2add4b67c   Westlake Legal Group PBSO-patrol-car Florida intruder kills man before neighbor shoots him, reports say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc article 10448410-1daa-5069-a027-abd2add4b67c

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