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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 20)

‘Fresh Air’ Remembers ‘PBS NewsHour’ Host Jim Lehrer

Westlake Legal Group facebook-default-wide 'Fresh Air' Remembers 'PBS NewsHour' Host Jim Lehrer

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. Jim Lehrer, the respected journalist and a nightly fixture on PBS for more than three decades, died Thursday at his home in Washington. He was 85. Lehrer is best-known for co-anchoring “The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour” from 1983 to ’95 with co-host Robert MacNeil and then, when McNeil retired, “The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer” until his retirement in 2011.

Lehrer grew up in Texas and was a newspaper journalist before getting into broadcasting. He was also a prolific writer. He published more than 20 novels and three memoirs and wrote four plays. Known for a calm, unflappable style and a commitment to fairness, Lehrer moderated presidential debates in every election from 1988 through 2012. He won numerous Emmys, a George Foster Peabody Award and a National Humanities Medal.

Jim Lehrer spoke to Terry Gross in 1988, five years after he’d suffered a heart attack and had double bypass surgery.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED NPR BROADCAST)

TERRY GROSS: You have been the subject of many interviews since your heart attack, really, in 1983 and then since the writing of your plays and your new novel. Have you learned a lot about interviewing from being an interviewee yourself?

JIM LEHRER: I have, I think. I – MacNeil says, I think correctly, that I am a terrible interviewee because I give very long answers. In fact, as he said, you know, Lehrer, if you were ever on our program, we’d never invite you back because your answers are very – you asked me a question when we started. You know, I went on for five minutes, I think. I mean, that’s a problem I have, and I understand. I sympathize, and I’m sure you must, too. I mean, I have great sympathy for the people I’m interviewing because I ask a question of somebody – now, keep in mind 99% of the interviews I do are live. I ask somebody a question, and then I’m immediately jumping, ready for the next question or ready to go on with it, you know?

I mean, I would much rather interview than be interviewed. I have learned a lot just out of sympathy for the people as a result of being the subject of the interview. There’s no question about it. I now understand how difficult it is.

GROSS: Well, do you tell the people who are appearing on your program to give you short answers (laughter), and how do you stop them if the answers…

LEHRER: No.

GROSS: …Are long?

LEHRER: What I tell the folks to do is to give their best answer. If it’s short, that’s fine. If it’s long, that’s fine. I can always interrupt them. I interrupt people for a living. That’s what I tell them. It’s very important that the person not have to be – not have to confine themselves to your rules. For instance, if – let’s say somebody is like me, gives long answers like I’m giving you right now, as a matter of fact. And – but, I mean, that’s your problem, see? That’s not my problem.

GROSS: (Laughter).

LEHRER: I mean, if I’m going…

GROSS: Hey; thanks a lot.

LEHRER: Yeah, right. I mean, I’ve come – if you asked me the story of my life and if it takes two hours to tell you the story of my life, I think it takes two hours. And it’s your job as the professional to cut it down a little bit. And I think that also, you get better answers that way. If I say to somebody who sits down who’s already nervous – now, that’s not true of people that are used to television. But if somebody comes in there very nervous – live show going all over the country, their mother’s watching and everybody’s there – and I say to them, all right; keep your answer short and blah blah blah, all it does is add to their anxiety. And I want people to be relaxed. I want them to forget that there are all these lights and cameras around and have eye contact. Our studios are set up, both in Washington and New York – are set up…

GROSS: This answer’s too long. No, I’m kidding.

LEHRER: No, I know (laughter). I know it is.

GROSS: Just thought I’d try that out, see what happened (laughter).

LEHRER: See, it doesn’t work with me. That’s – it feels right. But we set our people – our guests are very close to us, and there’s direct eyeball-to-eyeball contact. So that – so you try to confine the situation so the person is comfortable, and all they have to do is look at you. They’re not – they don’t have to look around. There’s not a place to – you know, to be distracted. It’s to make people comfortable.

GROSS: You’ve had to interview many politicians over the years, and I think that is always so difficult because politicians give you answers, but they’re not necessarily answers to the questions you’ve asked. I don’t mean you in particular.

LEHRER: Oh, I know.

GROSS: But in general, what are some of the techniques you’ve come up with for actually getting an answer to the question that you want answered because you’re just not necessarily going to get it?

LEHRER: Terry, there’s only one technique that works, and that’s to have enough time to ask the question a second time and then a third time and maybe a fourth time. And then, if Billy Bob Senator isn’t going to answer it, you at least have a stab. That’s his option. If he didn’t want to – you know, I mean, there’s no law that says he has to answer all the questions that Jimmy Charles Lehrer asks him on television, but I have the time. We have the time on our program.

Senator, what is your position on selling grain to the Soviet Union? Well, you know, Jim, that reminds me of when I was a little boy growing up in Oklahoma. And then he tells you a story. And you ask, yeah, but Senator – you give him the time, you know? He does that, and you say, yes, but what’s your position on selling grain? Well, you – first of all, you got to understand what grain is. Grains are these little – he still hasn’t answered. So then you say, yes, but Senator, again – you know? And then finally, you have to decide. And you’re sitting there in a live situation. Do I ask this sucker this question again, or do I go on? You have to – at some point, you have to have real confidence in your audience that they realize, hey; this jerk isn’t going to answer this question, or, this wonderful man isn’t going to answer this question, or whatever the situation is. Then you go on with it.

I do not believe in beating up on guests. I don’t – we don’t invite people on our program to abuse them. And so the other way to do it if you don’t have the time is you say, you didn’t answer my question, you know? Hey, hey, blah, blah, blah, you know? We don’t do it that way. And it’s because – it’s not because we object to it. That’s somebody else’s job to object to it. That’s just not our style. We’re not comfortable doing that. And we have the luxury of time.

GROSS: You know, you strike me as one of the few news anchors on television – I mean, you and MacNeil, really – who do more than just read the news while the newscast is on. Does the emphasis that American news viewers put on news anchors on commercial news seem a little absurd to you?

LEHRER: It seems incredibly absurd to me. I don’t understand it. I do – I simply do not understand the value that is placed on the ability of somebody to look into a television camera and read a teleprompter. Now, that’s called a short answer.

GROSS: Right (laughter). But would you ever want to be in a situation like that? What I’m thinking is that your partner, Robert MacNeil, went back and forth during his career between commercial and public television. To my knowledge, the only television work you’ve done is on public television.

LEHRER: That’s right. I went right from newspapers to public television. Look; my feeling about that is always – it’s always been consistent, I must say. The one thing I’ve been consistent on is that if commercial television or any other kind of television or a bus company or anybody else came along and offered me a job that was better than the one I have, I would seriously consider it. And if it was really better, I’d probably take it – now, better in any way you want to define better.

I’ve had opportunities to go into commercial television, but none of them involved anything that was anywhere near – I have the best job in television journalism, and it happens to be on public television. I mean, it could be somewhere else. But what I do now in the atmosphere in which I do it with the people with which – with whom I do it, and particularly Robert MacNeil, who is one of the really nice people in this whole world – he’s my best friend, in addition to being my partner business-wise and journalistically – journalistic-wise and whatever. I – you talk about my heart – we were talking about my heart attack. He got me through that. I mean, he really did.

I’m – but I’m not – if somebody were to come along tomorrow and offer me something that’s better than what I’m doing, I would do it. I think it’s impossible because I cannot conceive of a better job than the one I have. They’d have to create it. It doesn’t exist now. Let’s put it that way.

GROSS: OK. Well, I want to thank you so much for talking with us. Thank you.

LEHRER: Thank you, Terry.

DAVIES: Veteran PBS news anchor Jim Lehrer speaking with Terry Gross, recorded in 1988. Lehrer died Thursday. He was 85.

Tomorrow on FRESH AIR, our guest will be singer-songwriter Amy Rigby. She has a new memoir about growing up Catholic in Pittsburgh, living in the East Village during the New York punk era and raising a daughter on the road. She first earned critical acclaim with the release of her 1996 solo album “Diary Of A Mod Housewife”. Hope you can join us.

FRESH AIR’s executive producer is Danny Miller. Our technical director and engineer is Audrey Bentham. Our associate producer of digital media is Molly Seavy-Nesper. Roberta Shorrock directs the show.

We’ll close today’s show with a shout-out to the Charleston, S.C., band Ranky Tanky, which just won a Grammy for their second album, “Good Time.” Terry Gross returns tomorrow. I’m Dave Davies.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, “GOOD TIME”)

RANKY TANKY: (Singing) Good time, a good time – we going to have a time. Good time, a good time – we going to have a time. Good time, a good time – we going to have a time. Good time, a good time – we going to have a time. Good time, a good time – we going to have a time. Good time, a good time – we going to have a time. Good time, a good time – we going to have a time. When we all get together, we going to have a time. I got a letter – shake it – from Tallahassee. Shake it. My sweetheart – shake it – writing to me. Shake it. Oh, (unintelligible), shake it. Shake it in the tree. Shake it. Shake it in the mattress. Shake it. Shake it in the money bank. Oh, baby, oh, baby…

Copyright © 2020 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

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Chris Wallace: Bombshell claim by John Bolton has Trump defenders ‘spinning like crazy’

Westlake Legal Group wallace-trump-bolton Chris Wallace: Bombshell claim by John Bolton has Trump defenders 'spinning like crazy' fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/senate fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc David Montanaro article 3ca69b5e-3c89-5e3b-91b1-a3daf1b78d4b

The reported bombshell claim by former National Security Adviser John Bolton has left President Trump’s defenders “spinning like crazy” and likely triggered a “furious” response by Senate Republicans toward the White House, “Fox News Sunday” anchor Chris Wallace said Monday.

Appearing on Fox News’ live coverage of the Senate impeachment trial, Wallace told anchors Bret Baier and Martha MacCallum that he does not agree with the Trump team’s attempts to downplay the New York Times report. In his forthcoming book, Bolton reportedly claims that Trump explicitly linked a hold on Ukraine aid to an investigation of Joe and Hunter Biden.

“If you want a sense of how big the news is that we’ve heard in the last 12 or 14 hours, just listen to the Trump supporters, like Congressman Lee Zeldin and others, spinning like crazy. You get a sense that this is really an important development in this case,” said Wallace.

BOLTON’S MANUSCRIPT LEAKS AS MEMOIR PRE-ORDERS  BEGIN ON AMAZON; TRUMP FIRES BACK

Zeldin — a New York Republican who serves on the Trump defense team — told Baier and MacCallum that he does not believe the Bolton story changes the dynamics of the case.

“The president should be acquitted. We shouldn’t have even put the country through this in the first place. It does not change the dynamic that our country is being ripped in half right now,” said Zeldin.

The Times exclusively reported Sunday that Bolton’s book manuscript included a claim that Trump explicitly linked a hold on Ukraine aid to an investigation of Joe and Hunter Biden. Trump told Bolton in August, according to a transcript of Bolton’s forthcoming book reviewed by the Times, “that he wanted to continue freezing $391 million in security assistance to Ukraine until officials there helped with investigations into Democrats including the Bidens.”

WHITE HOUSE: BOLTON UKRAINE CLAIMS ARE UNTRUE, TIMING IS ‘VERY SUSPECT’

Trump fired back on Twitter on Sunday to refute Bolton’s claims, saying he “NEVER told John Bolton that the aid to Ukraine was tied to investigations into Democrats, including the Bidens.”

Trump went on to accuse Bolton of trying to “sell a book,” noting that Bolton did not complain publicly or privately about the aid holdup “at the time of his very public termination.”

Wallace said the impeachment trial previously appeared to be heading toward an acquittal later this week, with the Democrats’ calls for additional witnesses seeming to be “petering out.”

But he said the Bolton news may have changed the trajectory, possibly pushing a sufficient number of Republican senators to agree with Democrats that Bolton’s testimony is needed. He also said many Senate Republicans are likely “furious” at the White House and feel blindsided by the news.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“It seems to me that it’s going to be awfully hard for those Republican senators in the middle, maybe even some more senators than that, to now vote against witnesses … I suspect you’re going to find there are a lot of Republicans in that Senate lunch happening right now who are furious at the White House, saying: ‘Why didn’t you give us a heads up on this? We were [saying] no witnesses, nothing to see here, and you knew because the [book] transcript was submitted some time ago, you knew [Bolton] was going to basically incriminate you, so you put an egg on our face,'” said Wallace.

Westlake Legal Group wallace-trump-bolton Chris Wallace: Bombshell claim by John Bolton has Trump defenders 'spinning like crazy' fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/senate fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc David Montanaro article 3ca69b5e-3c89-5e3b-91b1-a3daf1b78d4b   Westlake Legal Group wallace-trump-bolton Chris Wallace: Bombshell claim by John Bolton has Trump defenders 'spinning like crazy' fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate/republicans fox-news/politics/elections/senate fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc David Montanaro article 3ca69b5e-3c89-5e3b-91b1-a3daf1b78d4b

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Holocaust survivor, 94, forms unlikely friendship with with middle schooler

A Holocaust survivor with no family in New York City didn’t talk to anyone at the nursing home until a middle school student said something that made her face light up. They recently celebrated her 94th birthday, too.

When Basti Williams, 14, an eighth-grader at the Allen-Stevenson School, visited the Upper East Side Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in the fall for a few hours with his classmates, he approached Hildegard, who was slouching down her wheelchair staring at a newspaper.

HOLOCAUST SURVIVOR, 104, HAS ‘EMOTIONAL’ BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION AT THE WESTERN WALL WITH 400 DESCENDANTS

Basti introduced himself, to no avail. The staff told him that Hildegard, whose last name was not released, mostly kept to herself. But since her name was of German descent, he tried again but this time, the youngster said it in German, which he is fluent in.

Westlake Legal Group Bastiandfriend1 Holocaust survivor, 94, forms unlikely friendship with with middle schooler fox-news/topic/holocaust fox-news/special/occasions/birthday fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values/family fox news fnc/us fnc f335ab6d-c7d6-5983-951f-c60b6869a212 Caleb Parke article

94-year-old Holocaust survivor, Hildegard, talks with New York City middle schooler Basti Williams. The two became friends through their shared German heritage. (Basti Williams)

Hildegard’s face lit up. They started talking and as time went by, she began opening up, and shared with Basti about how she survived the Holocaust. She had not told anyone at the rehab center that she was a Holocaust survivor.

HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS MARK AUSCHWITZ LIBERATION’S 75TH ANNIVERSARY AS THEIR STORIES GROW IN RELEVANCE

“I froze, lots of emotions hit me at the same time, the look in her eyes filled with so much pain and sadness, bringing tears to my eyes,” Basti recalls. “I started having flashbacks of what we learned during history class. And here I was, finding myself speaking to someone who lived through it all.”

Westlake Legal Group Bastiandfriend2 Holocaust survivor, 94, forms unlikely friendship with with middle schooler fox-news/topic/holocaust fox-news/special/occasions/birthday fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values/family fox news fnc/us fnc f335ab6d-c7d6-5983-951f-c60b6869a212 Caleb Parke article

Basti Williams and his family visit with Holocaust survivor, Hildegard, who has become part of their family. (Basti Williams)

Since that first meeting in the fall, Basti and his family have continued to visit Hildegard every week, and she has become a part of their family.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I was deeply touched when Basti’s family baked German pastries and came to visit me,” she said. ” It felt like long-distance family visiting: we shared baked goods and laughs. I don’t have many visitors and no family members left … what they have been doing for me and other residents is very nice and heartwarming.”

Westlake Legal Group Bastiandfriend4 Holocaust survivor, 94, forms unlikely friendship with with middle schooler fox-news/topic/holocaust fox-news/special/occasions/birthday fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values/family fox news fnc/us fnc f335ab6d-c7d6-5983-951f-c60b6869a212 Caleb Parke article

Basti Williams celebrates Hildegard’s 94th birthday at the nursing home in the Upper East Side. The two became friends and eventually family through their shared German heritage. (Basti Williams)

On Thursday, Basti and his family celebrated Hildegard’s birthday at the nursing home with a cake and balloons.

Westlake Legal Group Bastiandfriend1 Holocaust survivor, 94, forms unlikely friendship with with middle schooler fox-news/topic/holocaust fox-news/special/occasions/birthday fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values/family fox news fnc/us fnc f335ab6d-c7d6-5983-951f-c60b6869a212 Caleb Parke article   Westlake Legal Group Bastiandfriend1 Holocaust survivor, 94, forms unlikely friendship with with middle schooler fox-news/topic/holocaust fox-news/special/occasions/birthday fox-news/good-news fox-news/faith-values/family fox news fnc/us fnc f335ab6d-c7d6-5983-951f-c60b6869a212 Caleb Parke article

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Live Updates: Helicopter With Kobe Bryant Got Special Approval to Fly

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_167927064_81cf96bf-d933-4fc9-ad42-dd886feef481-articleLarge Live Updates: Helicopter With Kobe Bryant Got Special Approval to Fly Los Angeles Lakers Los Angeles (Calif) Deaths (Fatalities) California CALABASAS, Calif. Bryant, Kobe Bryant, Gianna (2006-20) basketball Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

A memorial for Kobe Bryant sits outside of Lower Merion High School in Ardmore, Pa., near Philadelphia. Bryant played at the school before going to the N.B.A.Credit…Hannah Yoon for The New York Times

The helicopter that crashed on Sunday with Kobe Bryant and eight other people on board, killing everyone, had received approval to fly even though weather conditions were worse than usual standards for flying.

The helicopter flew north from Orange County after takeoff on Sunday morning and circled near Burbank, waiting for clearance to keep going. According to audio records between the helicopter’s pilot and air traffic control at Burbank Airport, the helicopter was given what is known as Special Visual Flight Rules clearance, meaning they could proceed through Burbank’s airspace on a foggy morning in Southern California.

Whether the pilot made the right decision — to allow the helicopter to continue flying on despite low fog in the hillsides of Calabasas, where the aircraft crashed — will likely be at the center of the investigation into the cause of the crash.

Any special clearance from air traffic controllers would have allowed the pilot to fly through the controlled airspace around Burbank and Van Nuys, but would not give the flight permission to continue on to Calabasas.

Just before losing radio contact, the pilot asked for “flight following,” which allows controllers to track the flight and be in regular contact.

The controller responded that the helicopter was “too low level for flight following at this time.”

Sergeant Yvette Tuning, who was the watch commander for the Los Angeles Police Department’s Air Support Division on the morning of the crash, said that most of the Los Angeles basin was so cloudy that flights could be conducted only under instrument rules, on Sunday morning.

L.A.P.D. helicopters do not generally fly under those conditions. The visibility was less than two and a half miles from the department’s heliport near Union Station in downtown Los Angeles, she said.

She said these conditions occur more often in the winter and early in the summer, when fog along the coast is commonplace.

Tuning said the weather this winter, as it was on Monday morning, has been fairly clear, allowing helicopters to operate normally.

“But yesterday when I came to work I immediately saw it as I came down into the valley, that it was just socked in,” Tuning said. “So I already knew we” — meaning L.A.P.D. Air Support — “weren’t going to be flying unless it burned off quick. And it did not burn off quick.”

The retired Los Angeles Lakers star Kobe Bryant, 41, and his daughter Gianna died in a helicopter crash near Calabasas, Calif., on Sunday, along with seven other victims.

The helicopter was flying from Orange County, Calif., where the Bryant family lives, and crashed in foggy conditions about 30 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles as it was en route to Bryant’s youth basketball academy.

The other passengers included the pilot, Ara Zobayan; the college baseball coach John Altobelli and Altobelli’s wife, Keri, and daughter Alyssa; Christina Mauser, a basketball coach; and Sarah and Payton Chester, a mother and daughter who lived in Orange County.

Sheriff Alex Villanueva of Los Angeles County said the helicopter went down in an area with “very rough terrain,” and that even emergency crews had found it dangerous trying to get there during daylight on Sunday. The debris field, he said, was roughly 100 yards in each direction.

The National Transportation Safety Board said it would look at the history of the pilot and any crew on board.

“We’ll be looking at maintenance records of the helicopter,” said Jennifer Homendy, a member of the board. “We will be looking at records of the owner and operator of the helicopter and a number of other things.”

It was not immediately clear how many passengers the helicopter was approved to transport, or whether the helicopter was overloaded.

The chief medical examiner for Los Angeles County, Dr. Jonathan R. Lucas, said it could take several days to recover the bodies from the crash site.

“We will be doing our work thoroughly, quickly and with the utmost compassion,” Lucas said. “We’re doing everything we can to confirm identifications and give closure to the families involved.”

The helicopter was traveling to the Mamba Sports Academy in Thousand Oaks, Calif., and its passengers included Bryant’s 13-year-old daughter Gianna, who played at the school.

Bryant coached her team, and Gianna, whose nickname was Gigi, was “hellbent” on playing for the University of Connecticut and in the W.N.B.A., he told The Los Angeles Times last year.

At a UConn game last year, the father and daughter sat courtside and Bryant was asked about his daughter picking up the game by SNY. “I watch the game through my daughter’s eyes,” he said.

John Altobelli, 56, a longtime baseball coach at Orange Coast College, a junior college in Costa Mesa. Calif., was also on the helicopter with his wife, Keri, and daughter Alyssa, according to a college spokesman.

“This is a tremendous loss for our campus community,” said Angelica Suarez, the president of Orange Coast College, in a statement.

Last year, Altobelli led the Pirates to the California Community College baseball state championship, their fourth state title with the coach, and he was named one of the American Baseball Coaches Association coaches of the year.

Jeff McNeil, a Mets All-Star infielder, had been coached by Altobelli, and told ESPN, “Him taking that chance on me, having me on his team, got me drafted.”

Although the California authorities have not publicly identified the victims, their relatives, friends and employers announced and grieved the deaths. The other victims are:

  • Sarah and Payton Chester, a mother and daughter who lived in Orange County

  • Christina Mauser, a California basketball coach who had worked with Gianna Bryant

  • Ara Zobayan, a pilot

Bryant was drafted to the N.B.A. directly out of high school in 1996, helped lead the Los Angeles Lakers to five championships, and was named an All-Star in 18 of his 20 seasons for the team. His hypercompetitive nature could lead to drama among coaches and teammates — which sometimes spilled over into public — but his commitment to winning was never questioned.

Adam Silver, the N.B.A. commissioner, hailed Bryant as “one of the most extraordinary players in the history of our game.”

“For 20 seasons, Kobe showed us what is possible when remarkable talent blends with an absolute devotion to winning,” Silver said, adding that Bryant would “be remembered most for inspiring people around the world to pick up a basketball and compete to the very best of their ability.”

Bryant’s tenacity and intensity won him respect from rivals and inspired those who followed him into the game. Tributes from other athletes rolled in on Sunday, as Bryant’s friends and rivals shared what he meant to them. His former teammate, Shaquille O’Neal, said he would hug Bryant’s children “like they were my own.”

Michael Jordan said in a statement that he spoke to Bryant often and that he was “like a little brother to me.” Dwyane Wade, the former Miami Heat star, said on Instagram that Bryant “was who I chased” and that it was “one of the saddest days in my lifetime.”

Bryant’s résumé included the N.B.A.’s Most Valuable Player Award for the 2007-8 season, the finals M.V.P. in both 2009 and 2010, an 81-point game in 2006 that is the second-highest single-game total in N.B.A. history and a sterling pedigree on the international stage, where he won gold medals for U.S.A. Basketball in the 2008 and 2012 Olympics.

In 2016, after various injuries had taken their toll on the longtime superstar, he ended his career by scoring 60 points in his final game.

Off the court, Bryant’s legacy was far more complicated. He was arrested in 2003 after a sexual assault complaint was filed against him in Colorado. A 19-year-old hotel employee claimed that Bryant, who was working to rehabilitate his knee following surgery, had raped her. The legal case against Bryant was eventually dropped, and a civil suit was settled privately out of court, but Bryant publicly apologized for the incident.

“Although I truly believe this encounter between us was consensual, I recognize now that she did not and does not view this incident the same way I did,” he said in his statement. “After months of reviewing discovery, listening to her attorney, and even her testimony in person, I now understand how she feels that she did not consent to this encounter.”

In retirement, Bryant expanded his purview, winning an Academy Award in 2018 for his animated short film “Dear Basketball” while also creating the web series “Detail” for ESPN in which he analyzed current players. He was scheduled to headline the 2020 N.B.A. Hall of Fame nominees.

Three American presidents and athletes, celebrities and fans around the world grieved for Bryant, who became a superstar as basketball grew into an international sensation.

President Trump said that Bryant was “just getting started in life,” even after a career that forever marked him as one of basketball’s greats.

“He loved his family so much, and had such strong passion for the future,” the president wrote on Twitter. “The loss of his beautiful daughter, Gianna, makes this moment even more devastating.”

Former President Barack Obama, who once welcomed the Lakers to the White House, posted on Twitter that Bryant was “a legend on the court and just getting started in what would have been just as meaningful a second act.”

The death of Bryant’s daughter, the former president added, “is even more heartbreaking to us as parents.”

Former President Bill Clinton, who was in the White House when Bryant ascended to the N.B.A., and his wife, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, extolled how Bryant “brought excitement and joy to basketball fans not just in Los Angeles, but all over the U.S. and around the world.”

The Brazilian soccer star Neymar Jr. paid tribute to Bryant, as did the tennis player Naomi Osaka, who thanked him “for caring and checking up on me after my hard losses.”

Colin Kaepernick, the former N.F.L. quarterback whose kneeling during the national anthem in protest of racism and police brutality inspired a number of athletes to speak out publicly, said on Twitter that he would remember Bryant as a “basketball legend, a father & a man.”

The Italian Basketball Federation said on Monday that it would hold a moment of silence in every game this week for Bryant, who lived in Italy from ages 6 to 13 while his father played professional basketball there.

Bryant was fluent in Italian, and once said it would be a “dream” to play for the country, but in 2011, when an Italian team, Virtus Bologna, offered him a one-year contract during the N.B.A. lockout, the deal fell through, The Associated Press reported.

“It’s a small but heartfelt and deserved gesture to honor the life and memory of Kobe Bryant, an absolute champion who always had Italy in his heart,” the federation said in a statement. Bryant, the statement said, “was and will always be linked to our country.”

Los Angeles woke up Monday grappling with the loss of a global superstar who was, to Southern California, still a local hero. On Sunday, spontaneous shrines and vigils cropped up around the region, including outside Staples Center, the home of the Lakers, the team he played with for 20 seasons.

“He was not a perfect man, but we all have our faults,” Joe Rivas, a 28-year-old registered nurse, said on Sunday. “It’s beyond basketball.”

Los Angeles County officials have been worried by the number of people who tried to visit the crash site, which they said is located amid challenging terrain.

“We’re now faced with, I guess, well-wishers and people mourning who have descended on the area, on the residential community and even the crash site itself,” Sheriff Alex Villanueva said on Sunday evening. “We have to reiterate that it is off-limits to everybody except the first responders and investigators.”

Mourners, he said, could gather at a nearby park.

Tuesday promises to be a challenging day in Los Angeles, where the Lakers will play their first game since Bryant’s death. Their opponent? The Los Angeles Clippers.

The Washington Post suspended one of its reporters, Felicia Sonmez, after she published a series of tweets about Bryant in the hours after his death.

Sonmez initially tweeted a link to a Daily Beast article about sexual assault allegations made against Bryant in 2003 — a missive that stood out in the general outpouring of appreciation for Bryant and drew a swift backlash.

She followed up with a post about the negative responses she had received, including a screenshot of an email she had received that used offensive language, called her a lewd name and displayed the sender’s full name.

It was not immediately clear if any specific tweet prompted the suspension, and The Post said it was reviewing “whether tweets about the death of Kobe Bryant violated The Post newsroom’s social media policy.”

Separately, as the sheriff of Los Angeles County, Alex Villanueva, gave one of his first official update on the investigation, he declined to say whether Bryant was one of the victims and offered a pointed rebuke to the news organization that broke the news.

“It would be extremely disrespectful to understand your loved one has perished and you learn about it from TMZ,” he said. “That is just wholly inappropriate so we are not going to be going there. We are going to wait until the coroner does their job.”

TMZ did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The news media also drew criticism on Sunday after inaccurate reports circulated that four of Bryant’s children were killed in the crash, and a reporter for ABC News apologized for the report.

Reporting was contributed by Kevin Draper, Elena Bergeron, Jennifer Medina, Neil Vigdor, Marc Stein, Jill Cowan, Miriam Jordan, Mihir Zaveri, Jon Hurdle, Rachel Abrams, Benjamin Hoffman, Jonah Engel Bromwich and Daniel Victor.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

WATCH LIVE: Trump Defense At Impeachment Trial

Westlake Legal Group 5e2f1987240000530064c827 WATCH LIVE: Trump Defense At Impeachment Trial

President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial in the Senate continued on Monday with the second day of his defense team’s opening arguments.

The House in December passed two articles of impeachment against Trump ― abuse of power and obstruction of Congress ― stemming from his efforts to get Ukraine to publicly commit to investigating political rival Joe Biden. Trump has denied any wrongdoing.

Democrats are urging the Senate to call new witnesses who have direct knowledge of Trump’s handling of congressionally-approved aid to Ukraine, including former national security adviser John Bolton and acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney. 

Senate Republicans have been reluctant to do so. But an explosive report in The New York Times on Sunday that Bolton believed Trump tied the aid to Ukraine announcing his requested investigations prompted some key GOP senators to say they may vote in favor of calling such witnesses.

Each side in the trial was allotted 24 hours over three days to make their opening arguments. The Democrats concluded their presentation on Friday. After Trump’s defense team wraps up its arguments, senators will have 16 hours to ask questions before voting on whether to call new witnesses.

Read live coverage of Monday’s portion of the impeachment trial below:

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

What’s Coming To Netflix In February

Here’s What Arrives On And Leaves From Netflix In February 2020 | HuffPost Life

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Netflix adds over two dozen movies to the service on Feb. 1. Granted, seven of those movies are in the “Police Academy” franchise, but you still have a decent variety beyond that.

In particular, various romantic movies join throughout this Valentine’s Day-centric month, such as “The Notebook” and “Jerry Maguire.” Netflix also adds many poorly reviewed romantic films like “Dear John,” “Fools Rush In” and “Sex and the City 2.” So you’ve got options.

I’m particularly excited about the addition of “Good Time,” the 2017 movie by the Safdie brothers (“Uncut Gems”). That joins on Feb. 11.

Netflix has a few popular shows returning this month, too. Both “Altered Carbon” and “Narcos: Mexico” come back for their second seasons.

And Alison Brie co-wrote and stars in an upcoming Netflix film called “Horse Girl.” You can watch the trailer for that drama below.

Movies leaving the service throughout February include “District 9,” “Milk” and “Lincoln.” At the end of the month, “The Matrix” trilogy also departs.

Read below for the full list of arrivals and departures.

And if you want to stay informed on everything joining Netflix on a weekly basis, subscribe to the Streamline newsletter.

Westlake Legal Group 5e2f0a2e1f00002e008583af What’s Coming To Netflix In February

New Line Cinema

Rachel McAdams and Ryan Gosling in “The Notebook.”

Arrivals

Feb. 1

  • “A Bad Moms Christmas”
  • “A Little Princess”
  • “Back to the Future Part III”
  • “Blade Runner: The Final Cut”
  • “Center Stage”
  • “Cookie’s Fortune”
  • “Dear John”
  • “The Dirty Dozen”
  • “Dirty Harry”
  • “Driving Miss Daisy”
  • “Elizabeth”
  • “Elizabeth: The Golden Age”
  • “Fools Rush In”
  • “Hancock”
  • “Love Jacked”
  • “The Notebook”
  • “The Other Guys”
  • “The Pianist”
  • “Police Academy”
  • “Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment”
  • “Police Academy 3: Back in Training”
  • “Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol”
  • “Police Academy 5: Assignment: Miami Beach”
  • “Police Academy 6: City Under Siege”
  • “Police Academy 7: Mission to Moscow”
  • “Purple Rain”
  • “Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves”
  • “Scary Movie 2”
  • “Sex and the City 2”
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  • “Sordo” (Netflix Film)
  • “Team Kaylie” (Part 3, Netflix Family)
  • “Faith, Hope & Love”
  • “She Did That”
  • “Tom Papa: You’re Doing Great!” (Netflix Original)
  • “Black Hollywood: ‘They’ve Gotta Have Us’”
  • ″#cats_the_mewvie”
  • “The Pharmacist” (Netflix Documentary)
  • “Uppity: The Willy T. Ribbs Story”
  • “Cagaster of an Insect Cage” (Netflix Anime)
  • “The Ballad of Lefty Brown”
  • “Dragons: Rescue Riders” (Season 2, Netflix Family)
  • “Horse Girl” (Netflix Film)
  • “Locke & Key” (Netflix Original)
  • “My Holo Love” (Netflix Original)
  • “Who Killed Malcolm X?”
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  • “The Coldest Game” (Netflix Film)
  • “Better Call Saul” (Season 4)
  • “Captain Underpants Epic Choice-o-Rama” (Netflix Family)
  • “Polaroid”
  • “Good Time”
  • “CAMINO A ROMA” (Netflix Documentary)
  • “Q Ball”
  • “Anna Karenina”
  • “To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You” (Netflix Film)
  • “Dragon Quest Your Story” (Netflix Anime)
  • “Love is Blind” (Netflix Original)
  • “Narcos: Mexico” (Season 2, Netflix Original)
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  • “Cable Girls” (Final Season, Netflix Original)
  • “Isi & Ossi” (Netflix Film)
  • “A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon” (Netflix Family)
  • “Starship Troopers”
  • “The Expanding Universe of Ashley Garcia” (Netflix Family)
  • “Chef Show” (Volume 3, Netflix Original)
  • “Spectros” (Netflix Original)
  • “A Haunted House”
  • “Babies” (Netflix Documentary)
  • “Gentefied” (Netflix Original)
  • “Glitch Techs” (Netflix Family)
  • “Puerta 7” (Netflix Original)
  • “System Crasher” (Netflix Film)
  • “Girl on the Third Floor”
  • “Full Count”
  • “Every Time I Die”
  • “I Am Not Okay With This” (Netflix Original)
  • “Altered Carbon” (Season 2, Netflix Original)
  • “The Angry Birds Movie 2”
  • “Followers” (Netflix Original)
  • “Pokémon: Mewtwo Strikes Back ― Evolution” (Netflix Family)
  • “All The Bright Places” (Netflix Film)
  • “Babylon Berlin” (Season 3, Netflix Original)
  • “Formula 1: Drive to Survive” (Season 2, Netflix Original)
  • “Jeopardy!: Celebrate Alex Collection”
  • “Jeopardy!: Cindy Stowell Collection”
  • “Jeopardy!: Seth Wilson Collection”
  • “La trinchera infinita” (Netflix Film)
  • “Queen Sono” (Netflix Original)
  • “Restaurants on the Edge” (Netflix Original)
  • “Unstoppable” (Netflix Original)
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[embedded content]

  • “Jerry Maguire”
  • “Amit Tandon: Family Tandoncies” (Netflix Original)
  • “Taj Mahal 1989” (Netflix Original)

Departures

  • “Clouds of Sils Maria”
  • “District 9”
  • “Milk”
  • “Operator”
  • “Peter Rabbit”
  • “The 2000s” (Season 1)
  • “Charlotte’s Web”
  • “Gangs of New York”
  • “The Eighties” (Season 1)
  • “The Nineties” (Season 1)
  • “The Seventies” (Season 1)
  • “Lincoln”
  • “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”
  • “Our Idiot Brother”
  • “Jeopardy!: Buzzy Cohen Collection”
  • “Jeopardy!: College Championship II”
  • “Jeopardy!: Teachers’ Tournament II”
  • “Jeopardy!: Teen Tournament III”
  • “Jeopardy!: Tournament of Champions III”
  • “My Little Pony Equestria Girls: Rainbow Rocks”
  • “Primal Fear”
  • “Trainspotting”
  • “50/50”
  • “American Beauty”
  • “Anger Management”
  • “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”
  • “Free Willy”
  • “Hustle & Flow”
  • “Igor”
  • “Layer Cake”
  • “Rachel Getting Married”
  • “Stripes”
  • “The Matrix”
  • “The Matrix Reloaded”
  • “The Matrix Revolutions”
  • “The Mind of a Chef” (Season 1-5)
  • “The Taking of Pelham 123”
  • “Up in the Air”
Westlake Legal Group 5e2719522100002d00fffba2 What’s Coming To Netflix In February

Ji Sub Jeong/HuffPost

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Westlake Legal Group p?c1=2&c2=6723616&c3=&c4=&c5=&c6=&c15=&cj=1 What’s Coming To Netflix In February

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Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Harvey Weinstein accuser details her alleged assault in court: ‘I’m being raped’

At times sobbing, former production assistant Mimi Haleyi told jurors Monday at Harvey Weinstein’s rape trial how she tried to fight off the disgraced movie mogul and told him “no, no, no” while he sexually assaulted her.

“I did reject him, but he insisted,” said Haleyi, whose allegations against Weinstein led to his charges and trial. “Every time I tried to get off the bed he would push me back and hold me down.”

Haleyi testified she thought: “I’m being raped” and considered different options. “If I scream rape, will someone hear me?” she said before she “checked out.”

“I couldn’t get away from him at all, let alone get away,” Haleyi said. “I checked out and decided to endure it. That was the safest thing I could do.”

Weinstein, 67, is charged with forcibly performing oral sex on Haleyi in his New York City apartment in 2006 and raping another woman, an aspiring actress, in a Manhattan hotel room in 2013. He insists any sexual encounters were consensual.

HARVEY WEINSTEIN’S LEGAL TEAM CLAIMS IT HAS ‘DOZENS OF LOVING EMAILS’ FROM ACCUSERS

The 42-year-old Haleyi, whose legal name is Miriam Haley, is the first of the two women whose accusations are at the heart of the charges against Weinstein to take the stand at the closely watched #MeToo-era trial, which is in its fourth day of testimony.

Last week, “Sopranos” actress Annabella Sciorra testified that Weinstein overpowered and raped her after barging into her apartment in the mid-1990s. While outside the statute of limitations for criminal charges, Sciorra’s allegations could be a factor as prosecutors look to prove Weinstein has engaged in a pattern of predatory behavior.

Westlake Legal Group MimiHaleyi1 Harvey Weinstein accuser details her alleged assault in court: 'I'm being raped' fox-news/person/harvey-weinstein fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/events/in-court fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc f9e89dae-e52b-5516-9718-88696a81907f Associated Press article

Mimi Haleyi appears at a news conference in New York. Haleyi is expected to appear on the witness stand Monday, Jan. 27, 2020, at Weinstein’s New York City trial. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Haleyi went public with her allegations at an October 2017 news conference, appearing in front of cameras alongside lawyer Gloria Allred, who also represents Sciorra and other Weinstein accusers.

Haleyi, born in England and raised in Sweden, said she met Weinstein while in her 20s at the 2004 London premiere of the Leonardo DiCaprio film “The Aviator.”

They crossed paths again at the Cannes Film Festival in 2006 and, when she expressed interest in working on one of his productions, he invited her to his hotel room and asked for a massage.

She declined, saying she was “extremely humiliated.”

“I felt stupid because I was so excited to go see him and he treated me that way,” she testified.

HARVEY WEINSTEIN ‘SILENCE BREAKERS’ SAY THEY ‘STAND IN SOLIDARITY’ WITH WOMEN TESTIFYING

More meetings followed, and Weinstein secured Haleyi a job helping on the set of “Project Runway,” the reality competition show he produced. She testified that before the alleged assault, Weinstein showed up at her apartment and begged her to join him a trip to Paris for a fashion show.

“At one point, because I just didn’t know how to shut it down so to speak. … So I said, ‘You know you have a terrible reputation with women, I’ve heard,’” Haleyi said.

The then-revered Hollywood honcho “got offended,” she said. “He stepped back and said, ‘What have you heard?’”

Westlake Legal Group AP20016774719979 Harvey Weinstein accuser details her alleged assault in court: 'I'm being raped' fox-news/person/harvey-weinstein fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/events/in-court fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc f9e89dae-e52b-5516-9718-88696a81907f Associated Press article

Harvey Weinstein leaves a Manhattan courthouse after a second day of jury selection for his trial on rape and sexual assault charges, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020, in New York.  (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Asked by prosecutor Meghan Hast if she had any romantic or sexual interest in Weinstein, Haleyi firmly answered: “Not at all, no.”

The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they have been victims of sexual assault, unless they agree to be named as Haleyi and Sciorra have.

In testifying, Haleyi will have to deal with a defense team that said it plans to confront Weinstein’s accusers with their own words — messages they exchanged with Weinstein well after the alleged assaults. Weinstein’s lawyers argue the positive-sounding emails and texts call into question the accusers’ accounts.

The jury of seven men and five women also heard testimony from Dr. Barbara Ziv, a forensic psychiatrist who said that most sex assault victims continue to have contact with their attackers, often under threat of retaliation if the victims tell anyone what happened.

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Some of Haleyi’s messages were made public last year when Weinstein’s lawyers sought to get his case dismissed. One sent to Weinstein’s phone in 2007 reads: “Hi! Just wondering if u have any news on whether Harvey will have time to see me before he leaves? X Miriam.”

Westlake Legal Group AP20016774719979 Harvey Weinstein accuser details her alleged assault in court: 'I'm being raped' fox-news/person/harvey-weinstein fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/events/in-court fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc f9e89dae-e52b-5516-9718-88696a81907f Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group AP20016774719979 Harvey Weinstein accuser details her alleged assault in court: 'I'm being raped' fox-news/person/harvey-weinstein fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/events/in-court fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc f9e89dae-e52b-5516-9718-88696a81907f Associated Press article

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‘Friends’ star David Schwimmer shoots down reunion hopes, advocates for a reboot with a more diverse cast

David Schwimmer shot down hopes of a “Friends” reunion and instead advocated for a reboot of the beloved 90s sitcom with a more diverse cast.

The actor, 53, played Ross Geller on the hit sitcom for 10 seasons. Like the rest of the cast, he’s constantly asked about getting the band back together for a TV reboot similar to that of fellow NBC sitcom “Will & Grace.” However, speaking to The Guardian, Schwimmer explained that it’s hard for him to imagine a good enough reason to revive “Friends.”

“I just don’t think it’s possible, given everyone’s different career trajectories,” he told the outlet. “I think everyone feels the same: why mess with what felt like the right way to end the series? I don’t want to do anything for the money. It would have to make sense creatively and nothing I’ve heard so far presented to us makes sense.”

JENNIFER ANISTON REUNITES WITH ‘FRIENDS’ CAST FOR HER INSTAGRAM DEBUT

The actor also noted that, when it comes to reuniting with his former cast members Matthew Perry, Courteney Cox, Matt LeBlanc, Lisa Kudrow and Jennifer Aniston, he doesn’t really need a reboot of the show given that they continue to hang out every chance they get.

“We all had a little reunion dinner at Courteney’s house recently,” he explained. “Everyone drifts and everyone has families and gets on with it so there are different relationships among the cast, but I’m probably closest to LeBlanc on a regular basis. I’m the only one that lives in New York.”

Although he doesn’t have much desire to reprise the role of Ross Geller, Schwimmer doesn’t hate the idea of someone else taking on the character. He even goes as far as to suggest a reboot with a more diverse cast, noting he fought for diversity on the show while it was airing.

‘FRIENDS’ CAST HAS STAYED CLOSE FOR 25 YEARS BY ‘LEANING ON EACH OTHER’ IN TIMES OF NEED

“Maybe there should be an all-black Friends or an all-Asian Friends,” Schwimmer says. “But I was well aware of the lack of diversity and I campaigned for years to have Ross date women of color. One of the first girlfriends I had on the show was an Asian American woman, and later I dated African American women. That was a very conscious push on my part.”

Westlake Legal Group friends-cast-getty-1 'Friends' star David Schwimmer shoots down reunion hopes, advocates for a reboot with a more diverse cast Tyler McCarthy fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/sitcom fox-news/entertainment/genres/political fox-news/entertainment/friends fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9ffd8d1d-f088-53d9-bafa-efaafa7f5aa8

Lisa Kudrow as Phoebe Buffay, Matthew Perry as Chandler Bing, Jennifer Aniston as Rachel Green, David Schwimmer as Ross Geller, Courteney Cox as Monica Geller, Matt LeBlanc as Joey Tribbiani from the sitcom ‘Friends.’ (Jon Ragel/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)

In the wake of the series finding its way to Netflix for a binge-watching culture, Schwimmer commented that a millennial audience has criticized the sitcom for homophobia, transphobia and sexism. However, the actor brushes off those concerns noting how ahead of its time “Friends” was on other social issues.

“I don’t care,” he told The Guardian. “The truth is also that show was groundbreaking in its time for the way in which it handled so casually sex, protected sex, gay marriage and relationships. The pilot of the show was my character’s wife left him for a woman and there was a gay wedding, of my ex and her wife, that I attended.

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He continued: “I feel that a lot of the problem today in so many areas is that so little is taken in context. You have to look at it from the point of view of what the show was trying to do at the time. I’m the first person to say that maybe something was inappropriate or insensitive, but I feel like my barometer was pretty good at that time. I was already really attuned to social issues and issues of equality.”

Westlake Legal Group david-schwimmer-reuters 'Friends' star David Schwimmer shoots down reunion hopes, advocates for a reboot with a more diverse cast Tyler McCarthy fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/sitcom fox-news/entertainment/genres/political fox-news/entertainment/friends fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9ffd8d1d-f088-53d9-bafa-efaafa7f5aa8   Westlake Legal Group david-schwimmer-reuters 'Friends' star David Schwimmer shoots down reunion hopes, advocates for a reboot with a more diverse cast Tyler McCarthy fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/genres/sitcom fox-news/entertainment/genres/political fox-news/entertainment/friends fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 9ffd8d1d-f088-53d9-bafa-efaafa7f5aa8

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Discussion Thread: Senate Impeachment Trial – Day 7: Opening Arguments Continue | 01/27/2020 – Live, 1pm EST

Today the Senate Impeachment trial of President Donald Trump continues with Session 2 of President Trump’s defense counsel’s opening arguments. The Senate session is scheduled to begin at 1pm EST.

Prosecuting the House’s case will be a team of seven Democratic House Managers, named last week by Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and led by House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Adam Schiff of California. White House Counsel Pat Cipollone and Trump’s personal lawyer, Jay Sekulow, are expected to take the lead in arguing the President’s case. Kenneth Star and Alan Dershowitz are expected to fill supporting roles.

The Senate Impeachment Trial is following the Rules Resolution that was voted on, and passed, on Monday. It provides the guideline for how the trial is handled. All proposed amendments from Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) were voted down.

The adopted Resolution will:

  • Give the House Impeachment Managers 24 hours, over a 3 day period, to present opening arguments.

  • Give President Trump’s legal team 24 hours, over a 3 day period, to present opening arguments.

  • Allow a period of 16 hours for Senator questions, to be addressed through Supreme Court Justice John Roberts.

  • Allow for a vote on a motion to consider the subpoena of witnesses or documents once opening arguments and questions are complete.


The Articles of Impeachment brought against President Donald Trump are:


You can watch or listen to the proceedings live, via the links below:

You can also listen online via:


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As Virus Spreads, Anger Floods Chinese Social Media

Westlake Legal Group 27china-social01-facebookJumbo As Virus Spreads, Anger Floods Chinese Social Media Wuhan (China) Wang Huning (1955- ) Social Media Polls and Public Opinion Politics and Government Media Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Computers and the Internet China Censorship

SHANGHAI — Recently, someone following the coronavirus crisis through China’s official news media would see lots of footage, often set to stirring music, praising the heroism and sacrifice of health workers marching off to stricken places.

But someone following the crisis through social media would see something else entirely: vitriolic comments and mocking memes about government officials, harrowing descriptions of untreated family members and images of hospital corridors loaded with patients, some of whom appear to be dead.

The contrast is almost never so stark in China. The government usually keeps a tight grip on what is said, seen and heard about it. But the sheer amount of criticism — and the often clever ways in which critics dodge censors, such as by referring to Xi Jinping, China’s top leader, as “Trump” or by comparing the outbreak to the Chernobyl catastrophe — have made it difficult for Beijing to control the message.

In recent days, critics have pounced when officials in the city of Wuhan, the center of the outbreak, wore their protective masks incorrectly. They have heaped scorn upon stumbling pronouncements. When Wuhan’s mayor spoke to official media on Monday, one commenter responded, “If the virus is fair, then please don’t spare this useless person.”

The condemnations stand as a rare direct challenge to the Communist Party, which brooks no dissent in the way it runs China. In some cases, Chinese leaders appear to be acknowledging people’s fear, anger and other all-too-human reactions to the crisis, showing how the party can move dramatically, if sometimes belatedly, to mollify the public.

Such criticism can go only so far, however. Some of China’s more commercially minded media outlets have covered the disease and the response thoroughly if not critically. But articles and comments about the virus continue to be deleted, and the government and internet platforms have issued fresh warnings against spreading what they call “rumors.”

“Chinese social media are full of anger, not because there was no censorship on this topic, but despite strong censorship,” said Xiao Qiang, a research scientist at the School of Information at the University of California, Berkeley, and the founder of China Digital Times, a website that monitors Chinese internet controls. “It is still possible that the censorship will suddenly increase again, as part of an effort to control the narrative.”

When China’s leaders battled the SARS virus in the early 2000s, social media was only just beginning to blossom in the country. The government covered up the disease’s spread, and it was left to journalists and other critics to shame the authorities into acknowledging the scale of the problem.

Today, smartphones and social media make it harder for mass public health crises to stay buried. But internet platforms in China are just as easily polluted with false and fast-moving information as they are everywhere else. During outbreaks of disease, Beijing’s leaders have legitimate reason to be on alert for quack remedies and scaremongering fabrications, which can cause panic and do damage.

In recent days, though, Beijing seems to be reasserting its primacy over information in ways that go beyond mere rumor control. At a meeting this past weekend between Mr. Xi and other senior leaders, one of the measures they resolved to take against the virus was to “strengthen the guidance of public opinion.”

Wang Huning, the head of the Communist Party’s publicity department and an influential party ideologue, was also recently named deputy head of the team in charge of containing the epidemic, behind only China’s premier, Li Keqiang.

Chinese officials seem to recognize that social media can be a useful tool for feeling out public opinion in times of crisis. WeChat, the popular Chinese messaging platform, over the weekend said that it would crack down hard on rumors about the virus. But it also created a tool for users to report tips and information about the disease and the response.

Internet backlash may already have caused one local government in China to change course on its virus-fighting policies. The southern city of Shantou announced on Sunday that it was stopping cars, ships and people from entering the city, in a policy that echoed ones in Wuhan. But then word went around that the decision had led people to panic-buy food, and by the afternoon, the order had been rescinded.

Nowhere has the local government been the target of more internet vitriol than in Hubei Province, where Wuhan is the capital.

After the Hubei governor, Wang Xiaodong, and other officials there gave a news briefing on Sunday, web users mocked Mr. Wang for misstating, twice, the number of face masks that the province could produce. They circulated a photo from the briefing of him and two other officials, pointing out that one of them did not cover his nose with his mask, another wore his mask upside down and Mr. Wang did not wear a mask at all.

On Monday, social media users were similarly unrelenting toward Wuhan’s mayor, Zhou Xianwang.

During an interview Mr. Zhou gave to state television, commenters in live streams unloaded on him, with one writing: “Stop talking. We just want to know when you will resign.”

Top authorities may be deliberately directing public anger toward officials in Hubei and Wuhan as a prelude to their resigning and being replaced. Many other targets within the Chinese leadership seem to remain off limits.

This month, as news of the coronavirus emerged but Mr. Xi did not make public appearances to address it, people on the social platform Weibo began venting their frustration in veiled ways, asking “Where’s that person?”

But even those comments were deleted. So some users started replacing Mr. Xi’s name with “Trump.” As in, “I don’t want to go through another minute of this year, my heart is filled with pain, I hope Trump dies.”

Other people hungering to express frustration have taken to the Chinese social platform Douban, which has been flooded recently by user reviews for “Chernobyl,” the hit television series about the Soviet nuclear disaster.

“In any era, any country, it’s the same. Cover everything up,” one reviewer wrote on Monday.

“That’s socialism,” wrote another.

Some Chinese news outlets have been able to report incisively on the coronavirus. The influential newsmagazine Caixin has put out rigorous reporting and analysis. The Paper, a digital news outlet that is overseen by Shanghai’s Communist Party Committee, published a chilling video about a Wuhan resident who couldn’t find a hospital that would treat him and ended up wandering the streets.

Mr. Xiao, the Chinese internet expert, said the central authorities long gave such outlets special leeway to cover certain topics in ways that official media cannot. But the outlets should not be viewed as independent of the government, he said, calling their coverage “planned and controlled publicity” from the authorities.

Even outside the digital realm, it is not hard to find people in China who remain unsure of whether to trust what their government is telling them about the epidemic.

Chen Pulin, a 78-year-old retiree, was waiting outside a Shanghai hospital recently while his daughter was inside being tested for the virus. When word of the disease first began trickling out, he immediately had doubts about whether officials were being forthcoming about it.

“Even now, the government seems to be thinking about the economy and social stability,” Mr. Chen said. “Those things are important, but when it comes to these infectious diseases, stopping the disease should come first.”

Li Yuan contributed reporting from Hong Kong. Claire Fu, Lin Qiqing and Wang Yiwei contributed research.

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