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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 205)

GOP challenger says AOC failing New York by pandering for the spotlight

Westlake Legal Group SCHERIE GOP challenger says AOC failing New York by pandering for the spotlight Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/fundraising fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 0445caa5-8873-5fee-856b-a570975bb051

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., is failing her congressional districts in New York by not working with other elected officials in her party and pandering for the spotlight, Republican U.S. Congressional candidate Scherie Murray said Saturday.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends: Weekend” with host Lisa Boothe, Murray said Democrats are frustrated with Ocasio-Cortez and she is challenging for her seat because it is impacting her district.

“This is just another example of AOC trying to deliver socialism to America. And, she is trying to recruit radicals to do so,” said Murray.

“I think it’s just a shame that she doesn’t want to support her own party and be a team player,” she added.

AOC RILES DEMS BY REFUSING TO PAY PARTY DUES, BANKROLLING COLLEAGUES’ OPPONENTS

Although Ocasio-Cortez has already topped the fundraising charts in her short time in Congress, Fox News has learned that she won’t donate a cent of her money to the Democrats’ House campaign organization — a position that has rankled some of her colleagues.

Instead, she is building her own fundraising operation for fellow progressive candidates to bypass the official Democratic Party infrastructure. Already, she’s actively funding primary challengers to oust certain Democratic colleagues.

AOC SLAMS DEM CENTRISTS AS ‘TEA PARTY OF THE LEFT,’ SUGGESTS BIDEN SHOULDN’T BE IN SAME PARTY

Murray said she is challenging Ocasio-Cortez’s seat because of how much her actions negatively impact the voters of her district.

“We are in this fight to combat what we see as a far-left socialist narrative that’s detrimental to America. Democrats are up in arms with her,” Murray told Boothe.

“I plan on being in the district and I have a record of accomplishments, unlike my opponent who, from the time since she [was] elected, has been her bid for the limelight and has left the constituents of the 14th District abandoned,” she stated.

Murray believes that Queens and the Bronx deserve more.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“We don’t need someone in Washington that’s going to continue to divide the fight. We need someone that is going to unite the fight,” she asserted.

“We need a leader in Washington that can work across the aisle and that’s what I plan to do if duly elected to Queens and the Bronx to represent NY-14,” said Murray.

Fox News’ Marisa Schultz contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group SCHERIE GOP challenger says AOC failing New York by pandering for the spotlight Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/fundraising fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 0445caa5-8873-5fee-856b-a570975bb051   Westlake Legal Group SCHERIE GOP challenger says AOC failing New York by pandering for the spotlight Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/west/washington fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/socialism fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/republicans fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/elections/fundraising fox-news/person/alexandria-ocasio-cortez fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 0445caa5-8873-5fee-856b-a570975bb051

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Mike Lee signs on to Bernie Sanders’ bill to prevent funding for military intervention in Iran

Westlake Legal Group s0qVq6VEGDwh4xh65vvpeN7Th0y8cPGCdmqHR7yGWpw Mike Lee signs on to Bernie Sanders' bill to prevent funding for military intervention in Iran r/politics

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Prince Harry, Meghan Markle’s exit talks ‘progressing well’ with royal family: report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6121421166001_6121419971001-vs Prince Harry, Meghan Markle's exit talks 'progressing well' with royal family: report Jessica Napoli fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e765ddb2-61f6-5cc9-9014-845499d8bb42 article

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle stunned the royal family when the couple announced on Wednesday they were stepping down as “senior members” and wanted to split their time between the United Kingdom and North America.

A Buckingham Palace spokesperson told Fox News at the time, “Discussions with The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are at an early stage. We understand their desire to take a different approach, but these are complicated issues that will take time to work through.”

But now a new report revealed meetings between Prince Harry, Markle, and the rest of the royal family about their “new progressive role” are “progressing well.”

WHAT HAPPENS TO MEGHAN MARKLE, PRINCE HARRY’S FROGMORE COTTAGE AFTER THEY STEP BACK AS SENIOR ROYALS

According to BBC royal correspondent Nicholas Witchell, The Queen, the Prince of Wales and the Duke of Cambridge have all asked their staff to work with the Sussexes to “find a solution within days.”

At first, though, the Queen was reportedly “disappointed” by her grandson’s action. Neil Sean, a royal author, and broadcaster, told Fox News on Thursday that palace aides may not have been prepared for the unexpected announcement.

“The palace aides are working in conjunction with the queen,” he explained. “It’s not lost on anyone that they decided to launch this without the permission of the queen.”

In the meantime, Buckingham Palace confirmed Friday that Markle, 38, had returned to Canada, while Prince Harry, 35, remains in England.

The commonwealth country appears to hold a special place in their hearts. The couple and their 8-month-old son Archie spent a six-week holiday out of the public eye at a secluded luxury home on Vancouver Island.

HOW MEGHAN MARKLE AND PRINCE HARRY’S FINANCES WILL BE IMPACTED BY ABRUPT ROYAL EXIT

When they returned back from their hiatus, Prince Harry and Markle announced their decision on their verified Instagram account.

“We have chosen to make a transition this year in starting to carve out a progressive new role within this institution,” the couple shared. “We intend to step back as ‘senior’ members of the Royal Family and work to become financially independent, while continuing to fully support Her Majesty The Queen. It is with your encouragement, particularly over the last few years, that we feel prepared to make this adjustment.”

“We now plan to balance our time between the United Kingdom and North America, continuing to honor our duty to The Queen, the Commonwealth, and our patronages,” they continued. “This geographic balance will enable us to raise our son with an appreciation for the royal tradition into which he was born, while also providing our family with the space to focus on the next chapter, including the launch of our new charitable entity.”

CELEBRITIES REACT TO MEGHAN MARKLE, PRINCE HARRY ‘STEPPING BACK’ FROM ROYAL DUTIES

“We look forward to sharing the full details of this exciting next step in due course, as we continue to collaborate with Her Majesty The Queen, The Prince of Wales, The Duke of Cambridge and all relevant parties. Until then, please accept our deepest thanks for your continued support,” added the couple, who will reportedly keep their royal titles.

Fox News’ Stephanie Nolasco contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6121421166001_6121419971001-vs Prince Harry, Meghan Markle's exit talks 'progressing well' with royal family: report Jessica Napoli fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e765ddb2-61f6-5cc9-9014-845499d8bb42 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6121421166001_6121419971001-vs Prince Harry, Meghan Markle's exit talks 'progressing well' with royal family: report Jessica Napoli fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox news fnc/entertainment fnc e765ddb2-61f6-5cc9-9014-845499d8bb42 article

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Former NFL player dons different uniform, lives childhood dream in Army

Former Arizona Cardinals defensive back Jimmy Legree said Saturday that his dream was always to serve his country as a soldier.

Legree, appearing on “Fox & Friends,” said he envisioned a career in the military from the time he was a child transfixed by war movies.

“I always wanted to be a part of that military family,” he said.

FORMER ARIZONA CARDINALS’ JIMMY LEGREE ENLISTS IN ARMY, FULFILLING CHILDHOOD GOAL

Legree, 28, started basic training at Fort Sill in Oklahoma in December after enlisting in the Army as a communications specialist. So far, he said, his transition from pro athlete to soldier has been a “good journey.”

“I’m excited to be here,” Legree said. “And excited to see what my future is going to be in the military lifestyle.”

Westlake Legal Group 4279395f-694940094001_6121723028001_6121718641001-vs Former NFL player dons different uniform, lives childhood dream in Army Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/south-carolina fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/sports/nfl/arizona-cardinals fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 5af7e6b2-8453-5ade-bf8c-909d8976e231

Jimmy Legree, 28, began basic training at Fort Sill in Oklahoma back in December after enlisting in the Army to pursue a career as a communications specialist – something he says was a childhood goal. (U.S. Army)

Legree, a 2013 graduate of the University of South Carolina, said he hopes to bring dedication, a strong work ethic, resilience and focus to his budding military career.

He told “Fox & Friends” hosts Dean Cain and Pete Hegseth that he joined the Army to fight for his country.

“I always wanted that,” he said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Legree was with the Cardinals in 2014 and 2015, when he made preseason appearances. He was previously signed by the Seattle Seahawks for a short time in 2014.

While some of his fellow soldiers rib him about his time in the NFL, jokingly asking for autographs, for the most part he’s just one of them.

“I’m not special or anything like that,” Legree said.

He is currently assigned to D Battery, 1st Battalion, 19th Field Artillery. He graduates from basic training on Feb. 21 and will then head to Fort Gordon in Georgia to learn more adanced skills.

Fox News’ Paulina Dedaj contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6121723028001_6121718641001-vs Former NFL player dons different uniform, lives childhood dream in Army Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/south-carolina fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/sports/nfl/arizona-cardinals fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 5af7e6b2-8453-5ade-bf8c-909d8976e231   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6121723028001_6121718641001-vs Former NFL player dons different uniform, lives childhood dream in Army Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/south-carolina fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fox-news/sports/nfl/arizona-cardinals fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 5af7e6b2-8453-5ade-bf8c-909d8976e231

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Mike Lee signs on to Bernie Sanders’ bill to prevent funding for military intervention in Iran

Westlake Legal Group s0qVq6VEGDwh4xh65vvpeN7Th0y8cPGCdmqHR7yGWpw Mike Lee signs on to Bernie Sanders' bill to prevent funding for military intervention in Iran r/politics

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Mike Lee signs on to Bernie Sanders’ bill to prevent funding for military intervention in Iran

Westlake Legal Group s0qVq6VEGDwh4xh65vvpeN7Th0y8cPGCdmqHR7yGWpw Mike Lee signs on to Bernie Sanders' bill to prevent funding for military intervention in Iran r/politics

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Ukraine Plane Shot Down Because of Human Error, Iran Says: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166821423_cee7c765-85f7-4051-a580-d07974c2903b-articleLarge Ukraine Plane Shot Down Because of Human Error, Iran Says: Live Updates Zelensky, Volodymyr Zarif, Mohammad Javad Ukraine Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Pompeo, Mike Muhandis, Abu Mahdi al- (1954-2020) Iraq Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Canada Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 left Tehran’s international airport at 6:12 a.m. and lost contact two minutes later, according to a flight tracker.Credit…Ebrahim Noroozi/Associated Press

After maintaining for days that there was no evidence that one of its missiles had struck a Boeing 737-800 minutes after it took off from Tehran on Wednesday with 176 people on board, Iran admitted early on Saturday that its military had accidentally shot down the passenger jet.

The military blamed human error. In a statement, it said Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 had taken a sharp, unexpected turn that brought it near a sensitive military base.

In post on Twitter, Iran’s foreign minister, Mohamad Javad Zarif, apologized but appeared to also blame American “adventurism” for the tragedy, writing: “Human error at time of crisis caused by US adventurism led to disaster.”

Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who had been informed about the accidental shooting down, said information should be publicly announced after a meeting of Iran’s top security body, the semiofficial Fars news agency said on Twitter.

President Hassan Rouhani said on Twitter that Iran “deeply regrets this disastrous mistake.”

In a statement cited by the semiofficial Fars News Agency, the president offered condolences to the victims’ families and said that “the terrible catastrophe should be thoroughly investigated.”

He added that those responsible for “this unforgivable mistake” would be identified and “prosecuted.”

But he also said that in an environment of military threats and terror by the United States’ “aggressive” government against the people of Iran, and facing the possibility of American military strikes on Iran, the armed forces made a “human mistake and misfired” and “it led to a big catastrophe and innocent people were killed.”

“This painful incident is not something we can easily overcome,” he added, saying that was imperative to is correct any shortcomings in the country’s defense mechanism and ensure such a tragedy would not happen again.

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine, in his first reaction to Iran’s announcement, said Kyiv would “insist on a full admission of guilt” by Tehran.

“We expect Iran to assure its readiness for a full and open investigation, to bring those responsible to justice, to return the bodies of the victims, to pay compensation, and to make official apologies through diplomatic channels,” Mr. Zelensky said in a post on his Facebook page. “We hope that the investigation will continue without artificial delays and obstacles.”

Mr. Zelensky had come under domestic criticism this week for refusing to publicly blame Iran for the disaster even as the United States, Canada and Britain did.

Iran’s announcement on Saturday vindicated Mr. Zelensky’s cautious approach, said Ivan Yakovina, a columnist for the Kyiv-based magazine Novoye Vremya. “If there had been threats from Ukraine, then I believe Iran wouldn’t have allowed the specialists to do their jobs and generally would have refused to admit guilt,” he said.

Later, the office of the Ukrainian president posted on Facebook photos of what it said was shrapnel damage on the plane wreckage and a Canadian man’s passport showing piercings about half an inch in diameter.

Mr. Zelensky’s office said on Saturday that Iran had cooperated in Ukraine’s investigation of the crash and that Ukraine’s investigators had “received all of the necessary information from the beginning.”

That contrasted with remarks by the head of the Ukrainian investigation, Oleksiy Danilov, who said on Saturday that Iran had been forced to let in the Ukrainian investigators because the International Civil Aviation Organization would have closed off its airspace.

“As we saw it, Iran had to face the reality that there’s no way they’ll get out of this,” he said.

Mr. Danilov also accused the Iranians of doing their best to hide evidence from Ukraine, scraping the wreckage into piles rather than photographing and mapping the coordinates and generally behaved “inappropriately.”

“When a catastrophe happens, everything is supposed to stay in its place.” Mr. Danilov said. “Every element is described, every element is photographed, every element is fixed in terms of its location and coordinates. To our great regret, this was not done.”

At some point, he said, Iranian officials realized there was no way to hide the facts from Ukraine, whose investigators found shrapnel marks in wreckage.

Iranian officials did not immediately respond to the accusations.

A commander of the aerospace division of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps in Iran, Amirali Hajizadeh, said on Saturday that he accepted responsibility for the plane’s shooting down minutes after takeoff in Tehran, according to Iranian state TV.

In a televised address, he gave more details about the sequence of events that he said had led up to the disaster, which killed all 176 people on board the passenger jet. He said it had been misidentified as a cruise missile, and was shot down with a short-range missile that exploded near the plane.

He also said that the Iranian missile operator had acted independently because of “jamming.”

“I wish I was dead,” Mr. Hajizadeh was quoted as saying by local news outlets. “I accept all responsibility for this incident.”

He said that whatever decision the Iranian authorities made, “I will accept with the arms open.”

The downing came hours after Iran had fired a barrage of missiles at two American air bases in neighboring Iraq, in retaliation for an American drone strike that killed a top Iranian general, an Iraqi militia leader and others in Baghdad.

Asked during his address why Iranian airspace was not shut to commercial air traffic amid the attacks, Mr. Hajizadeh had no clear answer.

Iranians expressed fury toward their government in the first hours after Tehran’s admission, even as many planned to gather in main squares around town with candles at 5 p.m. Saturday local time.

Conservatives and supporters of the government accused the authorities of intentionally misleading the public initially about what had brought down the plane, whose passengers included many young Iranians on their way to Canada for graduate study.

The semiofficial Fars News Agency, which is affiliated with the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps, posted a harsh commentary condemning Iran’s leaders, saying “their shortcomings have made this tragedy twice as bitter.”

“It is pivotal that those who were hiding the truth from the public for the past 72 hours be held accountable, we cannot let this go,” it read.

“Individuals, media, political and military officials who commented in the past 72 hours must be investigated. If they knew of the truth and were deliberately speaking falsehood or for any reason were trying to hide it, they must be prosecuted, no matter what post they hold.”

Westlake Legal Group iran-tehran-airport-crash-flights-promo-1578698739538-articleLarge Ukraine Plane Shot Down Because of Human Error, Iran Says: Live Updates Zelensky, Volodymyr Zarif, Mohammad Javad Ukraine Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Pompeo, Mike Muhandis, Abu Mahdi al- (1954-2020) Iraq Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Canada Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Flights In and Out of Tehran Continued After Missile Strikes and Plane Crash

Planes took off after Iran’s missile strikes on bases in Iraq, and even after a Ukrainian plane crashed shortly after takeoff.

Siamak Ghaesmi, a Tehran-based economist, addressed the country’s leaders in an Instagram post: “I don’t know what to do with my rage and grief. I’m thinking of all the ‘human errors’ in these years that were never revealed because there was no international pressure. I’m thinking of the little trust left that was shattered. I’m thinking of the innocent lives lost because of confronting and being stubborn with the world. What have you done with us?”

Mohamad Saeed Ahadian, a conservative analyst in Iran, said on Twitter, “There are two major problems with the Ukrainian Airlines issue. One is firing at an airplane and two is firing at the public’s trust. The first can be justified but the latter is a mistake with absolutely no justification.”

Some social media posts made use of the term “harsh revenge,” which Iran’s leaders had promised to inflict on the United States for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, a top Revolutionary Guards commander; an Iraqi militia leader, Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis; and others as they left the airport in Baghdad. The general’s killing sent shock waves through the Middle East and led to calls for revenge in Iran, as well as a vote by Iraq’s Parliament to oust American troops from that country.

Mojtaba Fathi, an Iranian journalist, wrote on Twitter, “They were supposed to take their harsh revenge against America, not the people.”

French specialists will help decode the black boxes of the Ukrainian plane that crashed in Iran, the presidents of the two countries said on Saturday.

President Emmanuel Macron of France told his Ukrainian counterpart in a telephone call that France had also started a formal procedure to begin an international investigation. Macron agreed to visit Kyiv as well.

Video

Westlake Legal Group xxivid-iran-plane-2-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Ukraine Plane Shot Down Because of Human Error, Iran Says: Live Updates Zelensky, Volodymyr Zarif, Mohammad Javad Ukraine Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Pompeo, Mike Muhandis, Abu Mahdi al- (1954-2020) Iraq Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Canada Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

The New York Times has obtained and verified video showing the moment a Ukrainian airliner was hit in Iran.CreditCredit…Screenshot from video

International pressure had been building on Iran to take responsibility. American and allied officials had said that all intelligence assessments indicated that surface-to-air missiles fired by Iranian military forces had shot down Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752.

Hours after the crash, Ukraine International Airlines officials had consistently ruled out pilot error or mechanical problems as the cause of the crash. They had said the Boeing 737-800, which was less than four years old, was helmed by some of the airline’s most experienced crew.

“We never thought for a second that our crew and our plane could have been the reason for this terrible, horrific aviation catastrophe,” the airline’s president, Yevhenii Dykhne, said in a Facebook post on Saturday after Iran’s admission. “These were our best young men and women. The best.”

In Kyiv on Saturday, officials from Ukraine International Airlines pushed back forcefully on the Iranian government’s assertion, even as it acknowledged shooting down the plane, that the pilots shared blame for flying off route. Iran should take full responsibility, they said.

“Even in the statement of Iran there is a hint that our crew was acting independently, or that it could act differently,” the airline’s director, Yevhenii Dykhne,said. “Unfortunately, we have to acknowledge that our plane was in the wrong place at the wrong time. This could have been any plane.”

The crew received had no warning before leaving Tehran, the officials said. The plane took off as Ukrainian flights from Iran had dozens of times before, and followed the same departure routes as airliners leaving that night, Igor Sosnovsky, the airline’s vice president for flight operations, told journalists. “There was no deviation from any routes that some are hinting at,” he added.

The crew maintained normal radio contact with the tower in Tehran, he said, and followed a standard departure procedure for the airport. After reaching an elevation of 6,000 feet, the pilots were instructed to make a slight northerly turn. In the last communication, he said, one pilot simply read back this instruction from the tower, saying, “Turn and climb.”

Addressing criticism that the airline should not have sent a plane to Iran at all, in light of tensions in the region, the officials said it was Iran’s responsibility to close airspace if it intended to fire missiles.

There was also veiled criticism of the Iranian investigation, which the Ukrainians have been reluctant to discuss while their team is on the ground in Iran. Mr. Dykhne, the airline director, said, “we have noticed some oddities and irregularities.”

There was no immediate reaction from the United States to Iran’s admission, but Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had been the first American official to publicly confirm the intelligence assessments.

“We do believe that it’s likely that the plane was shot down by an Iranian missile,” Mr. Pompeo said at a briefing at the White House announcing new sanctions against Iran on Friday.

President Justin Trudeau of Canada, who has said his country expects to play a big role in Iran’s investigation of the airliner crash that killed 63 Canadians even though the two nations do not have diplomatic ties, said on Saturday that “ accountability” was needed after Iran’s admission, according to a statement from his office.

“Our focus remains closure, accountability, transparency and justice for the families and loved ones of the victims,” the statement said. “This is a national tragedy, and all Canadians are mourning together.

“We will continue working with our partners around the world to ensure a complete and thorough investigation, and the Canadian government expects full cooperation from Iranian authorities.”

The 176 people who died on the flight included 57 Canadians, many of them students or faculty at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. About 27 residents of Edmonton were on the plane.

In Canada, Iranians are comparative newcomers: Most arrived after the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Today, by some counts, Canada has the third-largest number of expatriate Iranians in the world and its universities are a top destination for Iranian graduate students.

Konstantin Kosachev, the head of the foreign relations committee in the Russian Senate, said Iran’s admission showed the downing of the plane had been a “tragic incident” and should not lead to further escalation between Iran and the West.

“It was a tragic incident; people cannot be returned,” Mr. Kosachev told the Interfax news agency. “The admission of error, although not immediately, and expression of condolences is sufficient to be accepted. With this, the incident should be closed.”

All sides should “learn lessons” from what happened, he said.

Mr. Kosachev also pushed back on reports that the missile used to strike the plane had been Russian-made. He did not deny the missile’s origin, but rejected any Russian responsibility for what had happened. “At the height of this tragedy,” he said, “it is absolutely immoral.”

American intelligence officials have said that a Russian-made missile system designated SA-15 by NATO and known in Russia as the Tor struck the civilian airliner shortly after takeoff.

The Tor system is a mobile missile launch system, with eight missiles carried on either a tracked vehicle or a truck. The vehicles can operate without relying on other air defense infrastructure.

They carry both a radar to detect targets and a launch system. The low- to medium-altitude missiles were developed by Soviet engineers in the 1970s as a so-called lower-tier air defense weapon.

Russia sold the Tor systems to Iran in 2005 as part of a $1 billion arms deal and over the objection of American diplomats. It has also sold the system to more than a dozen other countries.

A New York Times analysis of flight path information and video of the missile strike determined that the plane stopped transmitting its signal for between 20 seconds and 30 seconds before it was hit.

Civilian airplanes identify themselves with radio signals constantly streaming from a system known as a transponder on the planes, said Ian Petchenik, a spokesman for Flightradar 24, which tracks the signals for flights around the world.

The Tor software relied on radar and visual identification of a plane as well as the identification signals from the transponder, John Cox, an accident investigator and former pilot who is the chief executive of Safety Operating Systems, said. If the identification is incorrect or absent from the plane, Mr. Cox said, the system “will declare it a threat.”

From there, he said, the missile navigates via radar, “and when it gets in proximity to target it explodes,” releasing deadly fragments. A second missile is usually fired immediately after the first.

At that point, the plane, in flames, glided down to its demise.

Reporting was contributed by Farnaz Fassihi, Anton Troianovski, Ian Austen, Andrew E. Kramer, James Glanz, Malachy Browne, Christiaan Triebert and Ivan Nechepurenko.

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Pelosi has ‘lost control’ of the House, knows she made a mistake withholding impeachment articles: Rep. Roy

Westlake Legal Group CHIP-ROY Pelosi has 'lost control' of the House, knows she made a mistake withholding impeachment articles: Rep. Roy Julia Musto fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/jerrold-nadler fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 739d83f7-b8b6-5249-80fe-cf15697e2248

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi damaged cross-party relations and ignored the needs of the American people by withholding articles of impeachment against the president from the Senate, Rep. Chip Roy, R-Texas, said Saturday.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends,” Roy accused Pelosi, D-Calif., of knowing “full well” she made a mistake in holding the articles, which passed in the House more than three weeks ago.

TRUMP SIGNALS HE’D SEEK TO BLOCK IMPEACHMENT TRIAL TESTIMONY FROM BOLTON, OTHERS IN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

“I think she had a strategic error, and she was trying to appease her [far] left base,” he said. “… Over the last year, what has she done for the American people, other than turning over the House of Representatives to the radical left and AOC, and those who are trying to reshape this country [with] a socialist agenda?”

“She’s lost control,” he added.

PELOSI: HOUSE WILL MOVE TO TRANSMIT IMPEACHMENT ARTICLES NEXT WEEK

On Friday, Pelosi announced she will take steps to send the articles to the Senate.

“I have asked Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler to be prepared to bring to the Floor next week a resolution to appoint managers and transmit articles of impeachment to the Senate. I will be consulting with you at our Tuesday House Democratic Caucus meeting on how we proceed further,” Pelosi wrote in a letter to colleagues.

Roy said Pelosi is backtracking on her earlier decision and trying to save face. She is “hoping for a last-minute reason” to justify why she held onto the articles for so long, he said.

“What we will see when it gets over to the Senate is that the case that they presented is very weak,” Roy said.

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After months of listening to impeachment depositions as a member of the House Oversight Committee,  Roy said he came to the conclusion that there was “nothing there” that rises to  a high crime or misdemeanor under the Constitutiion.

“She wasted the time of the American people rather than focusing on what the American people care about around the kitchen table: health care costs, border security, our men and women in uniform, [and] our reckless spending,”  he said.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group CHIP-ROY Pelosi has 'lost control' of the House, knows she made a mistake withholding impeachment articles: Rep. Roy Julia Musto fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/jerrold-nadler fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 739d83f7-b8b6-5249-80fe-cf15697e2248   Westlake Legal Group CHIP-ROY Pelosi has 'lost control' of the House, knows she made a mistake withholding impeachment articles: Rep. Roy Julia Musto fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/jerrold-nadler fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 739d83f7-b8b6-5249-80fe-cf15697e2248

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The Merchants of Thirst

KATHMANDU, Nepal — It had been 11 days since a ruptured valve reduced Kupondole district’s pipeline flow to a dribble, and the phones at Pradeep Tamanz’s tanker business wouldn’t stop ringing.

A Malaysian embassy residence had run perilously low on water, and the diplomats wanted to shower. They’d pay extra for a swift delivery. A coffee processing plant was on the verge of shutting down production after emptying its storage tank. It, too, would shell out whatever amount of money it would take. Across the neighborhood and other parts of the city, the calls were coming in so feverishly that Sanjay, a tanker driver, jokily wondered if he might get carjacked. “This is like liquid gold,” he said, jabbing at his precious cargo, large amounts of which seeped from every hatch. “Maybe more than gold.”

Dashing from filling stations to houses and factories and back, Mr. Tamanz tried to meet demand. His three tanker crews slept in one or two-hour spurts, often in the cramped, refrigerator-sized truck cabins, and kept the tankers on the road for up to 19 hours a day. He fobbed off business to competitors, an unusual practice in the cutthroat world of Kathmandu tanker men, and even sounded out a mechanic about converting a flatbed truck into a new tanker. With fat profits pouring in, the young businessman figured it might soon repay its cost.

But no matter how hard the crews worked or how furiously they pushed their lumbering vehicles over the potholed roads, there was no satisfying the city’s needs. The going was too slow. The water shortage too severe. By the time the pipeline was fully restored, some households had subsisted on nothing but small jerrycans for almost an entire month. “You know it’s not even peak season, but this is what happens here,” Mr. Tamanz said. “Just imagine what things would be like if we didn’t exist?” He trailed off as his phone rang once more.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166763508_21ed48a9-3e32-4a59-914a-3a441328dab5-articleLarge The Merchants of Thirst Water Pollution water Urban Areas Shortages privatization Poverty nepal KATHMANDU, Nepal Jordan Infrastructure (Public Works) India Global Warming Aquifers

Women filling the jars from the water being supplied by the government water authority every four days in Bhaktapur. Credit…Purnima Shrestha for The New York Times

In Kathmandu, as in much of South Asia and parts of the Middle East, South America and sub-Saharan Africa, these men and their tanker trucks sometimes prevent entire cities from running dry. Without them, millions of households wouldn’t have sufficient water to cook, clean or wash. Or perhaps any at all. And without them, an already deteriorating infrastructure might break down completely, as the tanker men know well. “The city depends on us,” said Maheswar Dahal, a businessman who owns six trucks in Kathmandu’s Jorpati district. “There would be disaster if we didn’t do our work.”

Yet there’s another side to them, too, one that is less pleasant and sometimes outright nasty. Tankers frequently deliver poor quality water, which can sicken. They usually charge much more than the state, devastating to the poor. Tanker water costs on average 10 times more than government-supplied pipeline water, according to a World Resources Institute study of water access in 15 cities across the developing world, a figure that rises to 52 times more in Mumbai.

Greedy, uncompromising and fearful of being knocked from their perch, some tanker operators even conspire among themselves to fortify the conditions that contributed to their emergence in the first place. Locals tell tales of frequent underhand deal making, pipeline sabotage and egregious environmental destruction. “They’re all thieves, rotten thieves, who should be hanged,” said Dharaman Lama, a landlady who rents out rooms alongside the Bagmati River in the Nepali capital. “It’s disgusting what they do to us.”

In some ways, these tankers are just another phase in a decades-long global process of water privatization. Many authorities believe the private sector is better at eking results out of overwhelmed utilities and have given up control of key resources. Tankers have piggybacked off that trend to secure contracts, or simply muscle in, across dozens of cities — even as officials elsewhere have concluded that water is best kept in public hands and reined in corporatized services.

The tanker fleet in Karachi, Pakistan, might have doubled over the past decade. The number in Lagos, Nigeria, has quadrupled during that time, two researchers there estimated to me, though, like in many other cities, its tankers operate in such administrative shadows that not even ballpark estimates exist. In Yemen, tankers have cornered much of the urban market since the Saudi-led intervention began in 2015. And throughout the Indian subcontinent, in particular, tanker businesses big and small have boomed as the region’s cities have swelled. Often arriving in puffs of acrid black smoke, these leaky, rust-coated beasts have become a ubiquitous sight from Bangladesh to Bolivia.

But the tanker industry might also be an early illustration of how parts of the private sector stand to profit from a warming and fast-urbanizing world. The urban population of South Asia alone is projected to almost triple to 1.2 billion by 2050, and as infrastructure decays and cities continue to sprawl into areas that aren’t served at all, tankers are well-placed to absorb some of the shortfall. Up to 1.9 billion city dwellers might experience seasonal water shortages by midcentury, according to the World Bank.

“Tankers meet a need in the short and medium-term,” said Victoria Beard, a professor of city and regional planning at Cornell University. “ You can function without electricity, but not without water. And where you have no alternatives, you’re going to have all sorts of players filling the gap.”

For city authorities that are already struggling to maintain the current supply as climate change strikes, let alone source additional water, tankers can seem like a safety net they feel powerless to resist. When severe drought emptied Cape Town’s reservoirs in 2017 and 2018, wealthy residents sidestepped restrictions by buying extra water from informal operators. When Chennai, one of India’s largest cities, almost ran dry amid weak rains this summer, over 5000 private tankers ferried in water from outside. As these shocks intensify and affect more cities, the tanker men look set for boom times.

Perched at the foot of the water-rich Himalayas and blessed with a fierce monsoon, Kathmandu should never have become a poster child for the perils of tanker dependence. But years of rampant state mismanagement and booming in-migration from the countryside, particularly during the Maoist insurgency, have massively overextended the its pipeline network. Interviews with dozens of businessmen, officials, and residents reveal the extent to which the tanker industry has taken full advantage.

Beginning in the late 1990s, tankers began to spread from neighborhood to neighborhood, picking up customers among both poor and rich residents. At first, they were welcomed as a solution to the city’s interminable water pipeline disruptions. That soon changed as the less affluent began to chafe at their high prices and unsavory practices. Previously run-of-the-mill tasks, like washing, began to require careful financial calculations. “Before, I didn’t think about how often I could shower or when I can clean the house,” said Laxmi Magar, a housewife and mother of six. “But now that water is so expensive I watch every drop.”

Many families have been forced to alter what they cook, how they cook and whom they host. Water-intensive dishes, such as spinach, are off the menu for many. Large open fires in aging apartment blocks are frowned upon because there is insufficient water to douse flames if they spread. In a country where hospitality is treasured, guests are sometimes unwanted, or almost feared, as extra bodies to accommodate. At roughly 1800 Nepali rupees ($15.60) for 5000 liters, tanker water is about 40 times more expensive than pipeline water.

Among the city’s poorest and most vulnerable, tanker shenanigans have fueled some of the worst urban water access in the world. Because few of Kathmandu’s slums are connected to the water grid, they’re completely dependent on outside assistance during the dry season. The tankers raise their rates accordingly. And because many of these areas have narrow, tuk-tuk-wide streets sprawled across steep hills that often turn to mush in the monsoon, the bigger trucks can’t get through, meaning residents have to buy in smaller sums from middlemen at grossly inflated prices. Even ostensibly middle-class families are suffering as a consequence.

Nira Kasaju and her husband work in government factories in Bhaktapur, a city a few miles to Kathmandu’s east, and together earn more than their neighbors. But with limited vehicular access to their crumbling 17th century apartment building, they depend on narrow-bodied, tractor-drawn tankers that sell water at double the normal rate. They’ve since had to cut back on everything from toys for their children to holiday decorations. “Whatever it costs, we pay. We have no choice,” Ms. Kasaju said, as she sprinkled her stairwell with a few drops of water to keep the dust down. “This is unacceptable, of course, but what can we do?”

The World Health Organization recommends that households spend no more than 3 to 5 percent of their income on water, but tanker-dependent Nepalis shell out up to 20 percent of their earnings, a figure that can rise to over 50 percent in parts of rural Jordan.

Many customers say they would be able to manage the expense if only the water came clean. But that’s increasingly not the case. Residents report frequent skin problems, intestinal bugs and diarrhea, which compels those who can afford it to spend more money on “jugs” of potable water, and forces those who can’t to miss school or workdays. Again, it’s the poorest and most captive customers who get the worst of the water. (It could be even worse. Tankers in the Bolivian city of Cochabamba have been known to fill from chlorinated swimming pools, according to a WRI researcher in that city.)

Tankers strike deals with corrupt officials to limit pipeline flow and thus maximize their earnings, while also campaigning against public works projects that might break their strangleholds. In Lalitpur, Kathmandu’s adjoining city, residents around the landmark Patan Durbar Square said tankers paid officials not to fix many of the free, ornate public standpipes that were knocked out by the deadly 2015 earthquake. It’s a similar in Bangalore, India, where some state valve men are reportedly conspiring with businessmen.

Competition among Kathmandu’s roughly 400 tanker-owning businessmen is so ferocious that they regularly smash one another’s vehicles and call in favors from friendly politicians to shut down their rivals. “The competition is just unhealthy,” said Dharmanda Shresthra, who owns three tankers and a water bottling factory. “Everyone is always after each other and after profit, and it affects the quality of the water.”

And, crucially, the kingpins have few inhibitions about over-exploiting water resources, jeopardizing the environment and their cities’ long-term vitality. Tankers are tapping groundwater so relentlessly that many wells yield up to 20 percent less water every year. Dozens of deep boreholes and springs have already been exhausted. Unless there is a dramatic change of course, water experts — and many of the tanker men themselves — fear there will soon be few local resources left to tap.

Standing alongside the water filling station he operates at Khahare, in the hills to the south of Kathmandu, Krishna Hari Thapa was in a reflective mood in October. For the best part of a decade, he’s watched — and profited — as the number of tankers at his spring has increased from around 30 to over 80 a day. He’s watched too as the once mighty local spring has slowed to an unimpressive trickle. “Twenty years ago, it was like a river here, and now it’s not. You can only guess what it will look like in another twenty years,” he said. But Mr. Thapa won’t stop, no matter how low the flow goes, he says. The money is too good. And besides, “where else would people get water?”

Amid mounting public anger and shriveling resources, even big-time tanker operators admit their industry is out of control. For all their distasteful ways, though, the tanker men say they’re not the biggest villains in this sordid saga. That label, they insist, is best applied to the state, without whose repeated failures they never would have had an opening. The industry has a point. “Let’s face it: the private sector came in because the public sector failed,” said Dipak Gyawali, a political economist and former water minister. “And until you clean up government’s act, nothing will change. The tankers are just a symptom.”

These failures begin with the pipelines. Kathmandu Valley’s water delivery is so poor that its recipients average as little as one hour of running water every week, during which they’re expected to fill rooftop or underground cisterns. The pressure is so weak that many households capture no more than 250 liters on each occasion. For these people and the roughly 30 percent of residents who receive nothing at all, tankers tide them over until the next pipeline flow. Officials recognize it’s a crisis, but say the solution is out of their hands.

“Frankly speaking, the demand-supply gap is huge: demand is 400 million liters a day. Supply varies from 90 to 150 million liters,” said Sanjeev Bickram Rana, the executive director of the Kathmandu Valley Water Supply Management Board. “How can we bridge that gap?”

The roads in the area also impede water delivery to residents. Most trucks source their water in places like Khahare, where the terrain begins its slow climb to the Himalayas. But the rural roads are so rough that they can’t drive fast for fear of snapping axles, and the city’s poorly designed transport network is frequently snarled with traffic. Businessmen say their trucks could perform double their current daily average of four deliveries and thus sell more cheaply if they could move quicker. But with no expectation of improved roads, tanker drivers have implemented their own precautions.

Some pad their ceilings with folded newspapers to cushion the blows as they get bounced around their suspension-less vehicles; others deck their cabins out with so much religious iconography they can scarcely see through their windshields. The most impatient, or those who work the most traffic-clogged routes, take things further. Many trucks have equipped themselves with mini TVs or booming sound systems.

The government’s proposed solution to these grave water shortages, the Melamchi project, has turned into a four-decade-long fiasco of almost unrivaled incompetence. First proposed in the 1970s and begun in 2000, this scheme to divert a mountain river from the Himalayas has been so delayed that the water it will bring — 170 million liters a day in its first phase — is already insufficient to cover half of Kathmandu’s needs. It’s not a good plan, anyway, experts say. The pipeline network is so riddled with holes that “you could have Lake Baikal on the other end and it still wouldn’t be enough, ”Mr. Gyawali said.

In an interview at her family’s tightly guarded compound, Bina Magar, the minister of water supply, blames her predecessors for the severity of the water deficit. “For so long we had unstable governments that have lasted one year, six months, eight months.” she said. “Now we have an opportunity to bring stability and fix everything.” And while the minister conceded that tankers have helped mask the state’s shortcomings — so much so that every ministerial residence relies on them — she insists they’re living on borrowed time. “They charge too much. We charge much less. Once Melamchi is complete, we will be the answer.”

But corruption and bureaucracy riddle almost every level of state, ensuring the tankers perform even worse than they otherwise might. Tanker men field so many demands for bribes that they sometimes keep wads of cash on hand for that purpose. If they don’t pay sums that vary from 5,000 ($43) to 100,000 ($866) rupees, they can get shut down, a dozen businessmen said. These costs, too, must be passed on to the consumer. Officials are noticeably tentative in their denials. “These claims are not related to our organization, but perhaps the traffic police or someone else,” said Mr. Rana of the water management board, citing what’s widely seen as the greediest branch of Nepali officialdom.

In fact, the state’s disregard for the water sector is so pronounced that the poor quality of tanker water is as much a consequence of shoddy or nonexistent regulation as opportunism. The state implemented a color-coded sticker system to gauge tanker water in 2012 — green for drinkable water, blue for household use, yellow for construction-quality — but years on it still isn’t properly enforced. Kathmandu Valley Water Supply Management Board says it lacks the resources to monitor more than three days a week; the tanker men say officials don’t care as long as their pockets are lined. No one disagrees that it’s a mess.

As chairman of the largest water tanker association, Pradeep Prasad Pathak is charged with defending business interests, a task that he said is getting trickier as the state falls back on “divide and rule” tactics by playing off tanker men against one another. “The government has never felt responsible for supplying water to the people. It’s always the case in cities like Kathmandu that people like us do their job for them,” he said. Some tanker men lack the education to differentiate between good water and bad, he acknowledged, which is precisely why the industry needs to be regulated. “We’re not heroes. We need some controls as well.”

For the time being, neither the state nor most tankers have much inclination to change their ways. Circumstances might soon force their hand, though. Demand for water is growing so swiftly that tanker operators can’t meet all orders in the dry season, no matter how much they hike their prices. “Every year, more people come to us, which is great,” said Maheswar Dahal, the Jorpati tanker man. “But in the winter, we have to tell them, ‘it might take five days,’ or sometimes we just have to say ‘no.’” In times of scarcity, it’s the best customers, generally the rich, who get priority from the pipeline and tanker operators alike.

Supply is also shrinking, in part because authorities are mishandling growth that in Kathmandu, as in most South Asian cities, is far outpacing that of the region at large. In addition to the tankers’ over-exploitation of boreholes, the city is eating into its remaining forests, which feed the springs, while also sprawling over aquifer recharge areas. For much of the rainy season and the months that follow, many households use hand pumps to extract from the shallow aquifers under their properties and provide for at least some of their needs, but the more the valley is tarmacked over the less the groundwater is replenished. Climate change, in turn, is making the rains more erratic, which limits rooftop rainwater harvesting, and fuels floods that contaminate some aquifers.

And as this gap between supply and demand widens, the public is beginning to lash out. Residents of water-impoverished districts have assaulted water officials when they venture into their areas. Water tankers have been attacked when they have gone on strike, and people are increasingly fighting each other as water becomes scarcer and more expensive. Though many Kathmandu area farmers welcome tanker men and often make more from leasing wells than growing crops, increasing numbers of their peers in India and elsewhere are butting heads with businessmen whom they accuse of drilling them dry. “We get no water from the pipelines, less water from our well, and we can’t afford tanker water. Of course we’re angry!” said Anjali Tamang, a student, as she picnicked with friends along the Bagmati.

With some households subsisting on as little as 15 liters per person a day, well below the United Nations’s minimum acceptable standard of 20 liters for refugees, community leaders warn of more severe violence unless the government solves the crisis.

There are signs of hope. With their profits threatened by depleted resources, some tanker men have begun to adopt more sustainable extraction practices. In Chandragiri, a fast-expanding outer neighborhood of Kathmandu, six tanker men have banded together to try and save the forest on which their springs — and income — depend. In several municipalities far to the south of the capital, local administrators have signaled what can happen when they, not the central government, are entrusted with control of utilities. Hetauda municipality now delivers at least six hours of running water a day, at 60 percent of the price the state charges in the capital, which has shut out most private water providers.

Away from Nepal, in other water-impoverished megacities, authorities have proved that seemingly intractable shortages can be addressed, or at least somewhat allayed, while reining in private tankers. From Delhi, which is rehabilitating up to 500 lakes and wetlands in order to boost groundwater recharge, to large parts of urban sub-Saharan Africa, where public standpipe access has expanded, a number of cities are at least trying to cut back on informal water provision. “I think optimism at this point would just make us complacent, but not everything is lost,” said Aditi Mukherji, a senior researcher at the International Water Management Institute in New Delhi. “We have solutions, even if none of them are easy.”

But until Kathmandu and its growing cohort of struggling urban peers radically alter their ways, they won’t be among that select few. Residents certainly expect little to change. If anything, they’re gearing up for more thirst, more expense and even more vulture-like practices.

On a Saturday morning in late October, Sunita Suwal waited outside her house in Bhaktapur for the weekly pipeline delivery to flow. She grew increasingly angry as the scheduled time passed. Then, she waited another hour, losing out on a shift at a seamster’s workshop that she could ill afford to miss. Finally, as the morning ticked by with no water in sight, Ms. Suwal snapped. “The state fails us. The tanker men rob us,” she said. “They all just want to make money from us. Really, what’s the difference?”

Rojita Adhikari contributed reporting from Kathmandu.

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Sorry To Bother You, But Lakeith Stanfield Is The Best

Lakeith Stanfield gives polar-opposite performances in two of winter’s biggest sleeper hits. In the all-star whodunnit “Knives Out,” he plays an unflappable detective investigating the murder of a wealthy crime novelist (Christopher Plummer). In “Uncut Gems,” he’s a cocksure broker whose diamond-dealer boss (Adam Sandler) becomes engrossed in the frenzy of a high-stakes transaction involving NBA bigwig Kevin Garnett. The latter better reflects what we’ve come to expect from Stanfield, which is to say it’s much more madcap, though both rank among 2019’s best movies

The 28-year-old actor has been a rising darling since his breakthrough roles in “Straight Outta Compton,” “Get Out” and the FX series “Atlanta.” Stanfield’s idiosyncrasies were destined for the screen. His oddball energy is countered by tender eyes and a croaky baritone; you never know whether he’s about to smile or scream. Last year’s superb dystopian romp “Sorry to Bother You” confirmed his leading-man flair, which he’ll soon bring to “The Photograph,” a romantic drama co-starring Issa Rae. 

Amid the box-office success of “Knives Out” and “Uncut Gems,” as well as their ongoing awards-season acclaim, I hopped on the phone with Stanfield to process the two films and his broader career. Along the way, he talked about working with Garnett, hanging out with Chris Evans, falling asleep during “Joker” and how his scene-stealing orange “Gems” sweatshirt came about.

It’s a big moment for you. You’re in two massive hits. You must be feeling pretty good.

Isn’t it insane? It’s insane.

It’s especially nice to get to talk about box-office hits that aren’t superhero-Disney-franchise-type things that everyone expects to make a ton of money.

Definitely, man. Especially with “Gems.” I feel like that one is such a raw, broad depiction. It’s nice to see that on the big screen, man, especially with cinema being in this strange place right now where it’s becoming more and more of the same kind of manufactured stuff. It’s nice having really classic villains [with] old-school, dope, great cinema-making. And I don’t say that with all of my stuff, but that’s a really well-crafted film.

Westlake Legal Group 5e18aebd24000039345a587e Sorry To Bother You, But Lakeith Stanfield Is The Best

A24 Kevin Garnett, Lakeith Stanfield and Adam Sandler in “Uncut Gems.”

I was surprised by how restrained your “Knives Out” performance is. You’re kind of the straight man, whereas we usually see you in much more energetic roles. After hearing Daniel Craig’s big Foghorn Leghorn accent, did you feel you needed to play it chill so you would balance each other out?

No, I liked what he was doing. I like that he was making choices [and] doing some random stuff. I just felt like, for my character, it didn’t really require that. I’m glad that it worked like peanut butter and jelly for us. We complemented each other. We just let it happen naturally.

The movie has a dynamite cast across the board. Who did you bond with on the set?

A little of everyone. Plus you chill with everybody at one point or another. I get along with people. I am just going to let you do you. I will do me. Let’s make a party.

Did you guys hang out a lot throughout the shoot?

We did. Several get-togethers and situations. Chris [Evans], I think he lives close by where we were on filming. Unless it was not even his house. Him and Daniel [Craig] were hosting different things, and we were chilling. It was cool.

Did Chris Evans look as sexy in that white sweater in person as he does onscreen?

[Laughs.] I wouldn’t know. I wasn’t really looking at him. But as you said, he’s a very handsome fella.

Has Rian Johnson spoken to you about the sequel that was just announced?

Did they actually announce that? Because I’ve been hearing about it, but I didn’t know if it was really a thing. Is that a thing?

Rian said it was a few days ago. It’s going to be centered on the Daniel Craig character. I’m not sure what the rest of it will entail.

Oh, wow. OK, so Daniel’s just out here making sequels out of everything: 007, now he’s about to do “Knives Out.” He’s chilling. I love it. If they call me, I’m winning.

Most of “Knives Out” takes place in one location and has a sleekness to it, especially compared to the gritty chaos of “Uncut Gems.” Did filming them back-to-back feel like stepping into totally different worlds?

It does, for many reasons. For one, the directors are different, so they make a different environment on set. The energy is different. We were in two different locations. We shot “Knives Out” in Boston, and we shot “Uncut Gems” in the busy streets in Manhattan. Also, the cast and the people that you are working with, and the characters themselves, come with a different rhythm. So it definitely did take some adjusting, like, “OK, boom, we’re getting into a whole other type of thought.”

Westlake Legal Group 5e18af622400003200527aa7 Sorry To Bother You, But Lakeith Stanfield Is The Best

Lionsgate Daniel Craig, Chris Evans, Noah Segan and Lakeith Stanfield in “Knives Out.”

Did you enjoy the Safdie brothers’ way of making a movie? I gather the “Uncut Gems” set was as chaotic as the final product that we see.

You’re right, it is. It was dope. The energy was always flowing, anywhere you might be on the set. You might be experiencing something that’s interesting with a lot of the people being on set that were not actual actors, or at least not established actors at that point. And a lot of different characters in New York were walking up curious about what we were doing. There just wasn’t really a dull moment, which was dope. It was cool.

What was your first meeting with Kevin Garnett like?

It was cool. I met him on set, and it was like, “Damn, he’s tall.” Very sweet guy, smart, dedicated. He seemed like he really wanted to learn and do a good job, and he did do a good job.

What was the most chaotic “Uncut Gems” scene to shoot?

The club scene because there were 300 extras or something.

I love the neon-orange hoodie that you’re wearing in that scene. How did you guys settle on that particular hoodie? It’s sort of its own character in that scene because it stands out so much.

Yeah. The scene was a black-light scene, and the original wardrobe that I was wearing was pretty cool in the black light. But there was somebody who was in the crew who was around on the set wearing an orange sweatshirt. One of the directors, I think Josh, saw it and was like, “Yo, that shit? No, put that on.” And I was like, “Oh, OK.” So I just threw it on, and there you go.

What did you have on before that?

I think it was some kind of two-toned jacket or something.

Something not as eye-catching, I assume.

That’s right.

Westlake Legal Group 5e18b02b24000000355a587f Sorry To Bother You, But Lakeith Stanfield Is The Best

Annapurna Pictures Tessa Thompson and Lakeith Stanfield in “Sorry to Bother You.”

OK, that’s funny. Walk me through the introductory scene where you bring Kevin Garnett into Adam Sandler’s store and you guys are handling the diamond-encrusted Furby. Everything feels spontaneous. How did that sequence evolve? 

Shooting that was on the fly. We were making it up as we go, really, so a lot of improv and the directors really just feeling it out. Here and there, they were feeding us different things to add to the scene. It was dope. It was really built from the ground up. The Furbies were already there. They were made by production. We were just finding some way to get to them in the scene.

Were you guys not really adhering to a script, per se?

At certain points. We had the spine of it and what the objectives were and what we were trying to do, but there were certain places that were definitely just improv.

So with that scene, are you just told, “You need to incorporate the Furbies somehow, so just figure it out?”

Basically, but we kind of already came up with what the story is. Yeah, there are some points in the jewelry store where we would just kind of wander around and add things in.

You’ve said that one of the characters you most want to play is the Joker, so I’m curious what you thought of “Joker” and Joaquin Phoenix in the role?

I went to the premiere, but I probably had one too many shots because I fell asleep. And then I woke up and the movie was over, so I was like, “Damn.” I still got to see it again.

Now that there’s yet another Joker adaptation in the world, do you still have as much of a desire to do the character?

Having not seen the newest one, of course, do you have an idea of the character that has not been explored yet? Or a tone for it that maybe we haven’t seen yet?

What is it?

Well, if I tell you, that would spoil it.

I guess you’re right. Have you had conversations with anybody about putting together a Joker movie of your own?

Yeah, I definitely have. I’ve been moving around, talking to different things. I’ve been writing different things. One day, it shall happen, even if I have to do it on my own. Even if we have to screen it at, like, little small theaters or something.

So you’ve been writing some Joker-specific stuff?

Yeah. I’m mixing around a little. I’ve been writing some Joker stuff, I’ve been writing some different off-color projects, things that have nothing to do with anything that I’m doing. Just trying to build my own little story. But I’m definitely going to need some help because I suck at writing.

How much does the non-Joker stuff you’re writing reflect the Lakeith Stanfield that we’ve seen in “Sorry to Bother You,” “Uncut Gems” and the other more eclectic movies that you’ve made? Do you feel like they share some spiritual DNA?

I don’t know. That’s a good question. I think they probably do because all of my experiences are influencing everything. So I think my experiences with those movies obviously might find themselves in some ways creeping in. Not that it’s something I’m doing consciously. 

If you’re making movies written by people as smart as Boots Riley and the Safdies, you’ve got to infuse it into your bloodstream in some fashion.

Yeah, man. Experience is locked in. I feel like everything you experience is locked in and talking to your subconscious. It’s just about tapping into that.

Westlake Legal Group 5e18b0f02400003300527aa9 Sorry To Bother You, But Lakeith Stanfield Is The Best

Universal Pictures Lakeith Stanfield and Issa Rae in “The Photograph.”

In about a month, you have a star-driven romantic drama opening, which used to be the sort of thing that Hollywood thrived on. It’s still kind of a big deal to have an original studio movie that will open on some 3,000 screens. In that sense, does “The Photograph” feel like you’re breaking out on another level?

Well, Chris Evans told me it would be, but I don’t know. I don’t really have that experience, so maybe it will.

What did Chris Evans say?

He was like, “Bro, that’s the one.”

After “Knives Out” and “Uncut Gems,” it’s coming at the perfect time for you. 

It is. It’s really cool, man. And it’s on the opposite side of the spectrum, too. It’s almost like the people that love “Knives Out,” I don’t even know if they’re the same [as the people who love “Uncut Gems”]. There’s probably a lot of crossover. It just seems like two different sides of the world.

They really do orbit in different worlds, if you will. Now that everything has taken off for you after “Atlanta” and “Get Out” first came around, do you have a sense of how you’re being perceived as an actor based on the types of roles that you’re offered?

I think so, a little. I don’t think these people have seen anything yet. They think they have, but they haven’t seen me yet. I’ve only got a little drop in the bucket.

I like the sound of that. Do you have a specific idea about what we haven’t seen, or will you know it when you see it?

I think it’s a combination of both. There are things I know people haven’t seen that I still have, and there are things I feel like I can grow into and bring out of myself eventually. The goal is to go through the experience.

This interview has been edited and condensed. 

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