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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 201)

John Elway says Emmanuel Sanders trade is best for Denver Broncos

John Elway, the Denver Broncos’ president of team operations, addressed his decision to trade wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders on Tuesday after he had a five-catch, 60-receiving yard game.

The Broncos traded Sanders and a fifth-round pick to the San Francisco 49ers for a third- and a fourth-round pick, according to KUSA-TV. The 49ers later confirmed the trade.

PHILADELPHIA EAGLES’ FLETCHER COX GRABS SHOTGUN TO DEFEND HOME FROM GIRLFRIEND’S EX: REPORT

“I think eventually with what happened after the Tennessee game [a 16-0 victory] and where we were and with the value we were getting for him, we decided it was the best thing for our team to trade Emmanuel,” Elway said at a news conference without clarifying.

Sanders had one catch on three targets for zero yards. He left in the second half with a knee injury. Two weeks before the Titans game, he had five catches for 104 yards in a two-point loss to the Jacksonville Jaguars.

Westlake Legal Group Denver-Broncos-wide-receiver-Emmanu-f52dfd011a68f410VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ John Elway says Emmanuel Sanders trade is best for Denver Broncos Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/denver-broncos fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 16c6ad40-1a45-5a78-9630-103d67cdb2bb

Emmanuel Sanders was traded to the San Francisco 49ers. (Chris Humphreys-USA TODAY Sports)

Elway said that it was Sanders who requested the trade.

NEW YORK JETS’ LE’VEON BELL, ADAM GASE FUME OVER SAM DARNOLD’S ‘GHOSTS’ COMMENTS GETTING AIR PLAY

“When we looked at it, Emmanuel had issues and we had issues,” Elway said. “That is why it was a good time for us to go different directions — for Emmanuel to go in a different direction and for us to go in a different direction. With that being said, we were able to get the value that we thought was fair. That is why we decided to make the deal.”

Sanders was in the middle of his sixth season with the Broncos before the trade. He had 404 receptions for 5,361 yards and 28 touchdowns in 78 games for Denver. He had started 77 of the 78 games.

He told CBS Denver said he was happy with his time in Denver.

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“It’s hard anytime you break up or leave a place,” he said. “It’s tough. We definitely had a great run in Denver, had a lot of great times but all good things come to an end. Looking forward to getting out to San Fran and showcasing my talent.”

Westlake Legal Group Denver-Broncos-wide-receiver-Emmanu-f52dfd011a68f410VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ John Elway says Emmanuel Sanders trade is best for Denver Broncos Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/denver-broncos fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 16c6ad40-1a45-5a78-9630-103d67cdb2bb   Westlake Legal Group Denver-Broncos-wide-receiver-Emmanu-f52dfd011a68f410VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____ John Elway says Emmanuel Sanders trade is best for Denver Broncos Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/denver-broncos fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 16c6ad40-1a45-5a78-9630-103d67cdb2bb

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Trump Calls Syria Cease-Fire ‘Permanent’ After Russia, Turkey Make Deal

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1177744503_custom-f62c3565d58f76d94412aea21cf1efe0b48f3683-s1100-c15 Trump Calls Syria Cease-Fire 'Permanent' After Russia, Turkey Make Deal

President Trump speaks about Syria in the Diplomatic Reception Room at the White House on Wednesday with Vice President Pence listens. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Trump Calls Syria Cease-Fire 'Permanent' After Russia, Turkey Make Deal

President Trump speaks about Syria in the Diplomatic Reception Room at the White House on Wednesday with Vice President Pence listens.

Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET

President Trump says Turkey has agreed to what he called a permanent cease-fire in northern Syria, ending its military offensive against Kurdish forces that began after the U.S. pulled its troops from the area.

Trump said his decision to remove U.S. forces — criticized by U.S. Republican and Democratic lawmakers alike — helped to bring the deal to fruition.

“This was an outcome created by us, the United States, and nobody else, no other nation,” he said. “We’re willing to take blame and we’re also willing to take credit, this is something they’ve been trying to do for many, many decades.”

Trump said the U.S. will lift sanctions imposed on Turkey in the wake of its incursion into Syria. But, Trump warned that the sanctions could be re-imposed if Turkey fails to protect religious and ethnic minorities.

Trump abruptly announced on Oct. 6 that U.S. troops would withdraw from northern Syria. Lawmakers accused Trump of abandoning Kurdish forces, who were key allies in the U.S. fight against ISIS. Turkey argues that the Kurdish fighters are terrorists.

Trump used his remarks to push back against that criticism.

“The people that I watched and read giving me and the United States advice, were the people that I had been watching and reading for many years,” he said. “They are the ones that got us into the Middle East mess, but never had the vision or the courage to get us out, they just talked.”

The announcement of the permanent cease-fire comes after a deal was reached on Tuesday between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The agreement calls for the withdrawal of Syrian Kurdish forces from the Turkish border and then joint military patrols of the area now occupied by the Kurdish military.

Watch Trump’s Full Statement

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Contradicting Trump, Ukraine Knew of Aid Freeze Before It Became Public

Westlake Legal Group 21dc-aid-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 Contradicting Trump, Ukraine Knew of Aid Freeze Before It Became Public Zelensky, Volodymyr Volker, Kurt D United States Ukraine Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry State Department Sondland, Gordon D (1957- ) Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Presidential Election of 2020 Presidential Election of 2016 Office of Management and Budget (US) Mulvaney, Mick Giuliani, Rudolph W Defense Department

KIEV, Ukraine — To Democrats who say that President Trump’s decision to freeze a $391 million military aid package to Ukraine was intended to bully Ukraine’s leader into carrying out investigations for Mr. Trump’s political benefit, the president and his allies have had a simple response: There could not have been any quid pro quo because the Ukrainians did not know the assistance had been blocked.

Following testimony by William B. Taylor Jr., the top United States diplomat in Ukraine, to House impeachment investigators on Tuesday that the freezing of the aid was directly linked to Mr. Trump’s demand for the investigations, the president took to Twitter on Wednesday morning to approvingly quote a Republican member of Congress saying neither Mr. Taylor nor any other witness had “provided testimony that the Ukrainians were aware that military aid was being withheld.”

But in fact, word of the aid freeze had gotten to high-level Ukrainian officials by the first week in August, according to interviews and documents obtained by The New York Times.

The problem was not a bureaucratic glitch, the Ukrainians were told then. To address it, they were advised, they should reach out to Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, according to the interviews and records.

The timing of the communications about the issue, which have not previously been reported, shows that Ukraine was aware the White House was holding up the funds weeks earlier than United States and Ukrainian officials had acknowledged. And it means that the Ukrainian government was aware of the freeze during most of the period in August when Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudolph W. Giuliani, and two American diplomats were pressing President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine to make a public commitment to the investigations being sought by Mr. Trump.

The communications did not explicitly link the assistance freeze to the push by Mr. Trump and Mr. Giuliani for the investigations. But in the communications, officials from the United States and Ukraine discuss the need to bring in the same senior aide to Mr. Zelensky who had been dealing with Mr. Giuliani about Mr. Trump’s demands for the investigations, signaling a possible link between the matters.

Word of the aid freeze got to the Ukrainians at a moment when Mr. Zelensky, who had taken office a little more than two months earlier after a campaign in which he promised to root out corruption and stand up to Russia, was off balance and uncertain how to stabilize his country’s relationship with the United States.

Days earlier, he had listened to Mr. Trump implore him on a half-hour call to pursue investigations touching on former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and a debunked conspiracy theory about Ukrainian involvement in the 2016 hack of the Democratic National Committee. Mr. Zelensky’s efforts to secure a visit to the White House — a symbolic affirmation of support he considered vital at a time when Russia continued to menace Ukraine’s eastern border — seemed to be stalled. American policy toward Ukraine was being guided not by career professionals but by Mr. Giuliani.

Mr. Taylor told the impeachment investigators that it was only on the sidelines of a Sept. 1 meeting in Warsaw between Mr. Zelensky and Vice President Mike Pence that the Ukrainians were directly told the aid would be dependent on Mr. Zelensky giving Mr. Trump something he wanted: an investigation into Burisma, the company that had employed Hunter Biden, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s son.

American and Ukrainian officials have asserted that Ukraine learned that the aid had been held up only around the time it became public through a news story at the end of August.

The aid freeze is getting additional scrutiny from the impeachment investigators on Wednesday as they question Laura K. Cooper, a deputy assistant defense secretary for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia. This month, Democrats subpoenaed both the Defense Department and the White House Office of Management and Budget for records related to the assistance freeze.

As Mr. Taylor’s testimony suggests, the Ukrainians did not confront the Trump administration about the freeze until they were told in September that it was linked to the demand for the investigations. The Ukrainians appear to have initially been hopeful that the problem could be resolved quietly and were reluctant to risk a public clash at a delicate time in relations between the two nations.

The disclosure that the Ukrainians knew of the freeze by early August corroborates, and provides additional details about, a claim made by a C.I.A. officer in his whistle-blower complaint that sparked the impeachment inquiry by House Democrats.

“As of early August, I heard from U.S. officials that some Ukrainian officials were aware that U.S. aid might be in jeopardy, but I do not know how or when they learned of it,” the anonymous whistle-blower wrote. The complainant said that he learned that the instruction to freeze the assistance “had come directly from the president,” and said it “might have a connection with the overall effort to pressure Ukrainian leadership.”

Publicly, Mr. Zelensky has insisted he felt no pressure to pursue the investigations sought by Mr. Trump.

“There was no blackmail,” Mr. Zelensky said at a news conference earlier this month. He cited as evidence that he “had no idea the military aid was held up” at the time of his July 25 call with Mr. Trump, when Mr. Trump pressed him for investigations into the Bidens and a debunked conspiracy theory about Ukrainian involvement in the hacking of the Democratic National Committee in 2016.

Mr. Zelensky has said he knew about the hold up of the military aid before his meeting in Poland on Sept. 1 with Mr. Pence, but has been vague about exactly when he learned about it. “When I did find out, I raised it with Pence at a meeting in Warsaw,” he said this month.

In conversations over several days in early August, a Pentagon official discussed the assistance freeze directly with a Ukrainian government official, according to records and interviews. The Pentagon official suggested that Mr. Mulvaney had been pushing for the assistance to be withheld, and urged the Ukrainians to reach out to him.

The Pentagon official described Mr. Mulvaney’s motivations only in broad terms but made clear that the same Ukrainian official, Andriy Yermak, who had been negotiating with Mr. Giuliani over the investigations and a White House visit being sought by Mr. Zelensky should also reach out to Mr. Mulvaney over the hold on military aid.

A senior administration official who was not authorized to speak publicly about the issue said on Monday that Mr. Mulvaney “had absolutely no communication with the Ukranians about this issue.”

Ukrainian officials had grown suspicious that the assistance was in jeopardy because formal talks with the Pentagon on its release had concluded by June without any apparent problem.

In talks during the spring with American officials, the Ukrainians had resolved conditions for the release of the assistance, and believed everything was on schedule, according to Ivanna Klympush-Tsintsadze, Ukraine’s former vice prime minister for Euro-Atlantic Integration.

But by early August, the Ukrainians were struggling to get clear answers from their American contacts about the status of the assistance, according to American officials familiar with the Ukrainians’ efforts.

In the days and weeks after top Ukrainian officials were alerted to the aid freeze, Gordon D. Sondland, the United States ambassador to the European Union, and Kurt D. Volker, then the State Department’s special envoy to Ukraine, were working with Mr. Giuliani to draft a statement for Mr. Zelensky to deliver that would commit him to pursuing the investigations, according to text messages between the men turned over to the House impeachment investigators.

The text messages between Mr. Volker, Mr. Sondland and the top Zelensky aide did not mention the hold up of the aid. It was only in September, after the Warsaw meeting, that Mr. Taylor wrote in a text message to Mr. Sondland, “I think it’s crazy to withhold security assistance for help with a political campaign.”

After being informed on Sept. 1 in Warsaw that the aid would be released only if Mr. Zelensky agreed to the investigations, Ukrainian officials, including their national security adviser and defense minister, were troubled by their inability to get answers to questions about the freeze from United States officials, Mr. Taylor testified.

Through the summer, Mr. Zelensky had been noncommittal about the demands from Mr. Volker, Mr. Sondland and Mr. Giuliani for a public commitment to the investigations. On Sept. 5, Mr. Taylor testified, Mr. Zelensky met in Kiev with Senators Ron Johnson, Republican of Wisconsin, and Chris Murphy, Democrat of Connecticut.

Mr. Zelensky’s first question, Mr. Taylor said, was about the security aid. The senators responded, Mr. Taylor said, that Mr. Zelensky “should not jeopardize bipartisan support by getting drawn into U.S. domestic politics.”

But Mr. Sondland was still pressing for a commitment from Mr. Zelensky, and was pressing him to do a CNN interview in which he would talk about pursuing the investigations sought by Mr. Trump.

Mr. Zelensky never did the interview and never made the public commitment sought by the White House, although a Ukrainian prosecutor later said he would “audit” a case involving the owner of the company that paid Hunter Biden as a board member.

Mr. Giuliani has said he had nothing to do with the assistance freeze and did not talk to Mr. Trump or “anybody in the government” about it. “I didn’t know about it until I read about it in the newspaper,” he said in an interview last week.

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Pentagon will send more than 50 F-35s to Europe to deter Russia

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6075367651001_6075370763001-vs Pentagon will send more than 50 F-35s to Europe to deter Russia Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fnc/tech fnc d561c926-8045-54a2-a726-5091efc651ca article

The Pentagon is sending more than 50 F-35 Joint Strike Fighters to Europe over the next few years to deter Russia and help NATO prepare for an entirely new kind of warfare.

“By the time our planes get there, there will be 100-plus F-35s there with our European partners,” Air Force Gen. James Holmes told reporters at a recent Air Force Association Conference at Maryland’s National Harbor. “We will be falling in on our European partners who already have their F-35s.”

Although the full number of just over 50 combat aircraft won’t arrive until the early 2020s, preparations are already underway. The Air Force didn’t specify where the F-35s will be sent, citing security reasons. However, there are numerous vital strategic areas in the region, such as the Baltics and places in Eastern Europe, that might be considered.

INSIDE THE F-35 FACTORY, WHERE STEALTH BEGINS

Emphasizing that the arriving fighters will “train and operate” together with European allies, Holmes said the move was “important to our ability to compete and deter in Europe.”

Bringing F-35s to the European continent introduces a range of new attack options for U.S. and NATO forces seeking to prevent potential Russian advances. It brings 5th Generation stealth, which includes targeting sensors with never-before-seen range, new air-to-air weapons and a dronelike ability to surveil and target areas of interest.

U.S. and allied F-35s all have a common data link which enables dispersed, yet networked, attack options. In a tactical sense, it seems that a high-speed F-35, fortified by long-range sensors and targeting technologies, might be well positioned to identify and destroy mobile weapons launchers or other vital, but slightly smaller on-the-move targets.

“Once the F-35 gets there you will see it be moved around and used. It will operate with our allies, reassure them and do some deterrence as well,” Col. William Marshall, 48th Fighter Wing Commander, told reporters at AFA. The arriving F-35s will work through U.S. Air Force Europe.

F-35 SET FOR LASER BOOST

The weapons, the ISR (intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance) technology and the multirole functions of the F-35 provide a wide range of attack options should that be necessary in the region. The F-35 has completed a series of weapons separation tests and is currently able to be armed with the AIM-9X, AIM-120, AIM-132, GBU-12, JDAM, JSOW, SDB-1 and the Paveway IV, Lockheed Martin data states. The F-35 is configured to carry more than 3.500 pounds of ordnance in stealth mode and over 18,000 pounds uncontested.

As part of this equation, an F-35 might also increasingly be called upon to function as a key element of U.S. nuclear deterrence strategy. In recent years, F-35s were deployed to the Pacific theater to participate in military exercises over the Korean Peninsula.

Utilizing speed, maneuverability and lower-altitude flight – compared to how a bomber such as a B-2 would operate – a nuclear-capable F-35 presents new threats to a potential adversary.

LOCKHEED MARTIN F-35 LIGHTNING II: THE FIGHTER OF THE FUTURE

A nuclear-armed F-35 will be able to respond much more quickly, with low-yield nuclear weapons, in the event that new intelligence information locating a new target emerges. Lower-yield nuclear weapons on the F-35 could enable highly destructive, yet more surgical, nuclear attacks to eliminate targets without necessarily impacting much larger swaths of territory.

Air Force officials say the service is now integrating the B61 mod 12 nuclear bomb into the F-35 as part of an upcoming 4th software drop. The Block 4 F-35, to fully emerge in the next decade, contains more than 50 technical adjustments to the aircraft designed as software and hardware builds — to be added in six-month increments between April 2019 to October 2024.

The latest version of the B61 thermonuclear gravity bomb, which has origins as far back as the 1960s, is engineered as a low-to-medium yield strategic and tactical nuclear weapon, according to nuclearweaponsarchive.org, which also states the weapon has a “two-stage” radiation implosion design. The most current Mod 12 version has demonstrated a bunker-buster earth-penetrating capability, according to the Federation of American Scientists (FAS).

AIR FORCE F-16 GETS F-35 SENSORS, WEAPONS AND RADAR

The B61 Mod 12 is engineered with a special “Tail Subassembly” to give the bomb JDAM-type GPS accuracy, giving a new level of precision targeting, according to data provided by the Federation of American Scientists.

The text of the administration’s Nuclear Posture Review, released last year, specifically cites the importance of dual-capable aircraft (DCA) in Europe and states that a nuclear-armed F-35 is fundamental to deterring Russia.

“We are committed to upgrading DCA with the nuclear-capable F-35 aircraft. We will work with NATO to best ensure – and improve where needed – the readiness, survivability, and operational effectiveness of DCA based in Europe,” the Nuclear Posture Review states.

Strategically speaking, the 31st Fighter Wing Commander at Aviano Air Base in Italy, Brig. Gen. Daniel Lasica, put it this way:

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“We want the F-35s to be both predictable and unpredictable,” he said.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6075367651001_6075370763001-vs Pentagon will send more than 50 F-35s to Europe to deter Russia Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fnc/tech fnc d561c926-8045-54a2-a726-5091efc651ca article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6075367651001_6075370763001-vs Pentagon will send more than 50 F-35s to Europe to deter Russia Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-air-force fox-news/tech/topics/armed-forces fnc/tech fnc d561c926-8045-54a2-a726-5091efc651ca article

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Trump Calls Syria Cease-Fire ‘Permanent’ After Russia, Turkey Make Deal

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1177744503_custom-f62c3565d58f76d94412aea21cf1efe0b48f3683-s1100-c15 Trump Calls Syria Cease-Fire 'Permanent' After Russia, Turkey Make Deal

President Trump speaks about Syria in the Diplomatic Reception Room at the White House on Wednesday with Vice President Pence listens. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Trump Calls Syria Cease-Fire 'Permanent' After Russia, Turkey Make Deal

President Trump speaks about Syria in the Diplomatic Reception Room at the White House on Wednesday with Vice President Pence listens.

Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET

President Trump says Turkey has agreed to what he called a permanent cease-fire in northern Syria, ending its military offensive against Kurdish forces that began after the U.S. pulled its troops from the area.

Trump said his decision to remove U.S. forces — criticized by U.S. Republican and Democratic lawmakers alike — helped to bring the deal to fruition.

“This was an outcome created by us, the United States, and nobody else, no other nation,” he said. “We’re willing to take blame and we’re also willing to take credit, this is something they’ve been trying to do for many, many decades.”

Trump said the U.S. will lift sanctions imposed on Turkey in the wake of its incursion into Syria. But, Trump warned that the sanctions could be re-imposed if Turkey fails to protect religious and ethnic minorities.

Trump abruptly announced on Oct. 6 that U.S. troops would withdraw from northern Syria. Lawmakers accused Trump of abandoning Kurdish forces, who were key allies in the U.S. fight against ISIS. Turkey argues that the Kurdish fighters are terrorists.

Trump used his remarks to push back against that criticism.

“The people that I watched and read giving me and the United States advice, were the people that I had been watching and reading for many years,” he said. “They are the ones that got us into the Middle East mess, but never had the vision or the courage to get us out, they just talked.”

The announcement of the permanent cease-fire comes after a deal was reached on Tuesday between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The agreement calls for the withdrawal of Syrian Kurdish forces from the Turkish border and then joint military patrols of the area now occupied by the Kurdish military.

Watch Trump’s Full Statement

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‘No Safe Spaces’ star Adam Carolla says censorship ‘hurting everyone,’ not a partisan issue

Comedian Adam Carolla said the goal of his new documentary about free speech, “No Safe Spaces,” is to simply “make people aware of how nuts it is out there on campuses and in the media when it comes to censorship based on feelings” rather than facts and information.

“It’s not a left or a right wing thing,” Carolla told Fox News. “We have people across the political spectrum in the film, including [liberal CNN pundit] Van Jones, who says it doesn’t help his team to have young people who can’t defend their beliefs. This is hurting everyone.”

‘NO SAFE SPACES’ TAKES ON CENSORSHIP IN CHINA, POLITICALLY CORRECT WORLD OF ACADEMIA

Carolla stars in “No Safe Spaces” alongside conservative radio personality Dennis Prager.

The movie examines the politically correct world of academia, largely driven by the political left. Prager has called the film a “wake-up call” to the American people and claimed free speech is being trampled on to satisfy a political agenda.

Westlake Legal Group Adam-Carolla-Getty ‘No Safe Spaces' star Adam Carolla says censorship 'hurting everyone,' not a partisan issue fox-news/media fox news fnc/entertainment fnc Brian Flood article 268f6644-23d6-5567-84ec-0482d78ccf12

Adam Carolla’s “No Safe Spaces” is scheduled for release on Oct. 25. (Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)

Safe spaces, physical locations for students who feel victimized or offended, are becoming increasingly common on college campuses. Carolla joked that the average mid-20th century American would be completely dumbfounded by the trend.

“They’d have an easier time understanding the iPhone – a television, telephone, map, calculator, record player, camera and butler all in one device the size of the pack of Lucky Strikes they’d be smoking at the dinner table – than a ‘safe space’ on campus,” Carolla cracked.

DENNIS PRAGER: ‘NO SAFE SPACES’ SHOWS THE LEFT AS ‘A PURELY DESTRUCTIVE FORCE’

In addition to liberal universities, “No Safe Spaces” also takes on censorship in China. In one scene, Carolla says that in China “you go to jail if you say anything nice about gay people.” Another scene features a cartoon character singing about the First Amendment while mocking China.

DENNIS PRAGER ON WHY NEW FILM ‘NO SAFE SPACES’ IS UNFAIRLY RATE

According to The Hollywood Reporter, the documentary has “a couple of risky scenes” considering “China-owned AMC Entertainment is set to exhibit the film in several of its theaters early in the film’s distribution pattern.”

Carolla said that filmmakers weren’t scared of attacking the Communist nation despite possible financial backlash.

“China deserves to be called out,” Carolla said. “We’d be hypocrites if we did a movie about the suppression of free speech but didn’t mention China.”

Earlier this month, Prager said he was hoping for a PG rating but the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) wouldn’t budge from its PG-13 designation.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“Despite our best efforts to meet the MPAA more than halfway, they have continued to deny us the PG rating our film deserves,” Prager told Fox News. “I will urge my friends and fans who only go to PG movies to ignore the MPAA’s fake PG-13 rating and go anyway. And please bring friends.”

The film features commentary from a variety of Hollywood actors, scholars, academics, political figures and media members, including CNN’s Van Jones, Alan Dershowitz, Jordan Peterson, Dave Rubin, Cornel West and Tim Allen.

“No Safe Spaces” is working to expand the number of theaters where it will be shown, but Carolla still doesn’t expect colleges to eliminate safe spaces because of it.

“It would be nice,” Carolla said. “But I’m not holding my breath.”

“No Safe Spaces” is being released Oct. 25

Fox News’ Jessica Napoli contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Adam-Carolla-Getty ‘No Safe Spaces' star Adam Carolla says censorship 'hurting everyone,' not a partisan issue fox-news/media fox news fnc/entertainment fnc Brian Flood article 268f6644-23d6-5567-84ec-0482d78ccf12   Westlake Legal Group Adam-Carolla-Getty ‘No Safe Spaces' star Adam Carolla says censorship 'hurting everyone,' not a partisan issue fox-news/media fox news fnc/entertainment fnc Brian Flood article 268f6644-23d6-5567-84ec-0482d78ccf12

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RuPaul Announces ‘Celebrity Drag Race’ Is Coming To VH1 In 2020

Westlake Legal Group 5db05d35210000682534ad22 RuPaul Announces ‘Celebrity Drag Race’ Is Coming To VH1 In 2020

Start your engines and secure your wigs because RuPaul is werking overtime with a new celebrity-themed “Drag Race” spinoff. 

While everyone from Lady Gaga and Christina Aguilera to Ariana Grande and Khloe Kardashian has appeared on the main stage as guest judges for the flagship series, this time around all your favorite stars will compete for the crown on “RuPaul’s Celebrity Drag Race.”

Launching on VH1 sometime in 2020, the four-episode event series will pair “Drag Race” legends from seasons past, including Trixie Mattel, Alyssa Edwards, Bob the Drag Queen, Asia O’Hara, Trinity the Tuck, Kim Chi, Monét X Change, Monique Heart, Nina West and Vanessa Vanjie Mateo, with a crop of celebrities to see who will become America’s next celebrity drag superstar.

“Doing drag does not change who you are, it reveals who you are,” RuPaul said about the series in a statement. “I can’t wait for the world to see what happens when our celebrity contestants get all up in drags!”

While the celebrity contestants have yet to be announced (Tom Holland has this thing in the bag, right?), every episode will feature three stars undergoing a major drag transformation with all of the winnings donated to a charity of their choice. 

And if you are in need of an immediate injection of charisma, uniqueness, nerve and talent, “RuPaul’s Drag Race UK” is currently airing its first season across the pond, while the original series and “RuPaul’s Drag Race All-Stars” have already been renewed for their 12th and fifth seasons, respectively. 

The announcement arrives on the heels of “RuPaul’s Drag Race” scoring its second consecutive Emmy for Outstanding Competition Program with RuPaul picking up his fourth consecutive Emmy for Outstanding Host for a Reality or Competition Program.

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RuPaul Announces ‘Celebrity Drag Race’ Is Coming To VH1 In 2020

Westlake Legal Group 5db05d35210000682534ad22 RuPaul Announces ‘Celebrity Drag Race’ Is Coming To VH1 In 2020

Start your engines and secure your wigs because RuPaul is werking overtime with a new celebrity-themed “Drag Race” spinoff. 

While everyone from Lady Gaga and Christina Aguilera to Ariana Grande and Khloe Kardashian has appeared on the main stage as guest judges for the flagship series, this time around all your favorite stars will compete for the crown on “RuPaul’s Celebrity Drag Race.”

Launching on VH1 sometime in 2020, the four-episode event series will pair “Drag Race” legends from seasons past, including Trixie Mattel, Alyssa Edwards, Bob the Drag Queen, Asia O’Hara, Trinity the Tuck, Kim Chi, Monét X Change, Monique Heart, Nina West and Vanessa Vanjie Mateo, with a crop of celebrities to see who will become America’s next celebrity drag superstar.

“Doing drag does not change who you are, it reveals who you are,” RuPaul said about the series in a statement. “I can’t wait for the world to see what happens when our celebrity contestants get all up in drags!”

While the celebrity contestants have yet to be announced (Tom Holland has this thing in the bag, right?), every episode will feature three stars undergoing a major drag transformation with all of the winnings donated to a charity of their choice. 

And if you are in need of an immediate injection of charisma, uniqueness, nerve and talent, “RuPaul’s Drag Race UK” is currently airing its first season across the pond, while the original series and “RuPaul’s Drag Race All-Stars” have already been renewed for their 12th and fifth seasons, respectively. 

The announcement arrives on the heels of “RuPaul’s Drag Race” scoring its second consecutive Emmy for Outstanding Competition Program with RuPaul picking up his fourth consecutive Emmy for Outstanding Host for a Reality or Competition Program.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

CBS correspondent suffered miscarriage while covering wildfires: ‘I blamed myself’

Westlake Legal Group mireya-villareal-CBS-News CBS correspondent suffered miscarriage while covering wildfires: ‘I blamed myself’ fox-news/health/reproductive-health/pregnancy fox-news/health/healthy-living/womens-health fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 0619177b-728c-5743-8057-9dc6f3bccffa

A CBS News correspondent opened up about suffering a miscarriage while on assignment in 2017 covering wildfires and the guilt she continues to wrestle with, despite doctors reassuring her that it was not her fault.

Mireya Villarreal, who penned a personal essay titled “‘Did I cause this?’ Getting past the stigma of miscarriages” for CBS News on Tuesday, said she vividly remembers standing on the ridge of a scorched hill in Yosemite National park in July 2017 when she began to feel stabbing pains.

NEWS ANCHOR DIAGNOSED WITH MOLAR PREGNANCY, UNDERGOING CHEMOTHERAPY 

She said after a 45-minute trek up the hill, rather than feel accomplished, she was cringing in pain near the C-section scar left by the birth of her son. She was nine weeks pregnant and hadn’t told any members of her crew, leading one to suggest she “must have eaten a bad burrito for lunch or some bad Mexican food on the way here.”

“I’ll always remember those words, uttered by a co-worker who had no idea I was pregnant,” she wrote. “I knew if I told any of the men on that crew what I was going through, they wouldn’t understand. I’d get that look – ‘Oh, you poor woman’ – and then word would get back to my managers. So I kept everything to myself.”

She said due to her location, there were no bathrooms nearby and she knew she was heavily bleeding.

“There were no bathrooms close by and I was worried I’d bleed through several layers of clothing and then everyone would see the pain I was going through on my bright yellow fire-retardant suit. But it didn’t, and for that, I’m thankful,” she wrote.

Villarreal said that her thoughts were racing as to whether she could save the baby or even get a doctor on short notice before her thoughts turned to wondering if she had caused it to happen and if it was her fault.

“In my line of work, the facts are all that matter,” she wrote. “But for some reason, in this situation, finding data and stats wasn’t easy. Blaming something or someone for the loss isn’t that simple. Sometimes, your body can’t handle the pregnancy. Sometimes it’s chromosomal abnormalities with the fetus. Food. Trauma. Stress. Sometimes there is no explanation — it just happens.”

According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), anywhere from 10 to 25 percent of all clinically recognized pregnancies will end in miscarriage, with the most occurring during the first 13 weeks of pregnancy.

AFTER MISCARRIAGES, WOMAN DISCOVERS CONDITION WAS GIVING UTERUS ‘AN ACID BATH’

Despite knowing this and discussions with her doctor, Villarreal said she couldn’t help but blame herself for putting her body through a grueling work schedule while pregnant. She said she felt “ashamed and guilty,” and blamed herself “then and still do.”

“My ambition and selfishness led to this miscarriage,” she wrote. “No doctor will ever convince me that’s not true. And that’s OK.”

Villarreal said it was months before she could bring herself to seek help through therapy to deal with the emotional toll the loss had taken on her, and that talking about it with other women has also helped her.

She and her husband began trying for another baby again, and she said she has suffered two more miscarriages over the last eight months.

“Each time I’ve been on the road for work. And each time I go through one of them, the same feelings I had during the first miscarriage resurface,” she wrote.

Villarreal said that during a recent interview with Alanis Morissette, who has also had several miscarriages, the two talked about how the heartbreak hasn’t deterred them from wanting more children.

“Someone recently told me, ‘Why can’t you just be happy? Some women never get to have kids. Can’t you be happy with what you have? Isn’t it enough?’” Villarreal wrote. “Here’s the thing: No, it’s not enough. And it’s okay to say that. It’s okay to want more for whatever reasons you may have.”

Villarreal, who said she would go “through 100 more miscarriages if it meant having another child like my 3-year-old” said she is still working on forgiving herself.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Through therapy, I’ve realized that grieving the loss of this child was important, no matter what stage of the pregnancy I was in,” she wrote. “But forgiving myself is just as important and something I’m still working on.”

Villarreal’s essay comes days after another journalist, NBC News 3 Las Vegas’ Michelle Velez, opened up about her molar pregnancy and cancer diagnosis. Both women shared their stories during National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month, which is honored every October.

Westlake Legal Group mireya-villareal-CBS-News CBS correspondent suffered miscarriage while covering wildfires: ‘I blamed myself’ fox-news/health/reproductive-health/pregnancy fox-news/health/healthy-living/womens-health fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 0619177b-728c-5743-8057-9dc6f3bccffa   Westlake Legal Group mireya-villareal-CBS-News CBS correspondent suffered miscarriage while covering wildfires: ‘I blamed myself’ fox-news/health/reproductive-health/pregnancy fox-news/health/healthy-living/womens-health fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/health fnc article Alexandria Hein 0619177b-728c-5743-8057-9dc6f3bccffa

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Support for Trump impeachment rises as 59% say he pursued personal interests in Ukraine, poll finds

Westlake Legal Group v2-JLzPo4muL4EFhZ_VtGilYaDvozegeu1Rj6kF_FI8 Support for Trump impeachment rises as 59% say he pursued personal interests in Ukraine, poll finds r/politics

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