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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 192)

Patrick Mahomes leads Kansas City Chiefs to historic first half vs. Houston Texans

Westlake Legal Group Patrick-Mahomes8 Patrick Mahomes leads Kansas City Chiefs to historic first half vs. Houston Texans Ryan Gaydos fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/sports/nfl/kansas-city-chiefs fox-news/sports/nfl/houston-texans fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/travis-kelce fox-news/person/patrick-mahomes fox-news/person/deshaun-watson fox-news/person/damien-williams fox news fnc/sports fnc article 56f9c1e3-7782-5de7-b543-3aa38cfae372

Patrick Mahomes led the Kansas City Chiefs to a first-half lead over the Houston Texans after being down 24 points in the second quarter.

Mahomes threw four touchdown passes in the second quarter and helped the Chiefs to a 28-24 lead at the half. The 52 points scored between both teams in the first half were the most in a playoff game in NFL history.

Mahomes also was the second quarterback to throw four touchdowns in a quarter — joining Doug Williams who did it for the Washington Redskins in Super Bowl XXII.

TOM BRADY SETTING NO TIMETABLE FOR 2020 DECISION: ‘IT’S REALLY NOT MY CONCERN AT THIS POINT’

The Texans were rolling in the first half after a few miscues from the Chiefs on offense.

First, Deshaun Watson fired a 54-yard touchdown pass to wide receiver Kenny Stills to begin in the scoring onslaught. The Texans went up 14-0 after a blocked punt and a scoop and score from cornerback Lonnie Johnson Jr.

Houston was up 21-0 when Watson threw a 4-yard touchdown pass to tight end Daniel Fells after a Chiefs muffed punt. The Texans had plenty of momentum on their side until the second quarter.

BILL COWHER LEARNS HE’S BEEN ELECTED TO PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME DURING PREGAME BROADCAST

Kansas City started its run with a 4-yard touchdown pass from Mahomes to running back Damien Williams. Next, Mahomes found Travis Kelce for a 5-yard touchdown catch to bring the Chiefs within 10 points. Kelce would catch two more touchdown passes in the second quarter and give Kansas City the lead going into the half.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

Kelce became the third tight end in the Super Bowl era to catch three touchdown passes, according to ESPN Stats & Info.

Also, the Chiefs were the first team in NFL history to lead at halftime after being down by as many as 24 points, according to the Elias Sports Bureau.

Westlake Legal Group Patrick-Mahomes8 Patrick Mahomes leads Kansas City Chiefs to historic first half vs. Houston Texans Ryan Gaydos fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/sports/nfl/kansas-city-chiefs fox-news/sports/nfl/houston-texans fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/travis-kelce fox-news/person/patrick-mahomes fox-news/person/deshaun-watson fox-news/person/damien-williams fox news fnc/sports fnc article 56f9c1e3-7782-5de7-b543-3aa38cfae372   Westlake Legal Group Patrick-Mahomes8 Patrick Mahomes leads Kansas City Chiefs to historic first half vs. Houston Texans Ryan Gaydos fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/sports/nfl/kansas-city-chiefs fox-news/sports/nfl/houston-texans fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/travis-kelce fox-news/person/patrick-mahomes fox-news/person/deshaun-watson fox-news/person/damien-williams fox news fnc/sports fnc article 56f9c1e3-7782-5de7-b543-3aa38cfae372

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Iran’s Only Female Olympic Medalist Says She Has Defected

Westlake Legal Group ap_16232103039926-d07f2ccd696803b2fbd5e57325295e0f45c9c088-s1100-c15 Iran's Only Female Olympic Medalist Says She Has Defected

Kimia Alizadeh of Iran celebrates after winning a bronze medal in taekwondo at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She says she is defecting from Iran to escape oppression. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Iran's Only Female Olympic Medalist Says She Has Defected

Kimia Alizadeh of Iran celebrates after winning a bronze medal in taekwondo at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She says she is defecting from Iran to escape oppression.

Robert F. Bukaty/AP

An Iranian Olympian, Kimia Alizadeh, has reportedly defected from the Islamic Republic, according to a letter she published on her Instagram account on Saturday.

The letter was published in Persian and is accompanied by a black and white image of her from the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

She describes her decision to leave as difficult, but referring to herself as “one of the millions of oppressed women in Iran,” Alizadeh says it was necessary.

“This decision is even harder to win than the Olympic gold, but I remain the daughter of Iran wherever I am,” Alizadeh writes.

Alizadeh was 18-years-old when she won a bronze medal for taekwondo at the 2016 summer Olympics. She is the only woman to ever win an Olympic medal for Iran.

In her letter, she accuses officials in Iran of sexism and mistreatment and criticizes the compulsory wearing of hijab headscarves in public for women.

“They took me wherever they wanted. I wore whatever they said,” the letter reads. “Every sentence they ordered me to say, I repeated.”

Her letter did not disclose when she left Iran or where she has gone. But it did make clear that she was not invited to Europe and that her defection was not the result of any offer of asylum.

Iran’s semiofficial ISNA news agency reported that Alizadeh had fled to the Netherlands. There has been no immediate reaction from Iranian authorities.

It is unclear whether Alizadeh will compete at the Tokyo Olympics this summer under another nation’s flag.

Her defection comes at a time of high tension between Iran and the United States, as well as growing turmoil in Iran.

On Saturday, Iranians took to the streets of Tehran and other cities, with many demanding that the country’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, step down after the government admitted that it accidentally shot down a Ukrainian passenger plane killing all 176 people aboard. The admission marked the latest development in the fallout from the U.S. killing of Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani earlier this month.

In recent months, several top sports figures have decided to stop representing — and in some cases physically leave — the country.

Alireza Firouzja, Iran’s top-rated chess champion, decided to stop playing for Iran in December over the country’s informal ban on competing against Israeli players.

In September, Saeid Mollaei, a martial artist who practices judo, left the country for Germany. Alireza Faghani, an Iranian international soccer referee, left the country for Australia in 2019.

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Esper Says He Saw No Evidence Iran Targeted 4 Embassies, as Story Shifts Again

Westlake Legal Group 12dc-iranintel-facebookJumbo Esper Says He Saw No Evidence Iran Targeted 4 Embassies, as Story Shifts Again United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim O'Brien, Robert C (1952- ) Iran Esper, Mark T Diplomatic Service, Embassies and Consulates

WASHINGTON — They had to kill him because he was planning an “imminent” attack. But how imminent they could not say. Where they could not say. When they could not say. And really, it was more about what he had already done. Or actually it was to stop him from hitting an American embassy. Or four embassies. Or not.

For 10 days, President Trump and his team have struggled to describe the reasoning behind the decision to launch a drone strike against Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the commander of Iran’s elite security forces, propelling the two nations to the brink of war. Officials agree they had intelligence indicating danger, but the public explanations have shifted by the day and sometimes by the hour.

On Sunday came the latest twist. Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper said he was never shown any specific piece of evidence that Iran was planning an attack on four American embassies, as Mr. Trump had claimed just two days earlier.

“I didn’t see one with regard to four embassies,” Mr. Esper said on CBS’s “Face the Nation.” But he added: “I share the president’s view that probably — my expectation was they were going to go after our embassies. The embassies are the most prominent display of American presence in a country.”

The sharp disparity between the president and his defense secretary only added to the public debate over the Jan. 3 strike that killed Iran’s most important general and whether there was sufficient justification for an operation that escalated tensions with Iran, aggravated relations with European allies and prompted Iraq to threaten to expel United States forces. General Suleimani was deemed responsible for killing hundreds of American soldiers in the Iraq war more than a decade ago, but it was not clear whether he had specific plans for a mass-casualty attack in the near future.

While agreeing that General Suleimani was generally a threat, Democrats in Congress, as well as some Republicans, have said the administration has not provided evidence even in classified briefings to back up the claim of an “imminent” attack, nor has it mentioned that four embassies were targeted. Even some Pentagon officials have said privately that they were unaware of any intelligence suggesting that a large-scale attack was in the offing.

But senior government officials with the best access to intelligence have insisted there was ample cause for concern even if it has not been communicated clearly to the public. Gina Haspel, the director of the C.I.A., and Gen. Mark A. Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff — who were both appointed by Mr. Trump but are career officials without a political history — have said privately and forcefully that the intelligence was compelling and that they were convinced a major attack was coming.

The challenge for the Trump administration is persuading the public, which has been skeptical about intelligence used to justify military action since President George W. Bush invaded Iraq in 2003 based on what turned out to be inaccurate intelligence indicating that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction.

Mr. Trump himself has made clear in other circumstances that he does not trust the intelligence agencies that he is now citing to justify his decision to eliminate General Suleimani. Moreover, given his long history of falsehoods and distortions, Mr. Trump has his own credibility issues that further cloud the picture. All of which means the administration’s failure to provide a consistent explanation has sown doubts and exposed it to criticism.

“If indeed the strike was taken to disrupt an imminent threat to U.S. persons — and that picture seems to be getting murkier by the minute — the case should be made to Congress and to the public, consistent with national security,” said Lisa Monaco, a former senior F.B.I. official and homeland security adviser to President Barack Obama. “Failure to do so hurts our credibility and deterrence going forward.”

Intelligence officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe sensitive data collection, have said there was no single definitive piece of information about a coming attack. Instead, C.I.A. officers described a “mosaic effect,” multiple scraps of information that came together indicating that General Suleimani was organizing proxy forces around the region, including in Lebanon, Yemen and Iraq, to attack American embassies and bases.

Several officials said they did not have enough concrete information to describe such a threat as “imminent,” despite the administration’s assertion, but they did see a worrying pattern. A State Department official has privately said it was a mistake for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to use the word “imminent” because it suggested a level of specificity that was not borne out by the intelligence.

“I have not seen the intelligence, just to be clear, but it is sometimes possible for the reporting of planned attacks to be very compelling even without specificity of time, target or method,” said John E. McLaughlin, a former acting C.I.A. director. “In a sense, that is the story of 9/11. Our reporting gave us high confidence that a big attack was coming — and we so warned — but we were unable to nail down key details.”

Mr. McLaughlin said that the administration may well have had intelligence adequate to compel action, but that it was a separate question whether killing General Suleimani was the most effective response, as opposed to hardening targets or choosing a less provocative option.

Claims about an imminent attack that could take “hundreds of American lives,” as Mr. Pompeo put it right after the drone strike, have also generated doubts because no attack in the Middle East over the past two decades, even at the height of the Iraq war, has ever resulted in so many American casualties at once in part because embassies and bases have become so fortified.

The contrast in descriptions of what the administration knew and what it did not came in quick succession on a single Fox News show last week.

On Thursday night, Mr. Pompeo, while sticking by his description of an “imminent” attack, acknowledged that the information was not concrete. “We don’t know precisely when and we don’t know precisely where, but it was real,” he told the host, Laura Ingraham.

The next day, in a separate interview, Mr. Trump told Ms. Ingraham that in fact he did know where. “I can reveal that I believe it probably would’ve been four embassies,” he said.

That left administration officials like Mr. Esper in an awkward position when they hit the talk show circuit on Sunday. While the defense secretary revealed on CBS that he had not seen intelligence indicating four embassies were targeted, he sounded more supportive of Mr. Trump’s claim on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

“What the president said in regard to the four embassies is what I believe as well,” he said, seeming to make a distinction between belief and specific intelligence. “And he said he believed that they probably, that they could have been targeting the embassies in the region.”

Appearing on “Fox News Sunday,” Robert O’Brien, the president’s national security adviser, played down Mr. Trump’s claim of specific, imminent threats to four American embassies in the region.

“Look, it’s always difficult, even with the exquisite intelligence that we have, to know exactly what the targets are,” Mr. O’Brien said. “We knew there were threats to American facilities, now whether they were bases, embassies — you know it’s always hard until the attack happens.”

“But,” he added, “we had very strong intelligence.”

Senator Mike Lee of Utah, one of the administration’s most outspoken Republican critics after the strike, said on CNN that he worried about the quality of the information that national security officials were sharing with Congress and had not “been able to yet ascertain specific details of the imminence of the attack.”

“I believe that the briefers and the president believed that they had a basis for concluding that there was an imminent attack, I don’t doubt that, but it is frustrating to be told that and not get the details behind it,” he said.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi struck a similar tone, telling ABC’s “This Week” that “I don’t think the administration has been straight with the Congress of the United States” about the reasons for killing General Suleimani.

On “Face the Nation,” Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, accused the president and his top aides of “fudging” the intelligence.

“Frankly, I think what they are doing is overstating and exaggerating what the intelligence shows,” Mr. Schiff said. Officials briefing the so-called Gang of Eight top congressional leaders never said that four embassies were targeted, he added. “In the view of the briefers, there was plotting, there was an effort to escalate being planned, but they didn’t have specificity.”

Nicholas Fandos, Alan Rappeport and Chris Cameron contributed reporting.

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#MeToo Cases’ New Legal Battleground: Defamation Lawsuits

Westlake Legal Group 00defamation-metoo-judd-facebookJumbo #MeToo Cases’ New Legal Battleground: Defamation Lawsuits Zervos, Summer Weinstein, Harvey Trump, Donald J Suits and Litigation (Civil) Statutes of Limitations sexual harassment Sex Crimes New York State Moore, Roy S Miltenberg, Andrew T Libel and Slander Heard, Amber Giuffre, Virginia Roberts Freedom of Speech and Expression Elliott, Stephen Donegan, Moira Dershowitz, Alan M Depp, Johnny Cosby, Bill Corfman, Leigh #MeToo Movement

Ashley Judd was one of the first women to attach her name to accusations of sexual misconduct against Harvey Weinstein, but like many of the claims that followed, her account of intimidating sexual advances was too old to bring Mr. Weinstein to court over.

Then a legal window opened to her. After reading about a director’s claim that Mr. Weinstein’s studio, Miramax, had described Ms. Judd as a “nightmare to work with,” she sued the producer for defamation in 2018.

Mr. Weinstein’s rape trial in Manhattan, which began with jury selection last week, is a spectacle not only because he is the avatar of the #MeToo era, but also because it is one of the few sexual assault cases to surface with allegations recent enough to result in criminal charges.

So, unable to pursue justice directly, women and men on both sides of #MeToo are embracing the centuries-old tool of defamation lawsuits, opening an alternative legal battleground for accusations of sexual misconduct.

While the facts of the cases vary, the plaintiffs are generally using defamation law not just for its usual purpose — to dissuade damaging speech about them — but also as a tool to enlist the courts to endorse their version of disputed events.

This year, key verdicts are expected in defamation cases involving President Trump, the Senate candidate Roy Moore and the actor Johnny Depp, and lawyers are watching the proceedings closely.

In some cases, women are basing their suits on recent statements in which the men they accused called them liars; or in Ms. Judd’s case, on a disparaging statement she said she was not aware of until the director, Peter Jackson, revealed it in a 2017 interview. Men like Mr. Depp are using defamation suits to fend off allegations from women, in his case, his ex-wife Amber Heard, who accused him of domestic abuse.

Courts have only begun to grapple with this #MeToo-inspired wave of defamation lawsuits, which are, in some cases, being brought because the statutes of limitations on sexual misconduct can be as short as one year, depending on the state and severity of the accusation. Those statutes are a bedrock legal concept designed to discourage people from being sued or imprisoned based on witness memories that may have eroded over the years.

The cases raise a swirl of issues, including the appropriate limits on freedom of speech; the power of social media, where an accusation can spread on platforms that vary in reliability and authority; and whether the statutes of limitations should be extended, as some states have already done.

Advocates on both sides are anxious. Lawyers for people accused of misconduct fear that a string of defamation victories for women will prevent men who believe they have been wrongly accused from freely defending themselves. At the same time, backers of the #MeToo movement fear that a spate of defamation cases against women will push victims back into the shadows.

“The next year is going to be very interesting when it comes to the law of defamation,” said Sigrid McCawley, a lawyer representing Virginia Giuffre, who said she was a victim of Jeffrey Epstein’s sex trafficking operation and accused Mr. Epstein’s ex-girlfriend Ghislaine Maxwell and the lawyer Alan Dershowitz of being part of it. After they issued statements saying she was lying, she sued them for defamation. Mr. Dershowitz has countersued Ms. Giuffre for defamation; Ms. Maxwell settled in 2017.

“We’re going to see a wave of opinions that will shape that landscape quite a bit,” Ms. McCawley said.

Several cases involve big names in politics and entertainment. Summer Zervos, a former “Apprentice” contestant, filed a defamation lawsuit against Mr. Trump for his comments during his presidential campaign that her accusations of unwanted kissing and groping were fabricated. The president has argued that he cannot be sued in state court while in office, an issue that is likely headed for New York’s highest court. Its decision will be closely watched by E. Jean Carroll, who filed a similar claim against Mr. Trump after he said that she had lied about his raping her to increase sales of her new book.

Leigh Corfman, who accused Mr. Moore of touching her sexually when she was 14, sued him for defamation after he called her story false, malicious and “politically motivated.” That trial is expected to start this year in Alabama. Mr. Moore lost his Senate race in 2017 after accusations surfaced from Ms. Corfman and other women.

And last year, at least eight women reached settlements with Bill Cosby’s insurance company to end their defamation lawsuits. They filed them after his representatives accused them of lying when they said Mr. Cosby had sexually assaulted them decades ago.

At the same time, defamation suits are a go-to strategy for accused men trying to preserve their reputations. Mr. Depp’s lawsuit is expected to go to trial this summer in Virginia unless the judge dismisses it. And a judge in Brooklyn is considering whether to allow or throw out a lawsuit filed by the writer Stephen Elliott against Moira Donegan, the creator of a widely circulated list of men accused of sexual misconduct that included him.

Mr. Elliott, 48, who denied having assaulted anyone, said in an interview that after his essay about the accusation was rebuffed by mainstream news outlets and with his career in shambles, he saw a defamation lawsuit as his only option.

“What would you do if you had been falsely accused of rape?” he said.

There are lower-profile cases moving through the courts, too. Thirty-three out of 193 cases that the Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund supports involve defending workers who came forward about sexual harassment and were then sued for defamation, said Sharyn Tejani, the fund’s director.

For many plaintiffs, a benefit of suing for defamation is the opportunity to air the facts of what happened years ago, even if they are unable to sue for harassment or assault.

“In order to prove you’re a truth teller, you have to prove it happened,” said Joseph Cammarata, who represented seven Cosby accusers. “This is a direct way to get at the person who assaulted you.”

In Ms. Judd’s case, it could lead to a hearing over her account of visiting Mr. Weinstein’s room at the Peninsula Beverly Hills hotel one morning in late 1996 or early 1997, expecting a professional breakfast. She said that Mr. Weinstein, wearing a bathrobe, had requested to massage her or for her to watch him shower, and that she had refused.

Ms. Judd has argued that Miramax called her a “nightmare to work with” in retaliation for the hotel encounter. Miramax’s alleged conversation with Mr. Jackson occurred more than 20 years ago. The statute of limitations for a defamation claim in California is just one year, but the judge let the case go forward, saying that it was plausible that Ms. Judd would only learn about the conversation through Mr. Jackson’s 2017 interview. (The judge threw out Ms. Judd’s sexual harassment claim, saying it did not fall within the scope of California law.)

Mr. Weinstein has not directly disputed the allegation that Miramax said Ms. Judd was a “nightmare to work with” but has argued that his attempts to land her major acting roles later on showed that he was not trying to hinder her career. He has denied having any nonconsensual sexual encounters, including with the two women at the center of his rape trial in Manhattan. On Monday, prosecutors in Los Angeles announced that he had been charged with rape and sexual battery in connection with encounters with two women there.

Compared with some other countries, in the United States a defamation case is relatively difficult to win, because of a standard set by the Supreme Court to protect freedom of the press. If the plaintiff is a public figure, as many are, he or she must prove the statement was both false and made with “reckless disregard” for whether it was true.

In countries without the same high bar, including China, Australia and France, men have won high-profile defamation cases against women or news outlets that published their stories.

In the United States, a court must also find that the speech in question is based in fact and not purely opinion. Part of Mr. Trump’s argument against Ms. Zervos is that his statements were “fiery rhetoric, hyperbole and opinion” that are protected by the Constitution. Mr. Moore has made a similar argument. In denying Mr. Trump’s motion to dismiss the lawsuit, a judge wrote that he knew exactly what transpired between him and Ms. Zervos, so his calling her a liar was akin to an assertion of fact.

The public airing of #MeToo stories over the past two years has made these suits noticeable, but the strategy is not entirely new. In 1994, Paula Jones sued President Bill Clinton alleging that he had exposed himself to her when he was governor of Arkansas. One portion of the lawsuit accused him and his associates of defaming Ms. Jones by characterizing her as a liar.

A judge dismissed the claim, writing that the comments were “mere denials of the allegations and the questioning of plaintiff’s motives.” Mr. Clinton settled the rest of the suit for $850,000, without admitting wrongdoing; his lying about his affair with Monica Lewinsky during the Jones lawsuit led to his impeachment.

But a more recent ruling, by New York’s highest court, has given hope to lawyers representing women. The court in 2014 revived a lawsuit filed by two men against Jim Boeheim, the Syracuse University basketball coach, who had accused the two men of lying when they said one of Mr. Boeheim’s assistants, Bernie Fine, had abused them as children. The defamation lawsuit was settled in 2015. (Mr. Fine lost his job, but after an investigation, he was not charged with a crime.)

The decision made the New York court system an attractive place to file this kind of lawsuit, said Mariann Wang, who represented the plaintiffs in that case, and Ms. Zervos until recently.

Since the #MeToo movement took off, a number of states have lengthened the statutes of limitations for sexual assault claims, meaning future victims may have less need to rely on defamation lawsuits.

But those suits remain the only legal option for people like Therese Serignese, who said Mr. Cosby gave her pills backstage at a show in Las Vegas in 1976, when she was 19. The next memory she had was waking up to realize that she was being sexually violated.

She joined a lawsuit in 2015 asserting that representatives for Mr. Cosby had defamed her and other women by calling stories like theirs “fantastical” and “past the point of absurdity.” Mr. Cosby’s insurance company settled the lawsuit in April, about a year after he was convicted of sexual assault.

“My point was to make him accountable,” Ms. Serignese, 62, said. “Put him out there and make him work to prove that I’m not telling the truth. Because I knew I was telling the truth.”

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Will Smith surprises receptionist to celebrate her retirement 30 years after meeting

Westlake Legal Group Will-Smith Will Smith surprises receptionist to celebrate her retirement 30 years after meeting Nate Day fox-news/person/will-smith fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 63b56fef-87a5-5962-8e8b-0e7c908869f5

It’s a full-circle moment for Will Smith.

The actor recently visited an iHeart Radio receptionist to celebrate her retirement — 30 years after meeting her.

Smith, 51, shared a video on Instagram, showing him greeting an excited Anita Scipio on her last day in the office.

KATHARINE MCPHEE SLAMS TWITTER CRITIC AFTER PERFORMANCE OF CELINE DION SONG

“My favorite moments on the road are the ones where I can connect with people like @anitascipio,” the “Men in Black” star wrote. “I met her at the front desk before one of my VERY FIRST interviews of my career… and yesterday I was lucky enough to see her off into retirement 30 years later.”

He added: “She said I made her day. Y’all… she made MINE. Enjoy yourself Mama and keep spreading that love & light wherever you go!”

MARTINA MCBRIDE MOURNS MOTHER IN LOVING INSTAGRAM POST

In the video, Scipio laughed when she saw the musician, and exclaimed, “Will Smith! Oh my God!”

“I met you like 30 years ago… You were just getting started and I met you then for the first time,” Scipio recalled. “Now, to have you back again, it’s full-circle! God, I love you, you’re amazing.”

Smith then offered sage advice for Scipio as she entered a new stage of life.

“You go out there and you make sure you have some fun,” he said.

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“I’m gonna have some fun full of love and happiness for the rest of my life,” Scipio responded. “That’s what I believe in living for.”

Since the beginning of his career, Smith has earned four Grammy Awards and has been nominated for five Golden Globes and two Oscars.

Westlake Legal Group Will-Smith Will Smith surprises receptionist to celebrate her retirement 30 years after meeting Nate Day fox-news/person/will-smith fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 63b56fef-87a5-5962-8e8b-0e7c908869f5   Westlake Legal Group Will-Smith Will Smith surprises receptionist to celebrate her retirement 30 years after meeting Nate Day fox-news/person/will-smith fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 63b56fef-87a5-5962-8e8b-0e7c908869f5

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Iran protesters chant ‘Death to England’ outside British Embassy

Dozens of hard-line militia members gathered outside the British Embassy in Iran on Sunday, chanting “Death to England,” and calling for the ambassador to be expelled and the embassy closed.

The protests in Tehran followed British Ambassador Rob Macaire’s arrest for attending a Saturday night vigil for the victims of the Ukrainian passenger plane that Iran admitted it accidentally shot down earlier this week. All 176 people on board were killed.

Macaire, who has been Britain’s envoy to Iran since March 2018, left the vigil after it became a demonstration — but Iranian authorities later arrested him on allegations that he helped to incite the anti-government protest.

Westlake Legal Group AP20012579449268 Iran protesters chant 'Death to England' outside British Embassy fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article a9ba979d-0522-567c-ab41-e28387e8e2c9

Protesters chanting slogans and holding up posters of Gen. Qassem Soleimani during a demonstration in front of the British Embassy in Tehran on Sunday. (AP)

TRUMP ISSUES WARNING TO IRAN: ‘DO NOT KILL YOUR PROTESTERS… THE USA IS WATCHING’

Police released him after three hours but his arrest outraged the British government.

British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab derided Macaire’s arrest as a “flagrant violation of international law.”

Alaeddin Boroujerdi, a member of Iran’s parliamentary committee on national security and foreign policy, accused the ambassador of organizing Saturday night’s protests. Iranian state media echoed the claim.

Iranian foreign minister Seyed Abbas Araghchi on Sunday denied that investigators knew Macaire’s identity when he was arrested.

“He wasn’t detained, but arrested as unknown foreigner in an illegal gathering,” Araghchi tweeted. “When police informed me a man’s arrested who claims to be UK Amb, I said IMPOSSIBLE! only after my phone conversation w him I identified, out of big surprise, that it’s him. 15 min later he was free.”

Macaire denied taking part in any demonstrations, tweeting that he had gone to the event advertised as a vigil for the victims of the Ukraine airline crash.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Normal to want to pay respects- some of victims were British,” he wrote. “I left after 5 mins, when some started chanting.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP20012579449268 Iran protesters chant 'Death to England' outside British Embassy fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article a9ba979d-0522-567c-ab41-e28387e8e2c9   Westlake Legal Group AP20012579449268 Iran protesters chant 'Death to England' outside British Embassy fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox news fnc/world fnc Bradford Betz article a9ba979d-0522-567c-ab41-e28387e8e2c9

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Labor Dept. Rule to Curb Lawsuits by Franchise Workers

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Workers could have more difficulty suing large companies for wrongdoing by contractors or franchisees under a rule announced on Sunday by the Labor Department.

Under the rule, which will take effect in March, employees of a fast-food franchise like a McDonald’s restaurant, for example, may struggle to win a legal claim against the parent company if a franchisee violates minimum-wage and overtime laws.

“This final rule furthers President Trump’s successful, governmentwide effort to address regulations that hinder the American economy and to promote economic growth,” Secretary of Labor Eugene Scalia said in a statement.

The rule, which the department proposed last April, fleshes out its position on a concept known as joint employment. It effectively replaces a more labor-friendly Obama-era approach that the Trump administration withdrew in 2017, one of several departures from the previous administration in the area of employment and labor law.

After the rule takes effect, it could limit the ability of millions of workers to recover wages they are owed.

The contractors and franchisees that directly employ workers often have limited resources to pay legal penalties and settlements, making the large upstream companies with whom these employers have a relationship a more practical target.

“This resolution provides much-needed clarity for the 733,000 franchise establishments across America,” said Robert Cresanti, the president and chief executive of the International Franchise Association, an industry group.

Advocates for worker have criticized the rule, arguing that it provides a road map of sorts for employers seeking to avoid liability for harmful practices.

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Christina Aguilera wishes son a happy birthday with touching photo

Westlake Legal Group christina-aguilera Christina Aguilera wishes son a happy birthday with touching photo Nate Day fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9c9fe87c-886b-5e5e-9cad-d156658d27ec

Christina Aguilera didn’t let her son Max’s special day go by without a sweet birthday message.

The “Beautiful” singer posted a photo of herself and Max, now 12, cuddled up at a bonfire.

“Although you may have outgrown all the parties I’ve always loved throwing you since you were younger, I’ll never grow tired of celebrating the most incredible, amazing person you are…have become and continue to be,” Aguilera, 39, wrote in the caption. “You have the biggest heart and caring nature, which I’m so proud of seeing and hearing from others who experience being around you – because those are rare, natural instincts that can’t be taught!”

CHRISTINA AGUILERA EXPLAINS WHY SHE QUIT ‘THE VOICE’: IT WASN’T THE RIGHT ‘FIT FOR ME’

“You just have a special way of making the room light up, commanding attention & bringing new ideas and laughter to any conversation or situation you’re in,” she continued. “I love being your mom – thanks for constantly teaching ME new things in life and things about myself through knowing you, loving you and watching you grow. I can’t wait to experience all the adventures ahead for you and what exciting things life brings your way.”

The singer concluded, “I know whatever lies ahead, you will always dive head first in knowing yourself, navigating the path you want to be on and sharing the light you shine no matter where you go! Happy birthday!!!!!!🎈🙌 Love you so much Max… -Mom”

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Aguilera shares Max with ex-husband Jordan Bratman. She also has Summer, 5, whom she shares with fiancé Matthew Rutler.

Westlake Legal Group christina-aguilera Christina Aguilera wishes son a happy birthday with touching photo Nate Day fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9c9fe87c-886b-5e5e-9cad-d156658d27ec   Westlake Legal Group christina-aguilera Christina Aguilera wishes son a happy birthday with touching photo Nate Day fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9c9fe87c-886b-5e5e-9cad-d156658d27ec

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Rep. Lee: Trump is selling our soldiers as mercenaries, he ‘does not deserve to be the commander in chief’

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Jim Hanson: Trump’s tweets boost Iranian protests — the world is watching, president warns mullahs

Westlake Legal Group iran-protests-1 Jim Hanson: Trump's tweets boost Iranian protests — the world is watching, president warns mullahs Jim Hanson fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 4faf5600-5a6c-584e-9606-aaebddb9815f

Iran killed an American contractor, then killed 176 innocents on an airplane. But the really horrifying thing is they killed more than 1,500 of their own citizens over the past months for the crime of protesting against the regime.

Despite that crackdown, they are out in force protesting again, showing the bravery of the Iranian people and offering proof they are not going to accept the ongoing corruption and oppression of the mullahs. They have seen the damage these fanatics have done to the world and to their own country and they’ve had enough.

The protesters got a tremendous boost when President Trump sent a tweet in Farsi supporting their cause, which rapidly became the most liked tweet in Farsi in the history of Twitter.

LEW OLOWSKI: SOLEIMANI STRIKE JUSTIFIED — TRUMP HAD LEGAL AND MORAL AUTHORITY TO ACT

He followed that one up with a warning to the regime to stop its crimes against their own people, who are just standing up and asking for decent lives.

These two “tweets heard ‘round the world” may be the most consequential actions that platform has ever produced. By speaking directly to the Iranians and their oppressors Trump told them and the world we are watching and there will be consequences if the regime continues attacking its own people.

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The United States has been steadfast in saying our policy is not regime change but to change the regime. We are rapidly approaching the last chance for the mullahs to do that. The U.S. is applying even more sanctions to a regime crippled financially and unable to operate much longer. The protesters are applying internal pressure that delegitimizes a regime with a massive credibility deficit already.

The targeted killing of Qassem Soleimani has emboldened regime opponents at home and throughout the region. There were already huge anti-Iran protests in Iraq that threaten the control Iran has gained there over the past decade. The Iraqis don’t like the corruption and as patriots don’t want to be a puppet of their neighbor.

The people protesting in the streets now see cracks in the previously invincible façade of the mullahs and their thugs.

In Syria, Vladimir Putin took advantage of the vacuum to call Syrian President Bashar Assad to the Russian airbase for a chat about who would pull his strings now that Soleimani was dead and Iran was receding. With the very real prospect of more U.S. strikes looming, Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps units in Syria were seen packing their gear and getting out while the getting was still good. Iran has been able to leverage its proxies and infusions of cash to control Syria. Now that is all in limbo.

And the biggest effect from Soleimani’s long-overdue demise has been at home in Iran. He was the poster boy of the regime’s attempts at regional domination. He also served as the kingpin of the terror network of proxies that did the dirty work. He even helped with internal repression whenever needed.

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Much of the media made a big deal of the crowds at his funeral without noting that many of those people were there against their will. There were celebrations across the region with pastries being shared in celebration. “Hours after the strike, video circulated online showing people celebrating in Soleimani’s hometown of Kerman, Iran,” the Washington Examiner reported.

Is this a tipping point for Iranian influence and potentially the regime at home? It is certainly in dire straits and will be hard-pressed to maintain its proxies across the region. Soleimani was treacherous and evil, but he was an outstanding terror kingpin who got many groups to work together. That is gone and absent large infusions of money their willingness to do Iran’s heavy lifting will wane.

And the people protesting in the streets now see cracks in the previously invincible façade of the mullahs and their thugs. Soleimani was supposed to be 10 feet tall and bulletproof and it doesn’t matter how big a funeral they throw for him. The people know President Trump pushed one button and returned the general to his component molecules.

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Iranians want the treasure and energy of a great country to go toward making their lives better, not supremacist adventures in other countries. Eggs and butter in Tehran trump guns and rockets in Syria. The protesters see corruption and incompetence and know there is a better way. The mullahs need to change their ways or the people will change them.

However it happens, a more peaceful and prosperous Iran would be better for everyone.

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Westlake Legal Group iran-protests-1 Jim Hanson: Trump's tweets boost Iranian protests — the world is watching, president warns mullahs Jim Hanson fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 4faf5600-5a6c-584e-9606-aaebddb9815f   Westlake Legal Group iran-protests-1 Jim Hanson: Trump's tweets boost Iranian protests — the world is watching, president warns mullahs Jim Hanson fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 4faf5600-5a6c-584e-9606-aaebddb9815f

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