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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 202)

When Apps get Your Medical Data, Your Privacy May go With It

Americans may soon be able to get their medical records through smartphone apps as easily as they order takeout food from Seamless or catch a ride from Lyft.

But prominent medical organizations are warning that patient data-sharing with apps could facilitate invasions of privacy — and they are fighting the change.

The battle stems from landmark medical information-sharing rules that the federal government is now working to complete. The rules will for the first time require health providers to send medical information to third-party apps, like Apple’s Health Records, after a patient has authorized the data exchange. The regulations, proposed this year by the Department of Health and Human Services, are intended to make it easier for people to see their medical records, manage their illnesses and understand their treatment choices.

Yet groups including the American Medical Association and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists warned regulators in May that people who authorized consumer apps to retrieve their medical records could open themselves up to serious data abuses. Federal privacy protections, which limit how health providers and insurers may use and share medical records, no longer apply once patients transfer their data to consumer apps.

The American Medical Association, the American Hospital Association and other groups said they had recently met with health regulators to push for changes to the rules. Without federal restrictions in place, the groups argued, consumer apps would be free to share or sell sensitive details like a patient’s prescription drug history. And some warned that the spread of such personal medical information could lead to higher insurance rates or job discrimination.

“Patients simply may not realize that their genetic, reproductive health, substance abuse disorder, mental health information can be used in ways that could ultimately limit their access to health insurance, life insurance or even be disclosed to their employers,” said Dr. Jesse M. Ehrenfeld, an anesthesiologist who is the chair of the American Medical Association’s board. “Patient privacy can’t be retrieved once it’s lost.”

Enabling people to use third-party consumer apps to easily retrieve their medical data would be a milestone in patient rights.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_159509988_d979d0b6-f747-4581-baae-d3ba332596d9-articleLarge When Apps get Your Medical Data, Your Privacy May go With It Smartphones Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Privacy Mobile Applications Health and Human Services Department Electronic Health Records American Medical Assn

“Patient privacy can’t be retrieved once it’s lost,” said Dr. Jesse M. Ehrenfeld, the chair of the American Medical Association’s board.CreditDavid Kasnic for The New York Times

Dr. Don Rucker, the federal health department’s national coordinator for health information technology, said that allowing people convenient access to their medical data would help them better manage their health, seek second opinions and understand medical costs. He said the idea was to treat medicine as a consumer service, so people can shop for doctors and insurers on their smartphones as easily as they pay bills, check bus schedules or buy plane tickets.

“This is major, major, major,” he said. “The provision of health care will be brought into the app economy and, through that, to a much, much higher degree of patient control.”

The new rules are emerging just as Amazon, Apple, Google and Microsoft are racing to capitalize on health data and capture a bigger slice of the health care market. Opening the floodgates on patient records now, Dr. Rucker said, could help tech giants and small app makers alike develop novel consumer health products.

The regulations are part of a government effort to push health providers to use and share electronic health records. Regulators have long hoped that centralizing medical data online would let doctors get a fuller, more accurate picture of patient health and help people make more informed medical choices, with the promise of better health outcomes.

In reality, digital health records have been cumbersome for many physicians to use and difficult for many patients to retrieve.

Americans have had the right to obtain copies of their medical records since 2000 under the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, known as HIPAA. But many health providers still send medical records by fax or require patients to pick up paper or DVD copies of their files.

The new regulations are intended to banish such bureaucratic hurdles.

Dr. Rucker said it was self-serving for physicians and hospitals, which may benefit financially from keeping patients and their data captive, to play up privacy concerns.

“All we’re saying is that patients have a right to choose as opposed to the right being denied them by the forces of paternalism,” he said.

Dr. Don Rucker of the Department of Health and Human Services said it was self-serving for doctors and hospitals to play up privacy concerns.CreditDepartment of Health and Human Services

The Department of Health and Human Services proposed two new data-sharing rules this year to carry out provisions in the 21st Century Cures Act, a 2016 law designed to speed medical innovation.

Dr. Rucker’s office developed the one that would allow patients to send their electronic medical information, including treatment pricing, directly to apps from their health providers. It will require vendors of electronic health records to adopt software known as application programming interfaces, or A.P.I.s. Once the software is in place, Dr. Rucker said, patients will be able to use smartphone apps “in an Uber-like fashion” to get their medical data.

To foster such data-sharing, a coalition of tech giants — including Amazon, Google and Microsoft — has committed to using common standards to categorize and format health information. Microsoft, for instance, has developed cloud services to help health providers, insurers and health record vendors make data available to patients.

“What that lets an individual consumer do is to connect an app or service of their own choice into their health care records and pull down data about their historical lab tests, about their medical problems or condition, about medication prescription,” said Josh Mandel, chief architect for Microsoft Healthcare.

The other proposed rule, developed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, would require Medicare and Medicaid plans, and plans participating in the federal health insurance marketplace, to adopt A.P.I.s so people could use third-party apps to get their insurance claims and benefit information.

The regulations are expected to become final this year. Health providers and health record vendors will have two years to comply with the A.P.I. requirements. Electronic health record vendors that impede data-sharing — a practice called “information blocking” — could be fined up to $1 million per violation. Doctors accused of information blocking could be subject to federal investigation.

Brett Meeks, vice president of policy and legal for the Center for Medical Interoperability, a nonprofit that works to advance data sharing among health care technologies, said it would be better for regulators to help foster a trustworthy data-sharing platform before requiring doctors to entrust patients’ medical records to consumer tech platforms.

“Facebook, Google and others are currently under scrutiny for being poor stewards of consumer data,” he said. “Why would you carte blanche hand them your health data on top of it so they could do whatever they want with it?”

Tech executives are promoting data-sharing in health care. From left, Taha Kass-Hout of Amazon, Aashima Gupta of Google and Peter Lee of Microsoft attended a conference in July for Medicare’s Blue Button system.CreditMicrosoft

Physicians’ organizations and others said the rules failed to give people granular control over their data. They added that the regulations could require them to share patients’ sensitive medical or financial information with apps and insurers against their better judgment.

The current protocols for exchanging patients’ data, for instance, would let people use consumer apps to get different types of information, like their prescription drug history. But it is an all-or-nothing choice. People who authorized an app to collect their medication lists would not be able to stop it from retrieving specific data — like the names of H.I.V. or cancer drugs — they might prefer to keep private.

Dr. Rucker said that current information-sharing standards could not accommodate granular data controls and that privacy concerns needed to be balanced against the benefits of improved patient access to their medical information.

In any case, he said, many people are comfortable liberally sharing personal health details — enabling, say, fitness apps to collect their heart rate data — that are not covered by federal protections. Patients, he said, have the right to make similar choices about which apps to entrust with their medical data.

“A lot of this actually will be enforced by people picking apps they trust from brand names they trust in exactly the same way that people don’t let their banking data and their financial data just go out randomly,” he said.

Apple’s Health Records app, for instance, lets people send a subset of their medical data directly to their iPhones from more than 300 health care centers. Apple said it did not have access to that information because it was encrypted and stored locally on people’s personal devices.

But even proponents of the new regulations are calling for basic privacy and security rules for tech platforms that collect and use people’s medical information.

“The moment our data goes into a consumer health tech solution, we have no rights,” said Andrea Downing, a data rights advocate for people with hereditary cancers. “Without meaningful protections or transparency on how data is shared, it could be used by a recruiter to deny us jobs,” or by an insurer to deny coverage.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Getting Your Medical Records Through an App? There’s a Catch. And a Fight.

Americans may soon be able to get their medical records through smartphone apps as easily as they order takeout food from Seamless or catch a ride from Lyft.

But prominent medical organizations are warning that patient data-sharing with apps could facilitate invasions of privacy — and they are fighting the change.

The battle stems from landmark medical information-sharing rules that the federal government is now working to complete. The rules will for the first time require health providers to send medical information to third-party apps, like Apple’s Health Records, after a patient has authorized the data exchange. The regulations, proposed this year by the Department of Health and Human Services, are intended to make it easier for people to see their medical records, manage their illnesses and understand their treatment choices.

Yet groups including the American Medical Association and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists warned regulators in May that people who authorized consumer apps to retrieve their medical records could open themselves up to serious data abuses. Federal privacy protections, which limit how health providers and insurers may use and share medical records, no longer apply once patients transfer their data to consumer apps.

The American Medical Association, the American Hospital Association and other groups said they had recently met with health regulators to push for changes to the rules. Without federal restrictions in place, the groups argued, consumer apps would be free to share or sell sensitive details like a patient’s prescription drug history. And some warned that the spread of such personal medical information could lead to higher insurance rates or job discrimination.

“Patients simply may not realize that their genetic, reproductive health, substance abuse disorder, mental health information can be used in ways that could ultimately limit their access to health insurance, life insurance or even be disclosed to their employers,” said Dr. Jesse M. Ehrenfeld, an anesthesiologist who is the chair of the American Medical Association’s board. “Patient privacy can’t be retrieved once it’s lost.”

Enabling people to use third-party consumer apps to easily retrieve their medical data would be a milestone in patient rights.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_159509988_d979d0b6-f747-4581-baae-d3ba332596d9-articleLarge Getting Your Medical Records Through an App? There’s a Catch. And a Fight. Smartphones Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Privacy Mobile Applications Health and Human Services Department Electronic Health Records Computers and the Internet American Medical Assn

“Patient privacy can’t be retrieved once it’s lost,” said Dr. Jesse M. Ehrenfeld, the chair of the American Medical Association’s board.CreditDavid Kasnic for The New York Times

Dr. Don Rucker, the federal health department’s national coordinator for health information technology, said that allowing people convenient access to their medical data would help them better manage their health, seek second opinions and understand medical costs. He said the idea was to treat medicine as a consumer service, so people can shop for doctors and insurers on their smartphones as easily as they pay bills, check bus schedules or buy plane tickets.

“This is major, major, major,” he said. “The provision of health care will be brought into the app economy and, through that, to a much, much higher degree of patient control.”

The new rules are emerging just as Amazon, Apple, Google and Microsoft are racing to capitalize on health data and capture a bigger slice of the health care market. Opening the floodgates on patient records now, Dr. Rucker said, could help tech giants and small app makers alike develop novel consumer health products.

The regulations are part of a government effort to push health providers to use and share electronic health records. Regulators have long hoped that centralizing medical data online would let doctors get a fuller, more accurate picture of patient health and help people make more informed medical choices, with the promise of better health outcomes.

In reality, digital health records have been cumbersome for many physicians to use and difficult for many patients to retrieve.

Americans have had the right to obtain copies of their medical records since 2000 under the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, known as HIPAA. But many health providers still send medical records by fax or require patients to pick up paper or DVD copies of their files.

The new regulations are intended to banish such bureaucratic hurdles.

Dr. Rucker said it was self-serving for physicians and hospitals, which may benefit financially from keeping patients and their data captive, to play up privacy concerns.

“All we’re saying is that patients have a right to choose as opposed to the right being denied them by the forces of paternalism,” he said.

Dr. Don Rucker of the Department of Health and Human Services said it was self-serving for doctors and hospitals to play up privacy concerns.CreditDepartment of Health and Human Services

The Department of Health and Human Services proposed two new data-sharing rules this year to carry out provisions in the 21st Century Cures Act, a 2016 law designed to speed medical innovation.

Dr. Rucker’s office developed the one that would allow patients to send their electronic medical information, including treatment pricing, directly to apps from their health providers. It will require vendors of electronic health records to adopt software known as application programming interfaces, or A.P.I.s. Once the software is in place, Dr. Rucker said, patients will be able to use smartphone apps “in an Uber-like fashion” to get their medical data.

To foster such data-sharing, a coalition of tech giants — including Amazon, Google and Microsoft — has committed to using common standards to categorize and format health information. Microsoft, for instance, has developed cloud services to help health providers, insurers and health record vendors make data available to patients.

“What that lets an individual consumer do is to connect an app or service of their own choice into their health care records and pull down data about their historical lab tests, about their medical problems or condition, about medication prescription,” said Josh Mandel, chief architect for Microsoft Healthcare.

The other proposed rule, developed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, would require Medicare and Medicaid plans, and plans participating in the federal health insurance marketplace, to adopt A.P.I.s so people could use third-party apps to get their insurance claims and benefit information.

The regulations are expected to become final this year. Health providers and health record vendors will have two years to comply with the A.P.I. requirements. Electronic health record vendors that impede data-sharing — a practice called “information blocking” — could be fined up to $1 million per violation. Doctors accused of information blocking could be subject to federal investigation.

Brett Meeks, vice president of policy and legal for the Center for Medical Interoperability, a nonprofit that works to advance data sharing among health care technologies, said it would be better for regulators to help foster a trustworthy data-sharing platform before requiring doctors to entrust patients’ medical records to consumer tech platforms.

“Facebook, Google and others are currently under scrutiny for being poor stewards of consumer data,” he said. “Why would you carte blanche hand them your health data on top of it so they could do whatever they want with it?”

Tech executives are promoting data-sharing in health care. From left, Taha Kass-Hout of Amazon, Aashima Gupta of Google and Peter Lee of Microsoft attended a conference in July for Medicare’s Blue Button system.CreditMicrosoft

Physicians’ organizations and others said the rules failed to give people granular control over their data. They added that the regulations could require them to share patients’ sensitive medical or financial information with apps and insurers against their better judgment.

The current protocols for exchanging patients’ data, for instance, would let people use consumer apps to get different types of information, like their prescription drug history. But it is an all-or-nothing choice. People who authorized an app to collect their medication lists would not be able to stop it from retrieving specific data — like the names of H.I.V. or cancer drugs — they might prefer to keep private.

Dr. Rucker said that current information-sharing standards could not accommodate granular data controls and that privacy concerns needed to be balanced against the benefits of improved patient access to their medical information.

In any case, he said, many people are comfortable liberally sharing personal health details — enabling, say, fitness apps to collect their heart rate data — that are not covered by federal protections. Patients, he said, have the right to make similar choices about which apps to entrust with their medical data.

“A lot of this actually will be enforced by people picking apps they trust from brand names they trust in exactly the same way that people don’t let their banking data and their financial data just go out randomly,” he said.

Apple’s Health Records app, for instance, lets people send a subset of their medical data directly to their iPhones from more than 300 health care centers. Apple said it did not have access to that information because it was encrypted and stored locally on people’s personal devices.

But even proponents of the new regulations are calling for basic privacy and security rules for tech platforms that collect and use people’s medical information.

“The moment our data goes into a consumer health tech solution, we have no rights,” said Andrea Downing, a data rights advocate for people with hereditary cancers. “Without meaningful protections or transparency on how data is shared, it could be used by a recruiter to deny us jobs,” or by an insurer to deny coverage.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

British Parliament, US Congress both set to return from ‘recess’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6078488699001_6078483787001-vs British Parliament, US Congress both set to return from ‘recess’ fox-news/columns/capitol-attitude fox news fnc/politics fnc fc599ad4-5e4e-5bf5-9d00-ebf5f998ee57 Chad Pergram article

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson prorogued Parliament.

This is the term of art the British use when Parliament is suspended for a period.

The prorogue was a defensive move by Johnson to keep efforts at bay to derail his plan to yank the United Kingdom out of the European Union without a formal agreement. A “hard Brexit,” if you will.

So, Johnson essentially halted the session so Members of Parliament couldn’t offer legislative alternatives to his Brexit maneuver – or even call a vote of no-confidence against him. This upended the current parliamentary session which has run since June of 2017. It’s the longest such parliamentary convocation in 400 years.

But, Parliament wasn’t dissolved. It’s been on a kind of extended recess for a while.

Sound familiar?

The U.S. House and Senate have been gone for a while, too. No proroguing on Capitol Hill though – unless it’s willful. Congress is instead on the customary “August recess,” – even though it’s now September. The respite started in late July for the House. Early August for the Senate. Congress often reconvenes right after Labor Day. But not this year. Few lawmakers will surface in Washington until September 9.

The House and Senate resisted calls to reconvene in August and early September, despite mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton – followed by the melee in Odessa and Midland, TX. The House decided against returning to Washington. Democrats decided instead to ramp up attention on what many Democrats described as “inaction” by the Senate on gun measures. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) declined to summon senators back to Washington to work on firearms issues. McConnell knew it would be a challenge to advance anything on guns.

Much has been made about Johnson’s proroguing gambit in the United Kingdom. When leaders prorogue Parliament, it’s often suspended for a just few days. Not weeks. But even though there is no “prorogue” phenomenon in Congress, there are some similarities on Capitol Hill.

Congress has taken an August vacation for decades now. In 1963, the Senate met year-round, only breaking for weekends. But jet travel became easier, connecting lawmakers with the far-flung districts and states they represent. Media bolstered the importance of lawmakers returning regularly to home turf to conduct events, meet with constituents and “be seen.”

A Congressional “reorganization” in the 1970s recommended the establishment of the contemporary August recess, stretching from the end of July until just after Labor Day. Congress has stuck to the “August recess” concept for the most part. But it’s not unheard of for lawmakers to toil in Washington through the dog days of August. Such was the case with the 1994 crime bill (which barred assault weapons). Congress returned to Washington with a skeleton crew to approve emergency aid after Hurricane Katrina in August, 2005. McConnell gamely declared he was “cancelling” the August recess last year. But it turned out that senators were only in Washington for a few days.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD) control the House schedule. They could always summon the House back to session if necessary. But frankly, the leaders know it’s important to protect their majority and get vulnerable freshman Democrats back to their districts during this time. The House would not break the recess unless there was a big emergency. After the shootings, Democrats scheduled a House Judiciary Committee meeting for this week this to prepare gun legislation for later in the month. But the panel called off the session due to the threat of Hurricane Dorian in Florida and along the eastern seaboard.

Pelosi & company really didn’t want the House to meet over the past five weeks. The Speaker sent out a memo imploring Democrats to “own August” by discussing health care and economic issues.

Perhaps more importantly, the vacation helped Democrats ignore questions about impeachment and the investigations of President Trump. While more than half of all Democrats now support impeachment or some sort of an impeachment “inquiry,” they are a far cry from having the votes to impeach the President. This reflects the Democrats “both ways” strategy. Democrats continue to apply pressure on Mr. Trump and probe the possibility of impeachment. That helps Democrats with their leftist base. It simultaneously inoculates Democrats who oppose impeachment. Meantime, Democrats investigate a slate of other alleged misdeeds involving the Trump Administration. The House’s summer interlude probably aided Pelosi and many other Democrats by not having to address impeachment on a daily basis.

Mitch McConnell is probably glad the Senate was on hiatus, too. McConnell’s public statements about the shootings indicate he’s skeptical there’s anything on which the House, Senate and President Trump can agree when with guns. The Senate may have a slate of nominations McConnell still wants to tackle. But the Kentucky Republican doesn’t have a lot of other legislative traffic teed up. So, many senators are also content the Senate hasn’t been in session much lately. There’s nothing worse than having lawmakers in Washington with little to do. That’s not to say that there isn’t a lot to do on big issues. However, there’s a reason why the legislative docket is thin: the sides lack agreement. There isn’t going to be a magical solution to disputes about infrastructure or health care. So, why try? That’s why the Senate is more than happy to be on leave for weeks.

The circus will come back to town next week. The House will brawl over investigations and impeachment. The sides must forge a deal to fund the government past September 30. There will be discussions about guns. The House will likely even pass a bill or two related to firearms. It’s unclear if anything would happen in the Senate. And in the background, negotiations continue on the new trade pact between the United States, Canada and Mexico. That measure is nowhere close to passage yet.

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So no proroguing of the legislature here. But, for all intents and purposes, Congress was “suspended” for the past few weeks, much like in the United Kingdom. However, there is one major difference. When lawmakers in Washington return to work, they’ll start again without a speech by the Queen.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6078488699001_6078483787001-vs British Parliament, US Congress both set to return from ‘recess’ fox-news/columns/capitol-attitude fox news fnc/politics fnc fc599ad4-5e4e-5bf5-9d00-ebf5f998ee57 Chad Pergram article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6078488699001_6078483787001-vs British Parliament, US Congress both set to return from ‘recess’ fox-news/columns/capitol-attitude fox news fnc/politics fnc fc599ad4-5e4e-5bf5-9d00-ebf5f998ee57 Chad Pergram article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hurricane Dorian downgraded to Category 3 storm, continues its assault on the Bahamas

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082755520001_6082760765001-vs Hurricane Dorian downgraded to Category 3 storm, continues its assault on the Bahamas fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox news fnc/world fnc Edmund DeMarche c5f6f2cf-9452-5ad2-9d1a-9340c923fb56 article

Hurricane Dorian, the unpredictable monster of a storm that has pummeled parts of the Bahamas for the past 24 hours, has been downgraded to a Category 3 storm as it remains in a standstill near Grand Bahama.

‘LIKE YOU’RE STUCK IN A NIGHTMARE’

The National Hurricane Center said in a news release at 1 a.m. ET, that the storm is continuing to produce wind gusts of up to 155 mph and a storm surge of 18 feet. The storm’s current movement is considered stationary.

CONTINUING COVERAGE ON FOX NEWS CHANNEL  

Bahamian Prime Minister Hubert Minnis said at least five people were killed and dozens were injured. The storm has continued to impact the islands so it is difficult to determine the extent of damage, which will likely be historic.

Officials in the Bahamas have reported more than 2,000 distress messages, including reports of a 5-month-old baby stranded on a roof.

Dorian unleashed massive flooding across the Bahamas on Monday, pummeling the islands with so much wind and water that officials urged people to find floatation devices and grab hammers to break out of their attics if necessary.

Residents in Florida have been trying to track the slow-moving storm as it sits about 100 miles off West Palm Beach. There have been signs that the storm will make a northern turn, according to the Miami Herald.

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Derek Giardino of the National Weather Service said the probabilities of Dorian making a direct hit on the state’s landfall has diminished, but “is not completely ruled out.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082755520001_6082760765001-vs Hurricane Dorian downgraded to Category 3 storm, continues its assault on the Bahamas fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox news fnc/world fnc Edmund DeMarche c5f6f2cf-9452-5ad2-9d1a-9340c923fb56 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082755520001_6082760765001-vs Hurricane Dorian downgraded to Category 3 storm, continues its assault on the Bahamas fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox news fnc/world fnc Edmund DeMarche c5f6f2cf-9452-5ad2-9d1a-9340c923fb56 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Insists His Hurricane Warning Was Right Even After NWS Corrected Him

Westlake Legal Group 5d6df6c12500007e0401a4a3 Trump Insists His Hurricane Warning Was Right Even After NWS Corrected Him

President Donald Trump on Monday insisted he was right to warn Alabama of a non-existent hurricane threat and attacked a TV reporter who pointed out the fact that the state was not at risk from Dorian

Such a phony hurricane report,” he declared on Twitter as he railed at Jon Karl of ABC News for reporting on his erroneous warning.

Trump had claimed in a tweet on Sunday that Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia and Alabama “will most likely be hit (much) harder than anticipated.” 

He made a similar claim about Alabama in televised comments. 

The false alarm caused the National Weather Service to issue a correction, albeit without mentioning the president. About 20 minutes after Trump’s warning, the agency tweeted: 

Trump on Monday said he was right because Alabama was facing a hurricane threat “under certain original scenarios.”

However, Trump on Sunday did not refer to “certain original scenarios” but instead said after a FEMA briefing that “this just came up, unfortunately” as he spoke about a supposed threat to Alabama. 

In reality, the projections at that point did not show any path that would bring the storm to Alabama. Dorian instead was tracking further east. 

The storm is currently off the coast of Florida and is expected to move along the coast, with Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia all facing potential threat in the coming days. 

Twitter users called out the president from trying to save face instead of focusing on ensuring correct emergency information gets to the people who need it: 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

25 bodies found after California scuba boat fire, Coast Guard says

Westlake Legal Group boat-fire 25 bodies found after California scuba boat fire, Coast Guard says fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 6a5d8825-9469-54b0-b173-0b4b9daa5b14

The U.S. Coast Guard said late Monday that 25 bodies have been found and nine others remain missing after a fire broke out on a scuba boat anchored off an island in Southern California.

Authorities will continue to search for the nine still missing but have little hope that any others will be found alive, the Associated Press reported.  Only five people—all crew members—are known to have survived the fire after they jumped into an inflatable lifeboat and were rescued by a nearby vessel.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP 

Rescuers initially recovered four bodies about 90 miles northwest of Los Angeles just off Santa Cruz Island. Sixteen more bodies were pulled from the water later in the day Monday. The U.S. Coast Guard located but has yet to recover five bodies on the ocean floor underneath the boat, which sank 20 yards from the shore.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group boat-fire 25 bodies found after California scuba boat fire, Coast Guard says fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 6a5d8825-9469-54b0-b173-0b4b9daa5b14   Westlake Legal Group boat-fire 25 bodies found after California scuba boat fire, Coast Guard says fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 6a5d8825-9469-54b0-b173-0b4b9daa5b14

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

25 bodies found after California scuba boat fire, Coast Guard says

Westlake Legal Group boat-fire 25 bodies found after California scuba boat fire, Coast Guard says fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 6a5d8825-9469-54b0-b173-0b4b9daa5b14

The U.S. Coast Guard said late Monday that 25 bodies have been found and nine others remain missing after a fire broke out on a scuba boat anchored off an island in Southern California.

Authorities will continue to search for the nine still missing but have little hope that any others will be found alive, the Associated Press reported.  Only five people—all crew members—are known to have survived the fire after they jumped into an inflatable lifeboat and were rescued by a nearby vessel.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP 

Rescuers initially recovered four bodies about 90 miles northwest of Los Angeles just off Santa Cruz Island. Sixteen more bodies were pulled from the water later in the day Monday. The U.S. Coast Guard located but has yet to recover five bodies on the ocean floor underneath the boat, which sank 20 yards from the shore.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group boat-fire 25 bodies found after California scuba boat fire, Coast Guard says fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 6a5d8825-9469-54b0-b173-0b4b9daa5b14   Westlake Legal Group boat-fire 25 bodies found after California scuba boat fire, Coast Guard says fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox news fnc/us fnc Danielle Wallace article 6a5d8825-9469-54b0-b173-0b4b9daa5b14

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Tiger Woods and Rafael Nadal trade fist pumps at US Open

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_4454975948001_rafa-nadal-1 Tiger Woods and Rafael Nadal trade fist pumps at US Open New York Post fox-news/sports/tennis/us-open-tennis fox-news/person/tiger-woods fnc/sports fnc d9e5b5db-4165-5a0a-b19f-6337a4556ff9 article

Rafael Nadal was pumped and so was Tiger Woods. Let the fist pumping begin.

The golf great, along with his kids and girlfriend Erica Herman, watched Nadal’s 6-3, 3-6, 1-6 fourth-round win over Marin Cilic in the fourth round of the U.S. Open from a private box at Arthur Ashe Stadium on Monday night. At one point the 18-time major champion triggered a roar and signature fist pump from Woods.

US OPENS STAR FINED FOR RIFLE GESTURE AT OFFICIAL

“What a great night watching @RafaelNadal.,” Woods tweeted after the win. “Just an incredible performance and awesome way to close out the match.”

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His fist pump came after a nine-shot volley that Nadal won with a strong forehand shot from the back line to put himself up 40-love while leading 2-1 in the third. He let out a yell and fist pump and Woods followed suit.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_4454975948001_rafa-nadal-1 Tiger Woods and Rafael Nadal trade fist pumps at US Open New York Post fox-news/sports/tennis/us-open-tennis fox-news/person/tiger-woods fnc/sports fnc d9e5b5db-4165-5a0a-b19f-6337a4556ff9 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_4454975948001_rafa-nadal-1 Tiger Woods and Rafael Nadal trade fist pumps at US Open New York Post fox-news/sports/tennis/us-open-tennis fox-news/person/tiger-woods fnc/sports fnc d9e5b5db-4165-5a0a-b19f-6337a4556ff9 article

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US and Poland sign agreement to cooperate on 5G technology

The U.S. and Poland signed an agreement Monday to cooperate on new 5G technology as concerns grow about Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei.

Vice President Mike Pence and Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki signed the deal in Warsaw, where Pence is filling in for President Donald Trump, who scrapped his trip at the last minute because of Hurricane Dorian.

The signing comes during a global battle between the U.S. and Huawei, the world’s biggest maker of network infrastructure equipment, over network security and fears of Chinese access.

5G IS A BIGGER DEAL AND CHINA IS A BIGGER THREAT THAN YOU THINK, THINK TANK SAYS

The U.S.-Poland agreement states: “Protecting these next generation communications networks from disruption or manipulation and ensuring the privacy and individual liberties of the citizens of the United States, Poland, and other countries is of vital importance.” Both countries pledged to endorse the principles developed by cybersecurity officials from dozens of countries at a summit in Prague this year to counter threats and ensure the safety of the next generation of mobile networks.

Westlake Legal Group AP19245518772737 US and Poland sign agreement to cooperate on 5G technology JILL COLVIN fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/tech fox-news/person/mike-pence fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 3bbfd2a5-88c5-5a4b-a766-4bdcc6b9689e

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence and Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki, right, exchange copies of an agreement they signed in Warsaw, Poland, Monday, Sept. 2, 2019. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

Pence, speaking at a news conference with Polish President Andrzej Duda, said he hoped the declaration would set a “vital example for the rest of Europe on the broader question of 5G.”

The U.S. has been lobbying allies to ban Huawei from 5G networks over concerns the Chinese government could force the company to give it access to data for cyberespionage. Huawei has denied the allegation and states in Europe — where countries are gearing up to deploy the new networks, starting with the auction of radio frequencies this year — have balked at U.S. calls for an outright ban.

Pence’s chief staff, Marc Short, cited Huawei by name in a statement later Monday that called on other nations to “ensure that only trusted providers have access to their developing networks.”

“We recognize 5G networks will only be as strong as their weakest link,” he said, adding, “We must stand together to prevent the Chinese Communist Party from using subsidiaries like Huawei to gather intelligence while supporting China’s military and state security services – with our technology.”

At the news conference, Duda was asked whether the U.S. had ever provided Poland with evidence of Chinese spying using Huawei technology.

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He didn’t mention the U.S. in his answer, but said, “Indeed, Poland’s counterintelligence has detected activity that could be of espionage nature” and that prosecutors are investigating.

A Chinese businessman who served as Huawei’s sales director in Poland and a Pole who cooperated with the government on security measures were arrested in Poland in January on suspicion of espionage.

During a visit to Sweden last week, Morawiecki said work was being done to have Swedish networking and telecommunications company Ericsson invest in 5G development in Poland.

Westlake Legal Group AP19245518772737 US and Poland sign agreement to cooperate on 5G technology JILL COLVIN fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/tech fox-news/person/mike-pence fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 3bbfd2a5-88c5-5a4b-a766-4bdcc6b9689e   Westlake Legal Group AP19245518772737 US and Poland sign agreement to cooperate on 5G technology JILL COLVIN fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/tech fox-news/person/mike-pence fnc/world fnc Associated Press article 3bbfd2a5-88c5-5a4b-a766-4bdcc6b9689e

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Sikh Politician Goes Viral For Calm And Powerful Response To Anti-Muslim Attack

Westlake Legal Group 5d6dcc242500005500018965 Sikh Politician Goes Viral For Calm And Powerful Response To Anti-Muslim Attack

A Canadian politician is winning praise on social media this week for his surprising response to a racist attack at Sunday’s MuslimFest in Mississauga.

Gurratan Singh, who represents the Ontario district of Brampton East, went viral for declining to correct a man’s ignorant string of Islamophobic comments directed at him ― despite the fact he is not Muslim.

“I will never respond to an Islamophobe by stating, ‘I am not a Muslim,’” the Sikh politician tweeted.

“Instead, I will always stand with my Muslim brothers and sisters and say hate is wrong.”

In the video of the incident, which has been viewed more than 1.2 million times since it was posted on Sunday, Singh condemns the man’s Islamophobic comments and tells him it has “no place in Canada.”

“It’s not hate, it’s the truth buddy,” the man says at one point, denying repeatedly that he’s a racist. “What about sharia? Political Islam? You’re hiding bud. I’ll debate you anytime.”

The man in the video is Stephen Garvey, the leader of a minor federal political party called the National Citizens Alliance (NCA) which is known for its anti-immigration policies.

NCA streamed the same incident live to Facebook, stating “National Citizens Alliance’s agenda is Canadian First, and opposition to political correctness and third world migrant populism.”

Singh’s brother, leader of the federal New Democratic Party Jagmeet Singh, famously told a heckler he loved and supported her in response to racist remarks in 2017.

Watch the video of the incident below.

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