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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 189)

Activists demand facial recognition ban for law enforcement in major new push

A coalition of activist groups representing more than 15 million combined members is pushing for a federal ban on law enforcement’s use of facial recognition technology.

The groups, which are planning to blanket lawmakers with emails and phone calls, are coming together under BanFacialRecognition, which was organized by the digital rights group Fight for the Future as a way to show the public exactly where and how the controversial surveillance technology is being used nationwide.

“Facial recognition is one of the most authoritarian and invasive forms of surveillance ever created, and it’s spreading like an epidemic. … We need to ban this technology outright, treat it like biological or nuclear weapons, and prevent it from proliferating before it’s too late,” said Evan Greer, deputy director of the group, in a statement provided to Fox News.

The technology has been banned by three cities — Oakland and San Francisco in California, and Somerville, Mass. — and at least one 2020 presidential candidate, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, has called for a ban on its use by law enforcement.

EX-GOOGLE EMPLOYEE ALLEGING PREGNANCY DISCRIMINATION MOVES FORWARD WITH CLAIM

Westlake Legal Group facial-recognition-fight-for-the-future Activists demand facial recognition ban for law enforcement in major new push fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/tech/companies/amazon fox-news/person/jeff-bezos fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 5e073385-dff2-5bac-a18c-a829c0d8753e

Fight for the Future, along with more than two dozen other organizations, is calling for a total ban on facial recognition technology at the federal level. (Fight for the Future)

FORTNITE STAR USES RACIAL SLUR, BUT TWITCH ISN’T COMMENTING ON RULE VIOLATION

Two tests of Amazon’s facial recognition software, which the tech giant claims can now detect “fear,” falsely labeled California state lawmakers and members of Congress as criminal suspects.

Most of the false positives were people of color in both tests.

The Jeff Bezos-led company has said that it encourages law enforcement agencies to use 99 percent confidence ratings for public safety applications of the technology. Amazon’s Ring security service, which deploys facial recognition technology, is reportedly working with more than 200 police departments.

“When using facial recognition to identify persons of interest in an investigation, law enforcement should use the recommended 99 percent confidence threshold, and only use those predictions as one element of the investigation” and not the sole determinant, the company said in a blog post earlier this year.

The grassroots coalition, which includes Consumer Action, Restore the Fourth, Electronic Privacy Information Center, Color of Change, United We Dream and Media Justice, is united in the belief that regulating the technology isn’t enough.

AMAZON’S RING GAVE POLICE STATISTICS ABOUT USERS WHO REFUSED LAW ENFORCEMENT REQUESTS

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“We live in the land of the free and the home of the brave. There is nothing democratic about facial recognition technology — no one is truly free when our faces can be monitored and captured as we go about our daily business,” said Linda Sherry, director of national priorities for Consumer Action, in a statement to Fox News. “Facial recognition technology is notoriously inaccurate and biased. Deploying it on an unsuspecting public in the name of ‘crime-fighting’ is a crime in itself.”

Fox News reached out to Amazon for comment on this story.

Westlake Legal Group facial-recognition-fight-for-the-future Activists demand facial recognition ban for law enforcement in major new push fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/tech/companies/amazon fox-news/person/jeff-bezos fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 5e073385-dff2-5bac-a18c-a829c0d8753e   Westlake Legal Group facial-recognition-fight-for-the-future Activists demand facial recognition ban for law enforcement in major new push fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/facebook fox-news/tech/companies/amazon fox-news/person/jeff-bezos fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 5e073385-dff2-5bac-a18c-a829c0d8753e

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Fast track: USC’s Slovis surprised but eager to start at QB

Kedon Slovis enrolled early at Southern California this year as an unheralded recruit expected to provide quarterback depth in the seasons ahead.

Slovis quietly wanted a whole lot more for himself, and he wanted it to happen a whole lot quicker.

He never imagined it quite this way, however: After several months of hard work and one unfortunate injury for J.T. Daniels in the Trojans’ season opener, Slovis will be the starting quarterback in his second game at USC.

“It’s nothing you really expect,” Slovis said after practice. “But as a backup quarterback, you always have to be prepared. It’s really unfortunate what happened, but you’ve got to be the next man up and do your best.”

The 18-year-old freshman from Scottsdale, Arizona, is the unlikely leader of the Trojans (1-0) on Saturday night when they host No. 23 Stanford (1-0). An unsung passer who has already had three quarterbacks coaches since he committed last year is inheriting the job recently held by Carson Palmer, Matt Leinart, Matt Barkley, Cody Kessler and Sam Darnold.

“It was definitely weird waking up Sunday morning,” Slovis said after practice. “But nothing changes for me. I’m still going out to practice every day, except now it’s with the (starters) instead of the (backups). All of those guys are doing a great job of giving me a lot of encouragement.”

Slovis already played his first half of college ball last week after Daniels badly injured his knee while being blitzed by Fresno State 27 seconds before halftime. Slovis took over and went 6 of 8 with an interception while the Trojans largely relied on their running game and special teams to grind out a 31-23 win.

Ready or not, Slovis will face the vaunted Cardinal defense next. USC offensive coordinator Graham Harrell believes his freshman backup QB can handle the spotlight.

“He’s got as good of an arm as I’ve seen,” said Harrell, who once backed up Aaron Rodgers in Green Bay. “He can make any throw out there that most people can’t make. We just have to do our best to get him making the right decisions every time, and if he does that, he’s going to be fun to watch.”

While outsiders didn’t expect big things from Slovis immediately, Slovis was on a quicker timetable after he graduated from Desert Mountain High School, where Pro Football Hall of Famer Kurt Warner was his quarterbacks coach.

After fitting into the Trojans’ offense immediately during spring workouts, Slovis legitimately felt he was in competition for the starting job with Daniels, an 11-game starter last year. Slovis obviously impressed his coaches when they unexpectedly named him the backup ahead of more-experienced Jack Sears and Matt Fink.

But Slovis wasn’t impressed by himself.

“That was the biggest thing being named No. 2, is regaining that confidence you lost in not being named the guy,” Slovis said. “But coming out here with the (starters) and getting plenty of reps, that helps.”

Like most Trojans in recent years, Slovis has already had to prove he can handle upheaval.

Slovis was recruited when Tee Martin was the Trojans’ offensive coordinator and Bryan Ellis was their quarterbacks coach. Slovis made his official visit after coach Clay Helton fired Martin and Ellis left for another job, and Slovis committed to USC during the 34-day window when Kliff Kingsbury was USC’s new offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach.

Harrell, who took over both jobs for Kingsbury, knew almost nothing about Slovis until spring practices began at USC. The change could be hardest on Harrell, who had planned his season around Daniels’ particular skill set. Although Harrell insists that the Trojans “game-plan the same” no matter who is taking the shotgun snaps in his Air Raid offense, Slovis and Daniels have different skills and strengths.

Even if Slovis plays well against the Cardinal, the Trojans’ quarterback woes aren’t over. Slovis and Fink are the only scholarship QBs on the roster with nearly the entire regular season ahead of Helton, who probably needs a bounce-back season to keep his job.

Helton claims he isn’t worried about putting his future in the hands of a teenager who’s going to work faster than anyone imagined.

“I can always tell a quarterback by their eyes, and when his number was called (last week), there was no fooling,” Helton said. “He was just like, ‘I’m ready for this moment.'”

Westlake Legal Group CFB-Kedon-Slovis Fast track: USC's Slovis surprised but eager to start at QB fox-news/sports/ncaa/usc-trojans fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 8d5881f7-3d45-5dad-a99a-bef4ef2d20af   Westlake Legal Group CFB-Kedon-Slovis Fast track: USC's Slovis surprised but eager to start at QB fox-news/sports/ncaa/usc-trojans fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 8d5881f7-3d45-5dad-a99a-bef4ef2d20af

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Connecticut Sun star raising money for her native Bahamas

Connecticut Sun forward Jonquel Jones spent a few hours Wednesday night playing basketball, the rest of this week her focus has been on family and friends in her native Bahamas and the destruction from Hurricane Dorian

Jones has not been able to talk to her parents for three days, but has been in contact with other relatives and believes all of her family is safe. The stories they have told her, she said, of water rising to the ceiling in some apartments and utter devastation across the archipelago, have been heart-breaking.

“Talking to my sister today, I literally spoke to her before the game and they were walking through waist-deep water and stuff like this,” she said. “It flooded areas that we’ve never seen flooded before. I knew numerous people who were in situations where they had to be evacuated. So we’re just hoping for the best right now and just trying to help.”

Jones has set up a page on the crowdfunding site GoFundMe, hoping to raise $50,000 for the archipelago. She donated $10,000 and the page had just over $23,500 in donations by Wednesday night.

She said she and the other organizers of the crowdfunding page are still deciding which relief organizations will receive the funds, but she vowed to make sure all of the money got to people in need.

Jones moved to Maryland at 14 to pursue basketball in the United States. She recently wrote about her experiences as a child in the Bahamas for The Players Tribune, including having the roof of her home peeled back by Hurricane Wilma in 2005 and returning from a shelter to find fish swimming in her living room.

“The thing I’ll never forget is trying to dry off our family photo albums, wiping away the water from the Kodak prints,” she wrote. “And for a minute, it worked — and you could see all these memories again. And then the image would slowly fade to black. We lost years of our history as a family, and that’s why I work so hard to really remember things how they were, because that’s all we got now.”

Jones scored 22 points on Wednesday, leading the Sun to a 102-72 rout of the Dallas Wings, a win that secured Connecticut a double bye into the WNBA semifinals. All cash sales from the Sun’s first playoff game on Sept. 17 will benefit victims of Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas. The non-profit will be selected at the conclusion of the WNBA season.

Sun coach Curt Miller, who donated $250 to the Jones’ GoFundMe page, didn’t take her out of the game until the end of the third quarter. That was in part, he said, to keep her mind occupied on something other than the hurricane.

“I think it is a good distraction somewhat for JJ to go play basketball for a few hours a day,” he said. “Because if not, it’s understandable that you’re constantly on the phone with people, you’re constantly watching the weather reports and the news coverage on it and that can get overwhelming.”

Jones’ GoFundMe video and a link to the page were displayed on the video board during the game.

Teammates, including Jasmine Thomas ($500), Morgan Tuck ($200) and Layshia Clarendon ($200) were listed on the donation page, along with other WNBA players, such as Phoenix Mercury center Brittney Griner, who gave $1,000.

Jones is not the only Bahamian athlete raising money. Buddy Hield of the NBA’s Sacramento Kings, who played youth basketball with Jones and is a good friend, set up a separate GoFundme page. He said he would be donating $100,000 toward relief efforts.

“All of us have been blessed to be in situations where we can give back,” Jones said. “God put me in a situation now where I can reach back and help my communities. If we do nothing, then we’re definitely taking what we’ve been given and what we’ve worked hard for, for granted.”

Westlake Legal Group WNBA-Jonquel-Jones Connecticut Sun star raising money for her native Bahamas fox-news/sports/wnba fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 7e890078-1957-51e0-afb6-995708385b51   Westlake Legal Group WNBA-Jonquel-Jones Connecticut Sun star raising money for her native Bahamas fox-news/sports/wnba fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 7e890078-1957-51e0-afb6-995708385b51

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Beckham ‘ready to go’ for Browns’ opener against Titans

Odell Beckham Jr. didn’t play in the preseason as the Browns were extra careful with their prized new superstar.

But the three-time Pro Bowler, famous for one-handed catches, fashion risks and theatrics, practiced and showed his teammates why he’s one of the NFL’s highest-paid wide receivers.

“Worth every penny,” safety Damarious Randall said Wednesday.

Beckham was deemed “ready to go” for Cleveland’s home opener against Tennessee on Sunday by coach Freddie Kitchens, who is anxious to see an offense featuring the high-profile receiver, quarterback Baker Mayfield, receiver Jarvis Landry and running back Nick Chubb — a group that looks potent on paper and in practice live up to expectations and enormous hype.

“Very eager,” said Kitchens, who will make his regular-season coaching debut. “It is nice Monday that we had everybody at practice. In a lot of ways, it looked like a totally different team. We still have to take it to the game on Sunday.”

The 26-year-old Beckham was sidelined during the exhibition season by what the team said is a “minor” hip injury. Beckham insisted he would have played with the injury during the regular season, but the Browns, who acquired him from the New York Giants in a March trade that could alter the AFC North and NFC East, didn’t want to take any unnecessary risks.

Mayfield didn’t get to throw a pass to Beckham during the exhibition season. However, the pair did work out together in California before training camp and on the side during practice to create chemistry.

The second-year QB disputes the notion that their lack of playing time together is detrimental.

“I didn’t take a snap with Jarvis all last year during the preseason, so yeah, it’s probably pretty overblown,” Mayfield said.

Beckham’s speed, catching radius, route-running and aura are noticeable to anyone who has watched No. 13 in person. The talent is irrefutable.

Randall agreed that Beckham is elite, and said he does things on the field that may go unnoticed by the untrained eye.

“His run after catch is like really the most impressive stuff I’ve seen about him,” Randall said. “How quick he is, how elusive he is. I think he’s faster than what a lot of people give him credit for.”

The Browns are expecting big things from Beckham, who will likely speak to the media Thursday.

His hasty exit in New York was followed by some back-and-forth banter in the media with New York’s front office and some former teammates, drama the Browns hope he’s left behind.

Mayfield doesn’t sense that Beckham, who signed a five-year, $95 contract extension before last season, feels he has anything to prove or needs to quiet his detractors.

“He’s excited to get back to football. He’s feeling healthy, he’s ready to go,” said Mayfield, who broke the NFL’s rookie record for TD passes last season. “I’d say just talking to him, and knowing who he is, he’s very excited to get back on the field with a fresh start. I wouldn’t say that it has anything to do with the outside. He’s ready to do it for himself.”

Titans coach Mike Vrabel is very familiar with Beckham’s talent, and what his addition means to the Browns.

“He has really good instincts, really good spatial awareness. Great body control, great hands, good after the catch and has speed,” Vrabel said. “Every week in this league is a difficult challenge, and this will be another one for us to be able to cover their skill players — Landry, (TE David) Njoku; Chubb is a very good runner; (WR Rashard) Higgins has had success, has caught balls and is somebody that Baker is comfortable with.

“It is always something and this week we are zeroing in on those guys.”

NOTES: The Browns will be browner than ever. The NFL approved the team’s request to make their “color rush” uniforms their primary look this season. Cleveland will wear the brown jerseys with brown pants in six games, starting with Sunday’s opener. Cleveland went 3-0 in the unis last season. … Cleveland’s injury report was sparse with DL Devaroe Lawrence (shoulder) and rookie LB Sione Takitaki the only players listed.

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Odell-Beckham11 Beckham 'ready to go' for Browns' opener against Titans fox-news/sports/nfl/cleveland-browns fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/odell-beckham-jr fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 669ca2d3-fc3f-5f5a-8d1d-5ad4110fa9ba   Westlake Legal Group NFL-Odell-Beckham11 Beckham 'ready to go' for Browns' opener against Titans fox-news/sports/nfl/cleveland-browns fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/odell-beckham-jr fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 669ca2d3-fc3f-5f5a-8d1d-5ad4110fa9ba

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Republicans Think Democrats Want A Recession. Polling Shows They Don’t.

Westlake Legal Group 5d7019ad3b00009605cd8468 Republicans Think Democrats Want A Recession. Polling Shows They Don’t.

It didn’t take long after the U.S. economy showed signs of a potential economic downturn for conservative media figures to start arguing that Democrats were hoping for a recession in order to tank President Donald Trump’s chances at reelection. “Recession is at the top of Trump haters’ wish list,” a New York Post columnist wrote. Stephen Moore, a Trump adviser, cited his experience with a lone woman in San Francisco for a Washington Times column titled “Democrats Rooting for Recession.” 

To be fair, columnists did have one data point to back up their contention. Bill Maher, the HBO host and provocateur, had openly declared: “We have survived many recessions. We can’t survive another Donald Trump term.”

It turns out the multimillionaire comedian isn’t representative of the typical Democrat.

A new HuffPost/YouGov poll found just 9% of Democrats were hoping for a recession, while 72% were not. Among all Americans, 6% were hoping for a recession, and 70% were not. The group most likely to root for a recession? People ages 18 to 29, 13% of whom were hoping for a recession. A slight majority of the under-30 crowd, 53%, did not want an economic downturn.

Nonetheless, 71% of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents believed most Democrats were rooting for a recession, while just 13% said they were not. 

A recession, which economists typically define as two consecutive quarters of negative economic growth, would likely harm Trump’s reelection chances. In polling, voters are more likely to approve of Trump’s handling of the economy than they are to approve of his job performance more broadly. 

The HuffPost/YouGov poll also found a plurality of Americans now expect a recession in the next year: 49% said a recession was “very likely” or “somewhat likely” in the next 12 months, while 32% said it was “not very likely” or “not at all likely.” Among registered voters, a majority (56%) say a recession is very or somewhat likely in the next year. 

There was a significant partisan split on the question, with Democrats seeing a recession as likely by a 74%-to-13% margin. Just 30% of Republicans think a recession is likely, while 60% say the opposite. A number of Democratic-leaning subgroups also thought a recession was coming. A majority of women, 18-to-29-year-olds and African Americans all thought an economic downturn was likely. 

The HuffPost/YouGov poll consisted of 1,000 completed interviews conducted among U.S. adults, using a sample selected from YouGov’s opt-in online panel to match the demographics and other characteristics of the adult U.S. population.

HuffPost has teamed up with YouGov to conduct daily opinion polls. You can learn more about this project and take part in YouGov’s nationally representative opinion polling. More details on the polls’ methodology are available here.

Most surveys report a margin of error that represents some but not all potential survey errors. YouGov’s reports include a model-based margin of error, which rests on a specific set of statistical assumptions about the selected sample rather than the standard methodology for random probability sampling. If these assumptions are wrong, the model-based margin of error may also be inaccurate. Click here for a more detailed explanation of the model-based margin of error.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Republicans Think Democrats Want A Recession. Polling Shows They Don’t.

Westlake Legal Group 5d7019ad3b00009605cd8468 Republicans Think Democrats Want A Recession. Polling Shows They Don’t.

It didn’t take long after the U.S. economy showed signs of a potential economic downturn for conservative media figures to start arguing that Democrats were hoping for a recession in order to tank President Donald Trump’s chances at reelection. “Recession is at the top of Trump haters’ wish list,” a New York Post columnist wrote. Stephen Moore, a Trump adviser, cited his experience with a lone woman in San Francisco for a Washington Times column titled “Democrats Rooting for Recession.” 

To be fair, columnists did have one data point to back up their contention. Bill Maher, the HBO host and provocateur, had openly declared: “We have survived many recessions. We can’t survive another Donald Trump term.”

It turns out the multimillionaire comedian isn’t representative of the typical Democrat.

A new HuffPost/YouGov poll found just 9% of Democrats were hoping for a recession, while 72% were not. Among all Americans, 6% were hoping for a recession, and 70% were not. The group most likely to root for a recession? People ages 18 to 29, 13% of whom were hoping for a recession. A slight majority of the under-30 crowd, 53%, did not want an economic downturn.

Nonetheless, 71% of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents believed most Democrats were rooting for a recession, while just 13% said they were not. 

A recession, which economists typically define as two consecutive quarters of negative economic growth, would likely harm Trump’s reelection chances. In polling, voters are more likely to approve of Trump’s handling of the economy than they are to approve of his job performance more broadly. 

The HuffPost/YouGov poll also found a plurality of Americans now expect a recession in the next year: 49% said a recession was “very likely” or “somewhat likely” in the next 12 months, while 32% said it was “not very likely” or “not at all likely.” Among registered voters, a majority (56%) say a recession is very or somewhat likely in the next year. 

There was a significant partisan split on the question, with Democrats seeing a recession as likely by a 74%-to-13% margin. Just 30% of Republicans think a recession is likely, while 60% say the opposite. A number of Democratic-leaning subgroups also thought a recession was coming. A majority of women, 18-to-29-year-olds and African Americans all thought an economic downturn was likely. 

The HuffPost/YouGov poll consisted of 1,000 completed interviews conducted among U.S. adults, using a sample selected from YouGov’s opt-in online panel to match the demographics and other characteristics of the adult U.S. population.

HuffPost has teamed up with YouGov to conduct daily opinion polls. You can learn more about this project and take part in YouGov’s nationally representative opinion polling. More details on the polls’ methodology are available here.

Most surveys report a margin of error that represents some but not all potential survey errors. YouGov’s reports include a model-based margin of error, which rests on a specific set of statistical assumptions about the selected sample rather than the standard methodology for random probability sampling. If these assumptions are wrong, the model-based margin of error may also be inaccurate. Click here for a more detailed explanation of the model-based margin of error.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

ACC experiencing highs, lows of high-profile transfers

The Atlantic Coast Conference’s Coastal Division could serve as a case study for the extremes of college football’s transfer spectrum.

At one end is Miami, where the NCAA allowed quarterback Tate Martell to play immediately after coming in from Ohio State. At the other is Virginia Tech, where an outpouring of outrage came after Coastal Carolina transfer Brock Hoffman was denied in his request to play this year.

“In my estimation, he went about this thing the right way,” Virginia Tech coach Justin Fuente said, “and was punished because of it.”

Transfers — whether they actually play this year or not — have emerged as a dominant off-field storyline around the ACC and beyond.

The opening-week depth charts for the ACC’s 14 schools listed 21 players who came from other Division I programs. And according to the transfer tracker at 247sports.com, league schools had a combined 108 players transfer out before this season while 51 came in.

The vast majority of those on the two-deeps were graduate transfers who came through the NCAA’s transfer portal without much issue. A few underclassmen received waivers from the NCAA to play right away. Others must spend a season on the sideline after the governing body denied their requests.

Boston College coach Steve Addazio says the number of transfers wanting to play immediately has “gotten out of whack” and says he supports the American Football Coaches Association’s proposal for undergraduate transfers to sit out a year, then regain that year of eligibility if they graduate from their new school.

“You can’t have free agency in college football,” Addazio said. “You have an elite player and one of these schools comes in and poaches them,” he added. “You can’t do that. That’s just ridiculous.”

It’s become common practice in recent years for schools to mine the pool of graduate transfers to plug specific holes on their rosters. First-year Louisville coach Scott Satterfield added six of them to help with the massive attrition during the coaching change.

“We’re looking for the best players that fit what we need,” Pittsburgh coach Pat Narduzzi said.

The hotter topic has been undergraduates seeking waivers to play right away for their new schools.

The governing body issued a directive last year that helped clear the way for immediate eligibility for all approved requests. In June, it approved a series of adjustments to the guidelines used to determine when those waivers can be granted, requiring schools requesting a waiver to provide more documentation to support their argument and more detailed verification of athletes’ claims about why they are leaving.

Brandy Hataway, NCAA director of academic and membership affairs, said the changes weren’t designed to make it easier or harder to obtain a waiver, but to “streamline the process a little bit better” and better educate and inform schools, players and parents.

“The changes weren’t really as dramatic as I think folks may have thought they were, or some people alluded to in some of their reporting,” Hataway said. “It was really a part of the normal process of reviewing them.”

Among the highest-profile of this year’s instant transfers was Martell, who left Ohio State after the Buckeyes picked up Georgia transfer Justin Fields. He received his waiver to play right away in March.

A flurry of other decisions from the NCAA came on a single day last week. North Carolina defensive back Cam’Ron Kelly, who enrolled at Auburn in January only to transfer out two months later, was cleared.

“It was hard last week, because if you give him a bunch of reps and then he’s not able to go, you feel like you kind of cheated your defense a little bit,” defensive coordinator Jay Bateman said. “I think now he’ll be ready to go.”

Georgia Tech received the OK for Michigan transfer Myles Sims to play this season, but the request for Florida transfer Antonneous Clayton was rejected. New coach Geoff Collins simultaneously praised the decision on Sims but “vehemently” disagrees with the ruling on Clayton, adding that it “does not have the best interests of the student-athlete in mind.”

And then there was the final rejection for Hoffman.

He transferred to Virginia Tech in the offseason, saying the move was made to be closer to his mother, who two years ago had surgery to remove a non-cancerous brain tumor. His hometown of Statesville, North Carolina, is roughly a 2-hour drive from Blacksburg — about 1½ hours by car closer than Coastal Carolina’s campus in Conway, South Carolina.

That decision sparked widespread outcry, with Hoffman’s father posting a letter to the NCAA’s waiver committee and President Mark Emmert blasting the decision. He called it “truly a hardship and a disservice to the athletes and institutions you claim to support” and threatened to seek legal counsel.

“When you look at the decision that’s one thing, and when you look at the process of the decision, that is another thing,” Fuente said. “The process, to say it is disappointing, is an understatement.”

The NCAA does not comment on individual cases, Hataway said.

“I think this kind of falls into maybe a misperception that we get frequently that there’s inconsistency in cases,” Hataway said, speaking in general terms. “Some cases are being approved, some cases are being denied. . A lot of the cases that are getting a lot of attention publicly and maybe in the media fall into different (classifications).”

Westlake Legal Group CFB-Tate-Martell ACC experiencing highs, lows of high-profile transfers fox-news/sports/ncaa/miami-hurricanes fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 16081097-2f7c-507c-88d5-7b33f3e70394   Westlake Legal Group CFB-Tate-Martell ACC experiencing highs, lows of high-profile transfers fox-news/sports/ncaa/miami-hurricanes fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 16081097-2f7c-507c-88d5-7b33f3e70394

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Turkey’s Erdogan threatens to ‘open the gates,’ allow Syrian refugees to leave for Western countries

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-f2a664ddf1e84465b4402194637a2b0e Turkey's Erdogan threatens to 'open the gates,' allow Syrian refugees to leave for Western countries fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 3e709258-c545-5be7-af59-76c5aaa62e75

The president of Turkey said Thursday he would be forced to “open the gates” and allow a route for Syrian refugees to travel into WesternEurope unless a deal is reached with the U.S. by the end of the month to help resettle migrants in a so-called “safe zone” within its borders, according to reports.

SYRIAN CIVIL WAR HAS DAMAGED MORE THAN 120 CHURCHES, REPORT FINDS

President Tayyip Erdogan said in a speech to his ruling party officials in the country’s capital city of Ankara that he was determined to create a “safe zone” in northeast Syria in partnership with the United States by the end of September, but was prepared to act alone if necessary.

“We will be forced to open the gates,” Erdogan said. “We cannot be forced to handle the burden alone.”

Erdogan said Turkey aims to resettle about 1 million out of the 3.65 million Syrian refugees in the safe zone. He added that his nation “did not receive the support needed from the world” to help it cope with Syrian refugees.

The Syria War is an ongoing armed conflict between the Syrian government under President Bashar al-Assad and multiple opposing factions, including the Islamic State, according to Statista, a German online portal for statistics

More than half of the Syrian population fled the country as a result of the conflict, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees reported. About 6.6 million refugees left Syria since 2011—about half of which settled in Turkey which borders Syria from the north.

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About 207,000 civilians have died in the conflict since it first began about eight years ago, Statista reported. European nations and the United States have largely remained separated from the conflict until the U.S. and Allied forces conducted airstirkes in 2014 against Islamic extremists. Russia began to back the Syrian government in 2015, according to the site.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-f2a664ddf1e84465b4402194637a2b0e Turkey's Erdogan threatens to 'open the gates,' allow Syrian refugees to leave for Western countries fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 3e709258-c545-5be7-af59-76c5aaa62e75   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-f2a664ddf1e84465b4402194637a2b0e Turkey's Erdogan threatens to 'open the gates,' allow Syrian refugees to leave for Western countries fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 3e709258-c545-5be7-af59-76c5aaa62e75

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Republicans Think Democrats Want A Recession. Polling Shows They Don’t.

Westlake Legal Group 5d7019ad3b00009605cd8468 Republicans Think Democrats Want A Recession. Polling Shows They Don’t.

It didn’t take long after the U.S. economy showed signs of a potential economic downturn for conservative media figures to start arguing that Democrats were hoping for a recession in order to tank President Donald Trump’s chances at reelection. “Recession is at the top of Trump haters’ wish list,” a New York Post columnist wrote. Stephen Moore, a Trump adviser, cited his experience with a lone woman in San Francisco for a Washington Times column titled “Democrats Rooting for Recession.” 

To be fair, columnists did have one data point to back up their contention. Bill Maher, the HBO host and provocateur, had openly declared: “We have survived many recessions. We can’t survive another Donald Trump term.”

It turns out the multimillionaire comedian isn’t representative of the typical Democrat.

A new HuffPost/YouGov poll found just 9% of Democrats were hoping for a recession, while 72% were not. Among all Americans, 6% were hoping for a recession, and 70% were not. The group most likely to root for a recession? People ages 18 to 29, 13% of whom were hoping for a recession. A slight majority of the under-30 crowd, 53%, did not want an economic downturn.

Nonetheless, 71% of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents believed most Democrats were rooting for a recession, while just 13% said they were not. 

A recession, which economists typically define as two consecutive quarters of negative economic growth, would likely harm Trump’s reelection chances. In polling, voters are more likely to approve of Trump’s handling of the economy than they are to approve of his job performance more broadly. 

The HuffPost/YouGov poll also found a plurality of Americans now expect a recession in the next year: 49% said a recession was “very likely” or “somewhat likely” in the next 12 months, while 32% said it was “not very likely” or “not at all likely.” Among registered voters, a majority (56%) say a recession is very or somewhat likely in the next year. 

There was a significant partisan split on the question, with Democrats seeing a recession as likely by a 74%-to-13% margin. Just 30% of Republicans think a recession is likely, while 60% say the opposite. A number of Democratic-leaning subgroups also thought a recession was coming. A majority of women, 18-to-29-year-olds and African Americans all thought an economic downturn was likely. 

The HuffPost/YouGov poll consisted of 1,000 completed interviews conducted among U.S. adults, using a sample selected from YouGov’s opt-in online panel to match the demographics and other characteristics of the adult U.S. population.

HuffPost has teamed up with YouGov to conduct daily opinion polls. You can learn more about this project and take part in YouGov’s nationally representative opinion polling. More details on the polls’ methodology are available here.

Most surveys report a margin of error that represents some but not all potential survey errors. YouGov’s reports include a model-based margin of error, which rests on a specific set of statistical assumptions about the selected sample rather than the standard methodology for random probability sampling. If these assumptions are wrong, the model-based margin of error may also be inaccurate. Click here for a more detailed explanation of the model-based margin of error.

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Hurricane Dorian Updates: Storm Creeps Near the Carolina Coast

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group 05dorian-updates01-articleLarge Hurricane Dorian Updates: Storm Creeps Near the Carolina Coast

Waves crashed against a pier in Folly Beach, S.C., on Wednesday. The Carolinas are bracing for storm surge as Hurricane Dorian approaches.CreditEric Thayer for The New York Times

The Carolinas braced for dangerous rain, wind and storm surge on Thursday morning as Hurricane Dorian continued to creep on its parallel path north along the Eastern Seaboard of the United States, guaranteeing trouble for coastal residents even if it stays offshore.

The storm had strengthened to Category 3 late Wednesday night, when it was in the Atlantic Ocean about 105 miles south of Charleston, S.C., according to the National Hurricane Center. Its hurricane-force winds were extending as far as 60 miles from the center, with tropical-storm-force winds extending up to 195 miles. Forecasters said storm surge waters could flood up to eight feet in some areas.

With a hurricane warning in effect from the Savannah River north to the North Carolina-Virginia border — and thousands of residents cleared out of coastal areas after mandatory evacuations — there was little to do but wait for those rescue personnel and stragglers who remained in the coastal communities in Georgia and North and South Carolina.

In Charleston on Wednesday night, there was evidence that warnings were met with both seriousness and insouciance.

At about 7:30 p.m., an emergency alert went out to area cellphones: “EVACUATE IMMEDIATELY. HURRICANE DORIAN BEGINNING TO AFFECT AREA.” But many tourists and residents were already gone, and the streets of the historic downtown were mostly empty as the first heavy rain bands began soaking the city.

Still, on trendy King Street, sushi and gourmet burgers could be found in a handful of open restaurants. A Tex-Mex place called Juanita Greenberg’s Nacho Royale was completely boarded up. But next door, the bartenders at Proof were slinging cocktails for those seeking other means of escape.

Westlake Legal Group hurricane-dorian-map-promo-1566933204147-articleLarge-v366 Hurricane Dorian Updates: Storm Creeps Near the Carolina Coast

Maps: Track Hurricane Dorian’s Path

Maps tracking the hurricane’s path as it makes its way toward Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas.

A first-person account from Chris Dixon, an author and journalist.

I engaged in a grim ritual with my neighbors on Wednesday, sweating and cursing under a broiling Charleston sun while draping sheets of plywood across the windows on my house. For the fourth time since 2016, I was preparing for a hurricane: Matthew, Irma, Florence and now Dorian.

Depending on your point of view, I am lucky or unlucky enough to live on a tidal creek near Folly Beach, S.C. When hurricanes and tropical storms strafe our coast, their winds roar across the several miles of harbor and normally placid marsh that separate our neighborhood from the Sullivan’s Island Lighthouse. As the tides rise, these winds pile seawater into wave-driven surge and batter the homes in my neighborhood.

Yanking a splinter from my thumb, I asked myself, Why do I live here?

I should know better. When I was young, my great-aunt Ethel told frightful tales of Hurricane Hazel’s 1954 destruction of the Carolina coast. In 1989, Hurricane Hugo upended my life by destroying my home in Surfside Beach, north of Charleston. Two years ago, I gasped as the tides from Hurricane Irma casually carried a foot of marsh into my house while sweeping tons of my yard out to sea. And last year, while covering Hurricane Florence for The New York Times, I spent many tense hours among people who were in the process of losing everything.

So why do I choose to live in this slowly drowning port city? Why endure the annual stress of possibly losing everything? Why constantly check computer models before frantically hauling everything inside, boarding up, driving for safety and then waiting for interminable hours while glued to The Weather Channel?

Because the ocean is my family’s life and my livelihood. My wife grew up in Dana Point, Calif., with the Pacific in her backyard and saltwater in her veins. I grew up in Atlanta but had the great fortune of spending my summers along this Carolina coast — sailing, fishing and, eventually, having my life taken over by surfing.

It sounds cliché, but when your entire life comes to revolve around the ocean, it becomes almost impossible to imagine living any other way. You come to define life not by the hours on the clock, but by the ebb and flow of the tides and the rhythm of the winds and swells. You become deeply enmeshed in a culture of shrimpers, crabbers, divers and surfers. You watch your kids come to revere the ocean and respect its moods and its power. You manage to make a living writing about the ocean. You catch a perfect wave from a hurricane-spawned groundswell at your local break.

Video

Westlake Legal Group 04dorian-updates01sub-videoSixteenByNine3000 Hurricane Dorian Updates: Storm Creeps Near the Carolina Coast

Now a Category 2 storm, Hurricane Dorian is slowly moving northwest, threatening the U.S. southeast coast, after leaving behind major damage in the Bahamas.CreditCreditScott McIntyre for The New York Times

The pilot was anxious to help: He had gathered generators, diapers, tuna fish and other supplies. The people living on the islands in the Bahamas devastated by Hurricane Dorian needed them, immediately.

But he wasn’t sure if there was anywhere to land.

Flying over the hardest-hit areas — the islands of Abaco and Grand Bahama — the pilot saw homes turned to matchsticks and boats piled in heaps.

Harbors, supermarkets, a public hospital, airport landing strips — all had been damaged or blown to smithereens, frustrating rescue efforts.

[The Bahamas was stunned when the hurricane’s water receded.]

Hurricane Dorian, which made landfall on Sunday as a Category 5 storm and then lingered for days, not only left many residents in the most damaged islands without jobs or a place to live. It also stripped away the services required to meet their most immediate needs — like fresh water, food and medical care.

“It’s like a bomb went off, honestly,” said Julie Sands, who lives in Cherokee Sound, in the Abaco Islands.

In the Bahamas, with floodwaters receding, the trail of devastation was slowly becoming clear as residents began tallying their losses. As of Wednesday, according to Dr. Duane Sands, the minister of health, at least 20 people had been confirmed dead and the toll was expected to rise.

[Bahamian descendants in Miami are helping the battered nation.]

Westlake Legal Group bahamas-damage-hurricane-dorian-1567618513584-articleLarge Hurricane Dorian Updates: Storm Creeps Near the Carolina Coast

The Bahamas, Before and After Hurricane Dorian

Aerial images of flattened neighborhoods and a flooded airport give a first look at the large-scale damage there.

Reporting was contributed by Kirk Semple, Frances Robles, Rachel Knowles and Elisabeth Malkin.

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