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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 173)

Michael Bloomberg Quietly Rejoined Clubs That Largely Exclude Women, Minorities

When Michael Bloomberg was on the verge of running for mayor of New York City in 2001, he quietly resigned from several elite social clubs that primarily or exclusively counted white people ― and often only men ― among their members. 

But once the spotlight of public office was off Bloomberg, he began rejoining some of these clubs. The New York Post’s PageSix section noted in 2014 that Bloomberg had rejoined the Century Club, a predominantly white club in Purchase, New York. He also put his children up for membership, the Post reported at the time. 

Now, HuffPost has learned Bloomberg also rejoined The Brook club — an elite, secretive social club in midtown Manhattan. It’s difficult to even come by a picture of the inside of the club, and often the only way to discern members is when they list it in their obituary. It has been widely reported to be a men’s-only club, including when Bloomberg resigned in 2001.

As long as The Brook and similar clubs keep their membership under 400, they are able to avoid nondiscrimination laws and bar women. Several press reports have noted the club does allow women in for special events, however. A man who answered the phone at The Brook on Thursday told HuffPost that the club is not an all-male organization, but did not elaborate.

“My understanding is also that The Brook club has female members and people of color as members today, at some point in the past they were male only,” Stu Loeser, a campaign spokesman for Bloomberg, told HuffPost Wednesday.  

Westlake Legal Group 5e4585b5250000ec02080d4a Michael Bloomberg Quietly Rejoined Clubs That Largely Exclude Women, Minorities

JEFF KOWALSKY via Getty Images Democratic presidential candidate and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks at a campaign stop at Eastern Market in Detroit, Michigan, on Feb. 4, 2020.

Bloomberg’s memberships to social clubs like The Brook is reflective of the elite world that he’s inhabited for most of his life. The businessman, whose estimated net worth is around $53 billion, has refused any campaign contributions ― spending over $300 million of his own money on his campaign since entering the presidential race in November. Critics and fellow candidates alike have questioned if the billionaire media mogul will be able to assemble a broad and diverse coalition of voters to deliver him the Democratic nomination.

Loeser also confirmed Bloomberg is still a member at the Century Country Club. The Century Country Club was founded by Jewish men in the mid-1800s, and has a similar air of exclusivity. The club does accept female members, but the majority of its members are white.  

In 2001, Arthur Levitt, a former chair of the Securities and Exchange Commission and fellow member of the Century Country Club, where he was Bloomberg’s golf partner, told The New York Times that “I think there are probably a limited number of non-Jewish members.”

“I have seen Blacks and I have seen Hispanics, but I have no idea whether they are members or not,” he continued. “Somebody told me there was a Black member, but you could hardly say there was lavish representation of the Black or Hispanic community at Century, or any other club, for that matter.” 

At the time he quit the Century Country Club, The Brook and the two others ― the Racquet and Tennis Club and the Harmonie Club ―  Bloomberg said they were not diverse enough for him to keep his membership. 

“I have urged the membership committees of the clubs to consider as many different applicants as they possibly can and to take an active stance in trying to make sure that they get as good a group of people as they can, but a diverse group of people,” Bloomberg said at a news conference in July 2001. 

“Those clubs have a right to do what they want, but if I can’t change them, and I choose to resign, then I have chosen to go elsewhere,” he added. 

Loeser told HuffPost on Wednesday that Bloomberg rejoined both the Century Country Club and The Brook after he left office in 2013. Loeser claimed that the Century Country Club has become more diverse since Bloomberg left his role as mayor. 

“After serving as mayor, Mike found that clubs which had been formed as much as a century ago by Jewish families had changed in recent decades,” Loeser said of Bloomberg’s membership with the Century Country Club. “Just as families in the broader Jewish community had changed over time, the clubs had become far more interracial and more interfaith.” 

The Century Country Club did not respond to HuffPost’s request for comment. 

Bloomberg has come under fire for the controversial “stop and frisk” crime prevention strategy commonly practiced while he was mayor of New York City. The strategy has been widely criticized as racially discriminatory. Earlier this week, an audio clip from 2015 resurfaced of Bloomberg defending stop and frisk in which he says “all the crime” can be found in minority neighborhoods. 

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I’m Rebecca Tippett, a demographer at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill who uses Census data every week in my work. I’m here with friends from the Population Reference Bureau and the NC Counts Coalition to answer all of your Census-related questions. AMA!

Westlake Legal Group qYuVHn9LPluZ136utWNrLQaFedLY8NOmVk1N3Bdoqeg I’m Rebecca Tippett, a demographer at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill who uses Census data every week in my work. I’m here with friends from the Population Reference Bureau and the NC Counts Coalition to answer all of your Census-related questions. AMA! r/politics

When we talk about the importance of the Census, we often talk about power and money. We use the Census counts to distribute political power and allocate funding for everything from highway spending to programs like Medicare and Head Start.But the Census is more than just that. It is the backbone of virtually every data product researchers, governments, and businesses use to understand who we are, how we’ve changed, and what this might mean for the future. It’s also the most democratic and inclusive activity we do as a country. This once-a-decade count is the only source of basic demographic data on all individuals living in the United States.

Counting everyone who lives in the United States—and counting them accurately—is really hard to do. In 2010, the overall census count was highly accurate, but certain populations were undercounted, meaning they were missed in the census totals. Renters, black men, American Indians living on reservations, and Hispanics were among the groups with higher rates of undercount in 2010. But the highest rate of undercount was for young children ages 0 to 4.

We’re here today to answer any questions you have about the Census and and how researchers use Census data in their work. We are:

Rebecca Tippett, (ncdemography) a demographer who leads Carolina Demography at UNC-Chapel Hill and made a hard-to-count map of the state of North Carolina for the NC Counts Coalition

Stacey Carless, (nccountscoalition) the executive director of the NC Counts Coalition, which serves as a hub to facilitate a complete and accurate Census count for North Carolina

Beth Jarosz, (datageekb) a Senior Research Associate in U.S. Programs at the Population Reference Bureau, which has a lot of great resources about the US 2020 Census, including a FAQ, a guide to how the Census counts people who have more than one address (like college students!!) and a preview of the upcoming Census.

Ask us anything!

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How ‘Survivor’ Outwits, Outplays And Outlasts Its Reality TV Competition

Jeff Probst has seen a lot in his 20 years as host and executive producer of “Survivor,” a competition series that could be credited with ushering in and sustaining reality television.

He was there when Sue Hawk famously waxed poetic on snakes and rats in Season 1. He was as gobsmacked as anyone when he learned Jonny Fairplay lied about his grandmother’s death in Season 7. He was visibly concerned when Caleb Reynolds suffered heat stroke in Kaoh Rong and had to be medically evacuated. He sat horrified at tribal council as Zeke Smith was wrongly outed as transgender by Jeff Varner, who thought silence represented “deception” in the game.

But it wasn’t until last season that the show entered uncharted territory when Probst and producers chose to eject a player from the game. Castaway Dan Spilo was accused of inappropriate touching by a few of the female competitors, most notably Kellee Kim, who was booted from the show after other women exaggerated personal stories to further their gameplay. Many wondered why Spilo remained on the show for so long knowing Kim’s complaints were justified and caught on camera. 

“I feel like we handled and dealt with that actual situation and I don’t have anything else to add,” Probst told HuffPost when asked about steps the network is taking to ensure a safer environment. “But, in general, ‘Survivor’ will always be a reflection of our culture. And people say, ‘Oh, it brings out the worst.’ But, it brings out everything. It brings out the best, it brings out the worst, it pushes you to your limits, it makes you stand up and cheer, or it can make you cry.”

“We should slowly be evolving the game to reflect society,” he added. “That’s where we’re heading right now. We need less villains and we need more root-able people.”

Westlake Legal Group 5e455407230000310019a0b1 How ‘Survivor’ Outwits, Outplays And Outlasts Its Reality TV Competition

Timothy Kuratek/CBS Jeff Probst addresses previous champions on “Survivor: Winners at War,” the 40th season.

“Survivor” surely reflects society with its casting. So far, 590 people from diverse backgrounds, socioeconomic statuses and age groups have competed on the series. There have been winners of different races and ethnicities; champions both young and old. All while the governing body of producers throws twists and turns their way, the latest being the introduction of “Survivor” money.

And Probst is the true observer, and control, of this ever-evolving behavioral experiment. 

I have also been watching. A die-hard fan of “Survivor” since I was 11 years old, I consistently field comments about my unexpected obsession. “That show’s still on? And you still watch it?” Yes, it’s thrilling television, a true study of the human condition. It makes me constantly ponder, “Could I survive on an island for 39 days with complete strangers, and without proper nourishment?” (Heck yeah! Probably not! But I still dream of the challenge.) I’m captivated by the social interactions — the friendships, the backstabbing, the rivalries. I’m also in tune with the psychology of the show and how certain learned behaviors seep into each stretch, for good and bad.

So when I spotted Probst, alongside unexpected buddy Dave Grohl, at a Sundance Film Festival party in Park City, Utah, last month, couldn’t miss a chance to chat with him in the flesh.

I stoked myself up and revealed to him that I tried out for the show. I mentioned my career as an entertainment reporter; he graciously talked with me about the audition process and urged me to send in another tape. He even obliged my offer to continue our conversation over the phone.

During our interview, Probst was eager to focus on the show’s groundbreaking run, which continued Wednesday night as the 40th season premiered. The series has 20 of the most beloved champions duking it out for the title of Best of the Best and the largest cash prize in the history of reality TV: $2 million. Previous winners like Ethan Zohn, Sandra Diaz-Twine, Jeremy Collins, Parvarti Shallow, Tony Vlachos, Kim Spradlin, Yul Kwon and Wendell Holland have returned to outwit, outplay and outlast their toughest competition. Even fan-favorite married couple Amber and Boston Rob Mariano, who met and got engaged during the “All-Stars” season in 2004, are back, proving the new season is set to be a standout that showcases the differences between old-school and new-school strategy. 

The world’s upside down. There’s so much tension and we’re going to be in an election. I want underdogs. I want likable people… Jeff Probst on the future casts of ‘Survivor’

For Probst, the gravity of it all didn’t sink in until he saw “Survivor” royalty walking up the beach in Fiji. It was a moment of gratitude as he watched individuals he had championed for years come together to honor the show’s decadeslong history. Probst is a softy, even if his tough, khaki-covered exterior screams otherwise.

“It bums me out when players get mad at me or feel like I don’t like them. I’m their biggest fan,” he said. “But sometimes, I become the dad that you can’t please or the principal who’s pissing you off with my rules. That’s just my role on the show. Inside, the reason I say dig deep all the time is that’s what I’m wishing for you. We’re not going anywhere, so go for it. You can do anything. Just keep trying.” 

Probst knows a thing or two about perseverance. It was one fateful day in the late 1990s when he heard TV producer Mark Burnett on the radio talking about the tried and true concept of “Survivor”: a group of contestants are sequestered on an isolated island, divided into two “tribes” and left to face off against each other in grueling physical and mental challenges. The goal is to avoid tribal council, where castaways will be voted out until a jury of axed contestants decides which person deserves a $1 million prize and title of Sole Survivor.

Upon hearing this, Probst called up his agency and told them he wanted to schedule a meeting with CBS. “I’m the guy,” he told Burnett, who was skeptical. The network wanted someone more recognizable and, at that point, Probst was rather unknown. But when it came down to him and New Zealand TV personality Phil Keoghan, Probst’s live experience and passion for the project, as well as a “flirty” interview with Sandra Bullock on “Access Hollywood,” got him the gig. (Keoghan went on to book “The Amazing Race.”) 

Since then, Probst has hosted 582 episodes of “Survivor,” and won four Emmys in the process. And, like him, a lot of the crew members have been on deck since the beginning, including challenge producer John Kirhoffer, writer Charlie Parsons, composer David Vanacore and craft services chef Mary Anne Houston. 

“We’ve had the same creative team, in essence, for most of our run, which is crazy when you think about the fact that this is a show that shoots from the jungle and people leave their families every summer to come do it again,” Probst said of the five-month production schedule. They film two seasons back to back in that sprint. “A big part of the reason that it still works is that we just go for it. We trust each other, and the players trust us.” 

Reliability is a hard thing to come by on “Survivor.” Forging alliances, spilling secrets and spreading lies are all a part of the gameplay. Even the producers test boundaries by introducing, as Probst calls them, “fucked-up twists,” to switch up each iteration. The latest season, for example, sees the return of the controversial Edge of Extinction, which earned its fair share of criticism when it debuted last year. Edge is a remote island where eliminated players go if they want a chance to get back in the game. In Season 38, Chris Underwood ended up being crowned the Sole Survivor after being voted out third, fighting his way back and winning over the jury. Some were disappointed by the results, others were enthralled. But Probst stands firm behind the concept of Edge, saying it represents “a spiritual death and rebirth” for contestants.  

“In terms of people criticizing it, that seems appropriate. Not every idea is going to please everybody, and especially if it’s a big idea,” Probst said. “But if you want to turn the page and start a new chapter, or actually have something you can dig into, then it’s got to be big. And I understand people who wish the game would stay the way it was, but I would say, objectively, as somebody who does this for a living, I don’t think you’d like it as much as you think.”

Westlake Legal Group 5e456951230000510019a0cf How ‘Survivor’ Outwits, Outplays And Outlasts Its Reality TV Competition

CBS Photo Archive via Getty Images Jeff Probst extinguishes Chris Underwood’s torch at Tribal Council on the third episode of “Survivor: Edge of Extinction.”

Even though the predictable formula sustains an audience, it was clear to Probst and company that additions were needed in order to up the ante. That’s when hidden immunity idols and secret advantages came to mind. “People say all the time, get rid of idols,” Probst said. “But if I asked you for your top 10 favorite tribal councils, they would all involve idols! You hate the twist, but you love what came of it.” 

As for bringing back Edge of Extinction, producers wanted to make sure the winners who returned for this anniversary season had a fair shot and solid reason to risk their reputations and put their lives on hold. 

“There’s a bit of a quid pro quo,” Probst said, noting that a lot of the contestants now have young children at home, which only adds to the desire to win. “Every player knew going in that there would be some version of a second chance island. But what nobody knew was it was going to be a very different Edge of Extinction, where your actions directly impact what is happening in the game in a very big way.”

The difference centers on a new form of “Survivor” currency: the fire token. Each player starts out with one token and earns or receives more throughout the game. These tokens can be used to buy strategic advantages or luxury items like coffee, pastries, tarps, blankets and pillows. If voted out, a castaway must bequeath their money to another player. But on the Edge, players are able to trade things like immunity idols for tokens, so they, too, can use money for personal gain ― namely a comeback in the game. 

“This is the idea of evolving a society,” Probst said. “We looked at it like any economy ― let’s create a federal reserve, which is us, and we’re going to put so much money into the game. Then, we’re going to force a supply and demand situation. With that fire token you can get what you need, which is an advantage.” 

Currency is something none of these top-notch players have dealt with on “Survivor,” so it should get interesting.

“If ‘Survivor’ was a novel, then I would want every chapter to be a new adventure,” Probst said. “This season is going to be a war. We’re going to give [the contestants] the tools and the weapons to kill each other, and one of them will survive. And that person will be titled ‘The Greatest Player of All Time.’ Those are the stakes.” 

As “Hunger Games”-esque as that might sound, Probst explained that “Survivor” has only outlasted its TV competition because it has adapted with each installment. In the Season 40 premiere alone, audiences saw a divide erupt between the OGs and the new kids, so it will surely be an experiment in how idols, challenge advantages, alliances and money can enhance or hinder each victorious castaway’s proven technique.

Westlake Legal Group 5e4569ed2500007002080d2a How ‘Survivor’ Outwits, Outplays And Outlasts Its Reality TV Competition

CBS Photo Archive via Getty Images Jeff Probst watches Michaela Bradshaw, Troyzan Robertson, Cirie Fields and Hali Ford compete on the sixth episode of “Survivor: Game Changers.”

Probst says the showrunners take it one season at a time when it comes to looking toward the future. But for Seasons 41 and 42, they’re all about casting individuals who will lessen the blow of distressing news headlines.

“The world’s upside down. There’s so much tension and we’re going to be in an election,” he said. “I want underdogs. I want likable people. I want people to tune into ‘Survivor’ and think, ‘They’ve overcome a lot. I hope one of them wins a million dollars.’ That’s the flavor.” 

As someone who was 13 when the calculated yet extremely likable Boston Rob first appeared on “Survivor: Marquesas,” it’s not lost on me how special it is that, in an era where many institutions are eroding, my one TV mainstay holds strong. “Survivor” night is family night. I watched the show with my parents, and I now scream strategy at my TV as my husband sits beside me. I know my young daughter will watch it someday, too.

Maybe I’ll take up Probst’s offer to submit another audition tape. But for now, my torch burns bright as I watch from my couch.

“Survivor: Winners at War” airs Wednesdays at 8 p.m. on CBS.

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Trump interference in Roger Stone case is ‘abuse of power’, Pelosi says. ‘This is not what America is about. It is so wrong’

Westlake Legal Group bJNJ0QaSsjmrCEfeMuxV3gntb5NnJcuz4g__zct7MlU Trump interference in Roger Stone case is 'abuse of power', Pelosi says. 'This is not what America is about. It is so wrong' r/politics

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Warren accuses Bloomberg of lying over ‘redlining’ housing practice

Westlake Legal Group image Warren accuses Bloomberg of lying over 'redlining' housing practice Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc article 70cb3e18-7a1c-5e30-a6ab-4e4a7fcea93a

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., on Thursday called fellow 2020 Democratic contender Michael Bloomberg a liar over his comments about a controversial banking practice known as “redlining.”

The Associated Press broke a story Wednesday about comments the former New York City mayor made in 2008 at a forum hosted by Georgetown University. He said the end of the practice, in which banks would refuse to give out mortgages to people in poor – usually minority – areas, was a contributing factor to the 2008 housing crisis because “banks started making more and more loans where the credit of the person buying the house wasn’t as good as you would like.”

Warren responded to the comments in a thread of tweets Thursday.

TRUMP WARS WITH BLOOMBERG: RIVALS GO FULL NEW YORKER WITH EPIC BOUT OF INSULTS

“I’m surprised that someone running for the Democratic nomination thinks the economy would be better off if we just let banks be more overtly racist,” she said. “We need to confront the shameful legacy of discrimination, not lie about it like Mike Bloomberg has done.”

She continued: “The end of redlining didn’t cause the 2008 crash. Out-of-control greed by Wall Street and big banks, and the corruption that lets them control our government, caused the crash. Predatory lenders steered families of color into the worst loans and those families lost billions.”

SOURCE OF BLOOMBERG STOP-AND-FRISK AUDIO BLASTS CNN FOR ‘DISMISSING’ STORY

Bloomberg spokesman Stu Loeser said that the candidate “attacked predatory lending” as mayor and, if elected president, has a plan to “help a million more Black families buy a house, and counteract the effects of redlining and the subprime mortgage crisis.”

The campaign also pointed to efforts by Bloomberg’s private philanthropy to help other cities craft policies that will help reduce evictions. After the Associated Press published its original story on Bloomberg’s redlining comments, Loeser added: “He’s saying that something bad – the financial crisis – followed something good, which is the fight against redlining that he was part of as Mayor.”

Bloomberg’s redlining comments were made public after he was forced to apologize this week for supporting a “stop-and-frisk” policy while mayor. Resurfaced comments from the candidate show he was defending the policy as recently as 2015.

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While bashing Bloomberg, Warren took the opportunity to flaunt one of her signature accomplishments — working to create the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

“We need to take concrete steps to address the impact of redlining and the subprime mortgage crisis,” she said. “I built an office at the @CFPB to fight lending discrimination and my housing plan helps families in formerly redlined areas to buy homes and build wealth.”

With Super Tuesday drawing near, many Democratic candidates like Warren have taken shots at Bloomberg as he uses his personal fortune to flood the airwaves in the 14 states that will vote in the Democratic presidential primary March 3.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group image Warren accuses Bloomberg of lying over 'redlining' housing practice Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc article 70cb3e18-7a1c-5e30-a6ab-4e4a7fcea93a   Westlake Legal Group image Warren accuses Bloomberg of lying over 'redlining' housing practice Tyler Olson fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc article 70cb3e18-7a1c-5e30-a6ab-4e4a7fcea93a

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Australia wildfires ‘contained’ in New South Wales for first time in ‘exhausting’ fire season

After months of battling wildfires that scorched thousands of homes and created mass evacuations in eastern Australia, officials announced Thursday that all the blazes in the New South Wales state are considered contained after recent rains.

New South Wales Rural Fire Service‘s deputy commissioner Rob Rogers said in a video posted Twitter that while there is still some fire activity in the southern part of the state, emergency workers can now focus on “helping people rebuild.”

“After what’s been a truly devastating fire season for both firefighters and residents, who’ve suffered so much this season, all fires are now contained in New South Wales,” Rogers said.

AUSTRALIA RAIN MAY PUT OUT REMAINING WILDFIRES IN NEW SOUTH WALES BY END OF WEEK AFTER RECENT DELUGE

Rogers said all fires are contained, meaning that a perimeter has been established around the blazes to prevent additional spread.

The fire service said while “substantial rain” has recently fallen in some areas, firefighters continue to work on 24 bush and grass fires.

“The main focus now for crews is to locate and extinguish any remaining hotspots,” RFS said.

HEAVY RAIN IN AUSTRALIA EXTINGUISHES MAJOR WILDFIRE, CAUSES FLASH FLOODING

In all, Australia’s wildfires killed at least 33 people and destroyed more than 3,000 homes. The fires began causing widespread destruction toward the end of 2019, which was both the hottest and driest year in Australia’s recorded history, according to the Bureau of Meteorology.

Westlake Legal Group 023eb667-AustraliaRain_1 Australia wildfires 'contained' in New South Wales for first time in 'exhausting' fire season Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/world/disasters/fires fox-news/world/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/world/disasters fox-news/weather fox-news/us/disasters/wildfire fox news fnc/world fnc c03b97c7-2bf6-55e3-bfcc-17cc8c5b4143 article

Recent rains have helped drenched deadly wildfires in Australia. (NSW RFS)

During the deluge over recent days, coastal areas have experienced some of the heaviest rainfalls, which has caused flash flooding in some places.

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Sydney, the central coast and the Blue Mountains received up to 16 inches since last Friday, representing some of the heaviest falls in decades.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AustraliaRain_1 Australia wildfires 'contained' in New South Wales for first time in 'exhausting' fire season Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/world/disasters/fires fox-news/world/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/world/disasters fox-news/weather fox-news/us/disasters/wildfire fox news fnc/world fnc c03b97c7-2bf6-55e3-bfcc-17cc8c5b4143 article   Westlake Legal Group AustraliaRain_1 Australia wildfires 'contained' in New South Wales for first time in 'exhausting' fire season Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/world/disasters/fires fox-news/world/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/world/disasters fox-news/weather fox-news/us/disasters/wildfire fox news fnc/world fnc c03b97c7-2bf6-55e3-bfcc-17cc8c5b4143 article

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Tesla Faces a New S.E.C. Investigation

Westlake Legal Group 13tesla-facebookJumbo Tesla Faces a New S.E.C. Investigation Tesla Motors Inc subpoenas Stocks and Bonds Securities and Exchange Commission Musk, Elon Finances Company Reports

Tesla received a subpoena in December from the Securities and Exchange Commission asking the electric-car maker to turn over information about its financial data and contracts, the company said in a filing with the agency on Thursday.

In the filing, Tesla also said that the S.E.C. had closed a separate investigation into projections and statements the company made in 2017 about production rates of its Model 3 sedan.

It said the scope covered by the December subpoena included “Tesla’s regular financing arrangements.”

The S.E.C. had previously investigated statements from Elon Musk, Tesla’s chief executive, about plans to take the company private. That investigation ended in 2018 with Tesla and Mr. Musk each paying a $20 million fine and Mr. Musk stepping down as chairman for three years.

The agency declined to comment, and Tesla did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Tesla also announced on Thursday that it planned to issue about $2 billion in new common stock, just two weeks after Mr. Musk told investors on a call that it “doesn’t make sense to raise money.”

“We’re actually spending money as quickly as we can spend it sensibly,” he said at the time.

Mr. Musk plans to buy up to $10 million of stock from the new offering, the company said. Larry Ellison, a Tesla board member, plans to buy up to $1 million.

Since announcing its fourth-quarter earnings late last month, Tesla’s share price has risen by more than 30 percent, giving it a market value of about $137 billion. The stock’s price has risen about 80 percent since the beginning of the year.

After opening lower on Thursday, Tesla shares were up almost 3 percent in midday trading.

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Trump Fights Back After John Kelly Defends Vindman

Westlake Legal Group merlin_165731562_38cd19bf-bc8d-4ed7-b692-cf363d6dce43-facebookJumbo Trump Fights Back After John Kelly Defends Vindman United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Stone, Roger J Jr Justice Department Jackson, Amy Berman Fox News Channel Barr, William P

WASHINGTON — John F. Kelly, the former White House chief of staff, expressed support for one of the key impeachment witnesses who President Trump abruptly fired last week, drawing a swift response from the president, who tweeted Thursday morning that Mr. Kelly “misses the action & just can’t keep his mouth shut.”

Mr. Kelly said in a speech Wednesday evening that Lt. Colonel Alexander S. Vindman, an expert on Ukraine for the National Security Council removed from his post last week, was right to raise questions about a telephone call with the president of Ukraine in which Mr. Trump pressed for investigations of his political rivals.

“He did exactly what we teach them to do from cradle to grave,” Mr. Kelly said. “He went and told his boss of what he just heard. We teach them: ‘Don’t follow an illegal order. And if you’re ever given one, you’ll raise it to whoever gives it to you that this is an illegal order, and then you’ll tell your boss.’”

Mr. Trump quickly responded to his former top adviser, writing on Twitter that Mr. Kelly was “way over his head” as chief of staff and suggesting that his public comments violated a “military and legal obligation” to remain silent. The president also renewed his criticism of Mr. Vindman.

The response to Mr. Kelly came just hours after the president lashed out on Twitter against a member of the jury that convicted his friend Roger J. Stone Jr., saying the jury was tainted by prejudice in the president’s latest attempt to undermine the case against his friend.

Mr. Trump raised the question of a biased juror in the trial a day after the judge overseeing the Stone proceedings, Judge Amy Berman Jackson of the U.S. District Court in Washington, ruled against a previously sealed motion from Mr. Stone that claimed a different juror was biased and therefore he deserved a new trial.

By late morning, Mr. Trump’s focus was on Mr. Kelly, after news reports about his remarks in a speech at Drew University in New Jersey, as well as Mr. Vindman.

During an appearance on Geraldo Rivera’s radio show, Mr. Trump described Mr. Vindman as “very insubordinate” and claimed that Mr. Vindman’s colleagues applauded his departure last Friday when he was escorted out of the White House.

“Vindman was the guy that, when we took him out of the building, the whole building applauded,” Mr. Trump said. “Many people applauded.”

“No I didn’t want him in,” Mr. Trump said of his decision to oust Mr. Vindman, who testified in the impeachment inquiry about his concerns when he listened to the call between Mr. Trump and his counterpart in Ukraine. “I watched his testimony. Don’t forget he was the one who thought my call was bad and he ran in and started saying terrible things about the call.”

Mr. Trump also suggested that he could stop the tradition of allowing numerous national security officials to listen to his phone calls with foreign leaders. “I may end the practice, Mr. Trump said. “I may end it entirely.”

The president’s involvement in the Stone case has also roiled his Justice Department, causing four prosecutors to abruptly quit it.

In raising the possibility of another biased juror, Mr. Trump was responding to a Fox News report on Wednesday that the forewoman of the Stone jury was an anti-Trump Democratic activist. His complaints about the handling of Mr. Stone’s case have raised concerns from Democrats and critics that he was improperly influencing Justice Department matters.

On Wednesday the president praised Attorney General William P. Barr, on Wednesday for an extraordinary decision to override a sentencing recommendation for Mr. Stone.

That highly unusual decision, when the Justice Department replaced the prosecutors’ sentencing recommendation, caused the prosecutors to leave the case and raised fears that the president was undermining the Justice Department’s independence.

The charges against Mr. Stone stem from the special counsel investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election, an inquiry that Mr. Trump has dismissed as an illegitimate witch hunt led by senior law enforcement officials who did not want him to be elected.

Michael Crowley contributed reporting.

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Barclays C.E.O.’s Ties to Jeffrey Epstein Provoke U.K. Inquiry

Barclays said on Thursday that British financial regulators were investigating the relationship between James E. Staley, its chief executive, and Jeffrey Epstein, the financier who killed himself last August after facing new allegations of sex trafficking of underage girls.

Mr. Staley is one of a handful of prominent Wall Street financiers who have been linked to Mr. Epstein, who portrayed himself as indispensable to corporate executives and built up a small but powerful finance network. He had known Mr. Epstein since at least 1999, when the future Barclays chief was running the private banking business of the Wall Street bank JPMorgan.

“As has been widely reported, earlier in his career, Mr. Staley developed a professional relationship with Mr. Epstein,” Barclays said in a statement. It added that Mr. Staley, who is known as Jes, had told the bank that he had had no contact with Mr. Epstein after taking the top position at the lender in December 2015.

Barclays said regulators including the Financial Conduct Authority, the main overseer of banks in Britain, were examining how Mr. Staley characterized the relationship with Mr. Epstein to the company, as well as what the company subsequently told the financial conduct agency.

Barclays, the statement said, “believes that Mr. Staley has been sufficiently transparent with the company as regards the nature and extent of his relationship with Mr. Epstein.” It added that Mr. Staley retained the full confidence of the bank’s board.

The bank’s shares were trading about 1.6 percent lower on Thursday.

Over the years, Mr. Epstein referred dozens of wealthy clients to Mr. Staley and JPMorgan.

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Jeffrey Epstein referred dozens of wealth clients to Mr. Staley and JPMorgan. Credit…New York State Sex Offender Registry, via Associated Press

The relationship was good enough that Mr. Staley visited Mr. Epstein about 10 years ago, while he was serving time in Florida for soliciting prostitution from a minor. The visit occurred at Mr. Epstein’s Palm Beach office, where he was allowed to serve part of his 13-month sentence.

Among others, Mr. Epstein connected Mr. Staley with Glenn Dubin, who ran Highbridge Capital Management, a hedge fund in which JPMorgan bought a majority stake in 2004. The deal elevated the asset management division that Mr. Staley ran at JPMorgan into a major player in the hedge-fund world.

Mr. Staley was named C.E.O. of Barclays in 2015, becoming the fifth chief executive in about seven years at a bank that had suffered from regulatory troubles and involvement in the Libor-rigging scandal.

He has reshaped the bank, cutting costs and bolstering the company’s commitment to investment banking. But his tenure has also been marked by a series of questions over his judgment.

In 2016, he tried to unmask a whistle-blower who had criticized one of his senior hires. That led to a fine of $15 million from New York’s banking regulator, which said that it had uncovered “shortcomings in governance, controls and corporate culture” at the bank. British bank regulators also fined Mr. Staley about $1.5 million and required the bank to submit reports on parts of its whistle-blowing program.

Mr. Staley also upset a big client, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts, after trying to help his brother-in-law’s business interests. That and other stumbles have spurred some shareholders to demand his resignation along the way.

In August, Mr. Epstein killed himself while in a Manhattan jail, where he was being held awaiting trial on federal sex trafficking and conspiracy charges. He had been charged by Manhattan prosecutors in July with sexually exploiting dozens of women and girls in New York and Florida.

Those accusations involved actions up to 2005. A lawsuit filed last month by Denise N. George, the attorney general of the Virgin Islands, cited further evidence that Mr. Epstein had sexually abused and trafficked hundreds of young women and girls on his private Caribbean island, some as recently as 2018.

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Tesla Faces a New S.E.C. Investigation

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Tesla received a subpoena in December from the Securities and Exchange Commission asking the electric-car maker to turn over information about its financial data and contracts, the company said in a filing with the agency on Thursday.

In the filing, Tesla also said that the S.E.C. had closed a separate investigation into projections and statements the company made in 2017 about production rates of its Model 3 sedan.

It said the scope covered by the December subpoena included “Tesla’s regular financing arrangements.”

The S.E.C. had previously investigated statements from Elon Musk, Tesla’s chief executive, about plans to take the company private. That investigation ended in 2018 with Tesla and Mr. Musk each paying a $20 million fine and Mr. Musk stepping down as chairman for three years.

The agency declined to comment, and Tesla did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Tesla also announced on Thursday that it planned to issue about $2 billion in new common stock, just two weeks after Mr. Musk told investors on a call that it “doesn’t make sense to raise money.”

“We’re actually spending money as quickly as we can spend it sensibly,” he said at the time.

Mr. Musk plans to buy up to $10 million of stock from the new offering, the company said. Larry Ellison, a Tesla board member, plans to buy up to $1 million.

Since announcing its fourth-quarter earnings late last month, Tesla’s share price has risen by more than 30 percent, giving it a market value of about $137 billion. The stock’s price has risen about 80 percent since the beginning of the year.

After opening lower on Thursday, Tesla shares were up almost 3 percent in midday trading.

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