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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 196)

Elizabeth Warren Has Done the Hard Part. Now Comes the Harder Part.

Westlake Legal Group 23warren-image-promo-facebookJumbo Elizabeth Warren Has Done the Hard Part. Now Comes the Harder Part. Warren, Elizabeth Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 New Hampshire Iowa Democratic Party

VINTON, Iowa — Elizabeth Warren motors onstage at her campaign events like she is being chased: arm-pump, arm-pump, mid-jog wave. O.K.! Let’s get this thing going.

She rockets through the plan-a-minute portion of her stump speech with a winking plea for indulgence: “Just one more, just one more,” she promises, as if bargaining with an award-show orchestra trying to play her off before her subprime mortgage riff.

Then comes that crucial moment of a Warren gathering, when the power dynamic shifts from the stage to the crowd. Someone has a question. Ms. Warren has staked her 2020 candidacy on having the answers. And from her opening syllables — “O.K.!”, “Alrighty!”, “So!” — she takes care to project a problem-solving itch so irrepressible that only comic-book punctuation will suffice.

“Whoooaaaaa!” Ms. Warren said on a recent Saturday in Vinton, joined by 150 people inside a high school atrium.

A woman, Jan Bingham, 64, had just asked about the thorny subject of “electability,” at once a trope long used to diminish female candidates and a source of near-constant anxiety among Warren supporters.

“It has been said that Elizabeth Warren has a plan for everything,” Ms. Bingham said, “except how to beat Donald Trump.”

“All right!” Ms. Warren replied, over audience grumbles. She plowed through a familiar bit about turning back bullies, about knowing what’s broken and knowing how to fix it. Polite applause followed.

Ms. Bingham sat down. “I guess I wanted a few more specifics,” she said.

With less than three months before the voting begins, Ms. Warren has, in some ways, already completed the knottiest leg of her would-be path to the Democratic presidential nomination. Saddled early on by halting fund-raising totals, middling poll numbers and a running flap over claims of Native American ancestry, she managed to elevate herself above the primary morass behind a fire hose of policy plans and the canny celebri-fication of a septuagenarian bankruptcy expert who campaigns in sneakers and cardigans, smiling into any cellphone camera pointed at her until the photo line is bare.

Now it gets harder. After nearly a year of slowly, and then not so slowly, rising to the top of the pack, Ms. Warren is facing her first period of apparent plateau — her momentum stalled, according to polls and dozens of voter interviews, amid nagging doubts like Ms. Bingham’s and the predictable price of success: even more scrutiny.

Rank-and-file Democrats have raised concerns about the viability of her Medicare for all proposal. They smirk at some well-placed trolling — a “Billionaire Tears” coffee mug quickly became a campaign best seller — but worry about the blowback that some of her soak-the-rich platform has inspired. An unmemorable debate performance Wednesday night in Atlanta seems unlikely to advance Ms. Warren’s cause much.

In recent weeks, two prospective rivals, former Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg of New York and former Gov. Deval Patrick of Massachusetts, appeared so unimpressed with the strength of the Democratic candidates as Ms. Warren climbed that a historically large primary field has begun growing again. Supporters are wary of the toll on Ms. Warren as more moderate peers like former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., escalate their attacks.

And though Ms. Warren turns often to the language of political combat — the word “fight,” or some variation, appears three times combined in the titles of her last two books — she has rarely hit back at her leading competitors with much force.

“I was there when she was polling at 6 percent, and it was like, ‘Oh, it’s so cute you’re running,’” said Wade Snowden. “Now she’s, like, the front-runner.”Credit…Jordan Gale for The New York Times Ms. Warren turns often to the language of political combat — the word “fight,” or some variation, appears three times combined in the titles of her last two books.Credit…Jordan Gale for The New York Times

“I’m not here to criticize other Democrats,” she told reporters, at least twice, after filing for the New Hampshire primary at the state house in Concord last week. She spoke instead about being the daughter of a janitor.

Counteracting these headwinds, admirers say, is nearly a year’s worth of evidence that Ms. Warren is doing something different and durable, that the sum total of the plans and the persistence and the 85,000 photos with fans is a campaign built to withstand semi-lulls like this.

The question may be simple in the end, as it has been for the last two presidents — and the many talented and formidable opponents whom they bested:

Is Ms. Warren a phenomenon? A candidate magnetic enough to make believers out of even those typically disinclined to bother with democracy? Or is she merely another skilled candidate in a flawed field?

“I want to believe,” said Carrie Mirfield, a 47-year-old massage therapist, before an event in Davenport. “I’m not sure if I do yet.”

Of course, the trouble with phenomenon-candidacies is that you don’t know until you know. Did it feel preordained with Barack Obama in November 2007? With Donald Trump eight years later? Clearly something was happening. But could anyone be sure how it might scale?

Ms. Warren plainly has a gift for making her charges feel like part of a grander mission, for connecting her story to their own.

Allies have long believed that if voters could see her as Betsy from Oklahoma, and not Liz from Harvard, she would have a fighting chance. She prefers “teacher” to “professor” — and rarely uses the H-word — reminding crowds of her penchant for instructing and grading her childhood “dollies.” “I had a reputation for being tough but fair,” she says, every time.

Her stump speech is specked with a kind of knowing prairie humor: how she was referred to only as “the surprise” after her birth; how only one of her three older brothers is a Democrat (“do the math”); how her first husband came to be called “H-1” after the fact.

“Hint,” she likes to say. “It is never a good sign when you have to number your husbands.”

The room falls quietest as she tells the tale of her childhood finances in Oklahoma: her father’s heart attack, losing the family station wagon, her mother — 50 years old, without work experience outside the home — pulling on a black dress to interview for a job answering phones at Sears. Ms. Mirfield, the skeptical voter in Davenport, said after the event that the Sears story had steeled her to support Ms. Warren after all.

Her team likewise tends toward true believers, dressed in “liberty green” campaign gear and liable to slip phrases like “structural change” and “in this fight” into casual conversation. Even those closest to Ms. Warren appear skittish about going off-script. After attending an event of hers in Muscatine, Iowa — where the candidate talked about her dollies and the Koch brothers and made it all cohere — Ms. Warren’s son, Alex, fell into conversation with a voter. “This is genuinely who she is,” he said. “This is how she sounds.” Approached the next morning by a reporter, he offered similarly generic praise for his mother before insisting his remarks were off the record.

While some other campaigns have empowered aides to speak frequently on cable news about their candidate, Ms. Warren’s operation almost never dispatches a staff member to represent her on television. The closest approximation during her Iowa swing may have been a “Saturday Night Live” impression, airing above a bar in Dubuque where aides had gathered after her last event of the day, lampooning the costs of Ms. Warren’s plans.

Even among her supporters, Ms. Warren is still asked about the thorny subject of “electability.”Credit…Jordan Gale for The New York Times She has drawn skepticism from a peculiar class of Democrat: the progressive who fears others are not so progressive.Credit…Jordan Gale for The New York Times

“All we gotta do is convince JP Morgan to operate like a nonprofit,” Kate McKinnon’s Ms. Warren said, adding, “When the numbers are this big, they’re just pretend.”

Such gentle yuks are a small tax to pay for the mainstream relevance that Ms. Warren has earned. She seems to have grasped some superficial lessons from the last two presidents: As the first White House victors of the smartphone era, Mr. Obama and Mr. Trump each succeeded as a kind of lifestyle brand, their campaigns experienced in viral video snippets and projected across social media by supporters eager to share pictures of themselves, and their candidate, and themselves with their candidate.

Voters know the name of Ms. Warren’s golden retriever (Bailey). They chant the tagline of her wealth tax proposal (“two cents!”) as if they are requesting a song at a concert. They shell out money for campaign merchandise, like a “Purr-sist” cat collar, and less official wares like a skull-centric “EAT THE RICH” T-shirt sold outside her events by an unaffiliated vendor.

“No other candidate has ever done this,” Wade Snowden, 23, said of the photo line, as he waited his turn in Vinton. That this is untrue — candidates have done post-event photos with all comers for years — can feel almost irrelevant.

“I was there when she was polling at 6 percent, and it was like, ‘Oh, it’s so cute you’re running,’” said Mr. Snowden, whose T-shirt captured a screenshot of Ms. Warren’s facial expression from an old video stream as she read a message from him. “Now she’s, like, the front-runner.”

Some veterans of Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign have been impressed with Ms. Warren’s ability to play to her advantages, making white-paper gravitas look hipper, somehow, than Mrs. Clinton ever seemed to.

“Her campaign is doing something that she is an extremely unlikely heroine for, which is creating a celebrity around her,” said Jess Morales Rocketto, a Democratic strategist and former aide to Mrs. Clinton, comparing the effort to the popular legends constructed around Mr. Obama or Bernie Sanders.

Ms. Morales Rocketto suggested that the combination of Ms. Warren’s plans and her social media ubiquity — tormenting billionaires, surprising small-dollar donors with phone calls — had established “a very important permission structure to say ‘I can support her’ and — and this is crucial in 2019 — ‘it is cool to support her.’”

Other data points are more cautionary. Ms. Warren’s crowd sizes can register as more respectable than staggering, not bad for a cold-weather spell months before the voting starts but hardly imposing in a field with several candidates, from Mr. Sanders and Mr. Buttigieg to the former tech executive Andrew Yang, who can reliably fill event halls themselves.

In polls, Ms. Warren still struggles with nonwhite voters and those without college degrees. On the trail, where the most engaged voters often sound and behave like pundits, she has drawn skepticism from a peculiar class of Democrat: the progressive who fears others are not so progressive.

“If she isn’t willing to moderate some of her views, I don’t think she can beat Trump,” said Jim Butler, 73, a retired teacher from Dubuque wearing a “Nevertheless, She Persisted” shirt. “She scares some people. Doesn’t scare me, I’m as progressive as she is. But I’m not sure she can change people’s views as fast as she needs to change them.”

Ms. Warren’s standard remarks now seem to anticipate this argument. “It’s easy to give up on big ideas,” she said at an outdoor rally in Concord last week, her breath visible after certain punctuated syllables on a 25-degree afternoon. “It’s easy to sound so sophisticated when you do.”

But if you abandon your big ideas, she suggested, what have you won if you win?

Hours later, at a forum for union members a short walk away, Ms. Warren put it like this: “I’m not running for president so I get to try on the outfit.”

It was the question-and-answer portion, and hands were shooting up inside a hotel conference room. A woman stood to ask about Medicare for all, sounding anxious about Ms. Warren’s proposal. The candidate nodded.

“Good!” she began. “So, I appreciate the question.”

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Trevor Noah Taunts Trump With Rambling ‘Fox & Friends’ Call Supercut

Westlake Legal Group 5dd8ed48210000a87e34dd43 Trevor Noah Taunts Trump With Rambling ‘Fox & Friends’ Call Supercut

Trump repeatedly interrupts the hosts of the Fox News morning show, who often appear to be trying to cut their conversation with the president short, in an almost two-minute supercut released by Trevor Noah’s team on YouTube.

“When grandpa tells the same stories and you can’t get him off the phone,” the show captioned its mocking montage.

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Canaparo & von Spakovsky: Did Trump critic Rep. Rashida Tlaib violate campaign finance laws and ethics rules?

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083118647001_6083126047001-vs Canaparo & von Spakovsky: Did Trump critic Rep. Rashida Tlaib violate campaign finance laws and ethics rules? Hans von Spakovsky GianCarlo Canaparo fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 26ae3258-4973-5211-8abd-a578a1f821c3

“It’s pretty simple,” Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., tweeted last March, in calling for President Trump’s impeachment. “No one is above the law, including the President of the United States.”

But perhaps Tlaib – among Trump’s harshest critics in Congress – needs to follow up with another tweet, in the interests of transparency. This tweet could read: “No one is above the law. Except me.”

According to a report issued last week by the House Ethics Committee, there is “substantial reason to believe” that Tlaib used campaign funds for personal expenditures, thereby violating both campaign finance laws and House ethics rules.

TLAIB FRANTICALLY ASKED CAMPAIGN FOR PERSONAL MONEY, MESSAGES SHOW, AS ETHICS PROBES ANNOUNCED

The alleged violations stem from $17,500 that her campaign paid her, apparently to cover personal expenses, after she was elected to Congress.

More from Opinion

Text messages and emails between Tlaib and her campaign staff show that throughout her campaign she repeatedly asked her campaign for money to cover personal expenses like “car maintenance, child care and other necessities.”

At one point, Tlaib asked her campaign to give her $2,000 every two weeks. Between May 7 and Nov. 16, 2018, it did so. Then, on Dec. 1, 2018, it paid her $15,500.

In total, Tlaib’s campaign gave her $45,000 over seven months.

Federal campaign finance law (52 U.S.C. §30114(b)) prohibits the use of campaign funds for personal use. The law, including the regulations promulgated by the Federal Election Commission, defines “personal use” very broadly.

In total, Tlaib’s campaign gave her $45,000 over seven months.

Personal use includes any “commitment, obligation, or expense of a person that would exist irrespective of the candidate’s campaign duties.” That plainly includes car maintenance, child care and “other necessities.”

Additionally, House ethics rules prohibit representatives from using campaign funds for personal expenditures. They and their staffs are tasked with ensuring that their campaigns operate in compliance with the law.

While candidates may take a salary from their campaigns, there are very strict limits on that. Among the litany of restrictions is this one: the salary can only be paid for work performed before the election. The salary has to end the day the candidate is either elected or withdraws from the race and is no longer a candidate.

Tlaib’s eligibility for a salary paid from her campaign funds ended on Nov. 6, 2018, when she was elected to the House of Representatives. Yet her campaign continued to pay her through the end of December. She collected $17,500 after the election.

Tlaib’s lawyers concede that the payments were made after Nov. 6 last year, but argue that the money was for services performed before the election. But according to the report, documents taken from her campaign “suggest otherwise.”

A spreadsheet of campaign salary payments shows that Tlaib’s campaign paid her $2,000 on Nov. 16 last year for work performed between Nov. 1 and 15. And according to that same spreadsheet, the $15,500 paid on Dec. 1 was for work performed between Nov. 16 and Dec. 31 last year.

Additionally, the checks confirm those dates, as do emails from Tlaib’s campaign treasurer. As to the $15,500 payment, her campaign treasurer’s records show that at least $8,000 of it was paid for work performed after the election, and the remaining $7,500 was an unspecified “adjustment.”

It certainly appears to be a clear violation of federal law. Perhaps it’s no surprise, then, that the best arguments her lawyers can come up with are that there was no “conscious disregard” of the law, and that it’s “most irregular” for the Office of Congressional Ethics to look into pre-election activities.

In other words, Tlaib should be excused because she didn’t bother to learn the law or because Congress should permit candidates to violate ethics laws with impunity until they get elected. It doesn’t take a lawyer to see how feeble these arguments are.

Given how bad this looks for Tlaib, it’s no surprise that she and her campaign staff refused all interview requests from the Office of Congressional Ethics.

And Tlaib’s problems extend beyond the Ethics Committee.

Both the Federal Election Commission and the U.S. Justice Department have jurisdiction over violations of federal campaign finance law. The FEC can force those who err to repay the money and impose a civil penalty – even where there was no “conscious disregard” of the law.

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If Tlaib “knowingly and willfully” violated the law, that is a criminal violation that comes under the jurisdiction of the Justice Department. Criminal violations of the law can result not only in civil penalties, but prison time.

We agree with Tlaib that “no one is above the law.” Does she agree with her own tweet?

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY GIANCARLO CANAPARO

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY HANS VON SPAKOVSKY

Hans von Spakovsky is a senior legal fellow at the Heritage Foundation. He served on the Federal Election Commission from 2006 to 2007.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083118647001_6083126047001-vs Canaparo & von Spakovsky: Did Trump critic Rep. Rashida Tlaib violate campaign finance laws and ethics rules? Hans von Spakovsky GianCarlo Canaparo fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 26ae3258-4973-5211-8abd-a578a1f821c3   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6083118647001_6083126047001-vs Canaparo & von Spakovsky: Did Trump critic Rep. Rashida Tlaib violate campaign finance laws and ethics rules? Hans von Spakovsky GianCarlo Canaparo fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 26ae3258-4973-5211-8abd-a578a1f821c3

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Daniel Craig Is 00Done

Westlake Legal Group 5dd8f6df2500004f19d2dfd0 Daniel Craig Is 00Done

Daniel Craig is officially 00Done.

The actor confirmed on Friday’s episode of “The Late Show” that the upcoming “No Time To Die” is his last outing as the fictional British spy James Bond.

“Are you done with Bond?” asked host Stephen Colbert.

“Yes,” replied Craig.

“You’re done with Bond?” repeated Colbert.

“It’s done,” said Craig.

Check out the clip here:

Craig debuted as Bond in 2006′s “Casino Royale.” He also portrayed the character in 2008’s “Quantum of Solace,” 2012’s “Skyfall” and 2015’s “Spectre.”

The longest-serving Bond had, however, initially been hesitant to reprise his role in the 25th installment of the franchise, which is slated for an April 2020 release.

Craig told German website Express earlier this week that “someone else needs to have a go,” reported Esquire magazine.

“It’s been, as they always are, incredibly hard work, but it’s a massive collaboration,” he added. “One of the most moving things for me about finishing the film is that I have been working with some of the people for 30 years.”

It’s currently unclear who will replace Craig in the role. Idris Elba has repeatedly shut down rumors that he will become the first Black Bond.

Elsewhere on “The Late Show,” Craig (who was promoting his new movie “Knives Out”) taught Colbert how to speak with a Welsh accent.

Check out that clip here:

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Utah Jazz arena evacuated minutes after game over suspicious shoebox

Vivant Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City was evacuated Friday night after a suspicious shoebox was found underneath a table in an arena restaurant, according to reports.

The discovery came just minutes after the Utah Jazz defeated the Golden State Warriors 113-109 in an NBA game.

Players still in uniform left the building with the crowd, without even going to their locker rooms. Most of the spectators had already exited before the evacuation started.

“We don’t know if it’s anything explosive. So far what we have is just a suspicious package,” Salt Lake City Police Department Lt. Carlos Valencia told reporters after the evacuation. “Public safety is paramount to us and we take these complaints very seriously.”

CALIFORNIA HOMEOWNER FINDS DEAD WOMAN INSIDE HOUSE, BOMB THREAT WRITTEN ON WALL: POLICE

Westlake Legal Group AP19327206444816 Utah Jazz arena evacuated minutes after game over suspicious shoebox fox-news/us/us-regions/west/utah fox-news/sports/nba/utah-jazz fox-news/sports/nba/golden-state-warriors fox-news/sports/nba fox news fnc/sports fnc Brie Stimson article 75ed9b38-d3db-5f89-8fac-cac06e90c40a

People leave Vivint Smart Home Arena after the Utah Jazz’s home arena was evacuated because of a suspicious package following the team’s NBA basketball game against the Golden State Warriors on Friday, Nov. 22, 2019, in Salt Lake City. (Associated Press)

A police bomb squad was called in after a bomb-sniffing dog reacted to the shoebox, Valencia said.

Salt Lake City police said the package turned out to be a toolbox and the teams were allowed to return to the building about two hours later, the Jazz said.

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No injuries were reported.

Separately, about 25 minutes after the evacuation, three people were wounded in a drive-by shooting outside a concert venue called The Complex just two blocks away, The Salt Lake City Tribune reported. Valencia said one of the victims was shot in the chest but was expected to survive. No arrests were reported as of early Sunday.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group AP19327206444816 Utah Jazz arena evacuated minutes after game over suspicious shoebox fox-news/us/us-regions/west/utah fox-news/sports/nba/utah-jazz fox-news/sports/nba/golden-state-warriors fox-news/sports/nba fox news fnc/sports fnc Brie Stimson article 75ed9b38-d3db-5f89-8fac-cac06e90c40a   Westlake Legal Group AP19327206444816 Utah Jazz arena evacuated minutes after game over suspicious shoebox fox-news/us/us-regions/west/utah fox-news/sports/nba/utah-jazz fox-news/sports/nba/golden-state-warriors fox-news/sports/nba fox news fnc/sports fnc Brie Stimson article 75ed9b38-d3db-5f89-8fac-cac06e90c40a

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Former California lawmaker to pay $150G after using campaign cash for Asia trip, Hawaii home fix-up: reports

A former California Democratic lawmaker was ordered to pay $150,000 on Thursday after admitting to pulling funds from campaign coffers in part to pay for a trip to Asia, finance an expensive remodeling project on his Hawaii vacation home, and book flights for him and his wife to London and Washington, D.C.

Joseph Canciamilla, 64, was slapped with the maximum penalty the state allows for a campaign finance violation following a unanimous vote by the state’s Fair Political Practices Commission.

CALIFORNIA AG’S ANTI-TRUMP LAWSUITS ARE POLITICAL, HAVE COST TAXPAYERS $21M, STATE GOP SAYS

An investigation conducted by the California elections watchdog found Canciamilla misused more than $130,000 in campaign dollars raised from two local fundraising committees he created and falsified state filings to cover up the spending, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

“This is a spectacular fall from grace,” Commissioner Frank Cardenas told The Sacramento Bee. “It’s a breathtaking arrogance. There are particularly egregious issues here that appear to go, at least on their face, beyond mirror of civil law.”

“It’s a breathtaking arrogance. There are particularly egregious issues here that appear to go, at least on their face, beyond mirror of civil law.”

— Frank Cardenas, Fair Political Practices Commission

Commissioner Alison Hayward told San Francisco’s KPIX-TV Canciamilla’s violations were “particularly repugnant.”

“They show that a person who is raising money in trust for a political purpose is then converting that money to personal income,” she added.

Westlake Legal Group joe-canciamilla___21182850386 Former California lawmaker to pay $150G after using campaign cash for Asia trip, Hawaii home fix-up: reports fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/politics/state-and-local/elections fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/politics/elections/fundraising fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 0a5f2b35-8e9e-5b77-bd71-181ac2475b62

(Joseph Canciamilla, a former Democrat who’s no longer affiliated with a party, served in the California State Assembly in Sacramento from 2000 to 2006, then was appointed clerk-recorder in Contra Costa County​​​​​​. (Contra Costa County website))

Canciamilla served in the California State Assembly in Sacramento from 2000 to 2006 before he was appointed clerk-recorder in Contra Costa County near San Francisco. He served as a Democrat at the time. He is now registered as “No Party Preference,” according to The Bee.

The violations were found in the use of funding from one committee formed in 2011 for his campaign for judge in Contra Costa County Superior Court. He ultimately did not enter that race. Canciamilla also misused money raised in a second committee formed in 2012 for clerk-recorder. He won that office twice before abruptly resigning Oct. 31 when the campaign violations were discovered.

“Mr. Canciamilla has taken full responsibility for this situation, is humbled and embarrassed, and hopes the FPPC fines won’t severely overshadow his 46 years of public service to the residents of Contra Costa County,” a statement from his attorney, Andy Rockas, said in a statement, according to The Chronicle.

He “has cooperated with the FPPC, has paid back all disputed amounts, and all fines listed in the proposed stipulation have been paid in full,” it added.

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The commission launched an investigation after the Political Reform Audit Program of the Franchise Tax Board found irregularities in his filings. Canciamilla’s spending “was concealed on campaign statements by other reporting violations including non-reporting and the over-statement of available cash on hand,” according to the elections watchdog.

Canciamilla agreed to pay the $150,000 settlement for violating the Political Reform Act, which prohibits candidates from mixing campaign funds with personal finances. The commission also referred the case to the Contra Costa County’s district attorney’s office, which will decide whether to file criminal charges. The county’s retirement will also review his pension.

Westlake Legal Group joe-canciamilla___21182850386 Former California lawmaker to pay $150G after using campaign cash for Asia trip, Hawaii home fix-up: reports fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/politics/state-and-local/elections fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/politics/elections/fundraising fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 0a5f2b35-8e9e-5b77-bd71-181ac2475b62   Westlake Legal Group joe-canciamilla___21182850386 Former California lawmaker to pay $150G after using campaign cash for Asia trip, Hawaii home fix-up: reports fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/politics/state-and-local/elections fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/politics/elections/fundraising fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 0a5f2b35-8e9e-5b77-bd71-181ac2475b62

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New York City ‘F— the Police’ protest turns violent, dozens of arrests reported

Demonstrators shouting “F— the police!” turned violent in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City on Friday evening, vandalizing city buses and police cruisers, according to reports.

Nearly 60 people were arrested in what organizers said was a protest of excessive policing of the city’s subway system.

The outburst came in the wake of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo calling for 500 additional police officers to join the state-run Metropolitan Transit Authority’s force and several viral videos showing subway arrests that some thought showed excessive force, including pointing a gun at a teenager who jumped a turnstile, New York’s WNBC-TV reported.

ANN COULTER EVENT AT UC BERKELEY DRAWS MASKED PROTESTERS; MULTIPLE ARRESTS REPORTED

“F— cops and every racist, fascist person out here,” a protester who identified herself as Alicia, 22, of the Bronx, told the New York Post. “These are our neighborhoods.”

“F— cops and every racist, fascist person out here. These are our neighborhoods.”

— Alicia, 22, protester from the Bronx

At one point, New York City Transit tweeted that subway lines were bypassing the 125th Street station in Harlem and videos posted online showed that police had temporarily closed the station.

Videos posted online showed crowds flowing into the streets and city police officers making arrests. One video showed a subway turnstile had been vandalized.

The New York Police Department tweeted shortly before 7 p.m. that evening commuters should expect delays in vehicular traffic and on public tranist in the area.

A previous protest in the city’s Brooklyn borough on Nov. 1 drew a supportive Twitter message from U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.

“Ending mass incarceration means challenging a system that jails the poor to free the rich,” the left-wing freshman congresswoman tweeted, retweeting a video of protesters jumping subway turnstiles in Brooklyn.

As of early Saturday, the congresswoman hadn’t tweeted about the Harlem protest.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-NYC-Subway New York City 'F--- the Police' protest turns violent, dozens of arrests reported fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/politics/elections/first-amendment fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 8294345d-9132-5904-82c0-31e2d9ddb775

Protesters say New York City’s police have used excessive force in making arrests at city subway stations.

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The city reported last year that turnstile jumpers and bus-fare cheaters cost the MTA $215 million, according to Bloomberg.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-NYC-Subway New York City 'F--- the Police' protest turns violent, dozens of arrests reported fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/politics/elections/first-amendment fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 8294345d-9132-5904-82c0-31e2d9ddb775   Westlake Legal Group iStock-NYC-Subway New York City 'F--- the Police' protest turns violent, dozens of arrests reported fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/new-york-city fox-news/politics/elections/first-amendment fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 8294345d-9132-5904-82c0-31e2d9ddb775

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Baby boomers may put ‘tidal wave’ of 21M homes on market — but who will buy them?

SUN CITY, Ariz. — When this Phoenix suburb opened on January 1, 1960, it was billed as the original retirement community. From above, it would look like a UFO landing site, laid out in rings to mimic halos surrounding the sun. Just past the entrance, a billboard flanked by rows of palm trees promised “An Active New Way Of Life.”

On the weekend Sun City opened, cars were backed up for 2 miles as some 100,000 visitors waited to gawk at a village built specifically for adults over the age of 50. They found a new nine-hole golf course and a community center with 250-seat auditorium, swimming pool, shuffleboard court and lawn bowling green. Elsewhere there was a 30,000-square-foot Grand Shopping Center, a Safeway grocery store and a Hiway House Motor Hotel, where you could have a cup of coffee or something stronger at the bar. “The finest resort couldn’t supply more,” boasted a fictional resident of Sun City in a promotional video from the period.

LUXURY CONDOS IN MAJOR CITIES, ONCE A HOT MARKET, GO UNSOLD

The concept was a huge hit. The developer, Del Webb, sold about as many homes in the first year as executives had expected to sell in three. Six decades later Sun City is home to 38,000 people.

Westlake Legal Group Home-For-Sale Baby boomers may put 'tidal wave' of 21M homes on market -- but who will buy them? The Wall Street Journal Laura Kusisto fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/immigration/demographics fox-news/us/economy/housing fox-news/us fnc/lifestyle fnc article 7958a8bd-6dc8-59ad-a67b-c88fb3a780a2 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

The U.S. is at the beginning of a tidal wave of homes hitting the market on the scale of the housing bubble in the mid-2000s. What happens when so many homes post ‘For Sale’ signs around the same time? (iStock)

But the same demographics that propelled Sun City’s rise now pose an existential challenge to this suburb as baby boomers age. More than a third of Sun City’s homes are expected to turn over by 2027 as seniors die, move in with their children or migrate to assisted living facilities, according to Zillow. Nearly two thirds of the homes will turn over by 2037.

The big question looming in this neighborhood — and dozens of others like it in the Southeast and Rust Belt — is what happens to everything from home prices to the local economy when so many homes post ‘For Sale’ signs around the same time?

The U.S. is at the beginning of a tidal wave of homes hitting the market on the scale of the housing bubble in the mid-2000s. This time it won’t be driven by overbuilding, easy credit or irrational exuberance, but by an inevitable fact of life: the passing of the baby boomer generation.

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One in eight owner-occupied homes in the U.S., or roughly nine million residences, are set to hit the market from 2017 through 2027 as the baby boomers start to die in larger numbers, according to an analysis by Issi Romem conducted while he was a senior director of housing and urban economics at Zillow. That is up from roughly 7 million homes in the prior decade.

By 2037, one quarter of the U.S. for-sale housing stock, or roughly 21 million homes will be vacated by seniors. That is more than twice the number of new properties built during a 10-year period that spanned the last housing bubble.

This story continues in The Wall Street Journal.

Westlake Legal Group Home-For-Sale Baby boomers may put 'tidal wave' of 21M homes on market -- but who will buy them? The Wall Street Journal Laura Kusisto fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/immigration/demographics fox-news/us/economy/housing fox-news/us fnc/lifestyle fnc article 7958a8bd-6dc8-59ad-a67b-c88fb3a780a2 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE   Westlake Legal Group Home-For-Sale Baby boomers may put 'tidal wave' of 21M homes on market -- but who will buy them? The Wall Street Journal Laura Kusisto fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/immigration/demographics fox-news/us/economy/housing fox-news/us fnc/lifestyle fnc article 7958a8bd-6dc8-59ad-a67b-c88fb3a780a2 /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

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Carter Page reacts to DOJ inspector’s report: ‘There’s been no real action’ to address FISA abuse

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-11-22-at-11.48.16-PM Carter Page reacts to DOJ inspector's report: 'There's been no real action' to address FISA abuse Joshua Nelson fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc dd5f6190-322f-5e76-90bf-bd5bbbc20e58 article

Following this week’s report that an FBI lawyer falsified a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) document, former Trump 2016 campaign adviser Carter Page reacted Friday, saying federal authorities have taken no real action to address the abuse.

“It’s more of the same,” Page told Fox News’ “The Ingraham Angle” on Friday.

“We’ve known about this hoax for so long and all of the wrongdoing and unfortunately, there’s been no real action to address these issues so it’s a positive but it’s not anything amazing,”

HOROWITZ REPORTEDLY FINDS FBI LAWYER FALSIFIED FISA DOC; WAPO STEALTH-DELETES STRZOK CONNECTION

Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz has found evidence that an FBI lawyer manipulated a key investigative document related to the FBI’s secretive surveillance of a former Trump campaign adviser — enough to change the substantive meaning of the document, according to multiple reports.

The stunning development came as Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., told Fox News that Horowitz’s comprehensive report on allegations of FISA warrant abuse against Page would be released Dec. 9.

“That’s locked,” Graham said about the date.

WAYBACK MACHINE SHOWS ORIGINAL VERSION OF THE POST’S STORY, BEFORE STEALTH DELETION

The new evidence concerning the altered document, which pertained to the FBI’s FISA court warrant application to surveil Page, is expected to be outlined in Horowitz’s upcoming report. CNN first reported the news, which was largely confirmed by The Washington Post.

The paper eventually added a correction to the bottom of its piece, reading, “Correction: An earlier version of this story erroneously stated that the FBI employee being investigated for altering a document worked underneath former Deputy Assistant Director Peter Strzok. The employee was a low-level lawyer in the Office of General Counsel and did not report to the deputy assistant director.”

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“They were spying on all the people I was talking with during the Trump campaign, during the Trump transition and into the early months through September, apparently of 2017 so all of my interactions with various people, they swept up all of that,” Page said.

Fox News’ Gregg Re contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-11-22-at-11.48.16-PM Carter Page reacts to DOJ inspector's report: 'There's been no real action' to address FISA abuse Joshua Nelson fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc dd5f6190-322f-5e76-90bf-bd5bbbc20e58 article   Westlake Legal Group Screen-Shot-2019-11-22-at-11.48.16-PM Carter Page reacts to DOJ inspector's report: 'There's been no real action' to address FISA abuse Joshua Nelson fox-news/tech/topics/fbi fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc dd5f6190-322f-5e76-90bf-bd5bbbc20e58 article

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Giuliani Crony Can Detail Nunes Meeting With Ex-Ukraine Official To Get Biden Dirt: Report

Westlake Legal Group 5dd8abae1f00000a14def41d Giuliani Crony Can Detail Nunes Meeting With Ex-Ukraine Official To Get Biden Dirt: Report

Rudy Giuliani’s indicted associate Lev Parnas is prepared to tell Congress that Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) met with a former Ukrainian prosecutor who was ousted over corruption concerns in a bid to get dirt on Joe Biden, CNN reported Friday.

A lawyer for Parnas, a Soviet-born American who has been indicted on federal campaign finance violations, said his client found out about the meeting last year.

“Mr. Parnas learned from former Ukrainian Prosecutor General Viktor Shokin that Nunes had met with Shokin in Vienna last December,” attorney Joseph Bondy told CNN.

Shokin was forced out of office by Ukraine’s Parliament in 2016 under pressure from the U.S. and other Western nations over concerns he was soft on corruption. As vice president at the time, Biden was active in pushing for Shokin’s ouster.

Bondy also told CNN that Parnas worked to connect Nunes, the top Republican on the House Intelligence Committee, with other Ukrainians who allegedly could come up with negative information on former Vice President Biden and the Democrats. If true, Nunes would be the first member of Congress linked to gathering opposition research on President Donald Trump’s political rival from a former foreign official, CNN noted — and one with a score to settle with Biden, who had pushed for Shokin’s ouster.

Nunes declined repeated requests from CNN to comment.

The attorney told CNN that Parnas is willing to comply with a congressional subpoena for documents and testimony as part of its impeachment inquiry. Information could prove explosive for Nunes.

Parnas worked with Shokin and Giuliani to peddle the baseless claims that Ukraine — not Russia — interfered in the 2016 election on behalf of the Democrats and that Biden’s actions in Ukraine were corrupt because his son was on the board of a Ukrainian company. 

Bondy indicated in a tweet that he is already talking to congressional leaders about Parnas’s cooperation with the impeachment investigation.

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