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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 193)

‘Smiling Cinderella’ wins Women’s British Open

Hinako Shibuno of Japan won the Women’s British Open on Sunday in her major championship debut, holing an 18-foot birdie putt on the final hole for a one-stroke victory over Lizette Salas.

The 20-year-old Shibuno, a rookie on the Japan LPGA Tour who was making her LPGA Tour debut, birdied five of the final nine holes for a 4-under 68 and an 18-under 270 total at Woburn Golf Club.

Largely unknown before the championship, Shibuno — nicknamed “Smiling Cinderella” — started the round with a two-stroke lead, but lost it with a double bogey on the par-4 third. She birdied Nos. 5 and 7 before a bogey on the eighth.

She birdied Nos. 10-12, all par 4s, added another on the par-5 15th and closed with the winner on the par-4 18th.

Salas finished with a 65.

Jin Young Ko, who was seeking her third major title of the year after winning the Evian Championship last week in France, was two shots back after a bogey-free 66. Morgan Pressel (67) was fourth at 15 under.

___

PGA TOUR

GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) — J.T. Poston won the Wyndham Championship for his first PGA Tour title, shooting an 8-under 62 for a one-stroke victory.

Poston tied Henrik Stenson’s 2-year-old tournament record at 22-under 258. He became the first player since Lee Trevino in 1974 to win a 72-hole stroke-play event on tour without any bogeys or worse.

The native North Carolinian began his round three strokes back, took the lead for good with a birdie on the par-5 15th hole, then finished with three straight pars to earn $1,116,000 and 500 FedEx Cup points at the regular-season finale.

Webb Simpson was at 21 under after a 65. Byeong Hun An, who held or shared the lead after each of the first three rounds, three-putted the 18th for a bogey and a 67 to finish two shots back. Trying to force a playoff with a birdie, he nearly holed a 60-footer but had it run well past.

Poston, a former Western Carolina golfer playing a 100-mile drive from his hometown of Hickory, became the third player in 11 years with strong local ties to win at Sedgefield Country Club. He joined 2008 winner Carl Petterson — a Swede who grew up in Greensboro — and 2011 champion Simpson, a Raleigh native who played college golf at Wake Forest.

___

KORN FERRY TOUR

HAYWARD, Calif. (AP) — Zac Blair won the Ellie Mae Classic at TPC Stonebrae to wrap up a PGA Tour card for next season.

Blair closed with a 3-under 67 for a one-stroke victory over Brandon Crick. Blair jumped from 31st to 10th in the standings, with the top 25 after the regular-season finale next week earning PGA Tour cards.

The 28-year-old former BYU player finished at 17-under 263 for his first Korn Ferry Tour title.

Crick shot a 68. He went from 155th to 62nd in the season standings.

Maverick McNealy (69) was third at 15 under. He also locked up a tour card, going from 28th to 20th.

___

OTHER TOURS

José-Filipe Lima rallied to win the Challenge Tour’s Vierumaki Finnish Challenge. Five strokes down entering the final round, the 37-year-old Portuguese player closed with a 6-under 66 to finish at 14 under. South Africa’s Bryce Easton (71) was a stroke back. …. Taylor Pendrith won the Edmonton Championship to become the first Canadian winner on the Mackenzie Tour since 2016. He closed with a 9-under 62 to finish at 17 under. Lorens Chan was second, three shots back after a 65. … Ruan Conradie won the Royal Swazi Sun Challenge for his first Sunshine Tour. Conradie closed with a 6-under 66 to finish at 18 under, a stroke ahead of fellow South Africans Paul Boshoff (63), Anthony Michael (64) and Jaco van Zyl (65). Conradie opened the event with a 61. … Phillip Price of Wales won the Staysure PGA Seniors Championship at London Golf Club for his second Staysure Tour title in three years. He finished with a 5-under 67, making an eagle on the par-5 16th, to reach 17 under. Michael Campbell (67), Peter Lonard (69) and James Kingston (70) tied for second, a stroke back. … Misuzu Narita won the Japan LPGA’s Daito Kentaku Eheyanet Ladies. She closed with a 2-under 70 for a one-stroke victory, finishing at 11 under. … Christa Johnson won the Janesville Senior LPGA Pro-Am for her fifth Legends Tour title and first since 2011. She shot consecutive 2-under 71s for a one-stroke victory over Pat Hurst.

Westlake Legal Group GOLF-Hinako-Shibuno 'Smiling Cinderella' wins Women's British Open fox-news/sports/golf/the-open-championship fox-news/sports/golf fnc/sports fnc b9af6730-ab22-52bd-84db-0c8a20d9e537 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group GOLF-Hinako-Shibuno 'Smiling Cinderella' wins Women's British Open fox-news/sports/golf/the-open-championship fox-news/sports/golf fnc/sports fnc b9af6730-ab22-52bd-84db-0c8a20d9e537 Associated Press article

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China’s Zheng Saisai captures 1st singles title at San Jose

Zheng Saisai kept sending back those big, looping groundstrokes and digging balls from every corner to keep points alive as Aryna Sabalenka became more and more frustrated not to be thriving in her typical power game.

Zheng of China stayed steady and patient to capture her first career singles title, beating Belarusian Sabalenka 6-3, 7-6 (3) in the Mubadala Silicon Valley Classic on Sunday.

“It brings out so much confidence,” Zheng said. “I wasn’t winning and this week I beat many seeds. This gives me confidence but still I’m just going to play my tennis.”

Zheng, who is ranked 55th and played one more match than Sabalenka to reach Sunday’s championship, topped three seeded players on the way to her second career final and then another for her first victory at age 25. She was runner-up at Nanchang last year.

With her big topspin shots landing deep and the defensive ability to chase down balls all over the court, Zheng flustered opponents all week with her consistency and level-headed play — and the emotional Sabalenka was no different.

Not that Zheng was paying attention to her opponent’s outbursts, saying she stayed focused on her own game plan.

“The tactic is put the ball deep and whenever I see a space let her run and change if I can flies or high balls because if I give her the same pace, the same ball, she will hit winners on any corner, so I was just trying to mix it up,” Zheng said.

Sabalenka threw her racket after double-faulting on the first match point, slammed her racket to the court following another mistake and also hit it on the net in frustration in an afternoon of unforced errors after the 21-year-old missed on a fourth career title. The second-seeded Sabalenka, who lost in the first round of qualifying here in 2018, rode her powerful first serve to reach to her seventh final and is projected to match her career-high ranking of ninth.

Her power was neutralized by Zheng’s regular topspin on both sides, timely lobs and array of shot-making to keep Sabalenka guessing.

“I couldn’t do anything today with myself. I couldn’t control my emotions. I was screaming some (stuff), I was throwing the rackets,” she said. “… Her game destroyed me because I couldn’t use my power. I wasn’t ready for that.”

Zheng’s victory could propel her to No. 38 — matching her career best — when Monday’s new singles rankings are released.

The two met once previously, with Zheng winning in straight sets on the ITF circuit in 2017. Each woman had played one three-set match this week.

They even wore matching Nike outfits for the final of dark skirts and a gold tank.

For Sabalenka, the loss will provide lessons in how to be more mentally tough. She noted, “I want to be like Serena on the court.”

“I expect better tennis than I played today,” she said. “I just need to be calm on the court and just play my tennis and don’t care about anything else.”

Venus Williams lost her opening match Tuesday night after reaching last year’s quarterfinals here. The 39-year-old, seven-time Grand Slam champion was in the field for the 15th time, this year as a wild-card entry.

In the doubles final, Kveta Peschke of the Czech Republic and American Nicole Melichar defeated Japanese tandem Shuko Aoyama and Ena Shibahara 6-4, 6-4 earlier Sunday.

This marked the second year the event has been played at San Jose State University after moving from Stanford.

Westlake Legal Group TEN-Zheng-Saisai China's Zheng Saisai captures 1st singles title at San Jose fox-news/sports/tennis fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 1f8efcbc-3c37-54da-ae9c-206a6603dc8c   Westlake Legal Group TEN-Zheng-Saisai China's Zheng Saisai captures 1st singles title at San Jose fox-news/sports/tennis fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 1f8efcbc-3c37-54da-ae9c-206a6603dc8c

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Suspect shot co-worker multiple times, killing her at auto-supplier’s plant: authorities

Westlake Legal Group Police-line Suspect shot co-worker multiple times, killing her at auto-supplier’s plant: authorities fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/auto/make/mercedes-benz fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 7fec5fe0-4f4a-569c-ac0a-c01ae28ecc18

A female employee of a supplier to Mercedes-Benz has been charged with murder after the death of a co-worker Sunday near Brookwood, Ala.

The suspect, identified as Angela Mayo, 28, shot Shanina Smith, 27, multiple times near the assembly line at the Lear Corp. plant, the Tuscaloosa County Violent Crimes Unit told Birmingham’s WVTM-TV.

ILLINOIS WORKPLACE SHOOTING LEAVES 5 DEAD, SHOOTER KILLED, OFFICIALS SAY

Mayo then left the plant but later turned herself in to authorities, the station reported.

Lt. Jack Kennedy of the crimes unit told the station that past animosity between the parties likely led to the shooting.

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Mayo was being held in the Tuscaloosa County Jail with bond set at $150,000, according to TuscaloosaNews.com.

Lear makes seating for Mercedes-Benz vehicles, the site reported.

Westlake Legal Group Police-line Suspect shot co-worker multiple times, killing her at auto-supplier’s plant: authorities fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/auto/make/mercedes-benz fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 7fec5fe0-4f4a-569c-ac0a-c01ae28ecc18   Westlake Legal Group Police-line Suspect shot co-worker multiple times, killing her at auto-supplier’s plant: authorities fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/auto/make/mercedes-benz fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 7fec5fe0-4f4a-569c-ac0a-c01ae28ecc18

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Will Elizabeth Warren Be Able To Convince Black Voters She’s Their Woman?

COLUMBIA, S.C. ― Monty Bell entered the halls of the South Carolina Democratic Party convention in June firmly entrenched in former Vice President Joe Biden’s camp.

“I’ve always liked him,” said Bell. 

But by the time Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) wrapped up her six-minute speech at the Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center, the 38-year-old state delegate wasn’t quite as sure. 

“Warren was very impressive,” Bell said afterward. “She definitely gave me something to think about.” 

After stumbling in the early months of her presidential campaign, the Massachusetts senator has shoved herself back into the race with policy specifics, promises to forgo big-money fundraising tactics, and energetic and selfie-filled town halls. During the second quarter of the year, Warren steadily rose in national and early-state polls and raised $19.1 million, more than three times as much as she had in the prior three months.

But for the Warren campaign to stand a chance of winning the Democratic nomination next year, she’ll likely have to fully convert black voters like Bell, an increasingly critical, powerful and decisive voting bloc in the Democratic primary process.

Black voters now comprise more than 20% of Democratic primary voters and often put the vast majority of their political weight behind one presidential candidate ― two factors that together give them recognizable power in the party. “If you can’t compete strongly for African American votes, you’re not going to be the nominee,” said Cornell Belcher, a former pollster for the Democratic National Committee and Barack Obama’s 2008 and 2012 campaigns.

It’s still early. But so far, Warren’s message hasn’t resonated widely with the black electorate. In the early primary state of South Carolina, which has historically served as a harbinger of the larger black vote, Warren is currently polling at just 2% among black Democrats, according to a recent poll out of Monmouth University. Other national polls have also shown Warren polling in the single digits with black Americans ― often well behind Biden and Sens. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.).

“She’s got a tough road, and there is no shortcut to the front of the pack,” said Theodore Johnson, a senior fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice who studies black voting behavior.

Westlake Legal Group 5d42190f3b00004d00dadfe0 Will Elizabeth Warren Be Able To Convince Black Voters She’s Their Woman?

ASSOCIATED PRESS Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks at a candidate forum on June 15, 2019, in Charleston, South Carolina, sponsored by the Black Economic Alliance.

For a number of reasons, Warren entered the presidential contest at a disadvantage compared to her three fellow front-runners, according to Johnson: Biden and Sanders each came into the race with an “established reputation in black America” and more of an “inherent trust” among black voters. Harris has “the shared lived experience that allows her to make cultural appeals in a way that others can’t,” as well as the ability to offer “descriptive representation,” meaning that she herself is a woman of color. 

“Warren has neither of those things,” Johnson said. 

But by making racial inequity a central part of her campaign, Warren has made inroads with political activists and strategists of color. She released plans to address the racial wage gap, wealth gap, maternal mortality gap and “startup capital gap.” She proposed banning private prisons, paying reparations, legalizing marijuana, canceling most people’s student debt and making historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) tuition-free. And she didn’t shy away from her own personal story ― that of a college dropout and onetime single mother whose life was turned around by a selfless aunt and a commuter college that only cost $50 a month. 

At presidential forums hosted by the Black Economic Alliance in Charleston, South Carolina, and She the People in Houston, Warren received standing ovations, impressing attendees with her penchant for specifics and ability to connect on a personal level.

“A lot of people in that room were surprised like, ‘Wow, OK,’” said Aimee Allison, the founder and president of She the People, a political group that seeks to elevate women of color. “For her to make her case so powerfully ― and to win over women of color in that room ― demonstrated that she’s got staying power.” 

In June, almost half of political activists and strategists of color listed Warren as their top candidate when polled by She the People. It was one poll, but it served as evidence of a swift and remarkable shift. The previous December, only one-fifth of the same group even listed Warren in their top three.

The critical question for Warren and her campaign now becomes whether that newfound enthusiasm among the political class will translate to the black electorate. 

“Black activists is one thing,” said Yvette Simpson, chief executive of Democracy for America, a progressive political action committee. “But we always joke, does Rae-Rae know who you are? Does the everyday person know who you are?”

Black activists is one thing. But we always joke, does Rae-Rae know who you are? Does the everyday person know who you are? Yvette Simpson, chief executive of Democracy for America

Warren established her genuine concern for inequities specific to black Americans long ago. As a Harvard professor studying debt and bankruptcy, she repeatedly argued that discrimination put black middle-class families at a higher structural risk of financial collapse than white middle-class families. In a 2003 book, she and her daughter referred to subprime lending and paydays loans as “legally sanctioned corporate plans to steal from minorities.”

Ta-Nehisi Coates has said Warren is the only presidential candidate who reached out to discuss the idea of reparations with him. A few years back, Warren also reached out to meet with Rashad Robinson, the president of Color of Change, a civil rights advocacy organization. He immediately noticed that she did not bring along any staff, unlike many of her peers. 

“To me, that showed a real command of the information and a real comfort with each of the areas that we covered,” he said. “From bail reform and criminal justice to, of course, the economy.”

By 2015, Warren’s support for black Americans had become increasingly clear for those who wished to see it. That year, she took a strong stand in support of the burgeoning Black Lives Matter movement, which The Washington Post called “perhaps the most full-throated endorsement to date by a federal lawmaker.” Activist DeRay Mckesson said Warren understood the cause “better than any political leader I’ve yet heard.” 

Even still, some of the strategists and activists who are supportive of Warren acknowledged the difficulties she’ll face in winning over black voters. Jamecia Decre, a Democratic strategist, personally appreciates Warren’s ability to court “black voters without pandering to them,” but said there are a number of “assumptions” that the former Harvard professor will have to overcome in the black community. 

“I don’t know any other way to put it outside of the fact that she’s a white woman,” she said. “There’s just a lack of trust between white women and black folks in general.” 

Building up that trust is possible ― after all, Hillary Clinton earned 77% of the black vote in 2016 ― but it also takes time, activists and strategists of color said. At the Black Economic Forum in Charleston in June, Robert, who declined to give his last name, said he hadn’t heard of Warren until the 2016 election. 

“If I don’t hear about you until these times like this, what are you doing for me?” he asked.

“I’m not with Elizabeth,” Michael Yates, a 36-year-old former Marine and member of the Ashley Cooper Young Democrats, said at the South Carolina convention. “I see her on TV. I hear her. But you know how somebody just ― I don’t think you understand where I come from.” 

Warren may have inadvertently made things harder for herself among certain groups of black voters by positioning herself as an aspirational candidate. Warren ends many of her stump speeches by declaring “Let’s dream big, fight hard — and win!” But older black voters, in particular, are generally more drawn to established candidates they perceive as most likely to preserve past civil rights gains, Johnson and others said. 

“You can’t risk it on a radical or a dream candidate,” Johnson said, explaining the thought process around picking a candidate. “You have to use it very practically so that you can marshal the power of the black electorate to at least maintain gains that have been realized to date ― or make some incremental progress.”

“It’s always been true in the black community that we tend to not necessarily always vote with our hearts,” agreed Gilda Cobb-Hunter, a longtime state legislator in South Carolina.

John Cusack, a retired 70-year-old from Florence County, South Carolina, said he admires Warren’s courage and willingness to “tell it like it is.” But after Clinton’s loss in 2016, he has reservations about selecting a woman or a person of color as the nominee in 2020. 

“She may be a little more brash than some people would like to accept,” Cusack said. “America still hasn’t come to grips with black leadership, female leadership.” 

Instead, Cusack is reluctantly considering voting for Biden. “He’s a recognized name for the Democratic Party,” Cusack said. 

America still hasn’t come to grips with black leadership, female leadership. John Cusack, 70, from Florence County, South Carolina

Warren has hired more than two dozen staffers in South Carolina and made six visits to the state so far. Carol Fowler, the former chair of the South Carolina Democratic Party, said that people have been impressed with Warren when she has visited, but added that other candidates, like Harris and Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), have developed a stronger presence in the state so far. 

“She’s not neglecting us, but I do think South Carolina Democrats feel like they’ve gotten to know some of the other candidates a little better,” Fowler said. 

Strategists, politicians and voters in South Carolina and elsewhere told HuffPost that Warren needed to go further, especially in rural South Carolina communities. Multiple people pointed to Obama’s 2008 campaign in South Carolina as a blueprint. Back then, Clinton held a commanding lead in early South Carolina polls, including among black voters. 

“We knew Hillary Clinton,” said Kambrell Garvin, 27. “I can recall being a high school student. And folks told me I was crazy when I said that Barack Obama could win.”

But Obama committed to touring the state anyway, especially after his victory at the Iowa caucuses. “Obama went to every little small city in South Carolina,” said Sandino Moses, a 44-year-old teacher’s assistant in Charleston. “He visited all the HBCU colleges. He went to every town hall meeting he could go to. He went places I’ve never been before. And I live in South Carolina.”

In the end, Obama took 44 of 46 counties in the state’s Democratic primary and garnered 55% of the vote.

These folks need to know that you care. They need to hear your heart,” said Simpson of Democracy for America. “They don’t want the data. They want you to hear their story.” 

Nationally, Warren has been “conducting a master class” in reaching out to the broader black electorate in spite of the disadvantages she faces, said Johnson, mirroring the opinions of others. Warren has surrounded herself with some of the “best operatives of color” in politics, according to Bakari Sellers, a former South Carolina state legislator who has endorsed Harris. Since 2018, she has visited states including Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi ― as well as five HBCUs ― and held listening sessions with community leaders, as in Philadelphia ahead of the Netroots Nation convention in July.

At the second set of Democratic presidential debates in Detroit, when asked about the rise of white nationalism, Warren turned the conversation toward President Donald Trump, accusing him of “advancing environmental racism, economic racism, criminal justice racism, [and] health care racism.” It was critical, she explained, that Democrats tackle the specific issues of black Americans head-on. 

“So my plan has universal tuition-free college for all of our kids, but also increases the Pell Grants and levels the playing field by putting $50 billion into historically black colleges and universities,” she said. “It cancels student loan debt for 95% of the kids with student loan debt and helps close the black-white wealth gap in America.”

Warren has also made a clear effort to personalize her message, said Johnson, the voting expert: “There’s always something personal to show that these positions she holds are not the end product of an academic exercise, but of a lived experience in an America that didn’t do for her as a woman what it’s supposed to do for all of us as Americans.”

These folks need to know that you care. They need to hear your heart. They don’t want the data. They want you to hear their story. Yvette Simpson

In one instance, at Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network convention in New York this April, Warren connected her call for universal child care to her own struggles as a young mother and the support her aunt provided in a moment of personal crisis. 

“One night, after I’d put both kids to bed, my 78-year-old Aunt Bee called long-distance from Oklahoma to see how I was doing. I said, ‘Fine.’ Then, with no warning, I started to cry,” she said. “Then Aunt Bee said 11 words that changed my life forever. ‘I can’t get there tomorrow, but I can come on Thursday.’”

“Now, if every working mom in the country had an Aunt Bee, we’d all be good,” Warren added. “But think about all the moms in America who don’t have an Aunt Bee.”

That personal touch has worked occasionally. Joy Vandervort-Cobb, a teacher at the College of Charleston, found herself surprised by Warren at the Black Economic Alliance forum.

“I would never have attached to Sen. Warren the way ― oh my God, when she turned toward us, she was like, damn the camera, this is what I’m here for, this is what I’m about. I’ve got a plan for that. That, I thought, was beautifully done. She just went in, she went right at us,” she said.

Cobb-Hunter, the South Carolina legislator, said that she’s noticed a growing level of interest in Warren among black women in her state. It’s too soon to say exactly why. But Warren has made the idea that the “ultra-rich have rigged our economy” a central part of her campaign, and black voters ― and young black women in particular ― are highly likely to agree with that idea, according to recent research by The Groundwork Collaborative, the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, and UnidosUS Action Fund. 

Among the women who have been taken by Warren is South Carolina state representative Wendy Brawley, who recently endorsed the senator. Brawley said that she appreciated the extent to which Warren talks about “family economics” and child care.

All of the plans that she has talked about it in her campaign are ones that are relevant to everyday people, that would actually help everyday people who struggle every day trying to make ends meet,” said Brawley. 

For now, Biden retains a dominant lead with the black community, especially in South Carolina, where 51% of black voters listed him as their top pick in the latest Monmouth poll. But Temple Robinson, a 40-year-old stay-at-home mom and undecided voter, said there is something of a generational divide between older and younger black voters in South Carolina when it comes to Biden.

“The older people love him,” she said. “I don’t necessarily know how well he has connected to people who are 40 and under.” 

This primary season, Cobb-Hunter believes the black electorate will “fracture” more than in the past, both because of the large number of Democratic candidates and because of an influx of new issues-based voters. Should that happen, there are signs Warren could make inroads within the black community. In a May poll conducted by BlackPAC, Warren performed significantly better with black voters who are paying close attention to the news ― and almost as well as Biden. 

“Everybody, I think, firmly believes that Biden is in the lead. But when they talk about what’s next, I’m hearing a lot of Elizabeth Warren,” agreed Todd Rutherford, South Carolina’s House minority leader.

Kenneth Glover, the Democratic Party chair of Orangeburg County in South Carolina, said that Warren’s focus on student loan forgiveness and free college has also been “resonating” with a lot of young people in his community. Numerous young black voters said the same. 

One young South Carolinian who has been taken by Warren is Garvin, who is now a 27-year-old member of the South Carolina House of Representatives. In July, he decided to endorse Warren alongside Brawley, much to his own surprise. 

“When the process started a couple of months ago, Elizabeth Warren was not even on my list of candidates that I was intending to support,” he said. 

But Garvin appreciated her detailed policies, her warmth and her “down-to-earth” nature. He now believes the 2020 primary will mirror the events of 2008, when he was that high school kid crazy enough to believe a black senator from Illinois stood a chance. 

“There is a divide between some of my older colleagues and myself in regards to who we want to see elected and become president,” Garvin said. “But I don’t think that is a divide that Elizabeth Warren can’t overcome.”

Julia Craven and Igor Bobic contributed reporting. 

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Dayton vigil attendees issue challenge to Ohio governor: ‘Do something!’

During a candlelight vigil Sunday night honoring the nine victims killed in a mass shooting in Dayton in the morning, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine was challenged by protesters to “Do something!”

DeWine addressed hundreds gathered in the city’s Oregon District, the entertainment area where 24-year-old Conner Betts opened fire outside a crowded bar.

The governor, a native of the Dayton area, praised the city’s residents for their “love and resiliency” in the wake of the tragedy.

Shortly after a round of applause, however, several protesters began chanting “Do something!” and “Make a change!”

DAYTON SUSPECT COMPILED ‘HIT LIST’ AND ‘RAPE LIST’ IN HIGH SCHOOL: REPORTS

Westlake Legal Group Mike-DeWine-thumb Dayton vigil attendees issue challenge to Ohio governor: 'Do something!' Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox news fnc/us fnc article a312e798-80ae-5637-baae-a9c82f7d3b1a

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio. (Associated Press)

The chants persisted as DeWine tried to continue his remarks, and became so loud that many attendees had trouble hearing the Republican leader, Cleveland’s WKYC-TV reported.

Later Sunday afternoon, DeWine told reporters that “everything’s on the table” when it comes to gun-policy changes, including background checks.

“We’re open to discussion,” he said, according to Cleveland.com. “This is a debate that certainly should take place.”

“We’re open to discussion. This is a debate that certainly should take place.”

— Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine

DeWine, 72, a former U.S. senator, congressman and state attorney general who campaigned for governor last year as a pro-Second Amendment defender of gun rights, reportedly declined to speak at length about specific gun reforms that the state could enact out of respect for the victims and lack of details about the shooting.

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Any gun reforms need to be constitutional, he said, and must be able to pass the state’s Republican-controlled legislature.

The governor did, however, signal confidence in so-called “red-flag” legislation, which he unveiled in April. The measure would allow authorities to confiscate guns from those deemed a threat to themselves or others.

Westlake Legal Group Mike-DeWine-thumb Dayton vigil attendees issue challenge to Ohio governor: 'Do something!' Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox news fnc/us fnc article a312e798-80ae-5637-baae-a9c82f7d3b1a   Westlake Legal Group Mike-DeWine-thumb Dayton vigil attendees issue challenge to Ohio governor: 'Do something!' Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/second-amendment fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox news fnc/us fnc article a312e798-80ae-5637-baae-a9c82f7d3b1a

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Liz Peek: Obama could help Biden by giving him a boost – So why is he staying silent?

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6067543560001_6067548907001-vs Liz Peek: Obama could help Biden by giving him a boost – So why is he staying silent? Liz Peek fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 6e18d995-376a-5e66-af6d-45378cbf11e1

Where the heck is President Obama? Sane Democrats must be wondering why their popular former president is not stepping in to protect their party from leaping into the Wild Blue Yonder of unsustainable freebies and Big Government run amok.

And….why isn’t he sticking up for Joe Biden?

Here’s where Obama is: enjoying the fruits of his labors. Recently, he and his family vacationed in Provence, staying in a villa costing $62,000 a week. With Michelle raking in a $65 million advance on her book “Becoming,” the couple signing a Netflix deal worth $50 million and Barack charging $400,000 to give the occasional speech to Wall Street firms, the former president’s net worth has skyrocketed to an estimated $135 million. Good for him.

LIZ PEEK: SECOND DEMOCRATIC DEBATE – A TRUMP SUPPORTER’S TOP TAKEAWAYS

Maybe not so good for Democrats, who could surely use a unifying voice and definitely not good for his former vice president. Biden has come under attack, not only for historical positions like voting for the Iraq war or supporting the Hyde Amendment that are out of sync with today’s Democratic sensibilities but also for policies enacted by President Obama.

During the second round of the Democratic debates, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker ripped Biden for the record number of deportations of illegal immigrants carried out during Obama’s time in the White House. Others chided Biden for having supported Obama’s massive trade agreement known as the TPP. Biden looked stricken as the pummeling proceeded, shocked that these upstarts would dare to criticize his former boss.

He did not see this one coming.

Biden invokes Obama’s name constantly, clearly hoping that Democrats’ love affair with the former president has legs and that they will reward his eight years serving as faithful vice president. For some voters, the connection is magic. Visiting South Carolina, where 61 percent of Democratic primary voters are black, Biden boasted about “my buddy Barack;” Biden has a 25 point lead in the state, his biggest advantage in any contest.

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Touting his ties to the former president is awkward. Early on, Biden dubiously claimed he had asked his former boss not to endorse him. That was after Obama’s spokesperson delivered a statement which said, in part, “President Obama has long said that selecting Joe Biden as his running mate in 2008 was one of the best decisions he ever made.” The statement went on to say that the two “remain close today,” but there was no endorsement.

As Biden and his time in the White House come under increasing attack by the crowded primary field, the frontrunner might expect that Obama would weigh in on behalf of his loyal lieutenant. He need not endorse his former veep, but at least he could offer some support.

As in declaring, “I know Joe Biden and he is not a racist.”

After all, Biden is the favorite of Democratic pundits and politicians worried that policies like “Medicare-for-All” and free college tuition will scotch the party’s efforts to oust President Trump. They contend that moderate voters in important swing states like Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin will not climb aboard the Bernie Express, or swallow Elizabeth Warren’s vitriolic attacks on the American economy.

For those Democrats, Joe Biden is The Man, the one candidate who they think can beat President Trump. That confidence, backed up by polling, quickly boosted Biden to Leader of the Pack and has kept him afloat.

Despite coming under fire during recent debates, he still tops the charts by 16 points, according to an average of polls.

However, his performance on the campaign trail and in the debates have shaken perceptions of his infallibility. He could use a boost from Obama.

Unfortunately for Joe, though President Obama has not endorsed anyone in the Democratic race, it is well known that he has his favorites, and they are not named Joe.

Word is that Obama reached out early in the race to some of his former big-money bundlers and asked them to support Beto O’Rourke. The wunderkind former congressman from Texas apparently impressed Obama by spending an unheard-of $80 million only to lose to incumbent Republican Senator Ted Cruz.

Despite the favorable whisper campaign from Obama, O’Rourke’s candidacy has come and gone. After a brief surge of popularity earlier this year, he has dropped to about 3 percent in the polls. Many dismissed him as an empty suit after he indulged in some widely mocked publicity stunts, including posting a video on social media of him getting his teeth cleaned (my personal favorite.) His Spanish-language opening statement during the first debate, and Cory Booker’s comical reaction, became a much-circulated meme.

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More recently, some have speculated that Kamala Harris is Obama’s pick. Harris and Obama have been pals since 2004 when she was Attorney General of San Francisco and he was an Illinois State Senator. She was one of the first elected officials to back Obama, and he returned the favor, hosting a fundraiser for her in 2005.

The senator from California has shown herself to be a tough debater, taking on Joe Biden in the first round of Democratic debates and encouraging others to make the former veep a veritable piñata in the second round. Her aggression appeals to those Democrats worried that standing up to President Trump will require a stiff spine, in addition to a credible policy handbook.

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But the Democrats’ circular firing squad is shooting real bullets, and candidates are sustaining serious injuries. Could President Obama help, by backing a moderate candidate who could take back the White House and talk up party unity? Yes, but don’t hold your breath.

After all, he left Democrats broken and bankrupt at the end of his eight years, losing a record 1,000 legislative seats during his tenure. The surprise is not that he’s not riding to the rescue of his party or Biden; it’s that he isn’t speaking out to protect his legacy. Because that, after all, is something he cares about.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6067543560001_6067548907001-vs Liz Peek: Obama could help Biden by giving him a boost – So why is he staying silent? Liz Peek fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 6e18d995-376a-5e66-af6d-45378cbf11e1   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6067543560001_6067548907001-vs Liz Peek: Obama could help Biden by giving him a boost – So why is he staying silent? Liz Peek fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 6e18d995-376a-5e66-af6d-45378cbf11e1

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Joanna Gaines shares redesign tips after showing off newly renovated headquarters

Joanna Gaines has built an empire – along with her husband Chip – using her keen eye for design.

But how does the business woman, mom-of-five and queen of interior decorating design a space for herself – and her thriving company in Waco, Texas?

JOANNA GAINES’ COFFEE SHOP AT MAGNOLIA MARKET HAS A NAME, OPENING DATE

The short answer: with lots of seating options.

Westlake Legal Group Joanna-before Joanna Gaines shares redesign tips after showing off newly renovated headquarters fox-news/news-events/chip-and-joanna-gaines fox-news/house-and-home fox news fnc/real-estate fnc e66f6264-aa1d-5caa-b3cc-4d8847922b43 article Alexandra Deabler

The space, where weekly meetings are held for the Magnolia company, was “bland” and uninspiring, she explained. (Joanna Gaines / Magnolia)

The star of HGTV’s hit show “Fixer Upper,” which ended after five seasons in 2018, showed off her newly renovated office space on her Magnolia blog, and it utilizes “plenty of seating and a couple of vignettes to sit and read or work.”

Joanna shared before pictures of the space, which included beige seating, light-colored walls and ceiling and a long wood table.

“Define what you want the room to feel like and from there, create a mood board of images and pictures that speak to you.”

— Joanna Gaines

“There’s something about a long table and the typical conference set up that just didn’t feel like us here at Magnolia,” Joanna shared. “For me it felt stuffy and formal, and what I wanted to create was a space that encouraged conversation and had a relaxed and inspiring vibe.”

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The space, where weekly meetings are held for the Magnolia company, was “bland” and uninspiring, she explained.

Westlake Legal Group Joanna-before2 Joanna Gaines shares redesign tips after showing off newly renovated headquarters fox-news/news-events/chip-and-joanna-gaines fox-news/house-and-home fox news fnc/real-estate fnc e66f6264-aa1d-5caa-b3cc-4d8847922b43 article Alexandra Deabler

Joanna suggested a can of paint to “drastically change the mood of a space,” noting that she chose a deep green color to “feel significant and dramatic right when you walked in.” (Joanna Gaines / Magnolia)

“We needed a change and I could tell the weekly routine and daily grind met with a bland conference room wasn’t producing the kind of ideas and motivation our team needed,” she said.

So Joanna decided on a library and living room-type setting with dark green walls and eclectic furniture to really punch up her team’s creativity.

“I wanted this room to feel like a retreat from the day’s busyness, and be a place where the team could come and fill up creatively,” she said on the blog. “I left a long table in the room with eight chairs, added a sofa plus a few additional seating arrangements that would be comfortable.”

Westlake Legal Group joanna-after Joanna Gaines shares redesign tips after showing off newly renovated headquarters fox-news/news-events/chip-and-joanna-gaines fox-news/house-and-home fox news fnc/real-estate fnc e66f6264-aa1d-5caa-b3cc-4d8847922b43 article Alexandra Deabler

Joanna decided on a library and living room-type setting with dark green walls and eclectic furniture to really punch up her team’s creativity. (Joanna Gaines / Magnolia)

“There’s something so cozy and transcendent about a library—being surrounded by books, old and new, that can transport you to just about anywhere. I wanted people to feel that way in this space,” she added.

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Though you don’t need to work as an interior designer to transform your room.

Joanna suggested a can of paint to “drastically change the mood of a space,” noting that she chose a deep green color to “feel significant and dramatic right when you walked in.”

Westlake Legal Group joanna-after3 Joanna Gaines shares redesign tips after showing off newly renovated headquarters fox-news/news-events/chip-and-joanna-gaines fox-news/house-and-home fox news fnc/real-estate fnc e66f6264-aa1d-5caa-b3cc-4d8847922b43 article Alexandra Deabler

“I wanted this room to feel like a retreat from the day’s busyness, and be a place where the team could come and fill up creatively.” (Joanna Gaines / Magnolia)

But more than anything, the home-style guru’s advice to others who want to wake up their area is to “figure out the need” and “find the right space—whether that be an empty corner in your house or a room that’s underused.”

“Define what you want the room to feel like and from there, create a mood board of images and pictures that speak to you. Let the intentionality of the space drive you to start the process and then, when you are finished, surround the room with the things that inspire you most!” she said in the blog.

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Westlake Legal Group joanna-after2 Joanna Gaines shares redesign tips after showing off newly renovated headquarters fox-news/news-events/chip-and-joanna-gaines fox-news/house-and-home fox news fnc/real-estate fnc e66f6264-aa1d-5caa-b3cc-4d8847922b43 article Alexandra Deabler

“We needed a change and I could tell the weekly routine and daily grind met with a bland conference room wasn’t producing the kind of ideas and motivation our team needed,” she said. (Joanna Gaines / Magnolia)

As for her, the pieces that inspire her most in her new creative digs are the antique easel, complete with vintage New York City map that showcases where Joanna used to live on West 57th street.

“Every time I see it, I go back to those months I lived in New York City when I first felt the pull to open my own store, which makes it a fun piece of history for me,” she shared.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6022022720001_6022021281001-vs Joanna Gaines shares redesign tips after showing off newly renovated headquarters fox-news/news-events/chip-and-joanna-gaines fox-news/house-and-home fox news fnc/real-estate fnc e66f6264-aa1d-5caa-b3cc-4d8847922b43 article Alexandra Deabler   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6022022720001_6022021281001-vs Joanna Gaines shares redesign tips after showing off newly renovated headquarters fox-news/news-events/chip-and-joanna-gaines fox-news/house-and-home fox news fnc/real-estate fnc e66f6264-aa1d-5caa-b3cc-4d8847922b43 article Alexandra Deabler

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Working Dogs Deployed To Comfort El Paso Victims, First Responders

Westlake Legal Group 5d47adab260000aa0f046476 Working Dogs Deployed To Comfort El Paso Victims, First Responders

1. Dogs buffer stress.

Petting a dog, or even being in the presence of a dog, much like caring for a baby, can produce a surge in oxytocin, the all-purpose bonding hormone—one scientific term is a “parasympathetic surge.” In layman’s terms, you calm down, chill out. One recent study found that dogs were even better at controlling blood pressure spikes in subjects faced with a difficult task than were spouses—not so surprising when you think about it.

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Mary Anne Marsh: Democrats, 2020 and the Iowa State Fair — It’s not just the food that will be fried

Westlake Legal Group gillibrandbiden Mary Anne Marsh: Democrats, 2020 and the Iowa State Fair -- It's not just the food that will be fried Mary Anne Marsh fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c32d719b-e823-5e8e-8f5f-38b7b1cc44e6 article

With the latest round of Democratic primary presidential debates behind us, we head into the Iowa State Fair, the annual agricultural event and quadrennial political test before the Iowa caucuses. It’s a good time to assess the race for the Democratic nomination.

At the fair you can get almost any food fried on a stick. Of the 20 candidates speaking there this week, many of them are fried on a stick, too. A number of them won’t make it to February’s Iowa caucuses, the first contest of the nomination process.

If you didn’t make the debates, and you’re not going to make the next one, then you’re done. If you made the debate by the skin of your teeth and are polling in low single digits, you’re done, too. Some candidates are starting to realize it. California Rep. Eric Swalwell dropped out before the second debate. Ex-Colorado Gov.  John Hickenlooper may do the same, possibly entering the Colorado Senate race. More candidates will have to quit as the money starts to dry up for everyone except the top tier, and self-funding, candidates.

JESSICA TARLOV: DEM PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES WON’T BENEFIT BY BASHING OBAMA

Where does that leave top four, Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, and Kamala Harris?

While Biden had a more animated performance than in the first debate, it did nothing to assuage concerns about his ability to take on President Donald Trump.

Yes, he continues to lead in the polls but his margin is buoyed by the support of African-American voters. In the latest Quinnipiac poll, Biden has the support of 53 percent of black voters, the majority of whom are women. Those women are the most pragmatic voters, and they will decide the Democratic nomination. African-American women know all too well what is at stake in this election. If they decide Biden isn’t up to taking on Trump then they will support the candidate best suited to beat him.

Sanders’ Tuesday night debate performance could have been from 2016. It was classic Bernie — the crusading promoter of his policies and ideas accompanied by his trademark hand-waving gestures. But did it do anything to stop his slide in the polls?

This week’s straw poll is a reminder that the 2020 campaign is much further along than most people, and even many candidates, realize.

No. Is it likely Warren will continue to pick up support at Sanders’ expense? Yes. Will Sanders will have the money to stay in this race until at least Super Tuesday? Yes. But that doesn’t mean his standing will improve as the process continues.

If Sanders doesn’t win one of the first two contests it is hard to see him picking up enough delegates to finish in the top two, let alone secure the nomination.

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The winner of the debates last week was Warren. Her performance on Tuesday night was by far the best and better than anyone on Wednesday night as well. She drew contrasts between herself, Sanders, and the moderate candidates on stage with her. Warren also had the most memorable moment when she took out John Delaney with her comment “I don’t understand why anybody goes to all the trouble of running for president of the United States just to talk about what we really can’t do and shouldn’t fight for. I don’t get it.”  As soon as I heard that remark I tweeted, “Hello 911 I want to report a murder.”

Whether it is on the debate stage or the campaign trail you always see the same Warren; tough, passionate, and full of plans. That approach has served her well as she continues to climb in the polls.

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Last, but not least, is Kamala Harris. After her superb performance in the first debate that catapulted her in the polls, she came back to earth in the second one. I have called Warren methodical and Harris mercurial. We saw the mercurial Harris on Wednesday night. In that debate she reminded me of Barack Obama as a candidate. He would have a great performance one night and a terrible one the next, only to come back even better on the third performance. That is Harris too. If she can settle into a series of consistently strong performances using the prosecutorial approach that is so natural to her, then she will be a formidable opponent against Warren for the nomination.

Another indication of the position held by Warren and Harris in the wake of the latest debate is the impressive crowds at their events just after it. Warren had over 3,000 people the day before the AFSCME Presidential Forum in Nevada, site of the all-important caucus that is the fourth contest in the nomination process. Harris had a crowd of more than 2,000 people in Colorado, home of presidential candidates Michael Bennet and Hickenlooper. In addition to the crowds, this week Warren should see another increase in the polls and Harris might as well.

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Beyond the fried food on a stick and the iconic Butter Cow, another big attraction at the Iowa State Fair is the unscientific straw poll open to all attending the fair. In 2015, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump ran away with the poll. Hillary Clinton won the Iowa caucus and Trump came in a very close second behind Ted Cruz. Trump and Clinton eventually faced one another in the general election.

This week’s straw poll is a reminder that the 2020 campaign is much further along than most people, and even many candidates, realize. The fact is elections — and the nomination process — are won in June, July and August. With only 182 days until the Iowa caucuses, Warren and Harris are on the rise, Biden and Sanders are fading, and the rest of the field is fried on a stick.

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Westlake Legal Group gillibrandbiden Mary Anne Marsh: Democrats, 2020 and the Iowa State Fair -- It's not just the food that will be fried Mary Anne Marsh fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c32d719b-e823-5e8e-8f5f-38b7b1cc44e6 article   Westlake Legal Group gillibrandbiden Mary Anne Marsh: Democrats, 2020 and the Iowa State Fair -- It's not just the food that will be fried Mary Anne Marsh fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c32d719b-e823-5e8e-8f5f-38b7b1cc44e6 article

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Dayton suspect compiled ‘hit list’ and ‘rape list’ in high school: reports

The gunman who fatally shot nine people — including his sister — and injured more than two dozen others in Dayton, Ohio, early Sunday was reportedly suspended during his high school years for compiling a “hit list” of those he wanted to kill and a “rape list” of girls he wanted to sexually assault.

Conner Betts, 24, who was killed by police less than a minute after he opened fire outside a crowded bar, showed signs of hostility years before Sunday’s violent outburst, according to former classmates.

Betts was reportedly suspended in his junior year at Bellbrook High School after a list of names was found scrawled on a wall in a school restroom, the former classmates said. In an earlier suspension, Betts came to school with a list of female students he wanted to sexually assault.

OHIO SHOOTING VICTIMS INCLUDE GUNMAN’S SISTER, MOTHER OF TWO WHO WAS A NURSING STUDENT

“There was a kill list and a rape list, and my name was on the rape list,” one female classmate told the Associated Press.

“There was a kill list and a rape list, and my name was on the rape list.”

— Female former classmate of Dayton gunman

Westlake Legal Group Ohio-Shooting-Officer-thumb Dayton suspect compiled 'hit list' and 'rape list' in high school: reports Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 63230b06-58b4-589f-b96b-3c0c217b0817

Shoes are piled outside the scene of a mass shooting including Ned Peppers bar, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio. (Associated Press)

During her freshman year, the former cheerleader said she received a phone call from a police officer who informed her that her name was included on a list of potential targets.

“The officer said [Betts] wouldn’t be at school for a while,” she said, referring to the boy’s suspension. “But after some time passed he was back, walking the halls. They didn’t give us any warning that he was returning to school.”

OHIO GUNMAN HAD BULLETPROOF VEST, WAS STOPPED WITHIN 30 SECONDS OF OPENING FIRE OUTSIDE BAR, POLICE SAY

“They didn’t give us any warning that he was returning to school.”

— Female former classmate of Dayton gunman

The discovery of the hit list in early 2012 prompted a police investigation and caused roughly one-third of students to skip school out of fear for their safety, according to the AP report.

EL PASO, DAYTON COULD DEFINE AUGUST — A HISTORICALLY TURBULENT MONTH

Betts had no apparent criminal record as an adult, though if he had been charged as a juvenile those offenses would typically be sealed under state law.

“There’s nothing in this individual’s record that would have precluded him from getting these weapons,” Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl said Sunday.

“There’s nothing in this individual’s record that would have precluded him from getting these weapons.”

— Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl

Former Bellbrook Principal Chris Baker said he “would not dispute that information” when asked about the hit list suspension, according to the Dayton Daily News. Baker, who resigned this summer, declined to speak further on the matter.

A former middle school classmate told the local paper that Betts had an unusual obsession with killing and death. Betts, she said, once told her that he fantasized about tying her up and slitting her throat.

“He knew it wasn’t normal,” she said. “He and I talked at length about him getting help.”

“He knew it wasn’t normal. He and I talked at length about him getting help.”

— Former classmate who claims she was threatened

The woman said she and her parents informed Bellbrook police about the chilling confession, but said that she felt she wasn’t taken seriously.

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Background checks of Betts’ social media conducted by the Daily News also discovered alleged writing of phrases such as “All Shall Be Annihilated,” “Absolute Carnage” and “Bloody Massacre.”

Demoy Howell, who said he and Betts participated in Bellbrook’s Junior ROTC military program, remembered friends saying Betts made them feel threatened and uncomfortable.

“He was always a bit of an oddball,” Howell said. “He had a dark sense of humor — jokes about people dying. He would wear all black. I remember sensing a dark energy around him.”

“I think this is less of a hate crime and more of an ‘I hate everybody’ crime,” he added. “I honestly feel more comfortable now knowing that he’s gone.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Ohio-Shooting-Officer-thumb Dayton suspect compiled 'hit list' and 'rape list' in high school: reports Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 63230b06-58b4-589f-b96b-3c0c217b0817   Westlake Legal Group Ohio-Shooting-Officer-thumb Dayton suspect compiled 'hit list' and 'rape list' in high school: reports Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/ohio fox-news/us/crime/mass-murder fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 63230b06-58b4-589f-b96b-3c0c217b0817

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