web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 17)

This Company Says It Will Fix Your Smile. It May Shush You if It Doesn’t.

To fix some crowding in her teeth, Taylor Weakley, an environmental scientist in Denver, ordered teeth aligners two years ago from SmileDirectClub, a start-up she had seen advertised on social media.

At $1,850, the products were cheaper than braces, and she did not have to visit an orthodontist to get them.

But when the aligners did not correct Ms. Weakley’s teeth as promised, she asked for a refund. After a lengthy back-and-forth, SmileDirectClub said she would get her money back if she signed a nondisclosure provision as part of a general release form. In September, Ms. Weakley, 25, agreed.

“Going forward, I can’t say anything,” she wrote in an email.

What Ms. Weakley experienced was part of SmileDirectClub’s methods to limit information about customers’ dissatisfaction with its products. Seven people who ordered teeth aligners from the company described to The New York Times how the products did not fix their teeth; four said the aligners had created new problems that required traditional dentistry to correct.

When some of the customers requested refunds, SmileDirectClub asked them to sign the confidentiality provision. The agreement prohibited the customers from telling anyone about the refund and required them to delete negative social media comments and reviews, according to a copy viewed by The Times. Two of the seven people The Times talked to had signed the agreement.

SmileDirectClub’s actions underline the risks of ordering products from young companies that are bringing start-up-style “disruption” to health. Many such start-ups have sprung up in recent years selling contact lenses, birth control, acne medicine and prescription drugs directly to consumers without their needing to visit a medical professional.

But even in this world, the tactics employed by SmileDirectClub, which went public last year, stand out.

In addition to linking confidentiality to refunds, the company sued the parent of the productivity site Lifehacker last year for defamation and libel over an article that outlined the risks of its products. It also sued several state dental boards, the bodies that regulate dentistry, after they took steps that would have made it harder for SmileDirectClub to operate.

“They’ve been almost like nervous bullies to critics,” said Arthur L. Caplan, a professor of medical ethics at the New York University School of Medicine.

Susan Greenspon Rammelt, SmileDirectClub’s chief legal officer, said in interviews that the vast majority of users were happy with the company. SmileDirectClub pointed to an average customer rating of “4.9 out of 5” on more than 100,000 reviews on its website. It said fewer than 5 percent of its customers had received a refund. It does not publish the success rate of its aligners.

Ms. Greenspon Rammelt added that SmileDirectClub’s legal moves were necessary to protect itself. “When we believe that there is an organized campaign to damage our reputation amongst consumers, dentists and/or investors, we will defend ourselves and our mission to democratize access to care every chance we get,” she said.

SmileDirectClub has negotiated some of the general release forms with those who have asked for refunds, she said.

SmileDirectClub, founded in Nashville in 2014 by a pair of childhood friends, Alex Fenkell and Jordan Katzman, is one of the largest of the new online health companies that sell directly to consumers. Mr. Katzman’s father, David, is the company’s chief executive, and his uncle, Steven, is the chief operating officer.

Mr. Fenkell and Jordan Katzman had earlier started a website for Illinois license plate renewals. David Katzman has invested in companies such as 1-800-Contacts and Lens Express.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160668831_8d42786a-33b9-4a76-8775-768fcb84cea5-articleLarge This Company Says It Will Fix Your Smile. It May Shush You if It Doesn’t. Teeth and Dentistry SmileDirectClub Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Initial Public Offerings Corporate Social Responsibility Consumer Reviews Computers and the Internet Advertising and Marketing

SmileDirectClub was founded by Alex Fenkell, left, and Jordan Katzman, right. Mr. Katzman’s father, David, center, is the chief executive.Credit…Lucas Jackson/Reuters

To obtain SmileDirectClub’s teeth aligners, people make a mold of their teeth at home with a kit provided by the company or visit one of more than 300 “Smile Shop” retail locations to have their mouth and teeth scanned. The impressions and scans are reviewed by one of the 250 dentists and orthodontists in the company’s network, who generally do not interact directly with customers.

Potential users check a consent form saying they have had their teeth examined and X-rayed by a dentist, but are not asked to verify that. The form also states that they cannot sue the company for any reason. Then the aligners, which cost $1,850, or around a third of the cost of traditional braces, are sent to customers by mail.

SmileDirectClub offers refunds within 30 days after the aligners arrive. Anything after that is considered outside the company’s official refund policy and comes with the nondisclosure provision, which it said it began using in 2016.

Traditional orthodontists, who make money from in-person consultations, said that cutting dental professionals out of the process was dangerous and that regular visits were a key to avoiding new dental problems.

“Very few of my patients go from beginning to end in the way that I envisioned or planned,” said Brent E. Larson, a professor of orthodontics at the University of Minnesota and a practicing orthodontist.

SmileDirectClub grew quickly, fueled by $440 million in funding from venture capital and private equity investors. The company spent heavily on television and social media ads, promising to give people “a smile they love.” It also recruited influencers and celebrity spokesmen like the N.B.A. player Draymond Green.

In September, the company raised $1.29 billion in its initial public offering, which valued it at nearly $9 billion. SmileDirectClub, which is unprofitable, lost more than $74 million in 2018, as its sales nearly tripled to $423 million from a year earlier.

By then, SmileDirectClub had more than 750,000 customers, according to company filings. Around two-thirds of them used its financing plan, SmilePay, which charges an annual interest rate of 17 percent.

SmileDirectClub declined to say what percentage of applicants it turns down because they are not suitable for treatment; it rejects hundreds of cases a week, it said.

Rob Porter, 54, an executive recruiter in Frisco, Texas, said that he used SmileDirectClub’s aligners last year and that they had fixed his minor overbite. “Given the cost, I was not expecting perfection,” he said.

But others have differed. SmileDirectClub has been the subject of more than 1,670 Better Business Bureau complaints since 2014. In contrast, Align Technology, which makes the Invisalign teeth aligners that people get through orthodontists and that has been in business for more than two decades, has had five complaints.

SmileDirectClub said the “vast majority” of the Better Business Bureau complaints were related to shipping delays, with 3 percent linked to clinical concerns.

One unhappy user is Jessica Shorts, who turned to SmileDirectClub in 2017 to fix a slightly crooked tooth. Nine months into her treatment, she said, she experienced migraines and jaw pain. The aligners shifted her teeth so much, she said, that she could not properly chew and she developed an open bite, meaning her teeth no longer touched when she bit down.

SmileDirectClub declined her refund request, suggesting more treatment instead. The experience inspired her to go to dental school in Indiana, where she lives.

“If I knew then what I know now about teeth, I never ever would have done it,” said Ms. Shorts, 38, who eventually spent $6,000 on braces.

Some customers have flocked to Facebook groups to ask for advice on what happens if the aligners don’t fit or if they experience pain. They have also flooded SmileDirectClub’s Facebook page with complaints about the long wait for aligners or dissatisfaction with the results.

In September, some customers filed a class-action lawsuit against the company accusing it of false advertising and violating Food and Drug Administration regulations. All but two plaintiffs later withdrew from the suit because SmileDirectClub’s consent form required them to resolve disputes in arbitration.

As SmileDirectClub has grown, so have its regulatory fights. In recent years, Georgia’s dental board approved a new rule requiring a licensed dentist to be present when dental scans are taken. In Alabama, the state dental board interpreted existing regulations as requiring a dentist to be present.

Those rules might hurt SmileDirectClub, which was built on not needing dental professionals to be in the room for teeth scans. In 2018, the company sued the state boards in federal court. Parts of the company’s lawsuits have since been dismissed, though its claims that the boards violated federal antitrust laws are proceeding. The dental boards are appealing the parts of the cases that were not dismissed.

In October, Gavin Newsom, California’s governor, signed legislation requiring dentists to review recent X-rays before prescribing orthodontic treatment. That same month, SmileDirectClub sued California’s dental board, accusing it of trying to “squelch the competitive threat.” The board has filed a motion to dismiss the suit.

Ms. Greenspon Rammelt, SmileDirectClub’s chief legal officer, said state dental boards were trying to stifle competition. “The fact of the matter is that you’ve got over 750,000 people who’ve been able to get access to this type of care and they’re really happy,” she said.

The regulatory issues have been punishing for the company. Its stock is down around 40 percent since it went public.

This month, SmileDirectClub said it would sell its aligners through dentist and orthodontist offices, as well as online. Ms. Greenspon Rammelt said the move was “a natural progression of our model” in response to demand from consumers and dentists.

For Gavin Graham, 40, a technology worker in Toronto, that was too late. He used SmileDirectClub’s aligners last year, but said the treatment had created an open bite that he previously did not have.

Mr. Graham said SmileDirectClub had offered him 25 percent of his cost back, including agreeing to confidentiality. He declined and is fighting for a full refund.

“Had I known that I would end treatment with an open bite, I would not have signed up for it,” he said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Impeachment Live Stream: Highlights and Takeaways

Here’s what you need to know:

Video

Westlake Legal Group 21dc-live-mcconnellsub-videoSixteenByNine3000 Impeachment Live Stream: Highlights and Takeaways United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Senate Schumer, Charles E Schiff, Adam B Republican Party Politics and Government McConnell, Mitch impeachment Democratic Party

A debate is under way in the Senate over the ground rules the majority leader, Senator Mitch McConnell, has proposed for President Trump’s trial.CreditCredit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

The Senate convened shortly after 1 p.m. on Tuesday to start in earnest the impeachment trial of Mr. Trump, who faces charges that he abused the power of his office and obstructed Congress. Senators were warned that they had to remain quiet, a skill that they rarely exercise in the Senate chamber, or face imprisonment.

The first order of business was a debate over the format of the trial, a draft of which Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, released on Monday. Democrats spent the morning lashing out against Mr. McConnell’s plan, accusing him and other Republicans of trying to cover up Mr. Trump’s actions.

Unlike most other debates in the Senate, the elected senators will not be doing the debating. Instead, the seven House impeachment managers, who are serving as prosecutors in the case, and Mr. Trump’s legal defense team will argue over the rules that will govern the proceedings. The first round of the debate on Tuesday is expected to last two hours.

The House impeachment managers and Mr. Trump’s defense team will each have an additional day to argue their cases under the proposed rules the Senate began considering Tuesday afternoon.

This is a change from Mr. McConnell’s initial proposal, which gave each side up to 24 hours over two days — a time frame Democrats criticized because it could push key testimony into early morning hours, when most Americans would be sleeping.

Each side still gets a total of 24 hours to present, but spreading it across three days will give both legal teams more time to lay out their cases and end the days earlier.

Mr. McConnell made the change after key Republican senators, including Susan Collins of Maine, argued that the rules for Mr. Trump’s impeachment trial should not deviate from the rules used during the only modern precedent, the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton in 1999.

Ms. Collins, a moderate Republican who is likely to face a tough re-election bid later this year, has significant sway with Mr. McConnell, as her votes could change the outcome of the trial.

For weeks, Mr. McConnell, who has significant control over how the trial unfolds, has said Mr. Trump’s trial would be modeled after the Senate’s structure for Mr. Clinton’s trial.

But the proposal Mr. McConnell released Monday evening had some significant differences, including a provision that would speed up the time allowed for opening arguments. It would also allow admitting the records generated by the House impeachment inquiry into evidence only if a majority of senators agree to doing so. In the Clinton trial, those records were admitted automatically. Mr. McConnell appeared to walk back that change Tuesday. The rules he submitted to the Senate would automatically enter the evidence collected by the House impeachment inquiry into the Senate record of the trial.

Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of New York and one of seven House impeachment managers who will argue for impeaching President Trump during the Senate trial, said Tuesday that a key element of the rules for Mr. Clinton’s trial was that they were agreed on by the Senate’s top Republican and Democrat.

Mr. McConnell’s Democratic counterpart, Mr. Schumer of New York, was not consulted.

Democrats have also pushed for the trial rules to allow for calling witnesses and admitting new documents into evidence. Mr. McConnell’s plan would have the Senate first vote on whether they want to consider new evidence at all. If a majority of senators agreed to do so, then they would vote on admitting specific witnesses or documents individually.

Mr. Schiff said what Mr. McConnell had offered did “not describe the process for a fair trial.”

Mr. Schumer said the first amendment he planned to offer to Mr. McConnell’s rules would require the Senate to subpoena White House documents related to the charges against Mr. Trump.

While the Senate trial commenced with hours of debate over the format of Mr. Trump’s trial, the president met with world leaders at the annual World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, where he trumpeted the strong American economy, heaping praise upon himself.

But when Democrats called for the White House counsel, Pat A. Cipollone, to turn over documents related to the Ukraine matter, the White House hit back with a sharp statement on Mr. Trump’s behalf.

“The Democrats are an utter joke — they have no case, and this latest political stunt proves it,” said Hogan Gidley, a White House spokesman. “The idea that the counsel to the president has to turn over protected documents and confidential information is ludicrous, and to imply he can’t represent the president of the United States in an impeachment proceeding is completely absurd.”

Earlier on Tuesday, when Mr. Trump was asked a question about the impeachment trial, taking place thousands of miles away, he said, “That whole thing is a hoax.”

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine, whose call with Mr. Trump led to the whistle-blower complaint that jump-started the impeachment inquiry, is also at the Davos forum. It was unclear if the two world leaders would meet at some point.

While impeachment loomed large over Mr. Trump and his aides, the president’s economic policies drew a favorable response among the wealthy audience at Davos, many of whom were wary of what a progressive Democrat taking over the Oval Office could mean for them.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Harry Hamlin: Playing Gay ‘Completely Ended My Career’ In 1982

In recent years, Jake Gyllenhaal, Benedict Cumberbatch and Timothée Chalamet have joined a growing roster of actors to score Oscar nominations for their portrayals of gay characters on the big screen. 

In a new interview on The Hollywood Reporter’s “It Happened in Hollywood” podcast, however, Harry Hamlin reminded fans that the movie industry wasn’t always so welcoming of LGBTQ themes. 

The “L.A. Law” actor starred in 1982’s “Making Love,” which made history as the first gay-themed romance to be produced by a major studio, Twentieth Century Fox.

Hamlin was hot off the success of 1981’s “Clash of the Titans,” and said he was drawn to “Making Love” for its “cutting-edge” script. But the backlash to his portrayal of Bart McGuire, a gay novelist who begins an affair with married oncologist Zack Elliot (played by Michael Ontkean), was swift.  

“Everyone in town had turned the movie down, because at that time, the idea of a gay world was still not accepted,” he recalled. “Overall, in terms of how the way that film was received, it was too early. It was like 10 years too early and it completely ended my career.”

“That was the last studio picture I ever did,” he added. “The door shut with a resounding smash.”

Westlake Legal Group 5e274ed92100004c00fffbf5 Harry Hamlin: Playing Gay ‘Completely Ended My Career’ In 1982

Stanley Bielecki Movie Collection via Getty Images Harry Hamlin (right), Michael Ontkean and Kate Jackson in 1982’s “Making Love.” 

“Making Love” received near-universal pans from critics when it was released. Roger Ebert blasted for the movie for featuring “some of the worst dialogue one can imagine”; The New York Times offered faint praise, calling it “rip-roaring awful in an entirely enjoyable way.”

Hamlin, who is married to Lisa Rinna, eventually saw his career rebound when he landed the part of Michael Kuzak on “L.A. Law” in 1986. In 2013, he received an Emmy nomination for a guest role on “Mad Men,” and he has appeared on “Glee” and “Angie Tribeca” in recent years.  

He said he has no regrets about “Making Love,” and that the film’s boundary-pushing take on a same-sex relationship continues to pay dividends today. 

“I’m very proud of the movie,” he said. “Not a week goes by that people don’t come up to me and — I’m serious about this: in the supermarket, on the street — and they thank me for making that movie.” 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Jessie James Decker Is Readying New Music And A TV Show

If the way Jessie James Decker kicked off 2020 is any indication of what her year will look like, it’s going to be quite the busy one. 

The country-pop singer rang in 2020 as part of ABC’s “New Year’s Rockin’ Eve” in New York, announcing the first Powerball millionaire winner of the year. “I’ve done many hosting things but nothing to that level before, so it was a little nerve-wracking at first,” she admitted to HuffPost at Build Series

Now she’s plotting what’s next, and it involves everything from fashion and music to TV. Decker just signed a deal with Warner Music Group, which means fans can expect a new album this year and a possible fall tour. 

“I’m ready to get back out there and play more music because that’s my passion,” Decker said, adding, “There will always be that side of me that will always have that fun, quirky side. But I will say that this is probably the most elevated my music’s ever been, the most mature. I’ve been making music and recording records since I was a teenager. I’ll be 32 soon, and this is going to be a very mature womanly side. My audience is growing up with me, so I feel like they’re going to relate to what I am putting out. It will be a deeper side.”

Westlake Legal Group 5e27206f2400005100c96e09 Jessie James Decker Is Readying New Music And A TV Show

Mike Pont/Build Series Jessie James Decker released her self-titled debut album in 2009.

In addition to music, Decker is planning her next TV move. She previously starred alongside her husband, Eric Decker, in the reality series “Eric & Jessie: Game On,” but don’t expect to see the Decker family putting their lives out there on the small screen again anytime soon. 

Westlake Legal Group 5e271f6d2100002e00fffba9 Jessie James Decker Is Readying New Music And A TV Show

Taylor Hill via Getty Images Eric Decker and Jessie James Decker, seen here at the 2019 CMA Awards, tied the knot in 2013. They have three children: Vivianne, Eric and Forrest. 

“I wouldn’t do it that way again. I feel like that chapter has closed, and it was great. That was good while it was. But I feel like the next chapter in my life would be different in that way. Yes, we are working on a new TV show, but not in that way. It wouldn’t be scripted. It would be in the food space,” said Decker, who has long been interested in cooking and health. Her 2018 New York Times bestseller, “Just Jessie: My Guide to Love, Life, Family, and Food,” included family recipes and she’s currently working on a new stand-alone cookbook. 

When Decker isn’t working, she’s spending time with her family, including her three kids and her husband, who retired from the NFL in 2018.

“I love it. It’s been great,” she said. “My husband now works at [my fashion line] Kittenish, so we work together every day. And that’s a lot of fun. Our lives are very busy running after three kids. We have three under the age of 5. … It’s the best. Honestly, being a mother is the best thing I could have ever done with my life. Truthfully. All of this could go away, and all that matters is that I want my kids to be happy.” 

Through it all, Decker said, she tries to keep a level head when it comes to her lifestyle, particularly her social media presence. She said there are plenty of times she’ll post something expecting one response and then get hit with negativity or comments she didn’t expect. 

“I have to step back and say, ‘This is not real. This is a virtual world.’ … We have to step back and go, ‘That’s not real life. It doesn’t matter.’ We have to focus on the good and positivity in the world and the real relationships. Because the other stuff can consume you, but you can’t. It’s not what’s important in life,” Decker said. “[It happens] all the time, but that’s just part of it. You can look or you don’t look.” 

Decker said she wants to grow her career while still staying true to herself and her roots. 

“I never thought my career would take me where it has. My goal was always just music,” she said. “I always loved fashion. I was sketching outfits in high school, but music’s been the goal. It’s been amazing how it’s seen split off into all these different things that I never thought I would do, so it’s been an unexpected journey.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Kimia Alizadeh, Iran’s lone female Olympic medalist, moves to Germany after defecting, coach says

Kimia Alizadeh, Iran’s only female Olympic medalist who recently defected from the country, has moved to Germany, her coach said Monday.

Alizadeh announced earlier this month that she had permanently left the country and called out the Iranian government’s “hypocrisy” on social media. It was first reported that she may have moved to the Netherlands, but her coach told Reuters where she went instead.

IRAN ADMITS RUSSIAN-MADE MISSILES STRUCK UKRAINIAN PASSENGER PLANE

“Kimia has decided to continue in Germany,” Mimoun el Boujjoufi, a Dutch national and Alizadeh’s taekwondo coach, told the news agency.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-591909792 Kimia Alizadeh, Iran's lone female Olympic medalist, moves to Germany after defecting, coach says Ryan Gaydos fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/sports/olympics fox news fnc/sports fnc c7dab068-2972-569d-8729-b7179d11d7aa article

Kimia Alizadeh announced she was defecting from Iran earlier this month. (Photo by Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images)

According to Bild, Alizadeth hoped to continue her career in Germany and had moved to Hamburg. She reportedly received offers to compete for the Netherlands, Canada, Belgium and Bulgaria. El Boujjoufi told Reuters that many countries “fought for her attention.”

The 21-year-old won a bronze medal for Iran at the 2016 Rio Games. Her announcement came a day after Iranian officials admitted to downing a Ukrainian passenger plane, killing 176 people minutes after takeoff from Tehran’s international airport when “human error” mistook the civilian aircraft for a military one.

IRAN HOSTAGE CRISIS’ END: HOW AMERICA HELPED SECURE THE DIPLOMATS’ FREEDOM

She accused the Iranian government of “lying” and “injustice” toward Iranian athletes, adding all she wants is “taekwondo, security and a happy and healthy life,” according to AFP.

She said she wore everything the government asked her to wear, referring to the head covering all Iranian female athletes must wear, and wrote she “repeated everything they told me to say. … None of us matter to them.”

Iranian parliamentarian Abdolkarim Hosseinzadeh decried “incompetent officials,” saying the country had allowed “human capital to flee,” AFP reported.

He compared Alizadeh to Alireza Firouzja, an Iranian chess prodigy who now lives in France after becoming a grandmaster at age 14.

DOWNED UKRAINIAN PLANE’S BLACK BOXES WILL BE SENT TO UKRAINE, IRANIAN NEWS AGENCY SAYS

In a Twitter message, U.S. State Department spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus hailed Alizadeh’s decision.

#KimiaAlizadeh, Iran’s only female Olympic medalist, has rejected the regime’s oppression of women,” Ortagus wrote. “She has defected for a life of security, happiness, and freedom. #Iran will continue to lose more strong women unless it learns to empower and support them.”

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

Alizadeh promised the Iranian people she would always remain a “child of Iran.”

Fox News’ Brie Stimson contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-591909792 Kimia Alizadeh, Iran's lone female Olympic medalist, moves to Germany after defecting, coach says Ryan Gaydos fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/sports/olympics fox news fnc/sports fnc c7dab068-2972-569d-8729-b7179d11d7aa article   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-591909792 Kimia Alizadeh, Iran's lone female Olympic medalist, moves to Germany after defecting, coach says Ryan Gaydos fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/sports/olympics fox news fnc/sports fnc c7dab068-2972-569d-8729-b7179d11d7aa article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

First U.S. Case Of Deadly Wuhan Coronavirus Found In Washington State

The first U.S. case of a new coronavirus strain that has killed at least six people in China has been reported in Washington state, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday.

The deadly virus, which Chinese health officials have said can spread by human-to-human contact, has sickened hundreds of people, according to the mayor of China’s central city of Wuhan, where an outbreak is underway. Exported cases of the illness also have been confirmed in Thailand, Japan and the Republic of Korea.

The male U.S. patient is a resident of Snohomish County, Washington, who was hospitalized last week with pneumonia after returning from a trip to Wuhan, The New York Times reported.

The CDC on Monday said it has been actively screening incoming travelers from Wuhan City in Hubei Province. 

The World Health Organization has said it will convene on Wednesday to determine whether the virus outbreak warrants being declared a global health crisis.

Westlake Legal Group 5e2743ff2100004b00fffbe7 First U.S. Case Of Deadly Wuhan Coronavirus Found In Washington State

Darley Shen / Reuters Medical staff carry a box as they walk at China’s Jinyintan hospital, where patients with pneumonia caused by the new strain of coronavirus are being treated, in Wuhan, Hubei province.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Harry Hamlin says playing a gay man in the 1982 movie ‘Making Love’ ended his career

Harry Hamlin believes that taking on the role of a gay man in the 1982 film “Making Love” ruined his movie career.

The 68-year-old star appeared on the “It Happened in Hollywood” podcast Saturday where he opened up about his career and his role opposite Michael OntKean in the controversial film.

“Everyone in town had turned the movie down,” Hamlin explained. “Because at that time the idea of a gay world was still not accepted.”

HARRY HAMLIN REVEALS THE SECRET BEHIND HIS LASTING MARRIAGE TO ‘REAL HOUSEWIVES’ STAR LISA RINNA

The film focused on a married doctor played by OntKean who finds himself increasingly attracted to Hamlin’s character, an openly gay man. The two engage in an affair and even share some romantic scenes together on-screen. At the time, Hamlin said the script was “exactly the kind of movie” that he was looking to do.

“I wanted to do something that’s relevant and edgy, cutting edge,” he explained.

Westlake Legal Group HarryHamlin1 Harry Hamlin says playing a gay man in the 1982 movie 'Making Love' ended his career Tyler McCarthy fox-news/shows/the-real-housewives fox-news/person/lisa-rinna fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3ee3e7b3-7c94-5722-856b-4cdfc675c5a0

Promotional shot of actors Harry Hamlin and Michael Ontkean, as they appear in the movie ‘Making Love,’ 1982. (Stanley Bielecki Movie Collection/Getty Images)

Unfortunately for the star, he believes that he miscalculated in taking the role as he struggled to find work once it was done.

HARRY HAMLIN ONCE TOLD WIFE LISA RINNA HE HAS HIS ‘DIVORCE LAWYER ON SPEED DIAL’

“Overall, in terms of how the way that film was received, it was too early,” he said. “It was like 10 years too early and it completely ended my career. That was the last studio picture I ever did. The door shut with a resounding smash.”

Before agreeing to do “Making Love,” Hamlin, who is married to “Real Housewives of Beverly Hills” star Lisa Rinna, seemingly had the wind at his back when he starred opposite Laurence Olivier in the 1981 classic “Clash of the Titans.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

He eventually got his career back on track by way of the TV show “L.A. Law,” where he starred as Michael Kuzak. In the ensuing years, he’s had roles on popular shows such as “Veronica Mars,” “Army Wives,” “Shameless,” “Mad Men” and “Glee.”

Westlake Legal Group Harry-Hamlin Harry Hamlin says playing a gay man in the 1982 movie 'Making Love' ended his career Tyler McCarthy fox-news/shows/the-real-housewives fox-news/person/lisa-rinna fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3ee3e7b3-7c94-5722-856b-4cdfc675c5a0   Westlake Legal Group Harry-Hamlin Harry Hamlin says playing a gay man in the 1982 movie 'Making Love' ended his career Tyler McCarthy fox-news/shows/the-real-housewives fox-news/person/lisa-rinna fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 3ee3e7b3-7c94-5722-856b-4cdfc675c5a0

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Truck driver missing for 2 days found on snowy road in California

A truck driver who was reported missing last week in Northern California was found alive two days later along a snowy road, according to officials.

The California Highway Patrol said on Facebook that the truck driver was reported overdue by his company around 3 p.m. on Thursday after failing to arrive as expected earlier in the day.

GPS locations from the semi-truck placed the vehicle on Big Bend Road in Shasta County, around 45 miles northeast of Redding.

CALIFORNIA WOMAN FOUND ALIVE IN SNOW-COVERED VEHICLE AFTER 6 DAYS MISSING IN MOUNTAINS

Due to snowfall and poor roadway conditions at the time, no searches were conducted until Saturday, according to the CHP.

When conditions improved by Saturday morning, air units were sent out to search for the driver near the last GPS location.

Westlake Legal Group CaliforniaSnow_1 Truck driver missing for 2 days found on snowy road in California Travis Fedschun fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/us-regions/west fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc e3d31aae-961b-5c76-ba8c-edfb8488cfde article

A truck driver was found on a snowy road two days after being reported missing in Northern California. (California Highway Patrol)

After an hour, officials said that the driver was found on Summit Lake Road, about 20 miles from the last GPS position.

LAKE EFFECT SNOW: HERE’S HOW IT IMPACTS THE GREAT LAKES

Officials were able to make contact with the truck driver, who appeared uninjured. Another helicopter landed to rescue the driver, and he was transported to the Benton Airpark.

“The driver was assisted with finding a hot meal and a ride to a local hotel,” police said.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

The incident happened days after a woman with dementia was found alive in a snow-covered vehicle six days after she was reported missing in the region.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6125227707001_6125231365001-vs Truck driver missing for 2 days found on snowy road in California Travis Fedschun fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/us-regions/west fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc e3d31aae-961b-5c76-ba8c-edfb8488cfde article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6125227707001_6125231365001-vs Truck driver missing for 2 days found on snowy road in California Travis Fedschun fox-news/weather fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/us-regions/west fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/us/disasters fox news fnc/us fnc e3d31aae-961b-5c76-ba8c-edfb8488cfde article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

71% of republicans want mitch mcconnell to call witnesses at trump impeachment trial, new poll shows

Westlake Legal Group yzpW4964LzJABrqBO0wg94QYFDkDS23E1Homfo-7Gsg 71% of republicans want mitch mcconnell to call witnesses at trump impeachment trial, new poll shows r/politics

As a reminder, this subreddit is for civil discussion.

In general, be courteous to others. Debate/discuss/argue the merits of ideas, don’t attack people. Personal insults, shill or troll accusations, hate speech, any advocating or wishing death/physical harm, and other rule violations can result in a permanent ban.

If you see comments in violation of our rules, please report them.

For those who have questions regarding any media outlets being posted on this subreddit, please click here to review our details as to whitelist and outlet criteria.


I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Titanic remains protected by joint US-UK treaty signed by Pompeo

The remains of the Titanic will now be protected from people diving for valuables under a treaty between United States and the United Kingdom ratified last month by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, officials announced Tuesday.

Making the announcement in Belfast, where the once dubbed “unsinkable ship” was built, British Department for Transport and Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani said the treaty gives the U.S. and the U.K. the power to grant or deny licenses to enter the hulls of the wreckage, or collect artifacts found outside.

“Lying two and a half miles below the ocean surface, the RMS Titanic is the subject of the most documented maritime tragedy in history,” Ghani said. “This momentous agreement with the United States to preserve the wreck means it will be treated with the sensitivity and respect owed to the final resting place of more than 1,500 lives.”

NEW TITANIC IMAGES SHOW THE WRECK’S ‘SHOCKING’ DETERIORATION

Westlake Legal Group TitanicGetty2017 Titanic remains protected by joint US-UK treaty signed by Pompeo fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace d5bcd0f4-2e5e-581e-96fe-fc073c75bcde article

RMS Titanic passenger liner of the White Star Line. From The Story of 25 Eventful Years in Pictures, published 1935. (Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)

The U.K. signed the treaty in 2003, but Pompeo did not ratify it until late December.

This comes after RMS Titanic Inc., a subsidiary of Premier Exhibitions, filed a motion in U.S. District Court in eastern Virginia on Monday that it intends to retrieve items from the ship, arguing that the treaty has “no teeth” in U.S. law, The Guardian reported.

The company became the only group permitted to retrieve artifacts at the site in 1994 and has since collected 5,500 items, including a 17-ton section of the hull that was raised out of the ocean in 1998, Time reported. Some items have been auctioned off by Henry Aldridge & Son, including a water-stained letter, which sold for more than $163,000, and a violin, which sold for almost $1.5 million.

Lying beneath international waters, about 370 nautical miles south of Newfoundland, Canada, the RMS Titanic was not explicitly protected by any legislation since its discovery in 1985, the British Department for Transport and Maritime said in a press release. The treaty strengthens basic protections afforded to heritage sites under the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

The RMS Titanic set sail on its maiden voyage from Southampton, Britain on April 10, 1912, for New York City with 2,223 passengers and crew on board. Five days later it struck an iceberg, broke apart and sank to the bottom of the ocean where it remained undiscovered for more than 70 years. Only 706 people survived, according to the U.S. Senate report on the disaster.

Westlake Legal Group titanicsepia Titanic remains protected by joint US-UK treaty signed by Pompeo fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace d5bcd0f4-2e5e-581e-96fe-fc073c75bcde article   Westlake Legal Group titanicsepia Titanic remains protected by joint US-UK treaty signed by Pompeo fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace d5bcd0f4-2e5e-581e-96fe-fc073c75bcde article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com