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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 2)

Brit Hume says feeling self-assured led to ‘the kind of rage’ seen in today’s politics

Westlake Legal Group Hume-Tucker Brit Hume says feeling self-assured led to 'the kind of rage' seen in today's politics fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Charles Creitz article 45874cee-93cb-5b3e-87eb-e9be575c5597

When politicians and their supporters feel certain in their convictions and see opponents as insincere, it leads to the discord seen today in America, according to Brit Hume.

People are losing sight of the American custom of spirited disagreements and discussions often devolve into “rage,” Hume claimed Tuesday on “Tucker Carlson Tonight.”

“Liberalism has changed and the attitudes of liberals have changed,” he said.

“What I sense in all this… is a loss of humility about one’s own political viewpoint.

DEM-LED HOUSE FORMALLY CONDEMNS TRUMP REMARKS DEEMED ‘RACIST,’ AFTER DRAMATIC FLOOR FIGHT OVER PELOSI

“People have such conviction and certainty, that their views are right and wise and obviously correct, that they therefore believe that anyone who holds opposing views cannot possibly be doing so for any sincere reason.”

Additionally, Hume said he believed opposing sides sometimes thought their rivals were believing what they believed for reasons of “racism or greed.”

“That kind of viewpoint leads to a kind of rage,” he said.

“‘How can anybody possibly think this?'” he continued, mentioning a politico’s possible thought.

In his own life, Hume said he has experienced such friction firsthand.

He said Twitter users have wondered aloud why he decided to join Fox News Channel.

CLICK TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“You used to be a very good journalist and used to be respected… then you sold out and went to Fox News,” he recalled one case, adding that he formerly reported for ABC News decades ago.

He said he kept his opinions to himself as a reporter, and later, an anchor on “Special Report,” but could express his views publicly now that he’s specifically a political analyst.

Westlake Legal Group Hume-Tucker Brit Hume says feeling self-assured led to 'the kind of rage' seen in today's politics fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Charles Creitz article 45874cee-93cb-5b3e-87eb-e9be575c5597   Westlake Legal Group Hume-Tucker Brit Hume says feeling self-assured led to 'the kind of rage' seen in today's politics fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc Charles Creitz article 45874cee-93cb-5b3e-87eb-e9be575c5597

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Jeffrey Epstein’s mysterious passport is Austrian, was needed for ‘personal protection,’ attorneys say

Westlake Legal Group c24c03e5-ContentBroker_contentid-819b92324e534495b7a0608f725a6e28 Jeffrey Epstein’s mysterious passport is Austrian, was needed for 'personal protection,' attorneys say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox news fnc/us fnc article 9ca19341-f1e0-5eb0-8966-a45ba91fbe04

Attorneys representing registered sex offender Jeffrey Epstein said Tuesday that an expired passport federal investigators found in a safe in the well-connected financier’s Manhattan home was necessary for his “personal protection.”

During a two-hour bail hearing on Monday, prosecutors used the passport to bolster their argument that Epstein was a flight risk. Assistant U.S. Attorney Alex Rossmiller said the passport photo appeared to be Epstein, but the name on the document was different and placed the holder’s home address in Saudi Arabia.

In response, Epstein’s attorneys said the passport was Austrian and expired 32 years ago.

JEFFREY EPSTEIN ACCUSERS’ LAWYER SAYS FINANCIER ABUSED FEMALE VISITORS WHILE ON WORK RELEASE FROM JAIL 

“The government offers nothing to suggest – and certainly no evidence – that Epstein ever used it,” they wrote in the filing, addressed to U.S. District Judge Richard Berman. “In any case, Epstein – an affluent member of the Jewish faith – acquired the passport in the 1980s, when hijackings were prevalent, in connection to Middle East travel.

“The passport was for personal protection in the event of travel to dangerous areas, only to be presented to potential kidnapers [sic], hijackers or terrorists should violent episodes occur.”

In a letter sent to Judge Berman on Tuesday, Manhattan U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman (no relation) wrote that the government is trying to find out how Epstein obtained the foreign passport and whether it is genuine or fabricated.

“The defendant’s possession of what purports to be a foreign passport issued under an alias gives rise to the inference the defendant knows how to obtain false travel documents and/or assume other, foreign identities,” he wrote in the filling. “This adds to the serious risk of flight posed by the defendant.”

Judge Berman is expected to rule Thursday on whether Epstein, 66, should be detained until trial on charges that he recruited and abused dozens of underage girls in New York and Florida in the early 2000s. Epstein has pleaded not guilty.

In addition to the passport, investigators also discovered diamonds and cash in the safe during the raid of Epstein’s Upper East Side mansion following his July 6 arrest.

On Tuesday U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman said in a filing that “the Government has learned that the safe contained more than $70,000 in cash. In addition, the safe contained 48 loose diamond stones, ranging in size from approximately 1 carat to 2.38 carats, as well as a large diamond ring …  Such ready cash and loose diamonds are consistent with the capability to leave the jurisdiction at a moment’s notice.”

JEFFREY EPSTEIN HAD MYSTERIOUS PASSPORT, ‘PILES OF CASH,’ AND ‘DOZENS OF DIAMONDS’ IN HOME SAFE: PROSECUTORS

Epstein’s safe was also where hundreds of photos “of what appeared to be underage girls” were discovered after his arrest, prosecutors said. In addition to the disclosure of what was in the safe, prosecutors said their case is getting “stronger by the day” after several more women contacted them in recent days to say he abused them when they were underage.

In a written submission to Berman  Friday, prosecutors said they believe Epstein might have tried to influence witnesses after discovering that he had paid a total of $350,000 to two individuals late last year. That came after the Miami Herald reported the circumstances of his state court conviction in 2008, which led to a 13-month jail term and a deal to avoid federal prosecution.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In Tuesday’s filing, U.S. Attorney Berman asked for Epstein to “be detained pending trial.”

“The defendant cannot meet his burden of overcoming the presumption that there is no combination of conditions that would reasonably assure his continued appearance in this case or protect the safety of the community were he to be released,” he wrote in the filing.

Fox News’ Travis Fedschun, Marta Dhanis, Tamara Gitt, Maria Paronich and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group c24c03e5-ContentBroker_contentid-819b92324e534495b7a0608f725a6e28 Jeffrey Epstein’s mysterious passport is Austrian, was needed for 'personal protection,' attorneys say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox news fnc/us fnc article 9ca19341-f1e0-5eb0-8966-a45ba91fbe04   Westlake Legal Group c24c03e5-ContentBroker_contentid-819b92324e534495b7a0608f725a6e28 Jeffrey Epstein’s mysterious passport is Austrian, was needed for 'personal protection,' attorneys say Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox news fnc/us fnc article 9ca19341-f1e0-5eb0-8966-a45ba91fbe04

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Leslie Marshall: Trump deserves condemnation for ‘racist’ comments – Now Dems must unite against him

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6060013581001_6060009896001-vs Leslie Marshall: Trump deserves condemnation for ‘racist’ comments – Now Dems must unite against him Leslie Marshall fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 6d3d1605-41c4-564f-b15b-f2d473b11b58

The 240-187 House vote Tuesday night to approve a resolution titled “Condemning President Trump’s racist comments directed at Member of Congress” was justified and necessary to hold the president accountable for his unacceptable attack on four Democratic House members who are all women of color.

But the vote only amounts to a slap on the wrist for the president’s tweet Sunday and subsequent comments against the four congresswomen, which I consider racist.

What Democrats in Congress and across the nation – including all of my party’s presidential contenders – need to focus on now is making Trump a one-term president. That means spending less time quarreling with each other and taking extreme positions, and more time reaching out to independents and moderate Republicans to make the case for electing a Democratic president in 2020.

DEM-LED HOUSE FORMALLY CONDEMNS TRUMP REMARKS DEEMED ‘RACIST,’ AFTER DRAMATIC FLOOR FIGHT OVER PELOSI

Trump has no one to blame but himself for the House resolution.

The president’s tweet that prompted the House rebuke said: “So interesting to see ‘Progressive’ Democrat Congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe, the worst, most corrupt and inept anywhere in the world … viciously telling the people of the United States, the greatest and most powerful Nation on earth, how our government is to be run. Why don’t they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came. Then come back and show us how….”

Although Trump did not name them in his tweet, it was clear who he was talking about – Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts. All four are U.S. citizens. Omar was born in Somalia and the other three congresswomen were born in the U.S.

Why do I and so many other people consider the Trump tweet racist?

Because an American citizen is an American citizen, regardless of national origin, ethnicity or race. Sadly, some white people in our country still look at some non-white people and consider them the “other” – not true Americans.

This view is, frankly, anti-American as well as racist. Whether your origins are in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Latin America or as a Native American, if you are an American citizen you are equal to all your fellow citizens.

Unfortunate as Trump’s attack on the four congresswomen – known as the Squad – was, he managed to unite Democrats behind the four and at least temporarily halt the internal squabbling between moderates and those on the far left like members of the Squad.

And it doesn’t matter if your ancestors came here hundreds of years ago or if you are a naturalized citizen. In the same way, your religion has no bearing on equal status as an American citizen.

Unfortunate as Trump’s attack on the four congresswomen – known as the Squad – was, he managed to unite Democrats behind the four and at least temporarily halt the internal squabbling between moderates and those on the far left like members of the Squad.

The president could have attacked the congresswomen based on their policy positions and controversial statements on a number of issues, and would have been much smarter to do so. Instead, his racist attack prompted Democrats to circle the wagons around the four.

But the unity sparked by the Trump tweet is likely only temporary. It appears the Democratic Party is moving further and further left, creating the split with older and more moderate Democrats.

What’s most concerning is that while some far-left positions play well with members of the Democratic base who vote in primaries, the same positions could very well drive independent voters and moderate Republicans to hold their noses and vote for Trump again in 2020.

The leftward tilt of the Democratic Party is apparent in how differently the views of Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., are being received this year compared to the 2016 presidential primary, when he ran unsuccessfully against Hillary Clinton.

In the last presidential campaign, Sanders’ proposal for a $15 an hour minimum wage and “Medicare-for-all” were considered radical. Now they are considered mainstream, embraced by millions of voters and many Democratic presidential contenders.

But the Democratic presidential candidates seem to be in a competition now to see who can “out- left” other candidates. This has led some to support decriminalizing illegal entry across our border and eliminating private health insurance entirely.

These positions – and others on the far-left edge of the political spectrum – will not be popular with many moderate suburban swing voters who are the key to winning elections. By embracing these positions, it seems that Democrats are confirming Republicans’ accusations that the Democratic Party has moved too far from the mainstream.

So how far left is too left?

Democrats fought and up until recently continued to fight hard for Americans being able to obtain insurance if they had preexisting conditions; something which most Americans support.  But when you see Democrats supporting ending private insurance coverage, which the majority of our nation relies on for health coverage, the Democrats end up sounding more like Republicans who say they want to repeal and replace ObamaCare.

And on the controversial issue of immigration, the Democratic presidential candidates who want to make illegal border crossings a civil offense rather than a criminal one are giving Republicans ammunition to claim that the Democratic Party favors open borders – a key GOP talking point designed to appeal to swing voters.

So are Democrats concerned? Of course they are, and they should be.  Especially those who ran in the 2018 midterms and flipped seats in largely conservative districts that Trump carried in 2016. 

Why is the Democratic Party titling so far to the left?

Many say that Reps. Ocasio-Cortez and Omar bear a large responsibility. They attract heavy news coverage because their positions are so extreme and because the congresswomen know how to use social media and traditional media to get maximum publicity.

As the 2020 elections draw closer, Democrats will have to decide what is more important to them: appealing to far-left activists, or winning elections next year so they can send Trump into retirement and hopefully win majorities in both the House and Senate.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Early polling should be a warning sign to the Democrats: going too far to the left may satisfy their activist base, but could result in defeat at the polls next year.

As a Democrat, I hope the unity sparked by President Trump’s harsh attack on members of the Squad will last and will convince Democrats to take a pragmatic path to victory in 2020.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY LESLIE MARSHALL

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6060013581001_6060009896001-vs Leslie Marshall: Trump deserves condemnation for ‘racist’ comments – Now Dems must unite against him Leslie Marshall fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 6d3d1605-41c4-564f-b15b-f2d473b11b58   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6060013581001_6060009896001-vs Leslie Marshall: Trump deserves condemnation for ‘racist’ comments – Now Dems must unite against him Leslie Marshall fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 6d3d1605-41c4-564f-b15b-f2d473b11b58

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‘Unfit to be president’: Full text of House impeachment resolution on Trump

Westlake Legal Group N51OxSSnFpvET_cdyy5lL2T7vwJOgtAdY59M5to2LAc 'Unfit to be president': Full text of House impeachment resolution on Trump r/politics

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Rep. Jim Jordan: Dems ‘focused’ on impeaching Trump, ‘not going to stop at anything’

Westlake Legal Group jim-jordan-AP Rep. Jim Jordan: Dems 'focused' on impeaching Trump, 'not going to stop at anything' Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 7b750a55-d1cd-51b1-8208-26beb288b240

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, voiced his frustration with “the squad” Tuesday and reacted to the House of Representative’s vote to condemn President Trump’s controversial remarks.

“I mean they’re so focused on going after this president, so focused on actually getting to impeachment I believe that they’re not going to stop at anything even if it means breaking the rules on the House floor where there is a certain level of decorum that you must maintain,” Jordan said on “The Story with Martha MacCallum.”

The House passed a resolution Tuesday evening condemning Trump’s “racist” remarks this weekend.  The moment was overshadowed by a dramatic floor fight earlier in the day that ended with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi ruled out of order for a breach of decorum.

Jordan defended the president’s comments and his displeasure with the Democrat’s position on the border with Mexico.

AOC ‘SQUAD’ HOLDS PRESS CONFERENCE CALLING TRUMP ‘OCCUPANT’ OF WHITE HOUSE

“I think the president was expressing the frustration that so many Americans feel about what’s going on at the border. Understand this Martha, it was just a couple months ago when the president said this is a crisis and all the Democrats say ‘no, it’s not. It’s manufactured, it’s contrived.’ And they wouldn’t provide the money we needed to actually deal with the situation on the border,” Jordan said.

Jordan also blasted the four congresswomen, noting their past controversial comments saying it was difficult to work with them.

“These are the same people who said abolish ICE, abolish the Department of Homeland Security. I mean these are the radical positions they take,” Jordan said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“These are the same individuals who said that the detention facilities to deal with this influx of amazing numbers we’ve seen on the border. They call these detention facilities ‘concentration camp’s and we’re supposed to figure out a way to work with them. It’s just difficult.”

Fox News’ Gregg Re contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group jim-jordan-AP Rep. Jim Jordan: Dems 'focused' on impeaching Trump, 'not going to stop at anything' Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 7b750a55-d1cd-51b1-8208-26beb288b240   Westlake Legal Group jim-jordan-AP Rep. Jim Jordan: Dems 'focused' on impeaching Trump, 'not going to stop at anything' Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 7b750a55-d1cd-51b1-8208-26beb288b240

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Rep. Jim Jordan: Dems ‘focused’ on impeaching Trump, ‘not going to stop at anything’

Westlake Legal Group jim-jordan-AP Rep. Jim Jordan: Dems 'focused' on impeaching Trump, 'not going to stop at anything' Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 7b750a55-d1cd-51b1-8208-26beb288b240

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, voiced his frustration with “the squad” Tuesday and reacted to the House of Representative’s vote to condemn President Trump’s controversial remarks.

“I mean they’re so focused on going after this president, so focused on actually getting to impeachment I believe that they’re not going to stop at anything even if it means breaking the rules on the House floor where there is a certain level of decorum that you must maintain,” Jordan said on “The Story with Martha MacCallum.”

The House passed a resolution Tuesday evening condemning Trump’s “racist” remarks this weekend.  The moment was overshadowed by a dramatic floor fight earlier in the day that ended with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi ruled out of order for a breach of decorum.

Jordan defended the president’s comments and his displeasure with the Democrat’s position on the border with Mexico.

AOC ‘SQUAD’ HOLDS PRESS CONFERENCE CALLING TRUMP ‘OCCUPANT’ OF WHITE HOUSE

“I think the president was expressing the frustration that so many Americans feel about what’s going on at the border. Understand this Martha, it was just a couple months ago when the president said this is a crisis and all the Democrats say ‘no, it’s not. It’s manufactured, it’s contrived.’ And they wouldn’t provide the money we needed to actually deal with the situation on the border,” Jordan said.

Jordan also blasted the four congresswomen, noting their past controversial comments saying it was difficult to work with them.

“These are the same people who said abolish ICE, abolish the Department of Homeland Security. I mean these are the radical positions they take,” Jordan said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“These are the same individuals who said that the detention facilities to deal with this influx of amazing numbers we’ve seen on the border. They call these detention facilities ‘concentration camp’s and we’re supposed to figure out a way to work with them. It’s just difficult.”

Fox News’ Gregg Re contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group jim-jordan-AP Rep. Jim Jordan: Dems 'focused' on impeaching Trump, 'not going to stop at anything' Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 7b750a55-d1cd-51b1-8208-26beb288b240   Westlake Legal Group jim-jordan-AP Rep. Jim Jordan: Dems 'focused' on impeaching Trump, 'not going to stop at anything' Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 7b750a55-d1cd-51b1-8208-26beb288b240

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Photos of New York teenager’s corpse still being shared online: reports

Photos showing the corpse of a teenager allegedly killed by a man she’d met on Instagram continued to spread online on Tuesday amid efforts to curb their posting, according to reports.

Using the hashtag #yesjuliet, the gory pictures were redistributed widely, including by online posters making light of or celebrating the death of the teen, who had a small social media following in upstate New York.

Others urged people to stop circulating the images, seen on online chat sites including 4chan and Discord.

Discord users who saw the photos Sunday morning alerted police.

IS ‘FLESH-EATING’ BACTERIA HEADING TO A BEACH NEAR YOU?

Instagram spokeswoman Stephanie Otway told Fox News via email that her social media platform had blocked the hashtag #yesjuliet for attempting to spread the images.

But Rolling Stone reported that photos were still being circulated Tuesday, even via Twitter.

“On the Instagram side, we’re using technology that allows us to find other images that are visually similar to the original image posted and automatically remove them when people attempt to upload them,” Otway told Fox News. “When our teams become aware of other images from this incident on other social media sites, we are hashing them as a preventative measure to stop this content from being uploaded to Instagram.”

Utica police said they are working to address the sharing of the images with various Internet platforms.

Utica Police Lt. Bryan Coromato told Fox News via email Tuesday night, “We are working to stay in contact with all platforms where these photos are appearing to have them removed, hoping to keep the exposure to a minimum.”

Westlake Legal Group bianca-devins Photos of New York teenager's corpse still being shared online: reports Frank Miles fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc article 394f99ad-20b9-5e45-b245-2d4c77434677

Bianca Devins was killed, allegedly by a man she’d met recently on Instagram, who then posted photos of her corpse online, police said. (Instagram)

The teen was identified as Bianca Devins, Utica Police Sgt. Michael Curley said. He identified Brandon Clark, 21, as the suspect in her slaying.

Devins and Clark met on Instagram about two months ago, police said.

Initially, they were online acquaintances only, but the “relationship progressed into a personally intimate one,” police said. “They had spent time together, and were acquainted with each other’s families.”

Utica Police told Fox News they were continuing to examine the backgrounds of the pair and their relationship.

Police were also working to nail down the events of Saturday night through early Sunday.

The two, Devins and Carl, allegedly attended a concert together Saturday night in New York City and got into an argument. They arrived back in Utica early Sunday and went to a spot on a dead-end street, according to the police statement.

There, they argued until Clark used a large knife to kill the teenager, police said. Authorities began receiving calls around 7:20 a.m. Sunday, reporting that a man posted on a social media site that he’d killed someone.

The case is being investigated as a murder and attempted suicide, Coromato said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Clark was charged with second-degree murder Monday night, police said. It was unclear whether the suspect had an attorney who could comment on his behalf.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Bianca-Devis Photos of New York teenager's corpse still being shared online: reports Frank Miles fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc article 394f99ad-20b9-5e45-b245-2d4c77434677   Westlake Legal Group Bianca-Devis Photos of New York teenager's corpse still being shared online: reports Frank Miles fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc article 394f99ad-20b9-5e45-b245-2d4c77434677

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Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens dead at age 99

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens dead at age 99

Chief Justice John Roberts is doing all in his power to help the Supreme Court not look overtly political as it moves ideologically to the right. USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — John Paul Stevens, the second oldest and third longest-serving Supreme Court justice in history and a Republican president’s nominee who went on to lead the court’s liberal wing, died Tuesday at the age of 99. 

Stevens died in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., of complications from a stroke he suffered on Monday, according to a Supreme Cout of the United States press release. 

 “On behalf of the Court and retired Justices, I am saddened to report that our colleague Justice John Paul Stevens has passed away,” Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. said in the release. “He brought to our bench an inimitable blend of kindness, humility, wisdom, and independence. His unrelenting commitment to justice has left us a better nation. We extend our deepest condolences to his children Elizabeth and Susan, and to his extended family.”

For 35 years, Stevens’ trademark bow tie and gentle mien belied a competitive edge that turned up in his opinions and dissents, most often defending the rights of individuals against the government.

Stevens’ brand of conservatism – a term he insisted still applied until his retirement in 2010 – all but disappeared during his long and distinguished career. He was a proud veteran of World War II and a code-breaker who went on to become a corruption-buster in his native Chicago. President Gerald Ford not only nominated him in 1975 but proudly defended him 30 years later in a letter to USA TODAY.

“I am prepared to allow history’s judgment of my term in office to rest (if necessary, exclusively) on my nomination thirty years ago of Justice John Paul Stevens to the U.S. Supreme Court,” Ford wrote a year before his death.

In lengthy interviews with The New Yorker and The New York Times near the end of his career, Stevens insisted that he had not changed his stripes but had simply withstood the court’s transformation from liberal to conservative. During that time, he came to align more with the court’s liberals than its new brand of conservatives, eventually becoming the senior justice on that side with the power to assign opinions and dissents.

Those dissents often went to himself and were perhaps his greatest contribution. In his last term, he penned a 90-page dissent to the court’s decision in Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission, which gave corporations the right to spend freely on elections.

“While American democracy is imperfect, few outside the majority of this court would have thought its flaws included a dearth of corporate money in politics,” he wrote.

And a decade earlier, he led the opponents of the high court’s ruling in Bush v. Gore, which ended the Florida recount and handed the 2000 election to George W. Bush.

“Although we may never know with complete certainty the identity of the winner of this year’s presidential election, the identity of the loser is perfectly clear,” he wrote. “It is the nation’s confidence in the judge as an impartial guardian of the rule of law.”

That concern over impartiality led Stevens to oppose Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation in October 2018, following Kavanaugh’s intemperate performance at the Senate Judiciary Committee’s hearing on allegations of sexual misconduct during his youth. 

Guns, abortion, death penalty 

On other issues, Stevens appeared to be a true liberal. He fiercely opposed Associate Justice Antonin Scalia’s opinion in 2008 that said the Second Amendment gave Americans the right to keep guns at home for self-defense, later calling for its repeal. And he stood firmly behind women’s right to choose their reproductive future.

“The societal costs of overruling (Roe v. Wade) at this late date would be enormous,” he wrote in a 1992 case. “Roe is an integral part of a correct understanding of both the concept of liberty and the basic equality of men and women.”

Stevens enjoyed his share of victories on the closely-divided court, including on a series of cases during Bush’s administration that gave prisoners at Guantanamo Bay the right to challenge their incarceration in U.S. courts, rather than military tribunals.

And in his last decade, the court also upheld the McCain-Feingold campaign finance law and banned the use of the death penalty against juveniles and those with intellectual disabilities, with Stevens leading the liberal wing against the court’s conservatives.

His greatest regret, he would later say, was his vote in 1976 to reinstate the death penalty after a four-year hiatus. By the end of his time on the high court, he had decided capital punishment was unconstitutional.

Court’s last World War II vet

Born in 1920, Stevens enlisted in the Navy just hours before the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and later served out his time there as a cryptographer. His fierce patriotism led him to oppose the Supreme Court’s ruling that burning the American flag was a protected form of speech – a decision even Scalia supported.

Stevens had plans to become an English teacher until he was convinced he should attend Northwestern University School of Law, where he graduated at the top of his class in two years.

Content as a lawyer in Chicago, he was entering his sixth decade when President Richard Nixon named him to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit in 1970. Five years later, Ford named him to succeed Justice William O. Douglas, whose record 36 years on the high court Stevens nearly matched. He was succeeded by Justice Elena Kagan in 2010.

Over the years, Stevens survived both prostate cancer and heart bypass surgery and was the picture of good health. He would spend nearly half the time the court was in session at his condominium in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., reading briefs on the beach between tennis and golf matches. He swam in the Atlantic Ocean regularly until recent years, when he decided he was no longer safe without someone nearby to help him get out.

A devoted Chicago Cubs fan, Stevens was at Wrigley Field in 1932 when the New York Yankees’ Babe Ruth called his famous shot to center field. He threw out the first pitch at age 85, and attended Game 4 of the 2016 World Series in a red bowtie and Cubs jacket.

‘Maybe I should have had seven’

Since retiring from the court, Stevens maintained an active schedule of public speaking and wrote three books: “Five Chiefs: A Supreme Court Memoir,” “Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution,” and “The Making of a Justice: Reflections on My First 94 Years.”

“It’s certainly not easy to get the Constitution amended, and perhaps that’s one flaw in the Constitution that I don’t mention in the book,” he said during a wide-ranging interview with USA TODAY in 2014. While the book called for six new amendments, he mused, “Maybe I should have had seven.”

During the interview, Stevens correctly predicted the court would soon address same-sex marriage and government surveillance programs, and he said the court’s 2008 decision on guns wouldn’t be the final word.

As for bringing cameras into the court, Stevens was a traditionalist. “If you leave it up to members of the court, I don’t think there’s a chance in the foreseeable future,” he said. “The downside is that whenever you bring television into a new arena, you’re never sure what’s going to happen.”

And as for retirement, Stevens reveled in the time for golf, tennis and reading – lots of reading, particularly history.

“It’s amazing,” he said, “how many interesting things there are to learn about the world.”

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Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens dead at age 99

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens dead at age 99

Chief Justice John Roberts is doing all in his power to help the Supreme Court not look overtly political as it moves ideologically to the right. USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — John Paul Stevens, the second oldest and third longest-serving Supreme Court justice in history and a Republican president’s nominee who went on to lead the court’s liberal wing, died Tuesday at the age of 99. 

Stevens died in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., of complications from a stroke he suffered on Monday, according to a Supreme Cout of the United States press release. 

 “On behalf of the Court and retired Justices, I am saddened to report that our colleague Justice John Paul Stevens has passed away,” Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. said in the release. “He brought to our bench an inimitable blend of kindness, humility, wisdom, and independence. His unrelenting commitment to justice has left us a better nation. We extend our deepest condolences to his children Elizabeth and Susan, and to his extended family.”

For 35 years, Stevens’ trademark bow tie and gentle mien belied a competitive edge that turned up in his opinions and dissents, most often defending the rights of individuals against the government.

Stevens’ brand of conservatism – a term he insisted still applied until his retirement in 2010 – all but disappeared during his long and distinguished career. He was a proud veteran of World War II and a code-breaker who went on to become a corruption-buster in his native Chicago. President Gerald Ford not only nominated him in 1975 but proudly defended him 30 years later in a letter to USA TODAY.

“I am prepared to allow history’s judgment of my term in office to rest (if necessary, exclusively) on my nomination thirty years ago of Justice John Paul Stevens to the U.S. Supreme Court,” Ford wrote a year before his death.

In lengthy interviews with The New Yorker and The New York Times near the end of his career, Stevens insisted that he had not changed his stripes but had simply withstood the court’s transformation from liberal to conservative. During that time, he came to align more with the court’s liberals than its new brand of conservatives, eventually becoming the senior justice on that side with the power to assign opinions and dissents.

Those dissents often went to himself and were perhaps his greatest contribution. In his last term, he penned a 90-page dissent to the court’s decision in Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission, which gave corporations the right to spend freely on elections.

“While American democracy is imperfect, few outside the majority of this court would have thought its flaws included a dearth of corporate money in politics,” he wrote.

And a decade earlier, he led the opponents of the high court’s ruling in Bush v. Gore, which ended the Florida recount and handed the 2000 election to George W. Bush.

“Although we may never know with complete certainty the identity of the winner of this year’s presidential election, the identity of the loser is perfectly clear,” he wrote. “It is the nation’s confidence in the judge as an impartial guardian of the rule of law.”

That concern over impartiality led Stevens to oppose Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation in October 2018, following Kavanaugh’s intemperate performance at the Senate Judiciary Committee’s hearing on allegations of sexual misconduct during his youth. 

Guns, abortion, death penalty 

On other issues, Stevens appeared to be a true liberal. He fiercely opposed Associate Justice Antonin Scalia’s opinion in 2008 that said the Second Amendment gave Americans the right to keep guns at home for self-defense, later calling for its repeal. And he stood firmly behind women’s right to choose their reproductive future.

“The societal costs of overruling (Roe v. Wade) at this late date would be enormous,” he wrote in a 1992 case. “Roe is an integral part of a correct understanding of both the concept of liberty and the basic equality of men and women.”

Stevens enjoyed his share of victories on the closely-divided court, including on a series of cases during Bush’s administration that gave prisoners at Guantanamo Bay the right to challenge their incarceration in U.S. courts, rather than military tribunals.

And in his last decade, the court also upheld the McCain-Feingold campaign finance law and banned the use of the death penalty against juveniles and those with intellectual disabilities, with Stevens leading the liberal wing against the court’s conservatives.

His greatest regret, he would later say, was his vote in 1976 to reinstate the death penalty after a four-year hiatus. By the end of his time on the high court, he had decided capital punishment was unconstitutional.

Court’s last World War II vet

Born in 1920, Stevens enlisted in the Navy just hours before the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and later served out his time there as a cryptographer. His fierce patriotism led him to oppose the Supreme Court’s ruling that burning the American flag was a protected form of speech – a decision even Scalia supported.

Stevens had plans to become an English teacher until he was convinced he should attend Northwestern University School of Law, where he graduated at the top of his class in two years.

Content as a lawyer in Chicago, he was entering his sixth decade when President Richard Nixon named him to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit in 1970. Five years later, Ford named him to succeed Justice William O. Douglas, whose record 36 years on the high court Stevens nearly matched. He was succeeded by Justice Elena Kagan in 2010.

Over the years, Stevens survived both prostate cancer and heart bypass surgery and was the picture of good health. He would spend nearly half the time the court was in session at his condominium in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., reading briefs on the beach between tennis and golf matches. He swam in the Atlantic Ocean regularly until recent years, when he decided he was no longer safe without someone nearby to help him get out.

A devoted Chicago Cubs fan, Stevens was at Wrigley Field in 1932 when the New York Yankees’ Babe Ruth called his famous shot to center field. He threw out the first pitch at age 85, and attended Game 4 of the 2016 World Series in a red bowtie and Cubs jacket.

‘Maybe I should have had seven’

Since retiring from the court, Stevens maintained an active schedule of public speaking and wrote three books: “Five Chiefs: A Supreme Court Memoir,” “Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution,” and “The Making of a Justice: Reflections on My First 94 Years.”

“It’s certainly not easy to get the Constitution amended, and perhaps that’s one flaw in the Constitution that I don’t mention in the book,” he said during a wide-ranging interview with USA TODAY in 2014. While the book called for six new amendments, he mused, “Maybe I should have had seven.”

During the interview, Stevens correctly predicted the court would soon address same-sex marriage and government surveillance programs, and he said the court’s 2008 decision on guns wouldn’t be the final word.

As for bringing cameras into the court, Stevens was a traditionalist. “If you leave it up to members of the court, I don’t think there’s a chance in the foreseeable future,” he said. “The downside is that whenever you bring television into a new arena, you’re never sure what’s going to happen.”

And as for retirement, Stevens reveled in the time for golf, tennis and reading – lots of reading, particularly history.

“It’s amazing,” he said, “how many interesting things there are to learn about the world.”

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Trump Sets the 2020 Tone: Like 2016, Only This Time ‘the Squad’ Is Here

WASHINGTON — With three days of attacks on four liberal, minority freshman congresswomen, President Trump and the Republicans have sent the clearest signal yet that their approach to 2020 will be a racially divisive reprise of the strategy that helped Mr. Trump narrowly capture the White House in 2016.

It is the kind of fight that the president relishes. He has told aides, in fact, that he is pleased with the Democratic reaction to his attacks, boasting that he is “marrying” the House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the Democratic Party to the four congresswomen known as “the Squad.”

His efforts to stoke similar cultural and racial resentments during the 2018 midterm elections with fears of marauding immigrant caravans backfired as his party lost control of the House. But he is undeterred heading into his re-election campaign, betting that he can cast the entire Democratic Party as radical and un-American.

“He’s framing the election as a clash of civilizations,” said Charlie Sykes, a conservative writer who is critical of Mr. Trump. The argument Mr. Trump is making is both strategic and cynical, he said. “They’re coming for you. They hate you. They despise America. They are not you.”

“And if you look at the Electoral College map,” Mr. Sykes added, “the places that will play are the places Donald Trump will need to win the election.”

While the Democrats were voting Tuesday to condemn the president’s attacks against the four women as racist, Trump campaign officials, by contrast, were trying to cast Monday as a landmark day for the Democratic Party — the day that the progressive “Squad” became the de facto leaders of their party.

The four freshman, female members of Congress — Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan — hold no formal leadership positions in their party, and none have been on the national political stage for much longer than a year. Yet Republicans, led by Mr. Trump and buttressed by his allies in the conservative media, have spent months seizing on and distorting their more inflammatory statements.

Aides to Mr. Trump’s campaign conceded that the president’s tweets about the four women on Sunday were not helpful, were difficult to defend and caught them off guard. They would have preferred he had not tweeted that the four women, all racial and ethnic minorities, should “go back” to their own countries.

But they said that his instincts were what guided his campaign in 2016, when his attacks on immigrants resonated with alienated white voters in key states. They believe there is political value in having “the Squad” as the new face of their political opponents when Mr. Trump is tracing a path to re-election that runs through Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin, where the four women are unpopular.

Brad Parscale, the Trump campaign manager, has been telling people that it is very hard to persuade voters in the current hyperpartisan political landscape.

Mr. Trump’s re-election strategy, instead, is to solidify his base and increase turnout. A major component of that is to portray his opponents as not merely disliking him and his policies, but also disliking America itself.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_158003625_3029d1dd-70d2-4f4f-b4ed-58bbf91dd188-articleLarge Trump Sets the 2020 Tone: Like 2016, Only This Time ‘the Squad’ Is Here United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J tlaib, rashida Race and Ethnicity Pressley, Ayanna Presidential Election of 2020 Omar, Ilhan Ocasio-Cortez, Alexandria Minorities

During a news conference on Monday, Representatives Rashida Tlaib, Ayanna Pressley, Ilhan Omar and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez denounced Mr. Trump’s comments.CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

The strategy is reminiscent of how President Richard M. Nixon and the Republican Party tried to frame their fight with Democrats during the 1972 elections around questions of patriotism and loyalty. Nixon supporters took to using the slogan “America: Love It or Leave It” to cast the Democrats and the growing opposition to the Vietnam War as anti-American — not merely anti-Nixon or anti-Republican.

Pat Buchanan, the populist, conservative former presidential candidate who served as an aide to Nixon, said that by elevating the four, Mr. Trump is trying to set the terms of his re-election fight.

“Rather than let Democrats in the primaries choose his adversary, Trump is seeking to make the selection himself,” Mr. Buchanan said. And if the election is seen as a choice between Democrats like Ms. Ocasio-Cortez and Ms. Omar, Mr. Buchanan added, “Trump wins.”

Mr. Buchanan said he envisioned a scenario in which the battle for the Democratic nomination becomes, in part, a referendum on these four women. “The Democratic candidates will be forced to choose in the coming debates as to whether to back the four,” he said, “or put distance between themselves and the four.”

Only four Republicans and one independent broke and voted with the Democrats to condemn the president’s language in the House vote Tuesday, a stark reminder of just how far the party has come from the period when its leaders believed their political future depended on being a big tent, welcoming to Latino and African-American voters.

Instead, a range of party leaders were pushing messages of patriotism. Some attempted to sidestep the racial implications, while others seemed less concerned about the potential blowback.

“Forget these four,” said Kellyanne Conway, the counselor to the president, in an interview with Fox News on Tuesday. “They represent a dark underbelly of people in this country,” she added. “We are sick and tired of people denigrating that American flag, the American military, veterans and America.”

Others were jumping on the bandwagon, but seeking to reframe and soften the message. Representative Liz Cheney of Wyoming, the third-ranking House Republican, effectively offered Mr. Trump a tutorial in how to go on the offensive without inviting a backlash.

“Our opposition to our socialist colleagues has absolutely nothing to do with their gender, with their religion or with their race,” Ms. Cheney told reporters Tuesday. “It has to do with the content of their policies.”

The election is still more than 15 months away, and eventually the Democrats will have a standard-bearer to define the party in opposition to Mr. Trump. Still, some Democrats worry that criticism of the four congresswomen will resonate with a segment of their voters and independents, who may prove just as uneasy with the policies, and some of the rhetoric, of “the Squad” as they are with Mr. Trump’s own bombast.

The Democrats who fared the best in the midterms were those who played down Mr. Trump while highlighting issues like protecting the health insurance of people with pre-existing conditions. And many of the strategists who are rallying behind former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. believe the party can’t count on increasing turnout among young people and minorities, and needs to lure back voters it lost to Mr. Trump.

In research published in a journal in February, Carlos Algara and Isaac Hale found that among white voters, high levels of racial resentment — measured by asking people whether they agree with statements such as “I am angry that racism exists” — were a better indicator of how someone would vote than party affiliation or ideological beliefs.

Trump campaign officials have expressed confidence in the state of the race. Mr. Trump’s favorability rating is about 46 percent.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

They found that there was still a sizable number of white Democrats who harbor relatively high levels of racial resentment, and that is helping Republicans across the board.

Mr. Algara, a political scientist at the University of California, Davis, said that a forthcoming analysis of the 2018 midterm elections found that even without Mr. Trump on the ballot, white Democrats with high levels of racial resentment were likely to vote for Republican candidates.

“The president and the Republican National Committee know that if you prime racial resentment attitudes among Democrats, you’re more likely to win their votes,” he said. “It’s a very effective strategy.”

But many Democrats believe that Mr. Trump has repelled so many voters who gave him the benefit of the doubt in 2016 that he is only digging himself into a deeper hole. “He’s risking everything on a strategy of recreating his exact 2016 coalition, but things have changed,” said Nick Gourevitch, a pollster with the Global Strategy Group, a Democratic firm.

There are Trump supporters who agree that the president’s rhetoric could backfire, and wish he hadn’t gone down this road.

“I think a more successful strategy would be to focus on the growth in the economy and policies and go after moderates and independents,” Anthony Scaramucci, who briefly served as White House communications director, said on CNN on Tuesday.

He added that he found the comments reprehensible and was surprised that more Republicans were not speaking out. He said he found that “astonishing.”

And some Republicans believe that the president is squandering an opportunity to capitalize on what had been a smoldering fight between Ms. Pelosi and the first-term lawmakers and was simply uniting the party.

“It got in the way of a nice little meltdown the Democrats were enjoying and totally unified them,” said David Kochel, an Iowa-based Republican strategist. “I’m just concerned that he took the focus off a really interesting food fight between Pelosi and the Squad.”

On Michael Savage’s radio program on Monday, a caller named Susan dialed in to defend the president’s actions. “He’s said worse things than that, and he’s not a racist,” she said.

Mr. Savage, who was one of the earliest hosts in conservative radio to endorse Mr. Trump but has been more skeptical of late, questioned his caller’s blind faith and also expressed concern that the entire episode was unifying the Democrats.

“I’m starting to get very worried about the true believers out there,” Mr. Savage said, adding that he thought the president needed to stop being so impulsive.

“I think he needs to stop tweeting at 3 in the morning when he’s having a low-blood-sugar attack. He has set our entire cause back.”

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